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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from Mississippi
Based on 54 articles published since 2008
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These are the 54 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Mississippi during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3
1 Editorial Genetic Risk in Coronary Artery Disease. 2018

Martinez, Paula F / Okoshi, Marina P. ·Faculdade de Fisioterapia da Universidade de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS - Brazil. · Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu (UNESP), Botucatu, SP - Brazil. ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #30110045.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Association of embolism and stroke in the catheterization laboratory. 2015

Gilchrist, Ian C. ·College of Medicine, Penn State University, Heart & Vascular Institute, MS Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25904225.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Smaller may not be better if you cut corners. 2015

Hansen, James / Gilchrist, Ian C. ·Penn State University, College of Medicine, Heart & Vascular Institute, MS Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25789730.

ABSTRACT: 5-Fr transradial sheathless guide technique using a 4-Fr mother-child technique can be accomplished with excellent clinical success An enhanced risk for local traumatic injury to the radial artery was observed that may stem from the imperfect transition and taper between catheters, or friction inherent in the catheter surface design, that technologic advances may be able to address in the future If larger sheath technology is not feasible, this sheathless approach presents an option whether the risk/benefits appear favorable despite the potential from radial artery trauma.

4 Editorial Vignettes of DES failure. 2015

Gilchrist, Ian C. ·Division of Cardiology, College of Medicine, Penn State University, Heart & Vascular Institute, MS Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25647280.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial High dose statins prior to PCI--change our modus operandis and start guideline therapy earlier? 2015

Baquero, Giselle A / Gilchrist, Ian C. ·Heart and Vascular Institute, Division of Cardiology, Penn State University, College of Medicine, Heart & Vascular Institute, MS Hershey Medical Center, Pennsylvania. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25521929.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Sleep duration and mortality risk. 2014

Addison, Clifton / Jenkins, Brenda / White, Monique / LaVigne, Donna Antoine. ·Jackson Heart Study/Center of Excellence for Minority Health and Health Disparities, College of Public Service, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS. · Jackson State University, Jackson, MS. ·Sleep · Pubmed #25083006.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Acute thrombotic occlusion or intramural hematoma: only IVUS can tell for sure. 2013

Baquero, Giselle A / Gilchrist, Ian C. ·College of Medicine, Heart & Vascular Institute, MS Hershey Medical Center, Penn State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24167051.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Review Coronary risk assessment using traditional risk factors with CT coronary artery calcium scoring in clinical practice. 2018

Kerut, Edmund Kenneth / Hall, Michael E / Turner, Michael C / McMullan, Michael R. ·Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson, MS, USA. · Heart Clinic of Louisiana, Marrero, LA, USA. · Cardiovascular Specialists of Southwest Louisiana, Lake Charles, LA, USA. ·Echocardiography · Pubmed #29974506.

ABSTRACT: As coronary artery calcium (CAC) is atherosclerosis and not just a marker of cardiovascular (CV) disease, measurement of a patient's coronary artery calcium score (CACS) is a strong predictor of risk. Clinically performed in asymptomatic patients, the CACS, along with several CV risk factors, namely age, sex, ethnicity, diabetes, tobacco use, family history, cholesterol level, blood pressure, and use of cholesterol or hypertensive medications, provide a predictive model of 10 year risk for CV events. A smartphone "App" makes this quick to obtain and use. This helps the clinician in making recommendations for both lifestyle changes and statin therapy. Those patients in which the most benefit occur from measurement of a CACS are those at an intermediate CV risk. Measurement of the CACS has become an integral part of the clinician's assessment of a patient's CV risk and for guiding preventative therapies.

9 Review The State of the Absorb Bioresorbable Scaffold: Consensus From an Expert Panel. 2017

Bangalore, Sripal / Bezerra, Hiram G / Rizik, David G / Armstrong, Ehrin J / Samuels, Bruce / Naidu, Srihari S / Grines, Cindy L / Foster, Malcolm T / Choi, James W / Bertolet, Barry D / Shah, Atman P / Torguson, Rebecca / Avula, Surendra B / Wang, John C / Zidar, James P / Maksoud, Aziz / Kalyanasundaram, Arun / Yakubov, Steven J / Chehab, Bassem M / Spaedy, Anthony J / Potluri, Srini P / Caputo, Ronald P / Kondur, Ashok / Merritt, Robert F / Kaki, Amir / Quesada, Ramon / Parikh, Manish A / Toma, Catalin / Matar, Fadi / DeGregorio, Joseph / Nicholson, William / Batchelor, Wayne / Gollapudi, Raghava / Korngold, Ethan / Sumar, Riyaz / Chrysant, George S / Li, Jun / Gordon, John B / Dave, Rajesh M / Attizzani, Guilherme F / Stys, Tom P / Gigliotti, Osvaldo S / Murphy, Bruce E / Ellis, Stephen G / Waksman, Ron. ·Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: sripalbangalore@gmail.com. · Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Department of Medicine, HonorHealth and the HonorHealth Heart Group, Scottsdale, Arizona. · Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado. · Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Medicine, Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, New York. · Department of Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York. · Department of Medicine, Tennova Healthcare, Knoxville, Tennessee. · Department of Medicine, Baylor Heart and Vascular Hospital, Dallas, Texas. · Department of Medicine, North Mississippi Medical Center, Tupelo, Mississippi. · Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Medicine, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC. · Department of Medicine, Advocate Christ Hospital and Medical Center, Oak Lawn, Illinois. · Department of Medicine, MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Medicine, UNC/Rex Healthcare, Raleigh, North Carolina. · Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Research Institute of Kansas, Kansas City, Kansas. · Department of Medicine, Seattle Heart and Vascular Institute, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Medicine, OhioHealth, Columbus, Ohio. · Department of Medicine, University of Kansas, Kansas City, Kansas. · Department of Medicine, Missouri Heart Center, Columbia, Missouri. · Department of Medicine, The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano, Plano, Texas. · Department of Medicine, St. Joseph's/Trinity Hospital, Syracuse, New York. · Department of Medicine, DMC Heart Hospital/Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. · Department of Medicine, Mercy Hospital and Clinic, Springfield, Missouri. · Department of Medicine, Heart & Vascular Institute, Detroit, Michigan. · Department of Medicine, Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute, Baptist Health, Miami, Florida. · Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. · Department of Medicine, Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, Englewood, New Jersey. · Department of Medicine, York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania. · Department of Medicine, Tallahassee Memorial Hospital/Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida. · Department of Medicine, San Diego Cardiac Center, San Diego, California. · Department of Medicine, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Medicine, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona. · Department of Medicine, INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Department of Medicine, Geisinger Holy Spirit, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. · Department of Medicine, Sanford Health, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. · Department of Medicine, Seton Heart Institute, Austin, Texas. · Department of Medicine, Arkansas Heart Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Department of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29216997.

