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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from Rochester, MN
Based on 391 articles published since 2008
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These are the 391 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Rochester, MN during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16
1 Guideline Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A North American Perspective-2016 Update. 2016

Angiolillo, Dominick J / Goodman, Shaun G / Bhatt, Deepak L / Eikelboom, John W / Price, Matthew J / Moliterno, David J / Cannon, Christopher P / Tanguay, Jean-Francois / Granger, Christopher B / Mauri, Laura / Holmes, David R / Gibson, C Michael / Faxon, David P. ·From the Division of Cardiology, University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville (D.J.A.) · St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, and the Canadian Heart Research Centre · Canadian VIGOUR Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton (S.G.G.) · Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (D.L.B., D.P.F.) · Department of Medicine, Population Health Research Institute, Thrombosis & Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton, ON, Canada (J.W.E.) · Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Scripps Clinic, La Jolla CA (M.J.P.) · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Gill Heart Institute, University of Kentucky, Lexington (D.J.M.) · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Clinical Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (C.P.C., L.M.) · Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, QC, Canada (J.-F.T.) · Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC (C.B.G.) · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (D.R.H.) · and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (C.M.G.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27803042.

ABSTRACT: The optimal antithrombotic treatment regimen for patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation is an emerging clinical problem. Currently, there is limited evidenced-based data on the optimal antithrombotic treatment regimen, including antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies, for these high-risk patients with practice guidelines, thus, providing limited recommendations. Over the past years, expert consensus documents have provided guidance to clinicians on how to manage patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Given the recent advancements in the field, the current document provides an updated opinion of selected North American experts from the United States and Canada on the treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. In particular, this document provides the current views on (1) embolic/stroke risk, (2) ischemic/thrombotic cardiac risk, and (3) bleeding risk, which are pivotal for discerning the choice of antithrombotic therapy. In addition, we describe the recent advances in pharmacology, stent designs, and clinical trials relevant to the field. Ultimately, we provide expert consensus-derived recommendations, using a pragmatic approach, on the management of patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

2 Editorial Hey Goglexiri, Do I Have Coronary Artery Disease? 2018

Sugrue, Alan / Mahowald, Jillian / Asirvatham, Samuel J. ·Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Division of Heart Rhythm Services, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Division of Heart Rhythm Services, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Electronic address: asirvatham.samuel@mayo.edu. ·Mayo Clin Proc · Pubmed #29976371.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Biomarker-Based Risk Models to Risk Stratify Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease. 2017

Omland, Torbjørn / Kullo, Iftikhar J. ·Division of Medicine, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway; Center for Heart Failure Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: torbjorn.omland@medisin.uio.no. · Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #28797350.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Clinical Conundrum of Coronary Artery Disease and Aortic Valve Stenosis. 2017

El Sabbagh, Abdallah / Nishimura, Rick A. ·Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN rnishimura@mayo.edu. ·J Am Heart Assoc · Pubmed #28219922.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Exploring the Coronary Artery Wall From the Luminal Side: For Specialists or for All Cardiologists? 2017

Singh, Mandeep / Prati, Francesco. ·Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Electronic address: Singh.Mandeep@mayo.edu. · Cardiology Department, San Giovanni Hospital, Centro Lotta Infarto (CLI) Foundation, Rome, Italy. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #28183508.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Versus Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients With Left Ventricular Dysfunction: Do We Have the Evidence? 2016

Gulati, Rajiv / Gersh, Bernard J. ·From Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. gulati.rajiv@mayo.edu. · From Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. ·Circulation · Pubmed #27151533.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial MicroRNAs: small molecule, big potential for coronary artery disease. 2016

Widmer, R Jay / Lerman, Lilach O / Lerman, Amir. ·Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA lerman.amir@mayo.edu. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #26994151.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Moore's Law: Apples and Oranges. 2015

