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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from Ann Arbor
Based on 170 articles published since 2008
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These are the 170 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Ann Arbor during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7
1 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2018

Anonymous2701124 / Shah, Amar B / Kirsch, Jacobo / Bolen, Michael A / Batlle, Juan C / Brown, Richard K J / Eberhardt, Robert T / Hurwitz, Lynne M / Inacio, Joao R / Jin, Jill O / Krishnamurthy, Rajesh / Leipsic, Jonathon A / Rajiah, Prabhakar / Singh, Satinder P / White, Richard D / Zimmerman, Stefan L / Abbara, Suhny. ·Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, New York. Electronic address: ashah27@northwell.edu. · Panel Chair, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, Florida. · Panel Vice-Chair, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute and Baptist Health of South Florida, Miami, Florida. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts; American College of Cardiology. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; American College of Physicians. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. · The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio. · Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, Baltimore, Maryland. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #30392597.

ABSTRACT: Chronic chest pain (CCP) of a cardiac etiology is a common clinical problem. The diagnosis and classification of the case of chest pain has rapidly evolved providing the clinician with multiple cardiac imaging strategies. Though scintigraphy and rest echocardiography remain as appropriate imaging tools in the diagnostic evaluation, new technology is available. Current evidence supports the use of alternative imaging tests such as coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), cardiac MRI (CMRI), or Rb-82 PET/CT. Since multiple imaging modalities are available to the clinician, the most appropriate noninvasive imaging strategy will be based upon the patient's clinical presentation and clinical status. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

2 Guideline CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System. An expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT). 2018

Hecht, Harvey S / Blaha, Michael J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Cury, Ricardo C / Budoff, Matt / Leipsic, Jonathon / Shaw, Leslee. ·Division of Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Mount Sinai St. Luke's Medical Center, New York, NY, United States. Electronic address: harvey.hecht@mountsinai.org. · The Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Division of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Hospital of Miami, 8900 N Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176, United States. · Division of Cardiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, United States. · Department of Medicine and Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #29793848.

ABSTRACT: The goal of CAC-DRS: Coronary Artery Calcium Data and Reporting System is to create a standardized method to communicate findings of CAC scanning on all noncontrast CT scans, irrespective of the indication, in order to facilitate clinical decision-making, with recommendations for subsequent patient management. The CAC-DRS classification is applied on a per-patient basis and represents the total calcium score and the number of involved arteries. General recommendations are provided for further management of patients with different degrees of calcified plaque burden based on CAC-DRS classification. In addition, CAC-DRS will provide a framework of standardization that may benefit quality assurance and tracking patient outcomes with the potential to ultimately result in improved quality of care.

3 Guideline 2016 SCCT/STR guidelines for coronary artery calcium scoring of noncontrast noncardiac chest CT scans: A report of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography and Society of Thoracic Radiology. 2017

Hecht, Harvey S / Cronin, Paul / Blaha, Michael J / Budoff, Matthew J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Narula, Jagat / Yankelevitz, David / Abbara, Suhny. ·aLenox Hill Heart & Vascular Institute, New York, NY, United States bUniversity of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States cJohns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States dHarbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States eIcahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, NY, United States fThe Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, United States gUTSouthwestern Medical Center, Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blv, Dallas, TX 75390-9316, United States. ·J Thorac Imaging · Pubmed #28832417.

ABSTRACT: The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR) have jointly produced this document. Experts in this subject have been selected from both organizations to examine subject-specific data and write this guideline in partnership. A formal literature review, weighing the strength of evidence has been performed. When available, information from studies on cost was considered. Computed tomography (CT) acquisition, CAC scoring methodologies and clinical outcomes are the primary basis for the recommendations in this guideline. This guideline is intended to assist healthcare providers in clinical decision making. The recommendations reflect a consensus after a thorough review of the best available current scientific evidence and practice patterns of experts in the field and are intended to improve patient care while acknowledging that situations arise where additional information may be needed to better inform patient care.

