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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from Minneapolis-St. Paul
Based on 225 articles published since 2008
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These are the 225 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Minneapolis-St. Paul during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9
1 Guideline SCCT guidelines for the performance and acquisition of coronary computed tomographic angiography: A report of the society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee: Endorsed by the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI). 2016

Abbara, Suhny / Blanke, Philipp / Maroules, Christopher D / Cheezum, Michael / Choi, Andrew D / Han, B Kelly / Marwan, Mohamed / Naoum, Chris / Norgaard, Bjarne L / Rubinshtein, Ronen / Schoenhagen, Paul / Villines, Todd / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. Electronic address: Suhny.Abbara@UTSouthwestern.edu. · Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. · Cardiology Service Ft. Belvoir Community Hospital, Ft. Belvoir, VA, United States. · Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington DC, United States. · Minneapolis Heart Institute and Children's Heart Clinic, Minneapolis, MN, United States. · Cardiology Department, University Hospital, Erlangen, Germany. · Concord Hospital, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Cardiology B, Aarhus University Hospital-Skejby, Aarhus N, Denmark. · Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center & Rappaport School of Medicine- Technion- IIT, Haifa, Israel. · Cardiovascular Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, United States. · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27780758.

ABSTRACT: In response to recent technological advancements in acquisition techniques as well as a growing body of evidence regarding the optimal performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA), the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee has produced this update to its previously established 2009 "Guidelines for the Performance of Coronary CTA" (1). The purpose of this document is to provide standards meant to ensure reliable practice methods and quality outcomes based on the best available data in order to improve the diagnostic care of patients. Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines for the Interpretation is published separately (2). The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee ensures compliance with all existing standards for the declaration of conflict of interest by all authors and reviewers for the purpose ofclarity and transparency.

2 Editorial Net Health Benefit: Positive for CAC Scanning. 2017

Shaw, Leslee J / Narula, Jagat / Chandrashekhar, Y. ·Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Minnesota/VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Electronic address: shekh003@umn.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28797421.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Full Metal Jacket: Is it En Vogue? 2017

Banerjee, Subhash / Brilakis, Emmanouil S. ·Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care Systems, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. Electronic address: subhash.banerjee@utsouthwestern.edu. · Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care Systems, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28668315.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Quantitative PET Myocardial Blood Flow: "Trust, But Verify". 2017

Dilsizian, Vasken / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · University of Minnesota School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28473105.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Stable Angina in Advanced CKD. 2017

Foley, Robert N. ·University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Electronic address: robfoley@umn.org. ·Am J Kidney Dis · Pubmed #28236879.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Coronary Artery Calcium Progression and Residual Risk. 2016

Hecht, Harvey / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Minnesota School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27931531.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Serenity, courage, and wisdom: The keys to successful coronary calcification treatment. 2016

Danek, Barbara Anna / Brilakis, Emmanouil S. ·VA North Texas Healthcare System and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27886457.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Risk Detection Among Asymptomatic Patients With Diabetes: Is It Time for a Varied Approach? 2016

Shaw, Leslee J / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Minnesota School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27832904.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial CAD-RADS: A Giant First Step Toward a Common Lexicon? 2016

Chandrashekhar, Y / Min, James K / Hecht, Harvey / Narula, Jagat. ·University of Minnesota School of Medicine, and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical College and New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27609154.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Coronary Artery Calcium and Shared Decision Making. 2016

Hecht, Harvey S / Shaw, Leslee J / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Minnesota & VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27151526.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial In Sickness and in Health: Coronary Artery Calcium or Risk Factors. 2015

Hecht, Harvey S / Narula, Jagat / Chandrashekhar, Y. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: hhecht@aol.com. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26699109.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Diagnosis of Coronary Disease and Icing on the Cake. 2015

Min, James K / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. · University of Minnesota and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #26381774.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial The never-ending story on coronary calcium: is it predictive, punitive, or protective? 2015

Shaw, Leslee J / Narula, Jagat / Chandrashekhar, Y. ·Division of Cardiology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Division of Cardiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: jnarula@acc.org. · University of Minnesota/Division of Cardiology, VA Medical Center Cardiology, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #25835439.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Atherosclerotic versus nonatherosclerotic evaluation: the Yin and Yang of cardiovascular imaging in advanced chronic kidney disease. 2014

Herzog, Charles A / Shroff, Gautam R. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Chronic Disease Research Group, Minnesota Medical Research Foundation, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Electronic address: cherzog@cdrg.org. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25034922.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Catheterization laboratory activation during mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation: when should we say "No?". 2014

Kalra, Ankur / Maharaj, Valmiki / Johannsen, Ronald A / Hollenberg, Steven M. ·Department of Medicine, Section of Cardiology, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #24038710.

