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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from Quebec
Based on 337 articles published since 2008
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These are the 337 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Quebec during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14
1 Guideline Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A North American Perspective-2016 Update. 2016

Angiolillo, Dominick J / Goodman, Shaun G / Bhatt, Deepak L / Eikelboom, John W / Price, Matthew J / Moliterno, David J / Cannon, Christopher P / Tanguay, Jean-Francois / Granger, Christopher B / Mauri, Laura / Holmes, David R / Gibson, C Michael / Faxon, David P. ·From the Division of Cardiology, University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville (D.J.A.) · St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, and the Canadian Heart Research Centre · Canadian VIGOUR Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton (S.G.G.) · Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (D.L.B., D.P.F.) · Department of Medicine, Population Health Research Institute, Thrombosis & Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, ON, Canada (J.W.E.) · Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Scripps Clinic, La Jolla CA (M.J.P.) · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Gill Heart Institute, University of Kentucky, Lexington (D.J.M.) · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Clinical Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (C.P.C., L.M.) · Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, QC, Canada (J.-F.T.) · Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC (C.B.G.) · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (D.R.H.) · and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (C.M.G.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27803042.

ABSTRACT: The optimal antithrombotic treatment regimen for patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation is an emerging clinical problem. Currently, there is limited evidenced-based data on the optimal antithrombotic treatment regimen, including antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies, for these high-risk patients with practice guidelines, thus, providing limited recommendations. Over the past years, expert consensus documents have provided guidance to clinicians on how to manage patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Given the recent advancements in the field, the current document provides an updated opinion of selected North American experts from the United States and Canada on the treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. In particular, this document provides the current views on (1) embolic/stroke risk, (2) ischemic/thrombotic cardiac risk, and (3) bleeding risk, which are pivotal for discerning the choice of antithrombotic therapy. In addition, we describe the recent advances in pharmacology, stent designs, and clinical trials relevant to the field. Ultimately, we provide expert consensus-derived recommendations, using a pragmatic approach, on the management of patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

2 Guideline 2016 Focused Update of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines for the Management of Atrial Fibrillation. 2016

Macle, Laurent / Cairns, John / Leblanc, Kori / Tsang, Teresa / Skanes, Allan / Cox, Jafna L / Healey, Jeff S / Bell, Alan / Pilote, Louise / Andrade, Jason G / Mitchell, L Brent / Atzema, Clare / Gladstone, David / Sharma, Mike / Verma, Subodh / Connolly, Stuart / Dorian, Paul / Parkash, Ratika / Talajic, Mario / Nattel, Stanley / Verma, Atul / Anonymous6140880. ·Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: lmacle@mac.com. · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · London Heart Institute, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · QEII Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · McMaster University and Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, and Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · McMaster University and Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; The Canadian Stroke Network, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #27609430.

ABSTRACT: The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Guidelines Committee provides periodic reviews of new data to produce focused updates that address clinically important advances in AF management. This 2016 Focused Update deals with: (1) the management of antithrombotic therapy for AF patients in the context of the various clinical presentations of coronary artery disease; (2) real-life data with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (3) the use of antidotes for the reversal of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (4) digoxin as a rate control agent; (5) perioperative anticoagulation management; and (6) AF surgical therapy including the prevention and treatment of AF after cardiac surgery. The recommendations were developed with the same methodology used for the initial 2010 guidelines and the 2012 and 2014 Focused Updates. Using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) standards, individual studies and literature were reviewed for quality and bias; the literature review process and evidence tables are included in the Supplementary Material, and on the CCS Web site. The section on concomitant AF and coronary artery disease was developed in collaboration with the CCS Antiplatelet Guidelines Committee. Details of the updated recommendations are presented, along with their background and rationale. This document is linked to an updated summary of all CCS AF Guidelines recommendations, from 2010 to the present 2016 Focused Update.

3 Guideline Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines for the diagnosis and management of stable ischemic heart disease. 2014

Mancini, G B John / Gosselin, Gilbert / Chow, Benjamin / Kostuk, William / Stone, James / Yvorchuk, Kenneth J / Abramson, Beth L / Cartier, Raymond / Huckell, Victor / Tardif, Jean-Claude / Connelly, Kim / Ducas, John / Farkouh, Michael E / Gupta, Milan / Juneau, Martin / O'Neill, Blair / Raggi, Paolo / Teo, Koon / Verma, Subodh / Zimmermann, Rodney / Anonymous3830801. ·Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address: mancini@mail.ubc.ca. · Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, University of Montreal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Vancouver Island Health Authority, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Medicine, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University Health Network Hospitals, University of Toronto, Toronto, Onario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Regina Qu'Appelle Health Region, University of Saskatchewan, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #25064578.