4 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous3940905 / Akers, Scott R / Panchal, Vandan / Ho, Vincent B / Beache, Garth M / Brown, Richard K J / Ghoshhajra, Brian B / Greenberg, S Bruce / Hsu, Joe Y / Kicska, Gregory A / Min, James K / Stillman, Arthur E / Stojanovska, Jadranka / Abbara, Suhny / Jacobs, Jill E. ·Principal Author, VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: akerssco@me.com. · Research Author, Internal Medicine Resident, Henry Ford Allegiance Health, Jackson, Michigan. · Panel Vice-Chair, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky. · University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, California. · University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California; American College of Cardiology. · Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Panel Chair, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #28473096.

ABSTRACT: In patients with chronic chest pain in the setting of high probability of coronary artery disease (CAD), imaging has major and diverse roles. First, imaging is valuable in determining and documenting the presence, extent, and severity of myocardial ischemia, hibernation, scarring, and/or the presence, site, and severity of obstructive coronary lesions. Second, imaging findings are important in determining the course of management of patients with suspected chronic myocardial ischemia and better defining those patients best suited for medical therapy, angioplasty/stenting, or surgery. Third, imaging is also necessary to determine the long-term prognosis and likely benefit from various therapeutic options by evaluating ventricular function, diastolic relaxation, and end-systolic volume. Imaging studies are also required to demonstrate other abnormalities, such as congenital/acquired coronary anomalies and severe left ventricular hypertrophy, that can produce angina in the absence of symptomatic coronary obstructive disease due to atherosclerosis. Clinical risk assessment is necessary to determine the pretest probability of CAD. Multiple methods are available to categorize patients as low, medium, or high risk for developing CAD. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

5 Guideline 2016 SCCT/STR guidelines for coronary artery calcium scoring of noncontrast noncardiac chest CT scans: A report of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography and Society of Thoracic Radiology. 2017

Hecht, Harvey S / Cronin, Paul / Blaha, Michael J / Budoff, Matthew J / Kazerooni, Ella A / Narula, Jagat / Yankelevitz, David / Abbara, Suhny. ·Lenox Hill Heart & Vascular Institute, New York, NY, United States. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States. · Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, NY, United States. · The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, United States. · UTSouthwestern Medical Center, Radiology, 5323 Harry Hines Blv, Dallas, TX 75390-9316, United States. Electronic address: suhny.abbara@utsouthwestern.edu. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27916431.

ABSTRACT: The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR) have jointly produced this document. Experts in this subject have been selected from both organizations to examine subject-specific data and write this guideline in partnership. A formal literature review, weighing the strength of evidence has been performed. When available, information from studies on cost was considered. Computed tomography (CT) acquisition, CAC scoring methodologies and clinical outcomes are the primary basis for the recommendations in this guideline. This guideline is intended to assist healthcare providers in clinical decision making. The recommendations reflect a consensus after a thorough review of the best available current scientific evidence and practice patterns of experts in the field and are intended to improve patient care while acknowledging that situations arise where additional information may be needed to better inform patient care.

6 Editorial Prior Coronary Revascularization and Risk of Noncardiac Surgery. 2017

Eagle, Kim A / Mukherjee, Debabrata. ·University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Electronic address: keagle@umich.edu. · Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, Texas. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28161259.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Coronary Stents and Risk for Noncardiac Surgery: Much Ado About Something, Nothing, or DAPT? 2016

Vaishnava, Prashant / Eagle, Kim A. ·Mount Sinai Hospital and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Heart, New York, New York. · University of Michigan Health System, Samuel and Jean A. Frankel Cardiovascular Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Electronic address: keagle@umich.edu. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #26940924.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Coronary computed tomographic angiography for preoperative risk: improved area under curve is not enough. 2015

LaBounty, Troy M / Eagle, Kim A. ·From the Department of Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor. labt@med.umich.edu. · From the Department of Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor. ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25711277.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Review Treatment of Coronary Artery Disease in Women. 2017

Perdoncin, Emily / Duvernoy, Claire. ·UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN HEALTH SYSTEM, VA ANN ARBOR HEALTHCARE SYSTEM, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. ·Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J · Pubmed #29744012.