ABSTRACT: Significant progress has been made in the percutaneous coronary intervention technique from the days of balloon angioplasty to modern-day metallic drug-eluting stents (DES). Although metallic stents solve a temporary problem of acute recoil following balloon angioplasty, they leave behind a permanent problem implicated in very late events (in addition to neoatherosclerosis). BRS were developed as a potential solution to this permanent problem, but the promise of these devices has been tempered by clinical trials showing increased risk of safety outcomes, both early and late. This is not too dissimilar to the challenges seen with first-generation DES in which refinement of deployment technique, prolongation of dual antiplatelet therapy, and technical iteration mitigated excess risk of very late stent thrombosis, making DES the treatment of choice for coronary artery disease. This white paper discusses the factors potentially implicated in the excess risks, including the scaffold consideration and deployment technique, and outlines patient and lesion selection, implantation technique, and dual antiplatelet therapy considerations to potentially mitigate this excess risk with the first-generation thick strut Absorb scaffold (Abbott Vascular, Abbott Park, Illinois). It remains to be seen whether these considerations together with technical iterations will ultimately close the gap between scaffolds and metal stents for short-term events while at the same time preserving options for future revascularization once the scaffold bioresorbs.

10 Review Diagnosis of fatty liver by computed tomography coronary artery calcium score. 2017

Kerut, Sarah E / Balart, John T / Kerut, Edmund K / McMullan, Michael R. ·School of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA. · Jefferson Radiology Associates, West Jefferson Medical Center, Marrero, LA, USA. · Heart Clinic of Louisiana, Marrero, LA, USA. · Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, School of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA. ·Echocardiography · Pubmed #28493399.

ABSTRACT: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease may range from simple steatosis to fibrosis and cirrhosis. It is associated with the development of coronary artery calcification and appears to be an independent predictor of future adverse cardiovascular events. As the presence of a fatty liver appears to portray an independent increased risk, it may be beneficial to note this on coronary artery calcium scoring reports. Determination of fatty liver is relatively easy to perform. We discuss the method used by the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) study for determination of fatty liver from CT coronary artery calcium scoring acquisitions, which may be implemented in clinical analysis.

11 Clinical Trial Blinded outcomes and angina assessment of coronary bioresorbable scaffolds: 30-day and 1-year results from the ABSORB IV randomised trial. 2018

Stone, Gregg W / Ellis, Stephen G / Gori, Tommaso / Metzger, D Christopher / Stein, Bernardo / Erickson, Matthew / Torzewski, Jan / Williams, Jerome / Lawson, William / Broderick, Thomas M / Kabour, Ameer / Piegari, Guy / Cavendish, Jeffrey / Bertolet, Barry / Choi, James W / Marx, Steven O / Généreux, Philippe / Kereiakes, Dean J / Anonymous3531033. ·NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: gs2184@columbia.edu. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Kardiologie I University Medical Center and Deutsches Zentrum für Herz-Kreislaufforschung, Rhein-Main, Mainz, Germany. · Ballad Health Systems CVA Heart Institute, Kingsport, TN, USA. · Morton Plant Hospital, Clearwater, FL, USA. · Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia. · Kliniken Oberallgäu, Immenstadt, Germany. · Presbyterian Hospital, Charlotte, NC, USA. · Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY, USA. · The Carl and Edyth Lindner Research Center at The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Mercy St Vincent Medical Center, Toledo, OH, USA. · St Joseph Medical Center, Wyomissing, PA, USA. · Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla, La Jolla, CA, USA. · North Mississippi Medical Center, Tupelo, MS, USA. · Baylor Jack and Jane Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital, Dallas, TX, USA. · NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Clinical Trials Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY, USA; Gagnon Cardiovascular Institute, Morristown Medical Center, Morristown, NJ, USA; Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. ·Lancet · Pubmed #30266412.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous studies showed more adverse events with coronary bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS) than with metallic drug-eluting stents (DES), although in one randomised trial angina was reduced with BVS. However, these early studies were unmasked, lesions smaller than intended for the scaffold were frequently enrolled, implantation technique was suboptimal, and patients with myocardial infarction, in whom BVS might be well suited, were excluded. METHODS: In the active-controlled, blinded, multicentre, randomised ABSORB IV trial, patients with stable coronary artery disease or acute coronary syndromes aged 18 years or older were recruited from 147 hospitals in five countries (the USA, Germany, Australia, Singapore, and Canada). Enrolled patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive polymeric everolimus-eluting BVS (Absorb; Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA, USA) with optimised implantation technique or cobalt-chromium everolimus-eluting stents (EES; Xience; Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA, USA). Randomisation was stratified by diabetic status, whether patients would have been eligible for enrolment in the previous ABSORB III trial, and site. Patients and clinical assessors were masked to randomisation. The primary endpoint was target lesion failure (cardiac death, target vessel myocardial infarction, or ischaemia-driven target lesion revascularisation) at 30 days, tested for non-inferiority with a 2·9% margin for the risk difference. Analysis was by intention to treat. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02173379, and is closed to accrual. FINDINGS: Between Aug 15, 2014, and March 31, 2017, we screened 18 722 patients for eligibility, 2604 of whom were enrolled. 1296 patients were assigned to BVS, and 1308 patients were assigned to EES. Follow-up data at 30 days and 1 year, respectively, were available for 1288 and 1254 patients with BVS and for 1303 and 1272 patients with EES. Biomarker-positive acute coronary syndromes were present in 622 (24%) of 2602 patients, and, by angiographic core laboratory analysis, 78 (3%) of 2893 of lesions were in very small vessels. Target lesion failure at 30 days occurred in 64 (5·0%) patients assigned to BVS and 48 (3·7%) patients assigned to EES (difference 1·3%, upper 97·5% confidence limit 2·89; one-sided p INTERPRETATION: Polymeric BVS implanted with optimised technique in an expanded patient population resulted in non-inferior 30-day and 1-year rates of target lesion failure and angina compared with metallic DES. FUNDING: Abbott Vascular.