ABSTRACT: Sudden cardiac arrest is a devastating manifestation of coronary artery disease and a leading cause of death in the western world. Early and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation is essential for return of spontaneous circulation. If manual compression is ongoing and return of spontaneous circulation has not been achieved, the prognosis is poor, and the logistics of performing cardiac catheterization are forbidding. With the advent of mechanical chest compression, however, this clinical scenario has become much more complex. Coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention, although still cumbersome, has been established as feasible with ongoing mechanical chest compression. This article discusses the strengths and pitfalls of mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation, our experience, and current evidence behind activation of the catheterization laboratory with ongoing mechanical chest compression.

16 Editorial The ethics of publishing medical imaging research. 2013

Achenbach, Stephan / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Medizinische Klinik I, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg, Gießen, Germany. · University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: jagat.narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #24332290.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Review Clinical use of cardiac troponin for acute cardiac care and emerging opportunities in the outpatient setting. 2019

Sandoval, Yader / Sharain, Korosh / Saenger, Amy K / Smith, Stephen W / Apple, Fred S / Jaffe, Allan S. ·Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA - sandoval.yader@mayo.edu. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Emergency Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. ·Minerva Med · Pubmed #30484592.

ABSTRACT: Cardiac troponin (cTn) testing has evolved significantly in recent times. Because of increased sensitivity, its use has shifted from a marker used to help diagnose acute myocardial infarction (MI) to a marker than can be used in the outpatient setting, as well as for both detection of myocardial injury and risk-stratification. Its main role remains in the diagnosis of acute MI and the risk-stratification of patients presenting with suspected acute coronary syndrome. The analytical improvements in assays leading to precise high-sensitivity cTn assays have contributed to the development of numerous strategies to identify patients at both low- and high-risk for acute MI within a few hours. These approaches should reduce overcrowding in the emergency room and expedite triaging. The ability of measuring cTn in most patients using high-sensitivity (hs) assays has allowed for the opportunity to examine its use in the detection of cardiotoxicity in patients undergoing chemotherapy, as well as exploring the application in both primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. This particular field of research has become increasingly complex, partly due to the numerous cTn assays available (I and T; point-of-care, contemporary, hs) and an array of approaches in which one can use the test. The purpose of this document is to summarize the analytical and clinical information relevant to cTn assays, in particular, hs-cTn assays, and describe present and future opportunities for use of cTn in acute cardiac care and in the outpatient setting.

18 Review Risk Stratification and Treatment of Coronary Disease in Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Kidney Disease. 2018

Shroff, Gautam R / Chang, Tara I. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Electronic address: shrof010@umn.edu. · Division of Nephrology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California. ·Semin Nephrol · Pubmed #30413253.

ABSTRACT: Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease have an enormous burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but, paradoxically, their representation in randomized trials for the evaluation and management of coronary artery disease has been limited. Clinicians therefore are faced with the conundrum of synergizing evidence from observational studies, expert opinion, and extrapolation from the general population to provide care to this complex and clinically distinct patient population. In this review, we address clinical risk stratification of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease using traditional cardiovascular risk factors, noninvasive functional and structural cardiac imaging, invasive coronary angiography, and cardiovascular biomarkers. We highlight the unique characteristics of this population, including the high competing risk of all-cause mortality relative to the risk of major adverse cardiac events, likely owing to important contributions from nonatherosclerotic mechanisms. We further discuss the management of coronary artery disease in patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease, including evidence pertaining to medical management, coronary revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention, and coronary artery bypass grafting. Our discussion includes considerations of drug-eluting versus bare metal stents for percutaneous coronary intervention and off-pump versus on-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Finally, we address currently ongoing randomized trials, from which clinicians are optimistic about receiving guidance regarding the best strategies to incorporate into their practice for the evaluation and management of coronary artery disease in this high-risk population.