ABSTRACT: Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD), gender-related disparities continue to exist, and ischemic heart disease mortality in women remains higher than in men. This review will highlight gender-specific differences in the treatment of CAD that may impact outcomes for women. Further studies are needed to clarify the unique pathophysiology of CAD in women and, in turn, create more specific guidelines for its diagnosis, management, and treatment in this patient population.

10 Review Percutaneous coronary intervention strategies in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and multivessel coronary artery disease. 2017

Thomas, Michael P / Bates, Eric R. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. ·Curr Opin Cardiol · Pubmed #28759470.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review aims to summarize recent reports on percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) strategies for patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD). RECENT FINDINGS: Recent randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses have suggested that patients with STEMI and multivessel CAD may benefit more from multivessel PCI (either multivessel primary PCI or staged PCI before hospital discharge) than culprit vessel-only primary PCI. These reports have changed clinical practice guideline recommendations that now conclude that multivessel PCI may be considered in selected hemodynamically stable patients with significant noninfarct artery stenoses based on anatomic criteria alone. Fractional flow reserve measurement can document functional significance in nonculprit stenoses, but fractional flow reserve-guided PCI has not been shown to impact mortality or myocardial infarction rates. Additionally, nonculprit artery chronic total occlusion PCI was not effective in improving left ventricular function in one randomized trial. SUMMARY: Multivessel primary PCI or staged PCI is effective and safe in selected patients with STEMI and multivessel coronary disease. Future randomized controlled trials are needed to define the optimal timing of multivessel PCI, as well as the appropriate use of PCI in nonculprit stenoses.

11 Review Update on primary PCI for patients with STEMI. 2017

Thomas, Michael P / Bates, Eric R. ·Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5869. · Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5869. Electronic address: ebates@umich.edu. ·Trends Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #27450063.

ABSTRACT: Primary PCI is the dominant reperfusion strategy for patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and continues to evolve. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent reports that focused on the relationship of door-to-balloon time with mortality, radial versus femoral artery access, aspiration thrombectomy, culprit versus multivessel primary PCI, drug-eluting stents, and anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapies.

12 Review PCI Strategies in Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease. 2016

Bates, Eric R / Tamis-Holland, Jacqueline E / Bittl, John A / O'Gara, Patrick T / Levine, Glenn N. ·Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Electronic address: ebates@umich.edu. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai St. Luke's Hospital, New York, New York. · Munroe Heart and Vascular Institute, Munroe Regional Medical Center, Ocala, Florida. · Cardiovascular Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Section of Cardiology, Michael E. DeBakey Medical Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #27585512.

ABSTRACT: Recent randomized controlled trials have suggested that patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and multivessel coronary artery disease may benefit more from multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) compared with culprit vessel-only primary PCI. The American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, and Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions recently published an updated recommendation on this topic. The purpose of this State-of-the-Art Review is to accurately document existing published reports, describe their limitations, and establish a base for future studies.

13 Review Atherosclerosis and Nanotechnology: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications. 2016

Kratz, Jeremy D / Chaddha, Ashish / Bhattacharjee, Somnath / Goonewardena, Sascha N. ·Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 53705, USA. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA. · Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA. sngoonew@med.umich.edu. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA. sngoonew@med.umich.edu. ·Cardiovasc Drugs Ther · Pubmed #26809711.

ABSTRACT: Over the past several decades, tremendous advances have been made in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, with shifting demographics and evolving risk factors we now face new challenges that must be met in order to further advance are management of patients with CAD. In parallel with advances in our mechanistic appreciation of CAD and atherosclerosis, nanotechnology approaches have greatly expanded, offering the potential for significant improvements in our diagnostic and therapeutic management of CAD. To realize this potential we must go beyond to recognize new frontiers including knowledge gaps between understanding atherosclerosis to the translation of targeted molecular tools. This review highlights nanotechnology applications for imaging and therapeutic advancements in CAD.