Holmes, David R / Mack, Michael J. ·Department of Cardiovascular Diseases and Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Electronic address: holmes.david@mayo.edu. · Heart Hospital Baylor Plano, Baylor University, Dallas, Texas. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #26585616.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Angina in revascularization of ischemic cardiomyopathy: the whole quilt, or just a STICH? 2015

Geske, Jeffrey B / Gersh, Bernard J. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Electronic address: gersh.bernard@mayo.edu. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #26541920.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Which is the best graft for the right coronary artery? Response. 2015

Parissis, Haralabos / Parissis, Mondrian / Al-Alao, Bassel. ·Cardiothoracic Department, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast BT12 6BA, UK hparissis@yahoo.co.uk. · Cardiothoracic Department, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast BT12 6BA, UK. · Cardiothoracic Department, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. ·Asian Cardiovasc Thorac Ann · Pubmed #25972293.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Orthostatic hypotension: a new cardiac risk factor? 2015

Brady, Peter A. ·Division of Cardiovascular Diseaes, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA brady.peter@mayo.edu. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #25943538.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Clinical Imaging of ACS With Ruptured or Intact Fibrous Caps. 2015

Arbustini, Eloisa / Narula, Nupoor / Kodama, Takahide. ·Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Diseases, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. Electronic address: e.arbustini@smatteo.pv.it. · Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Diseases, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy; Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Diseases, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy; Cardiovascular Center, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #25937195.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Seeing is believing: new updates on coronary microvascular dysfunction. 2015

Herrmann, Joerg. ·Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905. Electronic address: herrmann.joerg@mayo.edu. ·Trends Cardiovasc Med · Pubmed #25453987.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Trends in noninvasive testing for coronary artery disease: less exercise, less information. 2015

Gharacholou, S Michael / Pellikka, Patricia A. ·Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. ·Am J Med · Pubmed #25195187.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Optimal medical therapy vs CT angiography screening for patients with diabetes. 2014

Gibbons, Raymond J. ·Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. ·JAMA · Pubmed #25402605.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Physical activity and cardiovascular risk: 10 metabolic equivalents or bust. 2013

Barnes, Jill N / Joyner, Michael J. ·Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. ·Mayo Clin Proc · Pubmed #24290107.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Echocardiography contrast for image optimization: beyond confidence, it is a matter of accuracy. 2008

Pellikka, Patricia A / Mulvagh, Sharon L. ·Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #19356421.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Review Clinical use of cardiac troponin for acute cardiac care and emerging opportunities in the outpatient setting. 2019

Sandoval, Yader / Sharain, Korosh / Saenger, Amy K / Smith, Stephen W / Apple, Fred S / Jaffe, Allan S. ·Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA - sandoval.yader@mayo.edu. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Emergency Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. ·Minerva Med · Pubmed #30484592.

ABSTRACT: Cardiac troponin (cTn) testing has evolved significantly in recent times. Because of increased sensitivity, its use has shifted from a marker used to help diagnose acute myocardial infarction (MI) to a marker than can be used in the outpatient setting, as well as for both detection of myocardial injury and risk-stratification. Its main role remains in the diagnosis of acute MI and the risk-stratification of patients presenting with suspected acute coronary syndrome. The analytical improvements in assays leading to precise high-sensitivity cTn assays have contributed to the development of numerous strategies to identify patients at both low- and high-risk for acute MI within a few hours. These approaches should reduce overcrowding in the emergency room and expedite triaging. The ability of measuring cTn in most patients using high-sensitivity (hs) assays has allowed for the opportunity to examine its use in the detection of cardiotoxicity in patients undergoing chemotherapy, as well as exploring the application in both primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. This particular field of research has become increasingly complex, partly due to the numerous cTn assays available (I and T; point-of-care, contemporary, hs) and an array of approaches in which one can use the test. The purpose of this document is to summarize the analytical and clinical information relevant to cTn assays, in particular, hs-cTn assays, and describe present and future opportunities for use of cTn in acute cardiac care and in the outpatient setting.