12 Article Baseline atrial fibrillation is associated with contrast-induced nephropathy after cardiac catheterization in coronary artery disease: Systemic review and meta-analysis. 2018

Prasitlumkum, Narut / Kanitsoraphan, Chanavuth / Kittipibul, Veraprapas / Rattanawong, Pattara / Chongsathidkiet, Pakawat / Cheungpasitporn, Wisit. ·Department of Internal Medicine, University of Hawaii Internal Medicine Residency Program, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand. · Department of Internal Medicine, Jackson Memorial Hospital Internal Medicine Residency Program, Miami, Florida. · Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Department of Nephrology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi. ·Clin Cardiol · Pubmed #30328129.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia, independently associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Recent studies suggest that AF is potentially associated with contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing catheterization. However, the association was not conclusive. Thus, we assessed the association between AF in patients with CAD and CIN by a systematic review of the literature and a meta-analysis. HYPOTHESIS: AF is a predictor of CIN in patients with CAD. METHODS: We comprehensively searched the databases of MEDLINE and EMBASE from inception to April 2018. Included studies were published observational studies that compared the risk of CIN among CAD patients with AF vs those without AF. Data from each study were combined using the random-effects, generic inverse variance method of DerSimonian and Laird to calculate risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Eight cohort studies from June 2007 to November 2017 were included in this meta-analysis involving 16,691 subjects with CAD (1,030 with AF and 15,661 without its presence). The presence of AF was associated with CIN (pooled risk ratio = 2.17, 95% CI: 1.50-3.14, P < 0.001, I CONCLUSIONS: AF increased the risk of CIN up to two fold among patients with CAD compared to the absence of it. Our study suggests that the presence of AF in CAD is prognostic for the development of CIN.

13 Article Coronary risk assessment using traditional risk factors with computed tomography coronary artery calcium scoring: Illustrative cases. 2018

Kerut, Edmund K / Hebert, Renee / Hall, Michael E / Turner, Michael C / McMullan, Michael R. ·Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson, Mississippi. · Heart Clinic of Louisiana, Marrero, Louisiana. · Cardiovascular Specialist of Southwest Louisiana, Lake Charles, Louisiana. ·Echocardiography · Pubmed #30011351.

ABSTRACT: A patient's coronary artery calcium score (CACS) is a strong independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. Used in conjunction with traditional measures of risk, the CACS helps the clinician discuss cardiovascular (CV) risk and recommend therapies with the patient. We present several cases in which measurement of the CACS and traditional risk factors were used to help guide the clinician-patient conversation and guide therapies.

14 Article Baroreflex activation therapy for the treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction in patients with and without coronary artery disease. 2018

Halbach, Marcel / Abraham, William T / Butter, Christian / Ducharme, Anique / Klug, Didier / Little, William C / Reuter, Hannes / Schafer, Jill E / Senni, Michele / Swarup, Vijay / Wachter, Rolf / Weaver, Fred A / Wilks, Seth J / Zile, Michael R / Müller-Ehmsen, Jochen. ·Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. Electronic address: marcel.halbach@uk-koeln.de. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Immanuel Heart Center Bernau - Medical School Brandenburg, Bernau, Germany. · Montreal Heart Institute, University of Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Cardiology A, University Hospital, Lille, France. · Division of Cardiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. · Department of Statistics, NAMSA, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Cardiovascular Department, Ospedale Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Department of Electrophysiology, Arizona Heart Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, USA. · Clinic and Policlinic for Cardiology, University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. · Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Department of Research, CVRx, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; Ralph H. Johnson Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA. · Department of Medicine, Asklepios Klinik Altona, Hamburg, Germany. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #29705650.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In a randomized trial, baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) improved exercise capacity, quality of life and NT-proBNP in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). In view of different mechanisms underlying HFrEF, we performed a post-hoc subgroup analysis of efficacy and safety of BAT in patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with left ventricular ejection fraction <35% and NYHA Class III were randomized 1:1 to guideline-directed medical and device therapy alone or plus BAT. Patients with a history of CAD, prior myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass graft were assigned to the CAD group with all others assigned to the no-CAD group. Of 71 BAT treated patients, 52 had CAD and 19 had no CAD. In the control group, 49 of 69 patients had CAD and 20 had no CAD. The system- or procedure-related major adverse neurological or cardiovascular event rate was 3.8% in the CAD group vs. 0% in the no-CAD group (p = 1.0). In the whole cohort, NYHA Class, Minnesota Living with Heart Failure score, 6-minute hall walk distance and NTproBNP were improved in BAT treated patients compared with controls. Statistical analyses revealed no interaction between the presence of CAD and effect of BAT (all p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: No major differences were found in BAT efficacy or safety between patients with and without CAD, indicating that BAT improves exercise capacity, quality of life and NTproBNP in patients with ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. CLINICALTRIALS. GOV IDENTIFIER: NCT01471860 and NCT01720160.

15 Article Genome-wide association study of homocysteine in African Americans from the Jackson Heart Study, the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, and the Coronary Artery Risk in Young Adults study. 2018

Raffield, Laura M / Ellis, Jaclyn / Olson, Nels C / Duan, Qing / Li, Jin / Durda, Peter / Pankratz, Nathan / Keating, Brendan J / Wassel, Christina L / Cushman, Mary / Wilson, James G / Gross, Myron D / Tracy, Russell P / Rich, Stephen S / Reiner, Alex P / Li, Yun / Willis, Monte S / Lange, Ethan M / Lange, Leslie A. ·Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA. laura_raffield@unc.edu. · Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Robert Larner, M.D. College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, 05405, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA. · Center for Applied Genomics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. · Department of Medicine, Robert Larner, M.D. College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, 05405, USA. · Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, 39216, USA. · Department of Biochemistry, Robert Larner, M.D. College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, 05405, USA. · Center for Public Health Genomics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22908, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA. · Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. ·J Hum Genet · Pubmed #29321517.

ABSTRACT: Homocysteine (Hcy) is a heritable biomarker for CVD, peripheral artery disease, stroke, and dementia. Little is known about genetic associations with Hcy in individuals of African ancestry. We performed a genome-wide association study for Hcy in 4927 AAs from the Jackson Heart Study (JHS), the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), and the Coronary Artery Risk in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. Analyses were stratified by sex and results were meta-analyzed within and across sex. In the sex-combined meta-analysis, we observed genome-wide significant evidence (p < 5.0 × 10

16 Article Prevalence and recognition of obesity and its associated comorbidities: cross-sectional analysis of electronic health record data from a large US integrated health system. 2017