ABSTRACT: This overview provides a guideline for the management of stable ischemic heart disease. It represents the work of a primary and secondary panel of participants from across Canada who achieved consensus on behalf of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society. The suggestions and recommendations are intended to be of relevance to primary care and specialist physicians with an emphasis on rational deployment of diagnostic tests, expedited implementation of long- and short-term medical therapy, timely consideration of revascularization, and practical follow-up measures.

4 Guideline Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement on the management of thoracic aortic disease. 2014

Boodhwani, Munir / Andelfinger, Gregor / Leipsic, Jonathon / Lindsay, Thomas / McMurtry, M Sean / Therrien, Judith / Siu, Samuel C / Anonymous6800795. ·Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: mboodhwani@ottawaheart.ca. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Montreal, Montreal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Radiology, University of British Colombia, Vancouver, British Colombia, Canada. · Division of Vascular Surgery, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #24882528.

ABSTRACT: This Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement aims to provide succinct perspectives on key issues in the management of thoracic aortic disease (TAD). This document is not a comprehensive overview of TAD and important elements of the epidemiology, presentation, diagnosis, and management of acute aortic syndromes are deliberately not discussed; readers are referred to the 2010 guidelines published by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, and other stakeholders. Rather, this document is a practical guide for clinicians managing adult patients with TAD. Topics covered include size thresholds for surgical intervention, emerging therapies, imaging modalities, medical and lifestyle management, and genetics of TAD. The primary panel consisted of experts from a variety of disciplines that are essential for comprehensive management of TAD patients. The methodology involved a focused literature review with an emphasis on updates since 2010 and the use of Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology to arrive at specific recommendations. The final document then underwent review by a secondary panel. This document aims to provide recommendations for most patients and situations. However, the ultimate judgement regarding the management of any individual patients should be made by their health care team.

5 Editorial Closing congenital vascular connections: the novel and the traditional… both at risk of developing ventricular dysfunction? 2018

Martucci, Giuseppe Joe / Piazza, Nicolo / Dancea, Adrian. ·Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University Health Center, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ·EuroIntervention · Pubmed #29624173.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial The Importance of Sex in the Stress-Heart Disease Relationship and the Potential Contribution of Gender to Future Research. 2018

Bacon, Simon L. ·From the Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre, CIUSSS-NIM, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Quebec, Canada; and Department of Exercise Science, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. simon.bacon@concordia.ca. ·Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol · Pubmed #29367230.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Combining Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and Coronary Angiography/Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Procedures: Ready for Prime Time? 2017

Rodés-Cabau, Josep. ·From the Quebec Heart and Lung Institute, Laval University, Quebec City, Canada. josep.rodes@criucpq.ulaval.ca. ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28768761.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Management of coronary artery disease with cardiac CT beyond gatekeeping. 2017

Cademartiri, Filippo / Nistri, Stefano / Tarantini, Giuseppe / Maffei, Erica. ·Department of Radiology & Research Center, Montreal Heart Institute/Universitè de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Radiology, Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Cardiology Service, CMSR- Veneto Medica, Altavilla Vicentina, Italy. · Department of Cardiology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. ·Heart · Pubmed #28446549.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Cardiac CT for the detection of vulnerable plaque. 2016

Cademartiri, Filippo / Maffei, Erica. ·Department of Radiology, Montreal Heart Institute, Universitè de Montreal, Montreal, Canada Department of Radiology, Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands filippocademartiri@gmail.com. · Centre de Recherche, Montreal Heart Institute, Universitè de Montreal, Montreal, Canada. ·Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26628618.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Reducing the burden of disease and death from familial hypercholesterolemia: a call to action. 2014

Knowles, Joshua W / O'Brien, Emily C / Greendale, Karen / Wilemon, Katherine / Genest, Jacques / Sperling, Laurence S / Neal, William A / Rader, Daniel J / Khoury, Muin J. ·Stanford University School of Medicine and Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford, CA; The FH Foundation, South Pasadena, CA. · Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC. Electronic address: emily.obrien@duke.edu. · The FH Foundation, South Pasadena, CA. · McGill University, Montreal, Canada. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. · West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Atlanta, GA. ·Am Heart J · Pubmed #25458642.