14 Review ACR Appropriateness Criteria Acute Nonspecific Chest Pain-Low Probability of Coronary Artery Disease. 2015

Hoffmann, Udo / Akers, Scott R / Brown, Richard K J / Cummings, Kristopher W / Cury, Ricardo C / Greenberg, S Bruce / Ho, Vincent B / Hsu, Joe Y / Min, James K / Panchal, Kalpesh K / Stillman, Arthur E / Woodard, Pamela K / Jacobs, Jill E. ·Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: uhoffmann@partners.org. · VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute and Baptist Health of South Florida, Miami, Florida. · Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. · Diagnostic Imaging, Los Angeles, California. · Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, American College of Cardiology. · University of Cincinnati Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. · New York University Medical Center, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #26653833.

ABSTRACT: Primary imaging options in patients at low risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) who present with undifferentiated chest pain and without signs of ischemia are functional testing with exercise or pharmacologic stress-based electrocardiography, echocardiography, or myocardial perfusion imaging to exclude myocardial ischemia after rule-out of myocardial infarction and early cardiac CT because of its high negative predictive value to exclude CAD. Although possible, is not conclusive whether triple-rule-out CT (CAD, pulmonary embolism, and aortic dissection) might improve the efficiency of patient management. More advanced noninvasive tests such as cardiac MRI and invasive imaging with transesophageal echocardiography or coronary angiography are rarely indicated. With increased likelihood of noncardiac causes, a number of diagnostic tests, among them ultrasound of the abdomen, MR angiography of the aorta with or without contrast, x-ray rib views, x-ray barium swallow, and upper gastrointestinal series, can also be appropriate. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. This recommendation is based on excellent evidence, including several randomized comparative effectiveness trials and blinded observational cohort studies.

15 Review Emergence of Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease: A Woman's Problem and Need for Change in Definition on Angiography. 2015

Pepine, Carl J / Ferdinand, Keith C / Shaw, Leslee J / Light-McGroary, Kelly Ann / Shah, Rashmee U / Gulati, Martha / Duvernoy, Claire / Walsh, Mary Norine / Bairey Merz, C Noel / Anonymous231124. ·Division of Cardiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Electronic address: carl.pepine@medicine.ufl.edu. · Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana. · Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Division of Cardiology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa. · Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah. · The College of Medicine and The College of Clinical Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. · Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · St. Vincent Heart Center of Indiana, Indianapolis, Indiana. · Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, California. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #26493665.

ABSTRACT: Recognition of ischemic heart disease (IHD) is often delayed or deferred in women. Thus, many at risk for adverse outcomes are not provided specific diagnostic, preventive, and/or treatment strategies. This lack of recognition is related to sex-specific IHD pathophysiology that differs from traditional models using data from men with flow-limiting coronary artery disease (CAD) obstructions. Symptomatic women are less likely to have obstructive CAD than men with similar symptoms, and tend to have coronary microvascular dysfunction, plaque erosion, and thrombus formation. Emerging data document that more extensive, nonobstructive CAD involvement, hypertension, and diabetes are associated with major adverse events similar to those with obstructive CAD. A central emerging paradigm is the concept of nonobstructive CAD as a cause of IHD and related adverse outcomes among women. This position paper summarizes currently available knowledge and gaps in that knowledge, and recommends management options that could be useful until additional evidence emerges.

16 Review Cardiovascular magnetic resonance phase contrast imaging. 2015

Nayak, Krishna S / Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik / Bernstein, Matt A / Markl, Michael / D Gatehouse, Peter / M Botnar, Rene / Saloner, David / Lorenz, Christine / Wen, Han / S Hu, Bob / Epstein, Frederick H / N Oshinski, John / Raman, Subha V. ·Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, 3740 McClintock Ave, EEB 406, Los Angeles, California, 90089-2564, USA. knayak@usc.edu. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. jfnielse@umich.edu. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. mbernstein@mayo.edu. · Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. mmarkl@northwestern.edu. · Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK. p.gatehouse@rbht.nhs.uk. · Cardiovascular Imaging, Imaging Sciences Division, Kings's College London, London, UK. rene.botnar@kcl.ac.uk. · Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. david.saloner@ucsf.edu. · Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Siemens Corporation, Baltimore, MD, USA. christine.lorenz@siemens.com. · Imaging Physics Laboratory, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA. han.wen@nih.gov. · Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, CA, USA. hub@pamf.org. · Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. fredepstein@virginia.edu. · Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. jnoshin@emory.edu. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. raman.1@osu.edu. ·J Cardiovasc Magn Reson · Pubmed #26254979.

ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) phase contrast imaging has undergone a wide range of changes with the development and availability of improved calibration procedures, visualization tools, and analysis methods. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current state-of-the-art in CMR phase contrast imaging methodology, clinical applications including summaries of past clinical performance, and emerging research and clinical applications that utilize today's latest technology.

17 Review Precision and accuracy of clinical quantification of myocardial blood flow by dynamic PET: A technical perspective. 2015

Moody, Jonathan B / Lee, Benjamin C / Corbett, James R / Ficaro, Edward P / Murthy, Venkatesh L. ·INVIA Medical Imaging Solutions, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1338 Cardiovascular Center, 1500 E. Medical Center Dr, SPC 5873, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-5873, USA. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1338 Cardiovascular Center, 1500 E. Medical Center Dr, SPC 5873, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-5873, USA. vlmurthy@med.umich.edu. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. vlmurthy@med.umich.edu. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #25868451.

ABSTRACT: A number of exciting advances in PET/CT technology and improvements in methodology have recently converged to enhance the feasibility of routine clinical quantification of myocardial blood flow and flow reserve. Recent promising clinical results are pointing toward an important role for myocardial blood flow in the care of patients. Absolute blood flow quantification can be a powerful clinical tool, but its utility will depend on maintaining precision and accuracy in the face of numerous potential sources of methodological errors. Here we review recent data and highlight the impact of PET instrumentation, image reconstruction, and quantification methods, and we emphasize (82)Rb cardiac PET which currently has the widest clinical application. It will be apparent that more data are needed, particularly in relation to newer PET technologies, as well as clinical standardization of PET protocols and methods. We provide recommendations for the methodological factors considered here. At present, myocardial flow reserve appears to be remarkably robust to various methodological errors; however, with greater attention to and more detailed understanding of these sources of error, the clinical benefits of stress-only blood flow measurement may eventually be more fully realized.

18 Review A review of the relationships between endogenous sex steroids and incident ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease events. 2015

Kim, Catherine / Cushman, Mary / Kleindorfer, Dawn / Lisabeth, Lynda / Redberg, Rita F / Safford, Monika M. ·2800 Plymouth Road, Building 16, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. cathkim@umich.edu. ·Curr Cardiol Rev · Pubmed #25563292.

ABSTRACT: For decades, it has been recognized that men have a higher age-adjusted risk of ischemic cardiovascular (CVD) events compared to women, thus generating hypotheses that sex steroids contribute to CVD risk. Potential mechanisms include genomic and non-genomic effects of sex steroids as well as mediation through classic CVD risk factors and obesity. However, results from randomized studies suggest that sex steroid supplementation in men and women do not result in improved CVD outcomes and may increase CVD risk. In contrast, prospective observations from endogenous sex steroid studies, i.e. among participants not using sex steroids, have suggested the opposite relationship. We reviewed the findings of prospective observational studies in men (17 studies) and women (8 studies) that examined endogenous sex steroids and CVD risk. These studies suggested a lack of association or that lower levels of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone are associated with higher CVD risk in both men and women. Higher, rather than lower, estradiol levels were associated with higher CVD risk in women. There were several significant gaps in the literature. First, it is unclear whether more sensitive measures of sex steroid levels might detect significant differences. Second, there are few prospective studies in women. Similarly, no studies report outcomes for high-risk groups such as African-Americans and Hispanics. Finally, few studies report upon ischemic coronary disease as opposed to ischemic stroke separately, although relationships between sex steroids and CVD may vary by vascular bed. Future investigations need to examine high risk groups and to distinguish between subtypes of CVD.

