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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from US Dept of Veterans Affairs
Based on 605 articles published since 2008
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These are the 605 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from US Dept of Veterans Affairs during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Risk Assessment for Cardiovascular Disease With Nontraditional Risk Factors: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2018

Anonymous2681075 / Curry, Susan J / Krist, Alex H / Owens, Douglas K / Barry, Michael J / Caughey, Aaron B / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kemper, Alex R / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #29998297.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of death among adults in the United States. Treatment to prevent CVD events by modifying risk factors is currently informed by the Framingham Risk Score, the Pooled Cohort Equations, or similar CVD risk assessment models. If current CVD risk assessment models could be improved by adding more risk factors, treatment might be better targeted, thereby maximizing the benefits and minimizing the harms. Objective: To update the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on using nontraditional risk factors in coronary heart disease risk assessment. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on using nontraditional risk factors in CVD risk assessment, focusing on the ankle-brachial index (ABI), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) level, and coronary artery calcium (CAC) score; the health benefits and harms of CVD risk assessment and treatment guided by nontraditional risk factors combined with the Framingham Risk Score or Pooled Cohort Equations compared with using either risk assessment model alone; and whether adding nontraditional risk factors to existing CVD risk assessment models improves measures of calibration, discrimination, and risk reclassification. Findings: The USPSTF found adequate evidence that adding the ABI, hsCRP level, and CAC score to existing CVD risk assessment models results in small improvements in discrimination and risk reclassification; however, the clinical meaning of these changes is largely unknown. Evidence on adding the ABI, hsCRP level, and CAC score to the Pooled Cohort Equations is limited. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence to assess whether treatment decisions guided by the ABI, hsCRP level, or CAC score, in addition to risk factors in existing CVD risk assessment models, leads to reduced incidence of CVD events or mortality. The USPSTF found adequate evidence to conceptually bound the harms of early detection and interventions as small. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of using the ABI, hsCRP level, or CAC score in risk assessment for CVD in asymptomatic adults to prevent CVD events. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of adding the ABI, hsCRP level, or CAC score to traditional risk assessment for CVD in asymptomatic adults to prevent CVD events. (I statement).

2 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous3940905 / Akers, Scott R / Panchal, Vandan / Ho, Vincent B / Beache, Garth M / Brown, Richard K J / Ghoshhajra, Brian B / Greenberg, S Bruce / Hsu, Joe Y / Kicska, Gregory A / Min, James K / Stillman, Arthur E / Stojanovska, Jadranka / Abbara, Suhny / Jacobs, Jill E. ·Principal Author, VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: akerssco@me.com. · Research Author, Internal Medicine Resident, Henry Ford Allegiance Health, Jackson, Michigan. · Panel Vice-Chair, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky. · University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, California. · University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California; American College of Cardiology. · Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Specialty Chair, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Panel Chair, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #28473096.

ABSTRACT: In patients with chronic chest pain in the setting of high probability of coronary artery disease (CAD), imaging has major and diverse roles. First, imaging is valuable in determining and documenting the presence, extent, and severity of myocardial ischemia, hibernation, scarring, and/or the presence, site, and severity of obstructive coronary lesions. Second, imaging findings are important in determining the course of management of patients with suspected chronic myocardial ischemia and better defining those patients best suited for medical therapy, angioplasty/stenting, or surgery. Third, imaging is also necessary to determine the long-term prognosis and likely benefit from various therapeutic options by evaluating ventricular function, diastolic relaxation, and end-systolic volume. Imaging studies are also required to demonstrate other abnormalities, such as congenital/acquired coronary anomalies and severe left ventricular hypertrophy, that can produce angina in the absence of symptomatic coronary obstructive disease due to atherosclerosis. Clinical risk assessment is necessary to determine the pretest probability of CAD. Multiple methods are available to categorize patients as low, medium, or high risk for developing CAD. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

3 Guideline The Rationale for Performance of Coronary Angiography and Stenting Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: From the Interventional Section Leadership Council of the American College of Cardiology. 2016

Ramee, Stephen / Anwaruddin, Saif / Kumar, Gautam / Piana, Robert N / Babaliaros, Vasilis / Rab, Tanveer / Klein, Lloyd W / Anonymous11460889 / Anonymous11470889. ·Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana. · Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Emory University/Atlanta VA Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois. Electronic address: lloydklein@comcast.net. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27931592.

ABSTRACT: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an effective, nonsurgical treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis. The optimal treatment strategy for treating concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been tested prospectively in a randomized clinical trial. Nevertheless, it is standard practice in the United States to perform coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention for significant CAD at least 1 month before TAVR. All existing clinical trials were designed using this strategy. Therefore, it is wrong to extrapolate current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Appropriate Use Criteria against invasive procedures in asymptomatic patients to the TAVR population when evaluating the quality of care by cardiologists or hospitals. In this statement from the Interventional Section Leadership Council of the ACC, it is recommended that percutaneous coronary intervention should be considered in all patients with significant proximal coronary stenosis in major coronary arteries before TAVR, even though the indication is not covered in current guidelines.