ABSTRACT: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disease characterized by substantial elevations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, unrelated to diet or lifestyle. Untreated FH patients have 20 times the risk of developing coronary artery disease, compared with the general population. Estimates indicate that as many as 1 in 500 people of all ethnicities and 1 in 250 people of Northern European descent may have FH; nevertheless, the condition remains largely undiagnosed. In the United States alone, perhaps as little as 1% of FH patients have been diagnosed. Consequently, there are potentially millions of children and adults worldwide who are unaware that they have a life-threatening condition. In countries like the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and Spain, cascade screening programs have led to dramatic improvements in FH case identification. Given that there are currently no systematic approaches in the United States to identify FH patients or affected relatives, the patient-centric nonprofit FH Foundation convened a national FH Summit in 2013, where participants issued a "call to action" to health care providers, professional organizations, public health programs, patient advocacy groups, and FH experts, in order to bring greater attention to this potentially deadly, but (with proper diagnosis) eminently treatable, condition.

11 Editorial Should early post-stress imaging be performed on a routine clinical basis for myocardial perfusion studies? 2014

Taillefer, Raymond. ·Department of Radiology, Radio-Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada, rtaillefer@hotmail.com. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #25213202.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Vitamin C and percutaneous coronary intervention: some answers, more questions. 2014

Gebhard, Catherine / Tardif, Jean-Claude. ·Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Québec, Canada. · Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Québec, Canada; Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Québec, Canada. Electronic address: jean-claude.tardif@icm-mhi.org. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #24365188.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Near-infrared spectroscopy for cardiovascular risk assessment? Not ready for prime time. 2014

Gebhard, Catherine / L'Allier, Philippe L / Tardif, Jean-Claude. ·Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Canada. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #24052602.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Depression screening in patients with coronary heart disease: does the evidence matter? 2013

Thombs, Brett D / Ziegelstein, Roy C. ·Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; School of Nursing, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: brett.thombs@mcgill.ca. ·J Psychosom Res · Pubmed #24290037.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Review 2018 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology Focused Update of the Guidelines for the Use of Antiplatelet Therapy. 2018

Mehta, Shamir R / Bainey, Kevin R / Cantor, Warren J / Lordkipanidzé, Marie / Marquis-Gravel, Guillaume / Robinson, Simon D / Sibbald, Matthew / So, Derek Y / Wong, Graham C / Abunassar, Joseph G / Ackman, Margaret L / Bell, Alan D / Cartier, Raymond / Douketis, James D / Lawler, Patrick R / McMurtry, Michael S / Udell, Jacob A / van Diepen, Sean / Verma, Subodh / Mancini, G B John / Cairns, John A / Tanguay, Jean-François / Anonymous921134. ·McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: smehta@mcmaster.ca. · University of Alberta and Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · University of Toronto and Southlake Regional Health Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Université de Montréal and Institut de Cardiologie de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Royal Jubilee Hospital, University of British Columbia, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. · McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · University of British Columbia and Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · McMaster University and St Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · University of Toronto and Women's College Hospital and Peter Munk Cardiac Centre of Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Toronto and St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Université de Montréal and Institut de Cardiologie de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: jean-francois.tanguay@icm-mhi.org. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #29475527.

ABSTRACT: Antiplatelet therapy (APT) has become an important tool in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic events, particularly those associated with coronary artery disease. A large evidence base has evolved regarding the relationship between APT prescription in various clinical contexts and risk/benefit relationships. The Guidelines Committee of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology publishes regular updates of its recommendations, taking into consideration the most recent clinical evidence. The present update to the 2011 and 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society APT guidelines incorporates new evidence on how to optimize APT use, particularly in situations in which few to no data were previously available. The recommendations update focuses on the following primary topics: (1) the duration of dual APT (DAPT) in patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute coronary syndrome and non-acute coronary syndrome indications; (2) management of DAPT in patients who undergo noncardiac surgery; (3) management of DAPT in patients who undergo elective and semiurgent coronary artery bypass graft surgery; (4) when and how to switch between different oral antiplatelet therapies; and (5) management of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in patients who undergo PCI. For PCI patients, we specifically analyze the particular considerations in patients with atrial fibrillation, mechanical or bioprosthetic valves (including transcatheter aortic valve replacement), venous thromboembolic disease, and established left ventricular thrombus or possible left ventricular thrombus with reduced ejection fraction after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. In addition to specific recommendations, we provide values and preferences and practical tips to aid the practicing clinician in the day to day use of these important agents.

