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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from Minneapolis-St. Paul
Based on 291 articles published since 2010
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These are the 291 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Minneapolis-St. Paul during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12
1 Guideline SCCT guidelines for the performance and acquisition of coronary computed tomographic angiography: A report of the society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee: Endorsed by the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI). 2016

Abbara, Suhny / Blanke, Philipp / Maroules, Christopher D / Cheezum, Michael / Choi, Andrew D / Han, B Kelly / Marwan, Mohamed / Naoum, Chris / Norgaard, Bjarne L / Rubinshtein, Ronen / Schoenhagen, Paul / Villines, Todd / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. Electronic address: Suhny.Abbara@UTSouthwestern.edu. · Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. · Cardiology Service Ft. Belvoir Community Hospital, Ft. Belvoir, VA, United States. · Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington DC, United States. · Minneapolis Heart Institute and Children's Heart Clinic, Minneapolis, MN, United States. · Cardiology Department, University Hospital, Erlangen, Germany. · Concord Hospital, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Cardiology B, Aarhus University Hospital-Skejby, Aarhus N, Denmark. · Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center & Rappaport School of Medicine- Technion- IIT, Haifa, Israel. · Cardiovascular Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, United States. · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27780758.

ABSTRACT: In response to recent technological advancements in acquisition techniques as well as a growing body of evidence regarding the optimal performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA), the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee has produced this update to its previously established 2009 "Guidelines for the Performance of Coronary CTA" (1). The purpose of this document is to provide standards meant to ensure reliable practice methods and quality outcomes based on the best available data in order to improve the diagnostic care of patients. Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines for the Interpretation is published separately (2). The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee ensures compliance with all existing standards for the declaration of conflict of interest by all authors and reviewers for the purpose ofclarity and transparency.

2 Editorial Deafening Silence: The Lack of Structured Patient Symptoms in Clinical Documentation of Angina. 2019

Bradley, Steven M. ·Minneapolis Heart Institute and Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation Minneapolis MN. ·J Am Heart Assoc · Pubmed #31364491.

ABSTRACT: See Article Owlia et al.

3 Editorial Diagnostic Testing in Coronary Artery Disease: Relieving the Stenosis, Attenuating Ischemia, or Preventing Hard Events? 2018

Chandrashekhar, Y. ·Department of Cardiology, University of Minnesota and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Electronic address: shekh003@umn.edu. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #30360822.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial The Shape of Imaging in the Future: Lessons Learned From the CRESCENT II Trial. 2018

Shaw, Leslee J / Narula, Jagat / Chandrashekhar, Y. ·Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: lshaw3@emory.edu. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York. · University of Minnesota/Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #29248643.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial The Immediate Effects of Statins on Coronary Atherosclerosis: Can Phenotype Explain Outcome? 2018

Min, James K / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical College and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. Electronic address: runone123@gmail.com. · University of Minnesota School of Medicine, and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28917681.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Net Health Benefit: Positive for CAC Scanning. 2017

Shaw, Leslee J / Narula, Jagat / Chandrashekhar, Y. ·Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Minnesota/VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Electronic address: shekh003@umn.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28797421.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Full Metal Jacket: Is it En Vogue? 2017

Banerjee, Subhash / Brilakis, Emmanouil S. ·Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care Systems, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. Electronic address: subhash.banerjee@utsouthwestern.edu. · Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care Systems, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28668315.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Quantitative PET Myocardial Blood Flow: "Trust, But Verify". 2017

Dilsizian, Vasken / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · University of Minnesota School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28473105.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Bypass Graft Failure: Changing What We Can, Accepting What We Cannot Change, and Developing the Science to Know the Difference. 2017

Karacsonyi, Judit / Brilakis, Emmanouil S. ·From the VA North Texas Health Care System and UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (J.K., E.S.B.) · Division of Invasive Cardiology, Second Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiology Center, University of Szeged, Hungary (J.K.) · and Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, MN (E.S.B.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28404624.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Stable Angina in Advanced CKD. 2017

Foley, Robert N. ·University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Electronic address: robfoley@umn.org. ·Am J Kidney Dis · Pubmed #28236879.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Coronary Artery Calcium Progression and Residual Risk. 2016

Hecht, Harvey / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Minnesota School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27931531.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Serenity, courage, and wisdom: The keys to successful coronary calcification treatment. 2016