Pantalone, Kevin M / Hobbs, Todd M / Chagin, Kevin M / Kong, Sheldon X / Wells, Brian J / Kattan, Michael W / Bouchard, Jonathan / Sakurada, Brian / Milinovich, Alex / Weng, Wayne / Bauman, Janine / Misra-Hebert, Anita D / Zimmerman, Robert S / Burguera, Bartolome. ·Endocrinology and Metabolism Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Diabetes, Novo Nordisk Inc., Plainsboro, New Jersey, USA. · Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Novo Nordisk Inc., Plainsboro, New Jersey, USA. · Translational Science Institute, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA. · Medical Affairs, Novo Nordisk Inc., Plainsboro, New Jersey, USA. · Medicine Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · National Diabetes and Obesity Research Insitute, Tradition, Mississippi, USA. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #29150468.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of obesity and its related comorbidities among patients being actively managed at a US academic medical centre, and to examine the frequency of a formal diagnosis of obesity, via International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) documentation among patients with body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m DESIGN: The electronic health record system at Cleveland Clinic was used to create a cross-sectional summary of actively managed patients meeting minimum primary care physician visit frequency requirements. Eligible patients were stratified by BMI categories, based on most recent weight and median of all recorded heights obtained on or before the index date of 1July 2015. Relationships between patient characteristics and BMI categories were tested. SETTING: A large US integrated health system. RESULTS: A total of 324 199 active patients with a recorded BMI were identified. There were 121 287 (37.4%) patients found to be overweight (BMI ≥25 and <29.9), 75 199 (23.2%) had BMI 30-34.9, 34 152 (10.5%) had BMI 35-39.9 and 25 137 (7.8%) had BMI ≥40. There was a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease (P value<0.0001) within higher BMI compared with lower BMI categories. In patients with a BMI >30 (n=134 488), only 48% (64 056) had documentation of an obesity ICD-9 code. In those patients with a BMI >40, only 75% had an obesity ICD-9 code. CONCLUSIONS: This cross-sectional summary from a large US integrated health system found that three out of every four patients had overweight or obesity based on BMI. Patients within higher BMI categories had a higher prevalence of comorbidities. Less than half of patients who were identified as having obesity according to BMI received a formal diagnosis via ICD-9 documentation. The disease of obesity is very prevalent yet underdiagnosed in our clinics. The under diagnosing of obesity may serve as an important barrier to treatment initiation.