16 Review Orbital atherectomy for the treatment of severely calcified coronary lesions: evidence, technique, and best practices. 2017

Shlofmitz, Evan / Martinsen, Brad J / Lee, Michael / Rao, Sunil V / Généreux, Philippe / Higgins, Joe / Chambers, Jeffrey W / Kirtane, Ajay J / Brilakis, Emmanouil S / Kandzari, David E / Sharma, Samin K / Shlofmitz, Richard. ·a Division of Cardiology , Columbia University Medical Center , New York , NY , USA. · b Cardiovascular Research Foundation , New York , NY , USA. · c Department of Clinical and Scientific Affairs , Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. , St. Paul , MN , USA. · d Division of Cardiology , UCLA Medical Center , Los Angeles , CA , USA. · e Duke Clinical Research Institute , Durham , NC , USA. · f Morristown Medical Center , Morristown , NJ , USA. · g Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal , Université de Montréal , Montréal , Canada. · h Department of Engineering , Cardiovascular Systems, Inc ., St. Paul , MN , USA. · i Metropolitan Heart and Vascular Institute , Mercy Hospital , Minneapolis , MN , USA. · j Minneapolis Heart Institute , Abbott Northwestern Hospital , Minneapolis , MN , USA. · k Piedmont Heart Institute , Atlanta , GA , USA. · l Division of Cardiology , Mount Sinai Hospital , New York , NY , USA. · m Department of Cardiology , St. Francis Hospital-The Heart Center , Roslyn , NY , USA. ·Expert Rev Med Devices · Pubmed #28945162.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The presence of severe coronary artery calcification is associated with higher rates of angiographic complications during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), as well as higher major adverse cardiac events compared with non-calcified lesions. Incorporating orbital atherectomy (OAS) for effective preparation of severely calcified lesions can help maximize the benefits of PCI by attaining maximal luminal gain (or stent expansion) and improve long-term outcomes (by reducing need for revascularization). Areas covered: In this manuscript, the prevalence, risk factors, and impact of coronary artery calcification on PCI are reviewed. Based on current data and experience, the authors review orbital atherectomy technique and best practices to optimize lesion preparation. Expert Commentary: The coronary OAS is the only device approved for use in the U.S. as a treatment for de novo, severely calcified coronary lesions to facilitate stent delivery. Advantages of the device include its ease of use and a mechanism of action that treats bi-directionally, allowing for continuous blood flow during treatment, minimizing heat damage, slow flow, and subsequent need for revascularization. The OAS technique tips reviewed in this article will help inform interventional cardiologists treating patients with severely calcified lesions.

17 Review Implications of GLAGOV study. 2017

Nicholls, Stephen J / Puri, Rishi. ·aSouth Australian Health and Medical Research Institute bUniversity of Adelaide, Australia cQuébec Heart & Lung Institute, Québec, Canada dCleveland Clinic Coordinating Center for Clinical Research, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. ·Curr Opin Lipidol · Pubmed #28937411.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibition has emerged as a novel approach to lowering levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). The impact of PCSK9 inhibition in statin-treated patients on coronary atherosclerosis had remained unknown. RECENT FINDINGS: The GLAGOV trial compared the effect of the PCSK9 inhibitor, evolocumab, and placebo on progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients treated with at least moderate intensity statin therapy. Predictable lowering of LDL-C with evolocumab (36.6 versus 93.0 mg/dl) associated with significant regression of coronary atherosclerosis. A direct relationship was observed between achieved LDL-C levels and disease progression. SUMMARY: Addition of evolocumab to statin therapy produces incremental regression of plaque regression in patients with established coronary artery disease. This finding provides a biological rationale for the reported beneficial effects of evolocumab on cardiovascular events.