Danek, Barbara Anna / Brilakis, Emmanouil S. ·VA North Texas Healthcare System and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27886457.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Risk Detection Among Asymptomatic Patients With Diabetes: Is It Time for a Varied Approach? 2016

Shaw, Leslee J / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Minnesota School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27832904.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial CAD-RADS: A Giant First Step Toward a Common Lexicon? 2016

Chandrashekhar, Y / Min, James K / Hecht, Harvey / Narula, Jagat. ·University of Minnesota School of Medicine, and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical College and New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27609154.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Coronary Artery Calcium and Shared Decision Making. 2016

Hecht, Harvey S / Shaw, Leslee J / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Minnesota & VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27151526.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial In Sickness and in Health: Coronary Artery Calcium or Risk Factors. 2015

Hecht, Harvey S / Narula, Jagat / Chandrashekhar, Y. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: hhecht@aol.com. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26699109.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Diagnosis of Coronary Disease and Icing on the Cake. 2015

Min, James K / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. · University of Minnesota and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26381774.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial The never-ending story on coronary calcium: is it predictive, punitive, or protective? 2015

Shaw, Leslee J / Narula, Jagat / Chandrashekhar, Y. ·Division of Cardiology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Division of Cardiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: jnarula@acc.org. · University of Minnesota/Division of Cardiology, VA Medical Center Cardiology, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #25835439.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Atherosclerotic versus nonatherosclerotic evaluation: the Yin and Yang of cardiovascular imaging in advanced chronic kidney disease. 2014

Herzog, Charles A / Shroff, Gautam R. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Chronic Disease Research Group, Minnesota Medical Research Foundation, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Electronic address: cherzog@cdrg.org. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25034922.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Catheterization laboratory activation during mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation: when should we say "No?". 2014

Kalra, Ankur / Maharaj, Valmiki / Johannsen, Ronald A / Hollenberg, Steven M. ·Department of Medicine, Section of Cardiology, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24038710.

ABSTRACT: Sudden cardiac arrest is a devastating manifestation of coronary artery disease and a leading cause of death in the western world. Early and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation is essential for return of spontaneous circulation. If manual compression is ongoing and return of spontaneous circulation has not been achieved, the prognosis is poor, and the logistics of performing cardiac catheterization are forbidding. With the advent of mechanical chest compression, however, this clinical scenario has become much more complex. Coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention, although still cumbersome, has been established as feasible with ongoing mechanical chest compression. This article discusses the strengths and pitfalls of mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation, our experience, and current evidence behind activation of the catheterization laboratory with ongoing mechanical chest compression.

21 Editorial The ethics of publishing medical imaging research. 2013

Achenbach, Stephan / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Medizinische Klinik I, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg, Gießen, Germany. · University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: jagat.narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #24332290.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Review Chronic Kidney Disease and Coronary Artery Disease: JACC State-of-the-Art Review. 2019

Sarnak, Mark J / Amann, Kerstin / Bangalore, Sripal / Cavalcante, João L / Charytan, David M / Craig, Jonathan C / Gill, John S / Hlatky, Mark A / Jardine, Alan G / Landmesser, Ulf / Newby, L Kristin / Herzog, Charles A / Cheung, Michael / Wheeler, David C / Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C / Marwick, Thomas H / Anonymous4681006. ·Division of Nephrology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: msarnak@tuftsmedicalcenter.org. · Department of Nephropathology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Division of Cardiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. · Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Division of Nephrology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. · College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Division of Nephrology, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California. · Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Department of Cardiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine and Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Chronic Disease Research Group, Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes, Brussels, Belgium. · University College London, London, United Kingdom. · Selzman Institute for Kidney Health, Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: tom.marwick@baker.edu.au. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #31582143.

ABSTRACT: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). As well as their high prevalence of traditional CAD risk factors, such as diabetes and hypertension, persons with CKD are also exposed to other nontraditional, uremia-related cardiovascular disease risk factors, including inflammation, oxidative stress, and abnormal calcium-phosphorus metabolism. CKD and end-stage kidney disease not only increase the risk of CAD, but they also modify its clinical presentation and cardinal symptoms. Management of CAD is complicated in CKD patients, due to their likelihood of comorbid conditions and potential for side effects during interventions. This summary of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference on CAD and CKD (including end-stage kidney disease and transplant recipients) seeks to improve understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CAD in CKD and to identify knowledge gaps, areas of controversy, and priorities for research.