17 Article Exome-wide association study of plasma lipids in >300,000 individuals. 2017

Liu, Dajiang J / Peloso, Gina M / Yu, Haojie / Butterworth, Adam S / Wang, Xiao / Mahajan, Anubha / Saleheen, Danish / Emdin, Connor / Alam, Dewan / Alves, Alexessander Couto / Amouyel, Philippe / Di Angelantonio, Emanuele / Arveiler, Dominique / Assimes, Themistocles L / Auer, Paul L / Baber, Usman / Ballantyne, Christie M / Bang, Lia E / Benn, Marianne / Bis, Joshua C / Boehnke, Michael / Boerwinkle, Eric / Bork-Jensen, Jette / Bottinger, Erwin P / Brandslund, Ivan / Brown, Morris / Busonero, Fabio / Caulfield, Mark J / Chambers, John C / Chasman, Daniel I / Chen, Y Eugene / Chen, Yii-Der Ida / Chowdhury, Rajiv / Christensen, Cramer / Chu, Audrey Y / Connell, John M / Cucca, Francesco / Cupples, L Adrienne / Damrauer, Scott M / Davies, Gail / Deary, Ian J / Dedoussis, George / Denny, Joshua C / Dominiczak, Anna / Dubé, Marie-Pierre / Ebeling, Tapani / Eiriksdottir, Gudny / Esko, Tõnu / Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni / Feitosa, Mary F / Ferrario, Marco / Ferrieres, Jean / Ford, Ian / Fornage, Myriam / Franks, Paul W / Frayling, Timothy M / Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth / Fritsche, Lars G / Frossard, Philippe / Fuster, Valentin / Ganesh, Santhi K / Gao, Wei / Garcia, Melissa E / Gieger, Christian / Giulianini, Franco / Goodarzi, Mark O / Grallert, Harald / Grarup, Niels / Groop, Leif / Grove, Megan L / Gudnason, Vilmundur / Hansen, Torben / Harris, Tamara B / Hayward, Caroline / Hirschhorn, Joel N / Holmen, Oddgeir L / Huffman, Jennifer / Huo, Yong / Hveem, Kristian / Jabeen, Sehrish / Jackson, Anne U / Jakobsdottir, Johanna / Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta / Jensen, Gorm B / Jørgensen, Marit E / Jukema, J Wouter / Justesen, Johanne M / Kamstrup, Pia R / Kanoni, Stavroula / Karpe, Fredrik / Kee, Frank / Khera, Amit V / Klarin, Derek / Koistinen, Heikki A / Kooner, Jaspal S / Kooperberg, Charles / Kuulasmaa, Kari / Kuusisto, Johanna / Laakso, Markku / Lakka, Timo / Langenberg, Claudia / Langsted, Anne / Launer, Lenore J / Lauritzen, Torsten / Liewald, David C M / Lin, Li An / Linneberg, Allan / Loos, Ruth J F / Lu, Yingchang / Lu, Xiangfeng / Mägi, Reedik / Malarstig, Anders / Manichaikul, Ani / Manning, Alisa K / Mäntyselkä, Pekka / Marouli, Eirini / Masca, Nicholas G D / Maschio, Andrea / Meigs, James B / Melander, Olle / Metspalu, Andres / Morris, Andrew P / Morrison, Alanna C / Mulas, Antonella / Müller-Nurasyid, Martina / Munroe, Patricia B / Neville, Matt J / Nielsen, Jonas B / Nielsen, Sune F / Nordestgaard, Børge G / Ordovas, Jose M / Mehran, Roxana / O'Donnell, Christoper J / Orho-Melander, Marju / Molony, Cliona M / Muntendam, Pieter / Padmanabhan, Sandosh / Palmer, Colin N A / Pasko, Dorota / Patel, Aniruddh P / Pedersen, Oluf / Perola, Markus / Peters, Annette / Pisinger, Charlotta / Pistis, Giorgio / Polasek, Ozren / Poulter, Neil / Psaty, Bruce M / Rader, Daniel J / Rasheed, Asif / Rauramaa, Rainer / Reilly, Dermot F / Reiner, Alex P / Renström, Frida / Rich, Stephen S / Ridker, Paul M / Rioux, John D / Robertson, Neil R / Roden, Dan M / Rotter, Jerome I / Rudan, Igor / Salomaa, Veikko / Samani, Nilesh J / Sanna, Serena / Sattar, Naveed / Schmidt, Ellen M / Scott, Robert A / Sever, Peter / Sevilla, Raquel S / Shaffer, Christian M / Sim, Xueling / Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh / Small, Kerrin S / Smith, Albert V / Smith, Blair H / Somayajula, Sangeetha / Southam, Lorraine / Spector, Timothy D / Speliotes, Elizabeth K / Starr, John M / Stirrups, Kathleen E / Stitziel, Nathan / Strauch, Konstantin / Stringham, Heather M / Surendran, Praveen / Tada, Hayato / Tall, Alan R / Tang, Hua / Tardif, Jean-Claude / Taylor, Kent D / Trompet, Stella / Tsao, Philip S / Tuomilehto, Jaakko / Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne / van Zuydam, Natalie R / Varbo, Anette / Varga, Tibor V / Virtamo, Jarmo / Waldenberger, Melanie / Wang, Nan / Wareham, Nick J / Warren, Helen R / Weeke, Peter E / Weinstock, Joshua / Wessel, Jennifer / Wilson, James G / Wilson, Peter W F / Xu, Ming / Yaghootkar, Hanieh / Young, Robin / Zeggini, Eleftheria / Zhang, He / Zheng, Neil S / Zhang, Weihua / Zhang, Yan / Zhou, Wei / Zhou, Yanhua / Zoledziewska, Magdalena / Anonymous1331021 / Anonymous1341021 / Anonymous1351021 / Anonymous1361021 / Anonymous1371021 / Howson, Joanna M M / Danesh, John / McCarthy, Mark I / Cowan, Chad A / Abecasis, Goncalo / Deloukas, Panos / Musunuru, Kiran / Willer, Cristen J / Kathiresan, Sekar. ·Department of Public Health Sciences, Institute of Personalized Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · MRC/BHF Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · The National Institute for Health Research Blood and Transplant Research Unit (NIHR BTRU) in Donor Health and Genomics at the University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Cardiovascular Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Center for Non-Communicable Diseases, Karachi, Pakistan. · Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · ICDDR, B, Dhaka, Bangladesh. · Imperial College London, London, UK. · Université Lille, INSERM, CHU Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, U1167-RID-AGE-Risk Factors and Molecular Determinants of Aging-related Diseases, Lille, France. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, EA 3430, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France. · VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA. · Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. · Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. · Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Center for Statistical Genetics, Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Human Genetics Center, Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA. · Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA. · The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Lillebaelt Hospital, Vejle, Denmark. · Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. · Clinical Pharmacology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Istituto di Ricerca Genetica e Biomedica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Monserrato, Cagliari, Italy. · The Barts Heart Centre, William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · NIHR Barts Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Cardiology, Ealing Hospital NHS Trust, Southall, UK. · Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · The Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, LABioMed at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Medical Department, Lillebaelt Hospital, Vejle, Denmark. · NHLBI Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, Massachusetts, USA. · Medical Research Institute, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK. · Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Università degli Studi di Sassari, Sassari, Italy. · Corporal Michael Crescenz VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece. · Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Université de Montréal Beaulieu-Saucier Pharmacogenomics Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. · The Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland. · Estonian Genome Center, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia. · Division of Statistical Genomics, Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Research Centre in Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine-EPIMED, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, UMR 1027-INSERM, Toulouse University-CHU Toulouse, Toulouse, France. · Robertson Centre for Biostatistics, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Institute of Molecular Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Clinical Sciences, Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. · Department of Public Health & Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genetics of Complex Traits, University of Exeter Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK. · Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC), Madrid, Spain. · Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Molecular Biology and Regulatory Peptides, Ministry of Health, Beijing, China. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD e.V.), Neuherberg, Germany. · Research Unit of Molecular Epidemiology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany. · Institute of Epidemiology II, Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany. · Departments of Medicine and of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Clinical Sciences, Diabetes and Endocrinology, Clinical Research Centre, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. · Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. · Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Division of Endocrinology and Center for Basic and Translational Obesity Research, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Public Health and General Practice, HUNT Research Centre, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway. · St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. · Department of Cardiology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China. · K. G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. · Department of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. · The Copenhagen City Heart Study, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark. · National Institute of Public Health, Southern Denmark University, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. · The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Biochemistry and the Copenhagen General Population Study, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Oxford University Hospitals Trust, Oxford, UK. · UKCRC Centre of Excellence for Public Health, Queens University, Belfast, UK. · Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Medicine and Abdominal Center: Endocrinology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. · Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki, Finland. · National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, Internal Medicine, University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. · Department of Physiology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio Campus, Kuopio, Finland. · Kuopio Research Institute of Exercise Medicine, Kuopio, Finland. · Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK. · Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Public Health, Section of General Practice, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Experimental Research, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Research Center for Prevention and Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. · The Mindich Child Health and Development Institute, Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. · State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Cardiovascular Genetics and Genomics Group, Cardiovascular Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Pharmatherapeutics Clinical Research, Pfizer Worldwide R&D, Sollentuna, Sweden. · Center for Public Health Genomics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA. · Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Unit of Primary Health Care, University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. · Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK. · NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester, UK. · Division of General Internal Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Clinical Sciences, University Hospital Malmo Clinical Research Center, Lund University, Malmo, Sweden. · Department of Biostatistics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Medicine I, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany. · DZHK German Centre for Cardiovascular Research, Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany. · Department of Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Population Genetics, National Center for Cardiovascular Investigation, Madrid, Spain. · IMDEA-Alimentacion, Madrid, Spain. · Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory, Jean Mayer-USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genetics, Merck Sharp & Dohme Corporation, Kenilworth, New Jersey, USA. · G3 Pharmaceuticals, Lexington, Massachusetts, USA. · Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Institute of Molecular Medicine FIMM, University of Helsinki, Finland. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Split, Split, Croatia. · Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Departments of Epidemiology and Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Departments of Genetics, Medicine, and Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Department of Biobank Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Imaging, Merck Sharp & Dohme Corporation, Kenilworth, New Jersey, USA. · Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, London, UK. · Division of Population Health Sciences, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK. · Generation Scotland, Centre for Genomic and Experimental Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Scientific Informatics, Merck Sharp & Dohme Corporation, Kenilworth, New Jersey, USA. · Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, UK. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Research Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Cardiovascular Division, Departments of Medicine and Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · The McDonnell Genome Institute, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · IBE, Faculty of Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich, Germany. · Institute of Genetic Epidemiology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medicine, Kanazawa, Japan. · Department of Medicine, Division of Molecular Medicine, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. · Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. · Chronic Disease Prevention Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Dasman Diabetes Institute, Dasman, Kuwait. · Centre for Vascular Prevention, Danube-University Krems, Krems, Austria. · Saudi Diabetes Research Group, King Abdulaziz University, Fahd Medical Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. · The Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Epidemiology, Indiana University Fairbanks School of Public Health, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. · Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. · Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. · Atlanta VA Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia, USA. · Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Institute of Vascular Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China. · Yale College, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Center for Regenerative Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Princess Al-Jawhara Al-Brahim Centre of Excellence in Research of Hereditary Disorders (PACER-HD), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #29083408.