18 Review In vivo visualization of lipid coronary atheroma with intravascular near-infrared spectroscopy. 2017

Kataoka, Yu / Puri, Rishi / Andrews, Jordan / Honda, Satoshi / Nishihira, Kensaku / Asaumi, Yasuhide / Noguchi, Teruo / Yasuda, Satoshi / Nicholls, Stephen J. ·a Department of Cardiovascular Medicine , National Cerebral & Cardiovascular Centre , Suita , Japan. · b Quebec Heart & Lung Institute , Laval University , Quebec City , Canada. · c Cleveland Clinic Coordinating Center for Clinical Trials (C5), Cleveland Clinic , Cleveland , OH , USA. · d Department of Medicine , University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA , Australia. · e Heart Health, South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute , University of Adelaide , Adelaide , Australia. ·Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther · Pubmed #28846060.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) has become a major health burden and is expected to further increase in the future. Better predictive approaches for ASCVD and more efficacious therapies are required to further improve cardiovascular outcomes. Intravascular imaging has contributed to the elucidation of atherosclerotic mechanisms and evaluation of novel therapies. Near-infrared spectroscopy has enabled the visualization of the lipid extent of atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. Given that lipid accumulation is considered to promote the formation and progression of atherosclerosis, this technology may harbor the potential to identify subjects with high cardiovascular risks and thus adopt more optimized therapeutic approaches. Areas covered: This review will outline the characteristics of NIRS, its validation data and in vivo findings of NIRS imaging in patients with coronary artery disease. The comparisons of NIRS with other imaging modalities will reveal the distinct capability of NIRS imaging to monitor high-risk atheroma harboring lipidic composition. Furthermore, the predictive ability of NIRS-derived measures in the occurrence of ASCVD will be summarized. Expert commentary: Ex vivo and in vivo findings suggest NIRS imaging as a potential tool for cardiovascular risk assessment and monitoring the benefit of pharmacological approaches.

19 Review Clinical outcomes with percutaneous coronary revascularization vs coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease: A meta-analysis of 6 randomized trials and 4,686 patients. 2017

Palmerini, Tullio / Serruys, Patrick / Kappetein, Arie Pieter / Genereux, Philippe / Riva, Diego Della / Reggiani, Letizia Bacchi / Christiansen, Evald Høj / Holm, Niels R / Thuesen, Leif / Makikallio, Timo / Morice, Marie Claude / Ahn, Jung-Min / Park, Seung-Jung / Thiele, Holger / Boudriot, Enno / Sabatino, Mario / Romanello, Mattia / Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe / Cavalcante, Raphael / Sabik, Joseph F / Stone, Gregg W. ·Polo Cardio-Toraco-Vascolare, Policlinico S. Orsola, Bologna, Italy. · International Centre for Circulatory Health, NHLI, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Columbia University Medical Center and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY; Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada; Morristown Medical Center, Morristown, NJ. · Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. · MC Moriec Ramsay Générale de Santé, ICPS, Massy, France. · The Heart Institute, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. · University Heart Center Lübeck and the German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Lübeck, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, University Heart Center, Leipzig, Germany. · Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina, Italy; Department of AngioCardioNeurology, IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, Italy. · Department of Interventional Cardiology, Thoraxcenter, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH. · Columbia University Medical Center and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY. Electronic address: gs2184@columbia.edu. ·Am Heart J · Pubmed #28760214.

ABSTRACT: Some but not all randomized controlled trials (RCT) have suggested that percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents may be an acceptable alternative to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery for the treatment of unprotected left main coronary artery disease (ULMCAD). We therefore aimed to compare the risk of all-cause mortality between PCI and CABG in patients with ULMCAD in a pairwise meta-analysis of RCT. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials comparing PCI vs CABG for the treatment of ULMCAD were searched through MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane databases, and proceedings of international meetings. RESULTS: Six trials including 4,686 randomized patients were identified. After a median follow-up of 39 months, there were no significant differences between PCI vs CABG in the risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 0.99, 95% CI 0.76-1.30) or cardiac mortality. However, a significant interaction for cardiac mortality (P CONCLUSIONS: In patients undergoing revascularization for ULMCAD, PCI was associated with similar rates of mortality compared with CABG at a median follow-up of 39 months, but with an interaction effect suggesting relatively lower mortality with PCI in patients with low SYNTAX score and relatively lower mortality with CABG in patients with high SYNTAX score. Both procedures resulted in similar long-term composite rates of death, myocardial infarction, or stroke, with PCI offering an early safety advantage and CABG demonstrating greater durability.