19 Review Risk factors and genetics of atrial fibrillation. 2014

Anumonwo, Justus M B / Kalifa, Jérôme. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Arrhythmia Research, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Road, 026-229N, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, 1137 East Catherine Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. Electronic address: anumonwo@umich.edu. · Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Arrhythmia Research, 2800 Plymouth Road, 026-227S, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. ·Cardiol Clin · Pubmed #25443231.

ABSTRACT: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is by far the most common sustained tachyarrhythmia, affecting 1% to 2% of the general population. AF prevalence and the total annual cost for treatment are alarming, emphasizing the need for an urgent attention to the problem. Thus, having up-to-date information on AF risk factors and appreciating how they promote maintenance of AF maintenance are essential. This article presents a simplified examination of AF risk factors, including emerging genetic risks.

20 Review Echocardiographic evaluation of coronary artery disease. 2013

Chatzizisis, Yiannis S / Murthy, Venkatesh L / Solomon, Scott D. ·aNon-Invasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts bDivisions of Cardiovascular Medicine, Nuclear Medicine and Cardiothoracic Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. ·Coron Artery Dis · Pubmed #24077229.

ABSTRACT: Although the availability and utilization of other noninvasive imaging modalities for the evaluation of coronary artery disease have expanded over the last decade, echocardiography remains the most accessible, cost-effective, and lowest risk imaging choice for many indications. The clinical utility of mature echocardiographic methods (i.e. two-dimensional echocardiography, stress echocardiography, contrast echocardiography) across the spectrum of coronary artery disease has been well established by numerous clinical studies. With continuing advancements in ultrasound technology, emerging ultrasound technologies such as three-dimensional echocardiography, tissue Doppler imaging, and speckle tracking methods hold significant promise to further widen the scope of clinical applications and improve diagnostic accuracy. In this review, we provide an update on the role of echocardiography in the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of coronary artery disease and introduce emerging technologies that are anticipated to further increase the clinical utility of echocardiography in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease.

21 Review Pediatric coronary allograft vasculopathy--a review of pathogenesis and risk factors. 2012

Schumacher, Kurt R / Gajarski, Robert J / Urschel, Simon. ·Congenital Heart Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. kurts@med.umich.edu ·Congenit Heart Dis · Pubmed #22176627.

ABSTRACT: Coronary allograft vasculopathy is the current leading cause for late graft loss following cardiac transplantation. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial, including immune, constitutional and genetic factors, metabolism, infection, as well as potential injury from routine immunosuppressive therapy. Children represent a patient group with unique differences: their pretransplant history rarely includes ischemic heart disease and risk factors for atherosclerotic heart disease, but many are presensitized from use of allograft material during reconstructive cardiac surgeries. Compared with older children and adults, infants and young children show significantly lower rates of graft vasculopathy that may be related to the relative immaturity of their immune system. This review summarizes the current concepts of coronary allograft vasculopathy derived mainly from animal models and adult clinical observations. It provides an overview of confirmed risk factors and explains their interactions. The characteristics and unique clinical findings among pediatric transplant recipients will be explored within the context of recent, albeit limited, scientific investigations.

22 Review Cardiac biomarkers in the diagnosis, prognosis and management of coronary artery disease: a primer for internists. 2010

Chopra, Vineet / Eagle, Kim A. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Divisions of General Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. vineetc@med.umich.edu ·Indian J Med Sci · Pubmed #21258154.

ABSTRACT: Initially coined in 1989, biomarkers have become a cornerstone of modern cardiovascular medicine. The past decade has borne witness to the rapid transition of cardiac biomarkers from bench to bedside in the management of patients with coronary artery disease. The implementation of cardiac biomarkers has transformed the internists' approach to cardiovascular patients. This article reviews several cardiac biomarkers in the context of diagnosis, prognosis, risk-assessment and management of patients at risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Biomarkers are presented according to their relevant role in the atherosclerotic cascade, a pathologic classification of particular value for internists, as it defines the role of these agents in the pathogenesis of heart disease. Where pertinent, limitations of cardiac biomarkers are discussed, thus allowing the discerning practitioner to remain cognizant of situations that may lead to spurious marker elevation or suppression. The review concludes with highlights on novel avenues of biomarker research that promise an exciting future for these entities.