ABSTRACT: We screened variants on an exome-focused genotyping array in >300,000 participants (replication in >280,000 participants) and identified 444 independent variants in 250 loci significantly associated with total cholesterol (TC), high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and/or triglycerides (TG). At two loci (JAK2 and A1CF), experimental analysis in mice showed lipid changes consistent with the human data. We also found that: (i) beta-thalassemia trait carriers displayed lower TC and were protected from coronary artery disease (CAD); (ii) excluding the CETP locus, there was not a predictable relationship between plasma HDL-C and risk for age-related macular degeneration; (iii) only some mechanisms of lowering LDL-C appeared to increase risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D); and (iv) TG-lowering alleles involved in hepatic production of TG-rich lipoproteins (TM6SF2 and PNPLA3) tracked with higher liver fat, higher risk for T2D, and lower risk for CAD, whereas TG-lowering alleles involved in peripheral lipolysis (LPL and ANGPTL4) had no effect on liver fat but decreased risks for both T2D and CAD.

18 Article Association between mitochondrial DNA copy number and sudden cardiac death: findings from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study (ARIC). 2017

Zhang, Yiyi / Guallar, Eliseo / Ashar, Foram N / Longchamps, Ryan J / Castellani, Christina A / Lane, John / Grove, Megan L / Coresh, Josef / Sotoodehnia, Nona / Ilkhanoff, Leonard / Boerwinkle, Eric / Pankratz, Nathan / Arking, Dan E. ·Departments of Epidemiology and Medicine, and Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2024 E. Monument St.. Room 2-645, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N. Broadway, Miller Research Building, Room 459, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Room 1-156, Moos Tower, 515 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. · Human Genetics Center, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, University of Washington, 1730 Minor Ave, Suite 1360, Seattle, Washington 98101, USA. · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Electrophysiology Section, Northwestern University, 676 N. St. Clair, Suite 600, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Inova Heart and Vascular Institute, 3300 Gallows Rd, Falls Church, VA 22042, USA. · Baylor College of Medicine, Human Genome Sequencing Center, One Baylor Plaza, Alkek N1419, MS: BCM226, Houston, TX 77030-3411, USA. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #29020391.

ABSTRACT: Aims: Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major public health burden. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in a wide range of cardiovascular diseases including cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and arrhythmias, but it is unknown if it also contributes to SCD risk. We sought to examine the prospective association between mtDNA copy number (mtDNA-CN), a surrogate marker of mitochondrial function, and SCD risk. Methods and results: We measured baseline mtDNA-CN in 11 093 participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. mtDNA copy number was calculated from probe intensities of mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) on the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. Sudden cardiac death was defined as a sudden pulseless condition presumed due to a ventricular tachyarrhythmia in a previously stable individual without evidence of a non-cardiac cause of cardiac arrest. Sudden cardiac death cases were reviewed and adjudicated by an expert committee. During a median follow-up of 20.4 years, we observed 361 SCD cases. After adjusting for age, race, sex, and centre, the hazard ratio for SCD comparing the 1st to the 5th quintiles of mtDNA-CN was 2.24 (95% confidence interval 1.58-3.19; P-trend <0.001). When further adjusting for traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, prevalent coronary heart disease, heart rate, QT interval, and QRS duration, the association remained statistically significant. Spline regression models showed that the association was approximately linear over the range of mtDNA-CN values. No apparent interaction by race or by sex was detected. Conclusion: In this community-based prospective study, mtDNA-CN in peripheral blood was inversely associated with the risk of SCD.

19 Article Visit-to-Visit Blood Pressure Variability in Young Adulthood and Hippocampal Volume and Integrity at Middle Age: The CARDIA Study (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults). 2017

Yano, Yuichiro / Reis, Jared P / Levine, Deborah A / Bryan, R Nick / Viera, Anthony J / Shimbo, Daichi / Tedla, Yacob G / Allen, Norrina B / Schreiner, Pamela J / Bancks, Michael P / Sidney, Stephen / Pletcher, Mark J / Liu, Kiang / Greenland, Philip / Lloyd-Jones, Donald M / Launer, Lenore J. ·From the Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson (Y.Y.) · Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (Y.Y., Y.G.T., N.B.A., M.P.B., K.L., P.G., D.M.L.-J.) · Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (J.P.R.) · Division of General Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (D.A.L.) · Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia (R.N.B.) · Department of Family Medicine, Hypertension Research Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (A.J.V.) · Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (D.S.) · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (P.J.S.) · Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente of Northern California, Oakland (S.S.) · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco (M.J.P.) · and Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD (L.J.L.). ·Hypertension · Pubmed #28993449.

ABSTRACT: The aims of this study are to assess the relationships of visit-to-visit blood pressure (BP) variability in young adulthood to hippocampal volume and integrity at middle age. We used data over 8 examinations spanning 25 years collected in the CARDIA study (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) of black and white adults (age, 18-30 years) started in 1985 to 1986. Visit-to-visit BP variability was defined as by SD

20 Article Exercise Stress Testing: Indications and Common Questions. 2017

Garner, Kathryn K / Pomeroy, William / Arnold, James J. ·National Capital Consortium Family Medicine Residency, Fort Belvoir, VA, USA. · Keesler Medical Center, Biloxi, MS, USA. ·Am Fam Physician · Pubmed #28925651.

ABSTRACT: Exercise stress testing is a validated diagnostic test for coronary artery disease in symptomatic patients, and is used in the evaluation of patients with known cardiac disease. Testing of asymptomatic patients is generally not indicated. It may be performed in select deconditioned adults before starting a vigorous exercise program, but no studies have compared outcomes from preexercise testing vs. encouraging light exercise with gradual increases in exertion. Preoperative exercise stress testing is helpful for risk stratification in patients undergoing vascular surgery or who have active cardiac symptoms before undergoing nonemergent noncardiac surgery. Exercise stress testing without imaging is the preferred initial choice for risk stratification in most women. Sensitivity and specificity increase with the use of adjunctive imaging such as echocardiography or myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography. Exercise stress testing is rarely an appropriate option to evaluate persons with known coronary artery disease who have no new symptoms less than two years after percutaneous intervention or less than five years after coronary artery bypass grafting. The Duke treadmill score has excellent prognostic value for exercise stress testing. Imaging is not necessary if patients are able to achieve more than 10 metabolic equivalents on exercise stress testing. Exercise stress testing is not indicated before noncardiac surgeries in patients who can achieve 4 metabolic equivalents without symptoms.