20 Review Coronary Revascularization in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement. 2017

Finn, Matthew T / Nazif, Tamim M / Fried, Justin / Labbé, Benoit M / Mohammadi, Siamak / Leon, Martin B / Kodali, Susheel K / Rodés-Cabau, Josep / Paradis, Jean-Michel. ·Columbia University Medical Center, New-York Presbyterian Hospital, New-York, New York, USA. · Columbia University Medical Center, New-York Presbyterian Hospital, New-York, New York, USA; Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York, USA. · Quebec Heart and Lung Institute, Laval University, Ville de Québec, Quebec, Canada. · Quebec Heart and Lung Institute, Laval University, Ville de Québec, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: jm.paradis@criucpq.ulaval.ca. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #28669699.

ABSTRACT: Concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) is highly prevalent among patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). Historically, surgical aortic valve replacement with coronary artery bypass grafting was the only treatment option for patients with severe AS and significant CAD. The rapid expansion of transcatheter aortic valve replacement has led to significant paradigm shifts in the treatment of severe AS and has raised new questions regarding the optimal management of CAD in these patients. We review the evidence regarding management of concomitant CAD in severe AS patients, specifically focusing on issues surrounding transcatheter aortic valve replacement. In the absence of robust evidence supporting specific treatment strategies, decisions regarding coronary revascularization in severe AS should be individualized and made within the context of a multidisciplinary heart team.

21 Review Contemporary use of drug-coated balloons in coronary artery disease: Where are we now? 2017

Picard, Fabien / Doucet, Serge / Asgar, Anita W. ·Interventional cardiology division, department of medicine, Montreal heart institute, université de Montréal, 5000 Bélanger, H1T 1C8 Montréal, QC, Canada; Interventional cardiology department, Cochin hospital, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. · Interventional cardiology division, department of medicine, Montreal heart institute, université de Montréal, 5000 Bélanger, H1T 1C8 Montréal, QC, Canada. · Interventional cardiology division, department of medicine, Montreal heart institute, université de Montréal, 5000 Bélanger, H1T 1C8 Montréal, QC, Canada. Electronic address: anita.asgar@umontreal.ca. ·Arch Cardiovasc Dis · Pubmed #28274589.

ABSTRACT: The drug-coated balloon (DCB) has emerged as an additional tool in the arsenal of interventional cardiology devices; it delivers antiproliferative drugs to local arterial tissue by single prolonged coated balloon angioplasty inflation, and prevents restenosis, leaving no implant behind. This strategy theoretically decreases the risk of late inflammatory response to device components, without preventing positive remodelling. DCBs, when used carefully and with a good technique, may have a role in the treatment of lesion subsets, such as in-stent restenosis, small vessel disease or side branch bifurcations, in which the implantation of a drug-eluting stent is not desirable or is technically challenging. Using the latest evidence regarding the effectiveness of the currently available DCBs, this review will discuss the rationale for DCB use, and the effectiveness of DCBs in different clinical and lesion settings, and will give practical tips for their correct use in everyday clinical practice.

22 Review Fractional flow reserve and resting indices for coronary physiologic assessment: Practical guide, tips, and tricks. 2017

Picard, Fabien / Pighi, Michele / Ly, Hung Q. ·Interventional Cardiology Division, Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Qubec, Canada. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28160376.

ABSTRACT: Physiologic assessment using fractional flow reserve (FFR) to guide percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) has been demonstrated to improve clinical outcomes, compared to angiography-guided PCI. Recently, resting indices such as resting Pd/Pa, "instantaneous wave-free ratio", and contrast medium induced FFR have been evaluated for the assessment of the functional consequences of coronary lesions. Herein, we review and discuss the use of FFR and other indices for the functional assessment of coronary lesions. This review will cover theoretical aspects, as well as practical points and common pitfalls related to coronary physiological assessment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