19 Review Atherosclerotic Heart Disease in Women With Autoimmune Rheumatologic Inflammatory Conditions. 2018

Kurmann, Reto D / Mankad, Rekha. ·Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. Electronic address: mankad.rekha@mayo.edu. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #29571422.

ABSTRACT: Women have a higher prevalence of several inflammatory rheumatologic conditions. These include systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and systemic sclerosis (SSc) to name a few. These conditions are all associated with higher rates of cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality, which is driven primarily by atherosclerotic heart disease. Traditional risk factors are important considerations in the assessment of CV risk in the rheumatologic patient; however, these factors do not appear to impart a similar weight of risk in women with inflammatory autoimmune rheumatologic conditions. In addition, even when controlling for traditional risk factors, patients with RA or SLE continue to have a higher risk of CV events, which has been linked to the burden of systemic inflammation. Currently, the CV risk scoring systems available for the general population underestimate the burden of the problem in these complex patients. The increased CV risk in patients with rheumatologic diseases has been reported in the literature for years but remains underrecognized by internists and cardiologists. Although these conditions themselves are relatively rare, the further study of inflammation and its treatment in CV disease will be beneficial to the general population.

20 Review Osteocardiology: Defining the Go/No-Go Time Point for Therapy. 2018

Rajamannan, Nalini M. ·Division of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, and Most Sacred Heart of Jesus Cardiology and Valvular Institute, Sheboygan, WI, USA. ·Cardiology · Pubmed #29393145.

ABSTRACT: Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that the risk factors associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC), including male gender, smoking, hypertension, and elevated serum cholesterol, are similar to the risk factors associated with the development of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). The results of the experimental and clinical studies demonstrate that traditional risk factors initiate early atherosclerosis which over time differentiates to form bone in the heart causing clinical CAC and CAVD. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of cardiovascular calcification, the end-stage process of the atherosclerosis will help define the specific time point to modify this cellular process of bone formation in the heart termed osteocardiology. This time point between subclinical atherosclerosis and clinical calcification is the go/no-go time point, or the point of no return with severe clinical calcification in the heart. This review will summarize the development of bone formation in the heart termed osteocardiology, to define the go/no-go time point for therapy initiation to slow the progression of cardiovascular calcification.

21 Review Diagnostic imaging in the management of patients with metabolic syndrome. 2018

Kim, Seo Rin / Lerman, Lilach O. ·Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. · Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Electronic address: Lerman.Lilach@Mayo.edu. ·Transl Res · Pubmed #29175480.

ABSTRACT: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is the constellation of metabolic risk factors that might foster development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Abdominal obesity and insulin resistance play a prominent role among all metabolic traits of MetS. Because intervention including weight loss can reduce these morbidity and mortality in MetS, early detection of the severity and complications of MetS could be useful. Recent advances in imaging modalities have provided significant insight into the development and progression of abdominal obesity and insulin resistance, as well as target organ injuries. The purpose of this review is to summarize advances in diagnostic imaging modalities in MetS that can be applied for evaluating each components and target organs. This may help in early detection, monitoring target organ injury, and in turn developing novel therapeutic target to alleviate and avert them.

22 Review The elusive role of myocardial perfusion imaging in stable ischemic heart disease: Is ISCHEMIA the answer? 2017

Xie, Joe X / Winchester, David E / Phillips, Lawrence M / Hachamovitch, Rory / Berman, Daniel S / Blankstein, Ron / Di Carli, Marcelo F / Miller, Todd D / Al-Mallah, Mouaz H / Shaw, Leslee J. ·Department of Cardiology, Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, 1462 Clifton Road NE, Room 529, Atlanta, Georgia. joe.xie@emory.edu. · Department of Cardiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine and Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Ministry of National Guard, Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. · Department of Cardiology, Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, 1462 Clifton Road NE, Room 529, Atlanta, Georgia. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #28752313.

