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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from Ann Arbor
Based on 245 articles published since 2010
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These are the 245 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Ann Arbor during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10
1 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Chest Pain-Possible Acute Coronary Syndrome. 2020

Anonymous4761190 / Batlle, Juan C / Kirsch, Jacobo / Bolen, Michael A / Bandettini, W Patricia / Brown, Richard K J / Francois, Christopher J / Galizia, Mauricio S / Hanneman, Kate / Inacio, Joao R / Johnson, Thomas V / Khosa, Faisal / Krishnamurthy, Rajesh / Rajiah, Prabhakar / Singh, Satinder P / Tomaszewski, Christian A / Villines, Todd C / Wann, Samuel / Young, Phillip M / Zimmerman, Stefan L / Abbara, Suhny. ·Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute and Baptist Health of South Florida, Miami, Florida. Electronic address: juan.batlle@alumni.duke.edu. · Panel Chair, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, Florida. · Panel Vice-Chair, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland; Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. · The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. · Toronto General Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Sanger Heart and Vascular Institute, Charlotte, North Carolina; Cardiology Expert. · Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. · UC San Diego Health, San Diego, California; American College of Emergency Physicians. · University of Virginia Health Center, Charlottesville, Virginia; Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. · Ascension Healthcare Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Nuclear Cardiology Expert. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, Baltimore, Maryland. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #32370978.

ABSTRACT: Chest pain is a frequent cause for emergency department visits and inpatient evaluation, with particular concern for acute coronary syndrome as an etiology, since cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Although history-based, electrocardiographic, and laboratory evaluations have shown promise in identifying coronary artery disease, early accurate diagnosis is paramount and there is an important role for imaging examinations to determine the presence and extent of anatomic coronary abnormality and ischemic physiology, to guide management with regard to optimal medical therapy or revascularization, and ultimately to thereby improve patient outcomes. A summary of the various methods for initial imaging evaluation of suspected acute coronary syndrome is outlined in this document. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

2 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2018

Anonymous7160967 / Shah, Amar B / Kirsch, Jacobo / Bolen, Michael A / Batlle, Juan C / Brown, Richard K J / Eberhardt, Robert T / Hurwitz, Lynne M / Inacio, Joao R / Jin, Jill O / Krishnamurthy, Rajesh / Leipsic, Jonathon A / Rajiah, Prabhakar / Singh, Satinder P / White, Richard D / Zimmerman, Stefan L / Abbara, Suhny. ·Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, New York. Electronic address: ashah27@northwell.edu. · Panel Chair, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, Florida. · Panel Vice-Chair, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute and Baptist Health of South Florida, Miami, Florida. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts; American College of Cardiology. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; American College of Physicians. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. · The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. · Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, Baltimore, Maryland. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #30392597.

ABSTRACT: Chronic chest pain (CCP) of a cardiac etiology is a common clinical problem. The diagnosis and classification of the case of chest pain has rapidly evolved providing the clinician with multiple cardiac imaging strategies. Though scintigraphy and rest echocardiography remain as appropriate imaging tools in the diagnostic evaluation, new technology is available. Current evidence supports the use of alternative imaging tests such as coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), cardiac MRI (CMRI), or Rb-82 PET/CT. Since multiple imaging modalities are available to the clinician, the most appropriate noninvasive imaging strategy will be based upon the patient's clinical presentation and clinical status. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

3 Guideline CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System. An expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT). 2018

Hecht, Harvey S / Blaha, Michael J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Cury, Ricardo C / Budoff, Matt / Leipsic, Jonathon / Shaw, Leslee. ·Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, United States. Electronic address: harvey.hecht@mountsinai.org. · The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Division of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Hospital of Miami, 8900 N Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176, United States. · Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, United States. · Department of Medicine and Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #29793848.

ABSTRACT: The goal of CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of CAC scanning on all noncontrast CT scans, irrespective of the indication, in order to facilitate clinical decision-making, with recommendations for subsequent patient management. The CAC-DRS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the total calcium score and the number of involved arteries. General recommendations are provided for further management of patients with different degrees of calcified plaque burden based on CAC-DRS classification. In addition, CAC-DRS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit quality assurance and tracking patient outcomes with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

4 Guideline 2016 SCCT/STR guidelines for coronary artery calcium scoring of noncontrast noncardiac chest CT scans: A report of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography and Society of Thoracic Radiology. 2017

Hecht, Harvey S / Cronin, Paul / Blaha, Michael J / Budoff, Matthew J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Narula, Jagat / Yankelevitz, David / Abbara, Suhny. ·aLenox Hill Heart & Vascular Institute, New York, NY, United States bUniversity of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States cJohns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States dHarbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States eIcahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, NY, United States fThe Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, United States gUTSouthwestern Medical Center, Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blv, Dallas, TX 75390-9316, United States. ·J Thorac Imaging · Pubmed #28832417.