23 Review The Emerging Role of Bone Markers in Diagnosis and Risk Stratification of Patients With Coronary Artery Disease. 2019

Kosmopoulos, Marinos / Paschou, Stavroula A / Grapsa, Julia / Anagnostis, Panagiotis / Vryonidou, Andromachi / Goulis, Dimitrios G / Siasos, Gerasimos. ·1 Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · 2 Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, "Aghia Sophia" Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · 3 Barts Heart Center, St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, UK. · 4 Unit of Reproductive Endocrinology, First Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · 5 Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Hellenic Red Cross Hospital, Athens, Greece. · 6 First Department of Cardiology, Hippokration Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. ·Angiology · Pubmed #30696256.

ABSTRACT: Molecules that govern bone metabolism, such as osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteopontin (OPN), have been isolated from other tissues, including blood vessels. Atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease (CAD) are leading causes of mortality worldwide. Despite novel biochemical and imaging techniques, early detection of CAD is still unsatisfactory. Experimental data indicate that bone turnover markers (BTMs) contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. This finding has sparked interest in their clinical use. This narrative review analyzed information from >50 human studies, which strongly suggest that OPG, OPN, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) serum concentrations are altered in patients with CAD. Osteoprotegerin seems to be more useful for the detection of early disease, while OPN and ALP are recruited in vessels after the establishment of disease. Osteocalcin may be used as a flow cytometry marker for endothelial progenitor cells and can constitute a marker to monitor response to interventional treatments and risk of restenosis. However, most data derive from observational studies. Incorporation of BTMs in multifactorial computational algorithms could further determine their role in CAD diagnosis and prognosis together with other imaging techniques and biochemical markers.

24 Review Coronary revascularization and use of hemodynamic support in acute coronary syndromes. 2019

Xenogiannis, Iosif / Tajti, Peter / Burke, M Nicholas / Chavez, Ivan / Gössl, Mario / Mooney, Michael / Poulose, Anil / Sorajja, Paul / Traverse, Jay / Wang, Yale / Brilakis, Emmanouil S. ·Minneapolis Heart Institute and Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Minneapolis Heart Institute and Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, MN, USA; University of Szeged, Division of Invasive Cardiology, Second Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiology Center, Szeged, Hungary. · Minneapolis Heart Institute and Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Electronic address: esbrilakis@gmail.com. ·Hellenic J Cardiol · Pubmed #30677518.

ABSTRACT: Cardiogenic shock develops in up to 10% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and continues to have high mortality. Early invasive treatment is the default therapeutic approach in these patients. On the basis of the results of the CULPRIT-SHOCK trial, culprit-only revascularization during the acute phase is preferred over multivessel revascularization. Routine use of intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) is not recommended; however, the use of mechanical circulatory support has been increasing despite limited observational data to support its use. Several studies support multivessel revascularization in patients with uncomplicated ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction and simple nonculprit lesions to improve subsequent clinical outcomes.

25 Review Contemporary Approach to Chronic Total Occlusion Interventions. 2019

Anantha-Narayanan, Mahesh / Garcia, Santiago. ·Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Minneapolis Heart Institute at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, 920 E 28th Street, Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN, 55407, USA. garci205@umn.edu. ·Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #30659365.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Chronic total occlusion (CTO) poses one of the greatest technical challenges to interventional cardiologists. Despite recent advancements in techniques and clinical trials showing significant benefits of CTO percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI), the proportion of patients with untreated CTOs remains high. We therefore aim to perform a comprehensive review of the various techniques available, recent advancements, benefits, and complications associated with CTO PCI. RECENT FINDINGS: Three randomized clinical trials examining the benefits of CTO PCI have recently been presented. Scoring systems have been developed to facilitate pre-procedural estimation of success and complications of CTO PCI. Technological enhancements in coronary wires and other interventional equipment along with dedicated training for CTO operators have improved the likelihood of successful recanalization of CTOs. CTO PCI has been shown to improve patient symptoms and quality of life. It is therefore important to have an in-depth knowledge of the various CTO techniques, appropriate equipment, and complications when performing these complex procedures. Clinicians should weigh the risks and benefits and choose the appropriate patient population who may benefit from revascularization.

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