ABSTRACT: The assessment of ischemia through myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is widely accepted as an index step in the diagnostic evaluation of stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD). Numerous observational studies have characterized the prognostic significance of ischemia extent and severity. However, the role of ischemia in directing downstream SIHD care including coronary revascularization has remained elusive as reductions in ischemic burden have not translated to improved clinical outcomes in randomized trials. Importantly, selection bias leading to the inclusion of many low risk patients with minimal ischemia have narrowed the generalizability of prior studies along with other limitations. Accordingly, an ongoing randomized controlled trial entitled ISCHEMIA (International Study of Comparative Health Effectiveness with Medical and Invasive Approaches) will compare an invasive coronary revascularization strategy vs a conservative medical therapy approach among stable patients with moderate to severe ischemia. The results of ISCHEMIA may have a substantial impact on the management of SIHD and better define the role of MPI in current SIHD pathways of care.

23 Review Targeting the dominant mechanism of coronary microvascular dysfunction with intracoronary physiology tests. 2017

Mejía-Rentería, Hernán / van der Hoeven, Nina / van de Hoef, Tim P / Heemelaar, Julius / Ryan, Nicola / Lerman, Amir / van Royen, Niels / Escaned, Javier. ·Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, 28040, Madrid, Spain. · Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clínico San Carlos (IdISSC), Madrid, Spain. · VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · AMC Heart Centre, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, 28040, Madrid, Spain. escaned@secardiologia.es. · Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain. escaned@secardiologia.es. · Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clínico San Carlos (IdISSC), Madrid, Spain. escaned@secardiologia.es. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28501910.

ABSTRACT: The coronary microcirculation plays a key role in modulating blood supply to the myocardium. Several factors like myocardial oxygen demands, endothelial and neurogenic conditions determine its function. Although there is available evidence supporting microvascular dysfunction as an important cause of myocardial ischaemia, with both prognostic and symptomatic implications, its diagnosis and management in clinical practice is still relegated to a second plane. Both diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are hampered by the broadness of the concept of microvascular dysfunction, which fails addressing the plurality of mechanisms leading to dysfunction. Normal microcirculatory function requires both structural integrity of the microcirculatory vascular network and preserved signalling pathways ensuring adequate and brisk arteriolar resistance shifts in response to myocardial oxygen demands. Pathological mechanisms affecting these requirements include structural remodelling of microvessels, intraluminal plugging, extravascular compression or vasomotor dysregulation. Importantly, not every diagnostic technique provides evidence on which of these pathophysiological mechanisms is present or predominates in the microcirculation. In this paper we discuss the mechanisms of coronary microvascular dysfunction and the intracoronary tools currently available to detect it, as well as the potential role of each one to unmask the main underlying mechanism.

24 Review Prognostic value of segment involvement score compared to other measures of coronary atherosclerosis by computed tomography: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Ayoub, Chadi / Erthal, Fernanda / Abdelsalam, Mahmoud A / Murad, M Hassan / Wang, Zhen / Erwin, Patricia J / Hillis, Graham S / Kritharides, Leonard / Chow, Benjamin J W. ·Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Electronic address: ayoub.chadi@mayo.edu. · Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Canada. Electronic address: ferthal@ottawaheart.ca. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address: ma.abdelsalam.md@gmail.com. · Evidence-based Practice Center, Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address: murad.mohammad@mayo.edu. · Evidence-based Practice Center, Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address: wang.zhen@mayo.edu. · Mayo Clinic Libraries, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address: erwin.patricia@mayo.edu. · Department of Cardiology, Royal Perth Hospital, University of Western Australia, Australia. Electronic address: graham.hillis@health.wa.gov.au. · University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Cardiology, Concord Hospital, Sydney Local Health District, New South Wales, Australia. Electronic address: leonard.kritharides@sydney.edu.au. · Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Canada; Department of Radiology, University of Ottawa, Canada. Electronic address: bchow@ottawaheart.ca. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28483581.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The segment involvement score (SIS) is a semiquantitative measure of the extent of atherosclerosis burden by coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). We sought to evaluate by meta-analysis the prognostic value of SIS, and to compare it with other CTA measures of coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS: Electronic databases from 1946 to January 2016 were searched. Studies reporting SIS, or an equivalent measure by coronary CTA, and clinical outcomes were included. Maximally adjusted hazard ratios (HR), predominantly for clinical variables, were extracted for SIS, obstructive CAD, Agatston coronary artery calcium score, and plaque composition. These were pooled using DerSimonian-Laird random effects models. RESULTS: Eleven nonrandomized studies with good methodological quality enrolling 9777 subjects (mean age 61 ± 11 years, 57% male, mean follow up 3.3 years) who had 472 (4.8%) MACE (cardiac or all cause death, non-fatal myocardial infarction or late revascularization), were included. SIS (per segment increase) had pooled HR of 1.25 (95% CI: 1.16,1.35; I CONCLUSION: Despite heterogeneity in endpoints, extent of CAD as quantified by SIS on coronary CTA is a strong, independent predictor of cardiovascular events.