21 Article Association of Rare and Common Variation in the Lipoprotein Lipase Gene With Coronary Artery Disease. 2017

Khera, Amit V / Won, Hong-Hee / Peloso, Gina M / O'Dushlaine, Colm / Liu, Dajiang / Stitziel, Nathan O / Natarajan, Pradeep / Nomura, Akihiro / Emdin, Connor A / Gupta, Namrata / Borecki, Ingrid B / Asselta, Rosanna / Duga, Stefano / Merlini, Piera Angelica / Correa, Adolfo / Kessler, Thorsten / Wilson, James G / Bown, Matthew J / Hall, Alistair S / Braund, Peter S / Carey, David J / Murray, Michael F / Kirchner, H Lester / Leader, Joseph B / Lavage, Daniel R / Manus, J Neil / Hartzel, Dustin N / Samani, Nilesh J / Schunkert, Heribert / Marrugat, Jaume / Elosua, Roberto / McPherson, Ruth / Farrall, Martin / Watkins, Hugh / Lander, Eric S / Rader, Daniel J / Danesh, John / Ardissino, Diego / Gabriel, Stacey / Willer, Cristen / Abecasis, Gonçalo R / Saleheen, Danish / Dewey, Frederick E / Kathiresan, Sekar / Anonymous7860898. ·Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts2Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston3Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts5Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Regeneron Genetics Center, Tarrytown, New Jersey. · Department of Public Health Sciences, Institute for Personalized Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania. · Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri9Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri10McDonnell Genome Institute, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Milan, Italy12Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. · Ospedale Niguarda, Milano, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson. · Munich Heart Alliance, München, Germany16Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universität München, Deutsches Zentrum für Herz-Kreislauf-Forschung, München, Germany. · Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson. · NIHR Leicester Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom. · Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, Leeds University, Leeds, United Kingdom. · Geisinger Health System, Danville, Pennsylvania. · Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universität München, Deutsches Zentrum für Herz-Kreislauf-Forschung, München, Germany. · Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Genetics, Hospital del Mar Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain. · University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom24Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Genetics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom27Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, United Kingdom28NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom29Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Division of Cardiology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Parma, Italy31Associazione per lo Studio Della Trombosi in Cardiologia, Pavia, Italy. · Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor33Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor34Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Center for Statistical Genetics, Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor. · Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. ·JAMA · Pubmed #28267856.

ABSTRACT: Importance: The activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is the rate-determining step in clearing triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from the circulation. Mutations that damage the LPL gene (LPL) lead to lifelong deficiency in enzymatic activity and can provide insight into the relationship of LPL to human disease. Objective: To determine whether rare and/or common variants in LPL are associated with early-onset coronary artery disease (CAD). Design, Setting, and Participants: In a cross-sectional study, LPL was sequenced in 10 CAD case-control cohorts of the multinational Myocardial Infarction Genetics Consortium and a nested CAD case-control cohort of the Geisinger Health System DiscovEHR cohort between 2010 and 2015. Common variants were genotyped in up to 305 699 individuals of the Global Lipids Genetics Consortium and up to 120 600 individuals of the CARDIoGRAM Exome Consortium between 2012 and 2014. Study-specific estimates were pooled via meta-analysis. Exposures: Rare damaging mutations in LPL included loss-of-function variants and missense variants annotated as pathogenic in a human genetics database or predicted to be damaging by computer prediction algorithms trained to identify mutations that impair protein function. Common variants in the LPL gene region included those independently associated with circulating triglyceride levels. Main Outcomes and Measures: Circulating lipid levels and CAD. Results: Among 46 891 individuals with LPL gene sequencing data available, the mean (SD) age was 50 (12.6) years and 51% were female. A total of 188 participants (0.40%; 95% CI, 0.35%-0.46%) carried a damaging mutation in LPL, including 105 of 32 646 control participants (0.32%) and 83 of 14 245 participants with early-onset CAD (0.58%). Compared with 46 703 noncarriers, the 188 heterozygous carriers of an LPL damaging mutation displayed higher plasma triglyceride levels (19.6 mg/dL; 95% CI, 4.6-34.6 mg/dL) and higher odds of CAD (odds ratio = 1.84; 95% CI, 1.35-2.51; P < .001). An analysis of 6 common LPL variants resulted in an odds ratio for CAD of 1.51 (95% CI, 1.39-1.64; P = 1.1 × 10-22) per 1-SD increase in triglycerides. Conclusions and Relevance: The presence of rare damaging mutations in LPL was significantly associated with higher triglyceride levels and presence of coronary artery disease. However, further research is needed to assess whether there are causal mechanisms by which heterozygous lipoprotein lipase deficiency could lead to coronary artery disease.

22 Article Difference in vascular response between sirolimus-eluting- and everolimus-eluting stents in ostial left circumflex artery after unprotected left main as observed by optical coherence tomography. 2017

Fujino, Yusuke / Attizzani, Guilherme F / Tahara, Satoko / Naganuma, Toru / Takagi, Kensuke / Yabushita, Hiroto / Wang, Wei / Tanaka, Kentaro / Matsumoto, Takahiro / Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi / Yamada, Yuya / Amano, Shinnosuke / Watanabe, Yusuke / Warisawa, Takayuki / Sato, Tomohiko / Mitomo, Satoru / Kurita, Naoyuki / Ishiguro, Hisaaki / Hozawa, Koji / Tsukahara, Takahiro / Motosuke, Masahiro / Bezerra, Hiram G / Nakamura, Shotaro / Nakamura, Sunao. ·Department of Cardiology, New Tokyo Hospital, Chiba, Japan. Electronic address: yusuke.fujino1979@gmail.com. · Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States. · Department of Cardiology, New Tokyo Hospital, Chiba, Japan. · Center of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, United States. · Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba, Japan. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #28065691.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Kissing-balloon technique (KBT) is commonly performed during percutaneous coronary intervention of distal unprotected left main coronary artery (ULM) aiming at obtaining optimal opening of the side branch (left circumflex artery; LCX) ostium. Nonetheless, detailed evaluation of vascular response to stents in LCX ostium is lacking. We therefore evaluated the vascular response to different drug-eluting stents (DES) in ostial LCX after ULM by means of optical coherence tomography (OCT). METHODS: We prospectively enrolled 38 consecutive patients with ULM disease, who were treated with single-stent procedure using DES, crossover the ULM-left anterior descending artery (LAD) followed by KBT. Twelve patients were treated with sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) and 26 patients were treated with everolimus-eluting stents (EES). OCT was conducted at post-PCI and 9-month follow-up. We evaluated the DES-vessel interactions and number of stent struts at the side branch (LCX) ostium (SO) at post-PCI, and compared the narrowing of ostial area at LCX between SES and EES. RESULTS: Post-procedure, the number of stent struts at SO was significantly higher in SES compared to EES (median 14.47% vs 0.19%, p<0.001). The narrowing of LCX ostial area at follow-up was more pronounced in SES compared with EES (29.16% vs 2.46%, respectively, p<0.001). Linear regression analysis showed a high correlation between the number of stent struts in LCX ostium and ostial area narrowing (r=0.771, p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: OCT showed differences between EES- and SES-vessel interactions at ULM bifurcation PCI. Number of LCX ostium struts at post-PCI impacted the narrowing of ostial area at 9-month follow-up.