19 Review Expecting the unexpected: preventing and managing the consequences of coronary perforations. 2018

Tajti, Peter / Xenogiannis, Iosif / Chavez, Ivan / Gössl, Mario / Mooney, Michael / Poulose, Anil / Sorajja, Paul / Traverse, Jay / Wang, Yale / Burke, M Nicholas / Brilakis, Emmanouil S. ·a Minneapolis Heart Institute , Abbott Northwestern Hospital , Minneapolis , MN , USA. · b Division of Invasive Cardiology, Second Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiology Center , University of Szeged , Szeged , Hungary. ·Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther · Pubmed #30338712.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Coronary artery perforations are more likely to occur during percutaneous coronary intervention of complex coronary lesions, such as heavily calcified lesions and chronic total occlusions. Areas covered: Authors provide an update on the management of coronary perforations by performing a critical review of the related, recently published literature. Expert commentary: Meticulous attention to guidewire position and to device selection is critical for minimizing the risk for coronary perforation. If a perforation occurs, following a structured, algorithmic approach can maximize the likelihood of a successful outcome.

20 Review Association between P2RY12 gene polymorphisms and adverse clinical events in coronary artery disease patients treated with clopidogrel: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2018

Li, Jun-Lei / Fu, Yu / Qin, Si-Bei / Liang, Guang-Kai / Liu, Jian / Nie, Xiao-Yan / Chen, Jing / Shi, Lu-Wen / Shao, Hong / Lu, Yun. ·School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191, China. · Department of Cardiology, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing 100044, China. · School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191, China. Electronic address: niexy@bjmu.edu.cn. · School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191, China. Electronic address: shilu@bjmu.edu.cn. · Department of Pharmacy, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN 55415, USA. ·Gene · Pubmed #29510176.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Investigate the association between P2Y12 Purinoceptor (P2RY12) polymorphisms and adverse clinical events in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients treated with clopidogrel. METHODS: We performed a comprehensive database search, with a particular focus on P2RY12 polymorphisms and their effects on clopidogrel-treated CAD patients, in the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, clinicaltrials.gov, Web of Science, and Chinese databases from their inceptions to April 8, 2017. The primary endpoints were composite ischemic events (including cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ischemic events), the secondary endpoints were independent cardiovascular events (mortality, non-fatal myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, unstable angina, and target vessel revascularization) and the safety endpoints were bleeding events. RESULTS: Overall 10 studies and 10,810 clopidogrel-treated CAD patients were studied in the present work. Subjects of the common alleles of P2RY12 polymorphisms showed higher risk for composite ischemic events compared to non-carriers (n = 434 of 3268[13.3%] vs. n = 646 of 6133[10.5%]; RR: 1.39, 95%CI: 1.14-1.69; p = 0.001). These allele carriers also showed increased risk for stent thrombosis (RR: 2.67, 95%CI: 1.03-6.91; p = 0.04), myocardial infarction (RR: 1.60, 95%CI: 1.06-2.42; p = 0.03), and unstable angina (RR: 1.72, 95%CI: 1.37-2.16; p < 0.00001) (vs. non-carriers). There was no significant difference between two groups in terms of mortality risk, target vessel revascularization or bleeding (p = 0.29; p = 0.48, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: P2RY12 gene polymorphisms might associate with higher risk of composite ischemic events, stent thrombosis, non-fatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina. While we found no significant effect on mortality, target vessel revascularization or bleeding.