25 Review Cardiac shock-wave therapy in the treatment of coronary artery disease: systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Burneikaitė, Greta / Shkolnik, Evgeny / Čelutkienė, Jelena / Zuozienė, Gitana / Butkuvienė, Irena / Petrauskienė, Birutė / Šerpytis, Pranas / Laucevičius, Aleksandras / Lerman, Amir. ·Clinic of Cardiac and Vascular Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania. gburneikaite@gmail.com. · Centre of Cardiology and Angiology, Vilnius University Hospital Santariskiu Klinikos, Vilnius, Lithuania. gburneikaite@gmail.com. · , Room No A311, Santariskiu str. 2, 08661, Vilnius, Lithuania. gburneikaite@gmail.com. · Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry, Moscow, Russia. · Yale- New Haven Health Bridgeport Hospital, Connecticut, United States of America. · Clinic of Cardiac and Vascular Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania. jelena.celutkiene@santa.lt. · Centre of Cardiology and Angiology, Vilnius University Hospital Santariskiu Klinikos, Vilnius, Lithuania. jelena.celutkiene@santa.lt. · Clinic of Cardiac and Vascular Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania. · Centre of Cardiology and Angiology, Vilnius University Hospital Santariskiu Klinikos, Vilnius, Lithuania. · Centre of Innovative Medicine, Vilnius, Lithuania. · Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States of America. ·Cardiovasc Ultrasound · Pubmed #28403861.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To systematically review currently available cardiac shock-wave therapy (CSWT) studies in humans and perform meta-analysis regarding anti-anginal efficacy of CSWT. METHODS: The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Medline, Medscape, Research Gate, Science Direct, and Web of Science databases were explored. In total 39 studies evaluating the efficacy of CSWT in patients with stable angina were identified including single arm, non- and randomized trials. Information on study design, subject's characteristics, clinical data and endpoints were obtained. Assessment of publication risk of bias was performed and heterogeneity across the studies was calculated by using random effects model. RESULTS: Totally, 1189 patients were included in 39 reviewed studies, with 1006 patients treated with CSWT. The largest patient sample of single arm study consisted of 111 patients. All selected studies demonstrated significant improvement in subjective measures of angina symptoms and/or quality of life, in the majority of studies left ventricular function and myocardial perfusion improved. In 12 controlled studies with 483 patients included (183 controls) angina class, Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ) score, nitrates consumption were significantly improved after the treatment. In 593 participants across 22 studies the exercise capacity was significantly improved after CSWT, as compared with the baseline values (in meta-analysis standardized mean difference SMD = -0.74; 95% CI, -0.97 to -0.5; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Systematic review of CSWT studies in stable coronary artery disease (CAD) demonstrated consistent improvement of clinical variables. Meta-analysis showed a moderate improvement of exercise capacity. Overall, CSWT is a promising non-invasive option for patients with end-stage CAD, but evidence is limited to small sample single-center studies. Multi-center adequately powered randomised double blind studies are warranted.

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