ABSTRACT: The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR) have jointly produced this document. Experts in this subject have been selected from both organizations to examine subject-specific data and write this guideline in partnership. A formal literature review, weighing the strength of evidence has been performed. When available, information from studies on cost was considered. Computed tomography (CT) acquisition, CAC scoring methodologies and clinical outcomes are the primary basis for the recommendations in this guideline. This guideline is intended to assist healthcare providers in clinical decision making. The recommendations reflect a consensus after a thorough review of the best available current scientific evidence and practice patterns of experts in the field and are intended to improve patient care while acknowledging that situations arise where additional information may be needed to better inform patient care.

5 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous3040905 / Akers, Scott R / Panchal, Vandan / Ho, Vincent B / Beache, Garth M / Brown, Richard K J / Ghoshhajra, Brian B / Greenberg, S Bruce / Hsu, Joe Y / Kicska, Gregory A / Min, James K / Stillman, Arthur E / Stojanovska, Jadranka / Abbara, Suhny / Jacobs, Jill E. ·Principal Author, VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: akerssco@me.com. · Research Author, Internal Medicine Resident, Henry Ford Allegiance Health, Jackson, Michigan. · Panel Vice-Chair, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky. · University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, California. · University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California; American College of Cardiology. · Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Panel Chair, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #28473096.

ABSTRACT: In patients with chronic chest pain in the setting of high probability of coronary artery disease (CAD), imaging has major and diverse roles. First, imaging is valuable in determining and documenting the presence, extent, and severity of myocardial ischemia, hibernation, scarring, and/or the presence, site, and severity of obstructive coronary lesions. Second, imaging findings are important in determining the course of management of patients with suspected chronic myocardial ischemia and better defining those patients best suited for medical therapy, angioplasty/stenting, or surgery. Third, imaging is also necessary to determine the long-term prognosis and likely benefit from various therapeutic options by evaluating ventricular function, diastolic relaxation, and end-systolic volume. Imaging studies are also required to demonstrate other abnormalities, such as congenital/acquired coronary anomalies and severe left ventricular hypertrophy, that can produce angina in the absence of symptomatic coronary obstructive disease due to atherosclerosis. Clinical risk assessment is necessary to determine the pretest probability of CAD. Multiple methods are available to categorize patients as low, medium, or high risk for developing CAD. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

6 Guideline 2016 SCCT/STR guidelines for coronary artery calcium scoring of noncontrast noncardiac chest CT scans: A report of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography and Society of Thoracic Radiology. 2017

Hecht, Harvey S / Cronin, Paul / Blaha, Michael J / Budoff, Matthew J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Narula, Jagat / Yankelevitz, David / Abbara, Suhny. ·Lenox Hill Heart & Vascular Institute, New York, NY, United States. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States. · Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, NY, United States. · The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, United States. · UTSouthwestern Medical Center, Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blv, Dallas, TX 75390-9316, United States. Electronic address: suhny.abbara@utsouthwestern.edu. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27916431.

ABSTRACT: The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR) have jointly produced this document. Experts in this subject have been selected from both organizations to examine subject-specific data and write this guideline in partnership. A formal literature review, weighing the strength of evidence has been performed. When available, information from studies on cost was considered. Computed tomography (CT) acquisition, CAC scoring methodologies and clinical outcomes are the primary basis for the recommendations in this guideline. This guideline is intended to assist healthcare providers in clinical decision making. The recommendations reflect a consensus after a thorough review of the best available current scientific evidence and practice patterns of experts in the field and are intended to improve patient care while acknowledging that situations arise where additional information may be needed to better inform patient care.