21 Review Orbital atherectomy for the treatment of severely calcified coronary lesions: evidence, technique, and best practices. 2017

Shlofmitz, Evan / Martinsen, Brad J / Lee, Michael / Rao, Sunil V / Généreux, Philippe / Higgins, Joe / Chambers, Jeffrey W / Kirtane, Ajay J / Brilakis, Emmanouil S / Kandzari, David E / Sharma, Samin K / Shlofmitz, Richard. ·a Division of Cardiology , Columbia University Medical Center , New York , NY , USA. · b Cardiovascular Research Foundation , New York , NY , USA. · c Department of Clinical and Scientific Affairs , Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. , St. Paul , MN , USA. · d Division of Cardiology , UCLA Medical Center , Los Angeles , CA , USA. · e Duke Clinical Research Institute , Durham , NC , USA. · f Morristown Medical Center , Morristown , NJ , USA. · g Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal , Université de Montréal , Montréal , Canada. · h Department of Engineering , Cardiovascular Systems, Inc ., St. Paul , MN , USA. · i Metropolitan Heart and Vascular Institute , Mercy Hospital , Minneapolis , MN , USA. · j Minneapolis Heart Institute , Abbott Northwestern Hospital , Minneapolis , MN , USA. · k Piedmont Heart Institute , Atlanta , GA , USA. · l Division of Cardiology , Mount Sinai Hospital , New York , NY , USA. · m Department of Cardiology , St. Francis Hospital-The Heart Center , Roslyn , NY , USA. ·Expert Rev Med Devices · Pubmed #28945162.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The presence of severe coronary artery calcification is associated with higher rates of angiographic complications during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), as well as higher major adverse cardiac events compared with non-calcified lesions. Incorporating orbital atherectomy (OAS) for effective preparation of severely calcified lesions can help maximize the benefits of PCI by attaining maximal luminal gain (or stent expansion) and improve long-term outcomes (by reducing need for revascularization). Areas covered: In this manuscript, the prevalence, risk factors, and impact of coronary artery calcification on PCI are reviewed. Based on current data and experience, the authors review orbital atherectomy technique and best practices to optimize lesion preparation. Expert Commentary: The coronary OAS is the only device approved for use in the U.S. as a treatment for de novo, severely calcified coronary lesions to facilitate stent delivery. Advantages of the device include its ease of use and a mechanism of action that treats bi-directionally, allowing for continuous blood flow during treatment, minimizing heat damage, slow flow, and subsequent need for revascularization. The OAS technique tips reviewed in this article will help inform interventional cardiologists treating patients with severely calcified lesions.

22 Review Percutaneous coronary intervention vs. coronary artery bypass grafting for left main revascularization: an updated meta-analysis. 2017

Bajaj, Navkaranbir S / Patel, Nirav / Kalra, Rajat / Marogil, Peter / Bhardwaj, Ashwanikumar / Arora, Garima / Arora, Pankaj. ·Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115, USA. · Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1900 University Boulevard Birmingham, AL 35233, USA. · Cardiovascular Division, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, Brookwood Baptist Health, 2010 Brookwood Medical Center Drive Birmingham, AL 35209, USA. · Section of Cardiology, Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 700 19th St S, Birmingham, AL 35233, USA. ·Eur Heart J Qual Care Clin Outcomes · Pubmed #28838092.

ABSTRACT: Aims: The optimal revascularization strategy for left main coronary artery disease (LMD) remains controversial, especially with two recent randomized controlled trials showing conflicting results. We sought to address this controversy with our analysis. Methods and results: Comprehensive literature search was performed. We compared percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for LMD revascularization using standard meta-analytic techniques. A 21% higher risk of long-term major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular event [MACCE; composite of death, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and repeat revascularization] was observed in patients undergoing PCI in comparison with CABG [risk ratio (RR) 1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.40]. This risk was driven by higher rate of repeat revascularization in those undergoing PCI (RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.34-1.95). On the contrary, MACCE rates at 30 days were lower in PCI when compared with CABG (RR 0.55, 95% CI 0.39-0.76), which was driven by lower rates of stroke in the PCI arm (RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.17-0.98). At 1 year, lower stroke rates (RR 0.21, 95% CI 0.08-0.59) in the PCI arm were balanced by higher repeat revascularization rates in those undergoing PCI (RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.33-2.37), resulting in a clinical equipoise in MACCE rates between the two revascularization strategies. There was no difference in death or MI between PCI when compared with CABG at any time point. Conclusion: Outcomes of CABG vs. PCI for LMD revascularization vary over time. Therefore, individualized decisions need to be made for LMD revascularization using the heart team approach.