23 Article Inflammatory Obesity Phenotypes, Gender Effects, and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study. 2016

Lin, Albert / Lacy, Mary E / Eaton, Charles / Correa, Adolfo / Wu, Wen-Chih. ·From the Center of Innovation Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS), Veterans Affairs Hospital, Providence, RI (A.L., M.E.L., W.-C.W.) · Department of Medicine, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (A.L., W.-C.W.) · Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI (M.E.L., W.-C.W.) · Center for Primary Care and Prevention, Department of Family Medicine, Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island, Pawtucket (C.E.) · and Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson (A.C.). ·Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol · Pubmed #27856456.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Reasons for variations in atherosclerotic burden among individuals with similar levels of obesity are poorly understood, especially in African Americans. This study examines whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is useful for discriminating between benign and high-risk obesity phenotypes for subclinical atherosclerosis in African Americans. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Participants from the Jackson Heart Study (n=4682) were stratified into 4 phenotypes based on the presence of National Heart and Lung and Blood Institute definition of obesity or obesity-equivalent (body mass index ≥30 or body mass index 25-30 with waist circumference >102 cm in men and >88 cm in women) and inflammation by hsCRP ≥2 mg/L. Using multivariate regression models, we conducted cross-sectional analyses of the association between inflammatory obesity phenotypes and subclinical atherosclerosis determined by carotid intima-media thickness or coronary artery calcium scores. Sex-specific analyses were conducted given significant interaction for gender (P=0.03). The prevalence of obesity or equivalent was 65%, of which 30% did not have inflammation. Conversely, 37% of nonobese individuals had inflammation. Among nonobese men, hsCRP ≥2 mg/L identified a subset of individuals with higher carotid intima-media thickness (adjusted mean difference =0.05, 95% confidence interval 0.02, 0.08 mm) compared with their noninflammatory counterparts. Among obese men, hsCRP <2 mg/L identified a subset of individuals with lower coronary artery calcium compared with their inflammatory counterparts. Among women, associations between hsCRP and carotid intima-media thickness or coronary artery calcium were not found. CONCLUSIONS: In the largest African American population-based cohort to date, hsCRP was useful in identifying a subset of nonobese men with higher carotid intima-media thickness, but not in women. hsCRP did not identify a subset of obese individuals with less subclinical atherosclerosis.

24 Article Comparative effectiveness of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in elderly patients with diabetes. 2016

Shah, Ruchit / Yang, Yi / Bentley, John P / Banahan, Benjamin F. ·a The University of Mississippi , MS , USA. ·Curr Med Res Opin · Pubmed #27479778.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To compare the relative effectiveness of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) among elderly patients with diabetes regarding acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, repeat revascularization, and all-cause mortality. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the 2006-2008 5% national sample of Medicare claims data. Elderly (≥65 years) beneficiaries with at least two claims of diabetes separated by ≥30 days and who had at least one inpatient claim for multi-vessel CABG or PCI between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2008 were identified. The date of beneficiary's first CABG or PCI was defined as the index date. All patients were followed from the index date to 31 December 2008 for outcomes. CABG and PCI patients were 1:1 matched on propensity scores and index dates. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare postoperative outcomes between patients undergoing CABG versus PCI. RESULTS: The matched sample consisted of 4430 patients (2215 in each group). The Cox proportional hazards models showed that, compared to patients undergoing PCI, CABG was associated with a lower risk of postoperative AMI (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.494; 95% CI: 0.396-0.616; p < .0001), repeat revascularization (HR: 0.194; 95% CI: 0.149-0.252; p < .0001), the composite outcome (HR: 0.523; 95% CI: 0.460-0.595; p < .0001), and all-cause mortality (HR: 0.775; 95% CI: 0.658-0.914; p = .0024); postoperative risk of stroke was not significantly different between the two groups (HR: 0.965; 95% CI: 0.812-1.148; p = .691). CONCLUSIONS: CABG appears to be the preferred revascularization strategy for elderly patients with diabetes and coronary heart disease. However, this result should be interpreted considering study limitations, for example, several patient clinical variables and physician-related factors which may affect procedure outcomes are not available in the data. Clinical decisions should be individualized considering all patient- and physician-related factors.

25 Article Life Course Socioeconomic Position and Subclinical Disease: The Jackson Heart Study. 2016

Deere, Bradley / Griswold, Michael / Lirette, Seth / Fox, Ervin / Sims, Mario. ·University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Medicine; Center of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Medicine. · Center of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Medicine; Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Medicine; Jackson Heart Study, Coordinating Center. · Center of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Medicine. · Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Medicine; Jackson Heart Study, Coordinating Center. ·Ethn Dis · Pubmed #27440975.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: African Americans experience higher rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and lower childhood and adult socioeconomic position (SEP). Research that examines the associations of multiple measures of SEP with subclinical CVD markers among African Americans is limited. METHODS: Data from the Jackson Heart Study (JHS) were used to examine cross-sectional associations of childhood SEP and adult SEP with subclinical markers among 4,756 African American participants (mean age 54, 64% female), adjusting for age, health behaviors and CVD risk factors. Subclinical markers included prevalent left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), peripheral artery disease (PAD), coronary artery calcification (CAC), and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). RESULTS: The prevalence of LVH, PAD and CAC was 7%, 6% and 45%, respectively. The mean CIMT was .72 ± .17 mm. In fully-adjusted models, having a college education was inversely associated with PAD (OR, .27; 95% CI .13,.56) and CIMT (β=-29.7, P<.01). Income was inversely associated with LVH after adjustment for health behaviors (OR, .49 95% CI .25,.96), though associations attenuated in the fully-adjusted model. Measures of childhood SEP (material resources and mother's education) were not consistently associated with subclinical disease measures other than a positive association between material resources and CIMT. CONCLUSIONS: Subclinical disease markers were patterned by adult SEP measures among African Americans.

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