7 Editorial Antiplatelet Therapy in Patients with Coronary Disease and Type 2 Diabetes. 2019

Bates, Eric R. ·From the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #31475797.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Balancing the Benefits, Risks, and Costs of Chronic Total Occlusion Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. 2019

Sutton, Nadia R / Bates, Eric R. ·Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #30871352.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Clinical Risk Scores to Minimize Low Yield Coronary Artery Disease Testing. 2019

Masri, Ahmad / Murthy, Venkatesh L. ·Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine and the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh (A.M.). · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Frankel Cardiovascular Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (V.L.M.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #30712365.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Left Main Stenting: Joining the Mainstream. 2018

Gurm, Hitinder S. ·Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Electronic address: hgurm@med.umich.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #30573060.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Women Are Why. 2017

Jackson, Elizabeth A / Nallamothu, Brahmajee K. ·From the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (E.A.J.) · VA Health Services Research and Development Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, MI (B.K.N.) · and Michigan Center for Health Analytics and Medical Prediction (M-CHAMP), Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor (B.K.N.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes · Pubmed #28228459.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Prior Coronary Revascularization and Risk of Noncardiac Surgery. 2017

Eagle, Kim A / Mukherjee, Debabrata. ·University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Electronic address: keagle@umich.edu. · Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, Texas. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28161259.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Coronary Stents and Risk for Noncardiac Surgery: Much Ado About Something, Nothing, or DAPT? 2016

Vaishnava, Prashant / Eagle, Kim A. ·Mount Sinai Hospital and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Heart, New York, New York. · University of Michigan Health System, Samuel and Jean A. Frankel Cardiovascular Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Electronic address: keagle@umich.edu. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #26940924.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Coronary computed tomographic angiography for preoperative risk: improved area under curve is not enough. 2015

LaBounty, Troy M / Eagle, Kim A. ·From the Department of Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor. labt@med.umich.edu. · From the Department of Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor. ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25711277.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Noncardiac surgery after coronary revascularization: more contemporary evidence needed. 2014

Vaishnava, Prashant / Eagle, Kim A. ·From the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor. · From the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor. keagle@med.umich.edu. ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #25139084.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Review Access and closure management of large bore femoral arterial access. 2018

Kaki, Amir / Blank, Nimrod / Alraies, M Chadi / Kajy, Marvin / Grines, Cindy L / Hasan, Reema / Htun, Wah Wah / Glazier, James / Mohamad, Tamam / Elder, Mahir / Schreiber, Theodore. ·Wayne State University, School of Medicine, Detroit Medical Center, Detroit Heart Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra Northwell Health, Northshore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Northwell Health, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, New York. ·J Interv Cardiol · Pubmed #30456854.

ABSTRACT: Femoral and radial artery access continue to be the standard of care for percutaneous coronary interventions. Cardiac catheterization has progressed to encompass a wide range of diagnostic and interventional procedures including coronary, peripheral, endovascular, and structural heart disease interventions. Despite advanced technology to make these procedures safe, bleeding, and vascular complications continue to be a substantial source of morbidity, especially in patients undergoing large-bore access procedures. New variations of percutaneous devices have reduced complications associated with these procedures. However, safe vascular access with effective hemostasis requires special techniques which have not been well described in the literature. Large-bore femoral artery access is feasible, safe, and associated with low complication rates when a protocol is implemented. Wayne State University, Detroit Medical Center Heart Hospital is a tertiary care, high-volume center for endovascular, structural heart and complex high risk indicated procedures with more 150 procedures involving mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices per year. In this manuscript, we describe our approach to femoral artery large-bore sheath insertion and management. Our protocol includes proper identification of the puncture site, device selection, insertion, assessment of limb perfusion while on prolong MCS support, and hemostasis techniques after sheath removal.

17 Review Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Disease: JACC State-of-the-Art Review. 2018

Rajagopalan, Sanjay / Al-Kindi, Sadeer G / Brook, Robert D. ·Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute, University Hospitals, Cleveland, Ohio; Case Cardiovascular Research Institute, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. Electronic address: sanjay.rajagopalan@uhhospitals.org. · Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute, University Hospitals, Cleveland, Ohio. · Michigan Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #30336830.

ABSTRACT: Fine particulate matter <2.5 μm (PM

18 Review How Genomics Is Personalizing the Management of Dyslipidemia and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention. 2018

Benes, Lane B / Brandt, Daniel J / Brandt, Eric J / Davidson, Michael H. ·Section of Cardiology, The University of Chicago Medicine, 5841 S Maryland Avenue, MC 6080, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, The University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA. · Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 789 Howard Avenue, New Haven, CT, 06519, USA. · Section of Cardiology, The University of Chicago Medicine, 5841 S Maryland Avenue, MC 6080, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA. mdavidso@bsd.uchicago.edu. ·Curr Cardiol Rep · Pubmed #30328514.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF THE REVIEW: To summarize advances in genomic medicine and anticipated future directions to improve cardiovascular risk reduction. RECENT FINDINGS: Mendelian randomization and genome-wide association studies have given significant insights into the role of genetics in dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease (CVD), with over 160 gene loci found to be associated with coronary artery disease to date. This has enabled the creation of genetic risk scores that have demonstrated improved risk prediction when added to clinical markers of CVD risk. Incorporation of genomic data into clinical patient care is on the horizon. Genomic medicine is expected to offer improved risk assessment, determination of targeted treatment strategies, and improved detection of lipid disorders causal to CVD development.