23 Review Interpreting results of coronary computed tomography angiography-derived fractional flow reserve in clinical practice. 2017

Rabbat, Mark G / Berman, Daniel S / Kern, Morton / Raff, Gilbert / Chinnaiyan, Kavitha / Koweek, Lynne / Shaw, Leslee J / Blanke, Philipp / Scherer, Markus / Jensen, Jesper M / Lesser, John / Nørgaard, Bjarne L / Pontone, Gianluca / De Bruyne, Bernard / Bax, Jeroen J / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·Department of Medicine and Radiology, Division of Cardiology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; Edward Hines Jr. Veteran's Affairs Hospital, Hines, IL, USA. Electronic address: mrabbat@lumc.edu. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Department of Imaging, USA. · VA Long Beach HCS, Department of Cardiology, University of California Irvine, USA. · Beaumont Health, Department of Cardiology, USA. · Duke University, Department of Medicine and Radiology, USA. · Emory University, Department of Cardiology, USA. · St. Paul's Hospital & University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology, Canada. · Sanger Heart and Vascular Institute, Department of Cardiology, USA. · Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Denmark. · Minneapolis Heart Institute, USA. · Cardiologico Monzino, Department of Cardiovascular Imaging, Milan, Italy. · OLV Ziekenhuis Aalst, Cardiovascular Center Aalst, Belgium. · Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, The Netherlands. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28666784.

ABSTRACT: The application of computational fluid dynamics to coronary computed tomography angiography allows Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) to be calculated non-invasively (FFR

24 Review A novel approach to diagnosing coronary artery disease: acoustic detection of coronary turbulence. 2017

Thomas, Joseph L / Winther, Simon / Wilson, Robert F / Bøttcher, Morten. ·Division of Cardiology, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, 1000 West Carson Street, Box 405, Torrance, CA, 90509, USA. jthomas@labiomed.org. · Department of Cardiology B, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N, Denmark. · Division of Cardiology, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Cardiac Imaging Center, Hospital Unit West, Herning, Denmark. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27581390.

ABSTRACT: Atherosclerotic disease within coronary arteries causes disruption of normal, laminar flow and generates flow turbulence. The characteristic acoustic waves generated by coronary turbulence serve as a novel diagnostic target. The frequency range and timing of microbruits associated with obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) have been characterized. Technological advancements in sensor, data filtering and analytic capabilities may allow use of intracoronary turbulence for diagnostic and risk stratification purposes. Acoustic detection (AD) systems are based on the premise that the faint auditory signature of obstructive CAD can be isolated and analyzed to provide a new approach to noninvasive testing. The cardiac sonospectrographic analyzer, CADence, and CADScore systems are early-stage, investigational and commercialized examples of AD systems, with the latter two currently undergoing clinical testing with validation of accuracy using computed tomography and invasive angiography. Noninvasive imaging accounts for a large percentage of healthcare expenditures for cardiovascular disease in the developed world, and the growing burden of CAD will disproportionately affect areas in the developing world. AD is a portable, radiation-free, cost-effective method with the potential to provide accurate diagnosis or exclusion of significant CAD. AD represents a model for digital, miniaturized, and internet-connected diagnostic technologies.

25 Review Atherectomy Devices for the Treatment of Calcified Coronary Lesions. 2016

Chambers, Jeffrey W / Behrens, Ann N / Martinsen, Brad J. ·Metropolitan Heart and Vascular Institute, The Heart Center, Mercy Hospital, Suite 120, 4040 Coon Rapids Boulevard, Minneapolis, MN 55433, USA. Electronic address: J.Chambers@mhvi.com. · Science & Research Department, Cardiovascular Systems, Inc, 1225 Old Highway 8 NW, St Paul, MN 55112, USA. ·Interv Cardiol Clin · Pubmed #28582200.

ABSTRACT: The presence of moderate and severe coronary artery calcification (CAC) is associated with higher rates of angiographic complications during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), as well as higher major adverse cardiac events compared with noncalcified lesions. Diabetes mellitus, a risk factor for CAC, is increasing in the United States. Vessel preparation before PCI with atherectomy can facilitate successful stent delivery and expansion that may otherwise not be possible. We review here CAC prevalence, risk factors, and impact on PCI, as well as the currently available coronary atherectomy devices including rotational atherectomy, orbital atherectomy, and laser atherectomy.

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