23 Review Impact of preoperative use of P2Y12 receptor inhibitors on clinical outcomes in cardiac and non-cardiac surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Siller-Matula, Jolanta M / Petre, Alexandra / Delle-Karth, Georg / Huber, Kurt / Ay, Cihan / Lordkipanidzé, Marie / De Caterina, Raffaele / Kolh, Philippe / Mahla, Elisabeth / Gersh, Bernard J. ·1 Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. · 2 3rd Medical Department of Cardiology and Emergency Medicine, Wilhelminen Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · 3 Division of Haematology and Haemostaseology, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. · 4 Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal; Research Center, Montreal Heart Institute, Canada. · 5 Institute of Cardiology, 'G d'Annunzio' University - Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy. · 6 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University Hospital of Liege, Belgium. · 7 Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Austria. · 8 Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, College of Medicine Rochester, USA. ·Eur Heart J Acute Cardiovasc Care · Pubmed #25943554.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To review systematically the evidence and perform a meta-analysis of benefits and risks associated with use of P2Y RESULTS: Fifty-four studies met the selection criteria and included 50,048 patients. Preoperative use of clopidogrel on top of aspirin in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft was associated with a 2.5-fold increased risk of re-operation for bleeding (95% CI: 1.92-3.25; p<0.001) and a 1.47-fold increased risk of death (95% CI: 1.25-1.72; p<0.001), but did not diminish the risk for myocardial infarction (RR: 0.96; 95% CI: 0.75-1.25; p=0.18) or MACE (RR: 1.16; 95% CI: 0.90--1.50; p=0.30). In patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, preoperative use of clopidogrel increased the RR of re-operation for major bleeding by 2.05-fold (95% CI: 1.13-3.73; p=0.002) but did not reduce the RR for MACE or death. Clopidogrel use during cardiac device implantation raised the RR for procedure-related haematoma by 3.0-fold (95% CI: 1.30--6.94; p=0.001). Whereas preoperative ticagrelor use did not increase the risk for mortality (RR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.49-2.14), preoperative prasugrel use tended to increase the risk for death (RR: 5.06; 95% CI: 0.54-47.65). CONCLUSION: Preoperative exposure to clopidogrel on top of aspirin did not reduce the risk of MACE but was associated with increased risk of bleeding and mortality.

24 Review Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for Bifurcation Lesions. 2016

Redfors, Björn / Généreux, Philippe. ·Clinical Trial Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 111 East 59th Street, New York, NY 10022, USA; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Bruna Straket 16, 413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden. · Clinical Trial Center, Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 111 East 59th Street, New York, NY 10022, USA; Department of Cardiology, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Université de Montréal, 5400, boul. Gouin Ouest, Montréal, Québec H4J 1C5, Canada. Electronic address: pgenereux@crf.org. ·Interv Cardiol Clin · Pubmed #28582201.

ABSTRACT: This article summarizes treatment alternatives for coronary bifurcation lesions. It also reviews current definitions and classifications pertaining to bifurcation lesions and provides an overview of the impact of bifurcation lesions on clinical outcomes.

25 Review Systematic Review of the Association between Dairy Product Consumption and Risk of Cardiovascular-Related Clinical Outcomes. 2016

Drouin-Chartier, Jean-Philippe / Brassard, Didier / Tessier-Grenier, Maude / Côté, Julie Anne / Labonté, Marie-Ève / Desroches, Sophie / Couture, Patrick / Lamarche, Benoît. ·Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. · Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Nutritional Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and. · CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. · Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; benoit.lamarche@fsaa.ulaval.ca. ·Adv Nutr · Pubmed #28140321.

ABSTRACT: The objective of this systematic review was to determine if dairy product consumption is detrimental, neutral, or beneficial to cardiovascular health and if the recommendation to consume reduced-fat as opposed to regular-fat dairy is evidence-based. A systematic review of meta-analyses of prospective population studies associating dairy consumption with cardiovascular disease (CVD), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, hypertension, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and type 2 diabetes (T2D) was conducted on the basis of the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. Quality of evidence was rated by using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation scale. High-quality evidence supports favorable associations between total dairy intake and hypertension risk and between low-fat dairy and yogurt intake and the risk of T2D. Moderate-quality evidence suggests favorable associations between intakes of total dairy, low-fat dairy, cheese, and fermented dairy and the risk of stroke; intakes of low-fat dairy and milk and the risk of hypertension; total dairy and milk consumption and the risk of MetS; and total dairy and cheese and the risk of T2D. High- to moderate-quality evidence supports neutral associations between the consumption of total dairy, cheese, and yogurt and CVD risk; the consumption of any form of dairy, except for fermented, and CAD risk; the consumption of regular- and high-fat dairy, milk, and yogurt and stroke risk; the consumption of regular- and high-fat dairy, cheese, yogurt, and fermented dairy and hypertension risk; and the consumption of regular- and high-fat dairy, milk, and fermented dairy and T2D risk. Data from this systematic review indicate that the consumption of various forms of dairy products shows either favorable or neutral associations with cardiovascular-related clinical outcomes. The review also emphasizes that further research is urgently needed to compare the impact of low-fat with regular- and high-fat dairy on cardiovascular-related clinical outcomes in light of current recommendations to consume low-fat dairy.

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