19 Review Heart Failure. 2018

Wu, Audrey. ·From the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. (A.W.). ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #29868816.

ABSTRACT: Heart failure affects more than 6 million people in the United States and incurs a heavy toll in morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. It frequently coexists with other important disorders, including hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes, and obesity. Decades of clinical trials have shown that several medications and interventions are effective for improving outcomes; however, mortality and hospitalization rates remain high. More recently, additional medications and devices have shown promise in reducing the health burden of heart failure.

20 Review HDL and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: genetic insights into complex biology. 2018

Rosenson, Robert S / Brewer, H Bryan / Barter, Philip J / Björkegren, Johan L M / Chapman, M John / Gaudet, Daniel / Kim, Daniel Seung / Niesor, Eric / Rye, Kerry-Anne / Sacks, Frank M / Tardif, Jean-Claude / Hegele, Robert A. ·Cardiometabolics Unit, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Hospital Box 1030, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, New York 10029, USA. · Medstar Heart and Vascular Institute, Washington Hospital Center, 110 Irving Street NW, Washington, DC 20010, USA. · School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Level 4E, Wallace Wurth Building, University of New South Wales Sydney, 18 High Street, Sydney, Kensington New South Wales 2052, Australia. · Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, New York 10029, USA. · Integrated Cardio Metabolic Centre, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, 171 77 Huddinge, Sweden. · National Institute for Health and Medical Research (INSERM) and Endocrinology Metabolism Service, Pitie-Salpetriere University Hospital, 83 Boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75651 Paris, France. · Lipidology Unit, Community Genomic Medicine Centre and ECOGENE-21, Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal, 930 Jacques-Cartier, Saguenay, Québec G7H 7K9, Canada. · University of Michigan School of Public Health, M4045 SPH II, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2029, USA. · Hartis-Pharma Sàrl, 13c Chemin de Bonmont, 1260 Nyon, Switzerland. · Nutrition Department, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02478, USA. · Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, 5000 Belanger Street, Montréal, Québec H1T 1C8, Canada. · Department of Medicine and Robarts Research Institute, Western University, 4288A-1151 Richmond Street North, London, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada. ·Nat Rev Cardiol · Pubmed #28795686.

ABSTRACT: Plasma levels of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) predict the risk of cardiovascular disease at the epidemiological level, but a direct causal role for HDL in cardiovascular disease remains controversial. Studies in animal models and humans with rare monogenic disorders link only particular HDL-associated mechanisms with causality, including those mechanisms related to particle functionality rather than cholesterol content. Mendelian randomization studies indicate that most genetic variants that affect a range of pathways that increase plasma HDL-C levels are not usually associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, with some exceptions, such as cholesteryl ester transfer protein variants. Furthermore, only a fraction of HDL-C variation has been explained by known loci from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), suggesting the existence of additional pathways and targets. Systems genetics can enhance our understanding of the spectrum of HDL pathways, particularly those pathways that involve new and non-obvious GWAS loci. Bioinformatic approaches can also define new molecular interactions inferred from both large-scale genotypic data and RNA sequencing data to reveal biologically meaningful gene modules and networks governing HDL metabolism with direct relevance to disease end points. Targeting these newly recognized causal networks might inform the development of novel therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

21 Review Treatment of Coronary Artery Disease in Women. 2017

Perdoncin, Emily / Duvernoy, Claire. ·UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN HEALTH SYSTEM, VA ANN ARBOR HEALTHCARE SYSTEM, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. ·Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J · Pubmed #29744012.

ABSTRACT: Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD), gender-related disparities continue to exist, and ischemic heart disease mortality in women remains higher than in men. This review will highlight gender-specific differences in the treatment of CAD that may impact outcomes for women. Further studies are needed to clarify the unique pathophysiology of CAD in women and, in turn, create more specific guidelines for its diagnosis, management, and treatment in this patient population.