23 Review Evaluation of patients with suspected coronary artery disease. 2010

Menees, Daniel S / Bates, Eric R. ·Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. ·Coron Artery Dis · Pubmed #20555262.

ABSTRACT: Coronary artery disease affects millions of Americans and is a major cause of global morbidity and mortality. Detection and optimal treatment strategies are needed to reduce the clinical and economic burden of this disease. Chest pain history, risk factor profile, and noninvasive stress test results are used for clinical risk stratification. In high-risk patients, coronary angiography is the standard for anatomic diagnosis and additional risk stratification. All patients with coronary artery disease should be treated with optimal medical therapy. Patients with uncontrolled symptoms or high risk for adverse outcomes benefit from coronary artery revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

24 Review Medical therapy versus percutaneous coronary interventions for patients with stable and unstable coronary artery disease. 2008

Pitt, Bertram. ·University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. bpitt@umich.edu ·Curr Atheroscler Rep · Pubmed #18606099.

ABSTRACT: The Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive Drug Evaluation (COURAGE) trial has evoked renewed and intense discussion as to whether to recommend medical therapy or coronary revascularization for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), especially in those patients with stable CAD who are at low to intermediate risk for future cardiovascular events. The decision in regard to the timing and role of revascularization in patients with unstable CAD, although still evolving, is somewhat less controversial. The major focus of this discussion is, therefore, on the patient with stable CAD.

25 Clinical Trial Preprocedural statin use in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. 2014

Kenaan, Mohamad / Seth, Milan / Aronow, Herbert D / Naoum, Joseph / Wunderly, Douglas / Mitchiner, James / Moscucci, Mauro / Gurm, Hitinder S / Anonymous1530798. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI. · Michigan Heart and Vascular Institute, St Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI. · Department of internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Henry Ford Health Systems, Mt Clemens, MI. · Department of Cardiology, Bronson Heart Care, Kalamazoo, MI. · Michigan's Quality improvement Organization, Farmington Hills, MI. · Department of internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Miami Health System, Miami, FL. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI. Electronic address: hgurm@med.umich.edu. ·Am Heart J · Pubmed #24952867.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Earlier studies suggest that administering statins prior to percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) is associated with lower risk of periprocedural myocardial infarction and contrast-induced nephropathy. Current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines recommend routine use of statins prior to PCI. It is unclear how commonly this recommendation is followed in clinical practice and what its effect on outcomes is. METHODS: We evaluated the incidence and in-hospital outcomes associated with statin pretreatment among patients undergoing PCI and enrolled in the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium PCI registry at 44 hospitals in Michigan between January 2010 and December 2012. Propensity and exact matching were used to adjust for the nonrandom use of statins prior to PCI. Long-term mortality was assessed in a subset of patients who were linked to Medicare data. RESULTS: Our study population was comprised of 80,493 patients of whom 26,547 (33 %) did not receive statins prior to undergoing PCI. When compared to statin receivers, nonreceivers had lower rates of prior cardiovascular disease. In the matched analysis, absence of statin use prior to PCI was associated with a similar rate of in-hospital mortality (0.43% vs 0.42%, odds ratio 1.00, 95% CI 0.70-1.42, P = .98) and periprocedural myocardial infarction (2.34% vs 2.10%, odds ratio 1.13, 95% CI 0.97-1.32, P = .11) compared to statin receivers. Likewise, no difference in the rate of coronary artery bypass grafting, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), or contrast-induced nephropathy was observed. There was no association between pre-PCI use of statins and long-term survival among the subset of included Medicare patients (hazard ratio = 1.0, P = .96). CONCLUSIONS: A significant number of patients undergo PCI without statin pretreatment, but this is not associated with in-hospital major complications or long-term mortality.

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