22 Review Percutaneous coronary intervention strategies in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and multivessel coronary artery disease. 2017

Thomas, Michael P / Bates, Eric R. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. ·Curr Opin Cardiol · Pubmed #28759470.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review aims to summarize recent reports on percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) strategies for patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD). RECENT FINDINGS: Recent randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses have suggested that patients with STEMI and multivessel CAD may benefit more from multivessel PCI (either multivessel primary PCI or staged PCI before hospital discharge) than culprit vessel-only primary PCI. These reports have changed clinical practice guideline recommendations that now conclude that multivessel PCI may be considered in selected hemodynamically stable patients with significant noninfarct artery stenoses based on anatomic criteria alone. Fractional flow reserve measurement can document functional significance in nonculprit stenoses, but fractional flow reserve-guided PCI has not been shown to impact mortality or myocardial infarction rates. Additionally, nonculprit artery chronic total occlusion PCI was not effective in improving left ventricular function in one randomized trial. SUMMARY: Multivessel primary PCI or staged PCI is effective and safe in selected patients with STEMI and multivessel coronary disease. Future randomized controlled trials are needed to define the optimal timing of multivessel PCI, as well as the appropriate use of PCI in nonculprit stenoses.

23 Review At the Heart of the Pregnancy: What Prenatal and Cardiovascular Genetic Counselors Need to Know about Maternal Heart Disease. 2017

Morales, Ana / Allain, Dawn C / Arscott, Patricia / James, Emily / MacCarrick, Gretchen / Murray, Brittney / Tichnell, Crystal / Shikany, Amy R / Spencer, Sara / Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara M / Kushner, Jessica D / Munn, Christi / Smith, Emily / Spoonamore, Katherine G / Tandri, Harikrishna S / Kay, W Aaron. ·Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. ana.morales@osumc.edu. · Human Genetics Division, The Ohio State University, 306 BRT, 460 W. 12th Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA. ana.morales@osumc.edu. · Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. · Human Genetics Division, The Ohio State University, 306 BRT, 460 W. 12th Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA. · Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Heart Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA. · The Heart Center, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA. · Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA. · GeneDx, Gaithersburg, MD, USA. · Cardiovascular Genetics Program, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. · Department of Medicine, Krannert Institute of Cardiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA. ·J Genet Couns · Pubmed #28283918.

ABSTRACT: In the last decade, an increasing number of cardiac conditions have been shown to have a genetic basis. Cardiovascular genetic counseling has emerged as a subspecialty aiming to identify unaffected at-risk individuals. An important sector of this at-risk population also includes expectant mothers, in whom unique clinical challenges may arise. Genetic counselors, especially those in cardiovascular and prenatal settings, have an opportunity to identify and assist women who may benefit from cardiovascular care during pregnancy. This paper provides basic management and genetic evaluation principles for affected women, as well as guidance on identifying those who are at risk. We provide considerations for cardiac surveillance in pregnancy and the post-partum period. Finally, key psychosocial issues that appraise how to best provide support to at risk women as they make informed decisions are discussed. We propose that a team approach including cardiology, maternal fetal medicine, and genetic counseling best serves this patient population. Ongoing questions addressing an evidence based approach to cardiovascular genetic conditions in pregnancy still remain. Thus, well-designed research protocols are essential to mark progress in this area.

24 Review Update on primary PCI for patients with STEMI. 2017

Thomas, Michael P / Bates, Eric R. ·Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5869. · Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5869. Electronic address: ebates@umich.edu. ·Trends Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #27450063.

ABSTRACT: Primary PCI is the dominant reperfusion strategy for patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and continues to evolve. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent reports that focused on the relationship of door-to-balloon time with mortality, radial versus femoral artery access, aspiration thrombectomy, culprit versus multivessel primary PCI, drug-eluting stents, and anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapies.

25 Review PCI Strategies in Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease. 2016

Bates, Eric R / Tamis-Holland, Jacqueline E / Bittl, John A / O'Gara, Patrick T / Levine, Glenn N. ·Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Electronic address: ebates@umich.edu. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai St. Luke's Hospital, New York, New York. · Munroe Heart and Vascular Institute, Munroe Regional Medical Center, Ocala, Florida. · Cardiovascular Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Section of Cardiology, Michael E. DeBakey Medical Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #27585512.

ABSTRACT: Recent randomized controlled trials have suggested that patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and multivessel coronary artery disease may benefit more from multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) compared with culprit vessel-only primary PCI. The American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, and Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions recently published an updated recommendation on this topic. The purpose of this State-of-the-Art Review is to accurately document existing published reports, describe their limitations, and establish a base for future studies.

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