4 Guideline SCAI expert consensus statement: 2016 best practices in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: (Endorsed by the cardiological society of india, and sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia intervencionista; Affirmation of value by the Canadian Association of interventional cardiology-Association canadienne de cardiologie d'intervention). 2016

Naidu, Srihari S / Aronow, Herbert D / Box, Lyndon C / Duffy, Peter L / Kolansky, Daniel M / Kupfer, Joel M / Latif, Faisal / Mulukutla, Suresh R / Rao, Sunil V / Swaminathan, Rajesh V / Blankenship, James C. ·Division of Cardiology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, New York. ssnaidu@winthrop.org. · Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Cardiovascular Institute, Providence, RI. · West Valley Medical Center, Caldwell, ID. · FirstHealth of the Carolinas, Pinehurst, NC. · Cardiovascular Medicine Division, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · University of Illinois School of Medicine-Peoria, Peoria, IL. · University of Oklahoma and VA Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK. · University of Pittsburgh and VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC. · Weill Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Greenberg Division of Cardiology, New York, NY. · Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27137680.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio Pressure Pullback With Virtual Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Planning: Seeing the Future of Coronary Interventions? 2018

Kern, Morton J / Seto, Arnold H. ·Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, California; and the University of California, Irvine, Orange, California. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29673508.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Coronary Atherosclerosis: What Do The Lungs Have To Do With It? 2018

Ghadban, Rugheed / Aggarwal, Kul. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO. Electronic address: aggarwalk@health.missouri.edu. ·Am J Med Sci · Pubmed #29661341.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Reconsidering the Gatekeeper Paradigm for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Stable Coronary Disease Management. 2017

Schulman-Marcus, Joshua / Weintraub, William S / Boden, William E. ·Division of Cardiology, Albany Medical Center, Albany Medical College,Albany, New York. Electronic address: schulmj1@mail.amc.edu. · Division of Cardiology, Christiana Healthcare System,Newark, Delaware. · VA New England Healthcare System, Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology, Research, and Informatics Center (MAVERIC), Boston University School of Medicine,Boston, Massachusetts. ·Am J Cardiol · Pubmed #28818317.

ABSTRACT: Major randomized clinical trials over the last decade support the role of optimal medical therapy for the initial management approach for patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD), whereas percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) ought to be reserved for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Likewise, several studies have continued to demonstrate the superiority of coronary artery bypass grafting surgery over PCI in many patients with extensive multivessel CAD, especially those with diabetes. Nevertheless, the decision-making paradigm for patients with stable CAD often continues to propagate the upfront use of "ad hoc PCI" and disadvantages alternative therapeutic approaches. In our editorial, we discuss how multiple systemic and interpersonal factors continue to favor early revascularization with PCI in stable patients. We discuss whether the interventional cardiologist can be an unbiased "gatekeeper" for the use of PCI or whether other physicians should also be involved with the patient in decision-making. Finally, we offer suggestions that can redefine the gatekeeper role to facilitate an evidence-based approach that embraces shared decision-making.

8 Editorial Net Health Benefit: Positive for CAC Scanning. 2017

Shaw, Leslee J / Narula, Jagat / Chandrashekhar, Y. ·Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Minnesota/VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Electronic address: shekh003@umn.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28797421.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Development and Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification. 2017

Wilson, Peter W F. ·Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: pwwilso@emory.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28797407.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Omega-3 Fatty Acids (Fish Oil) Supplementation and Albuminuria: Not a Slam Dunk. 2017

Navaneethan, Sankar D / Virani, Salim S. ·Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Selzman Institute for Kidney Health, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. · Section of Nephrology, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX. · The Health Policy, Quality & Informatics Program, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center Health Services Research and Development Center for Innovations & Section of Health Services Research, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX virani@bcm.edu. · Section of Cardiovascular Research, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. · Section of Cardiology, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX. · Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Houston, TX. ·J Am Heart Assoc · Pubmed #28710179.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Full Metal Jacket: Is it En Vogue? 2017

Banerjee, Subhash / Brilakis, Emmanouil S. ·Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care Systems, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. Electronic address: subhash.banerjee@utsouthwestern.edu. · Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care Systems, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28668315.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Stimulating Extracardiac Collaterals via Right Internal Mammary Artery Occlusion: Another Step Into an Undiscovered Country. 2017

Kern, Morton J / Seto, Arnold H. ·From the Department of Medicine, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System and University of California, Irvine. mortonkern2007@gmail.com. · From the Department of Medicine, Veterans Administration Long Beach Health Care System and University of California, Irvine. ·Circ Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28566293.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial SYNTAX scoring: growing stronger. 2017

Mavromatis, Kreton / King, Spencer B. ·Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA, USA. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #28481983.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Quantitative PET Myocardial Blood Flow: "Trust, But Verify". 2017

Dilsizian, Vasken / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · University of Minnesota School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28473105.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Should Fractional Flow Reserve Be Measured After Stent Deployment? Routinely? Ever? 2017

Sedlis, Steven P / Lorin, Jeffrey D. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Health Care System, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: steven.sedlis@va.gov. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Health Care System, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #28456701.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Role of Imaging in the Management of Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: An Evolving Paradigm Shift. 2017

Boden, William E / Meadows, Judith L. ·VA Boston Healthcare System and the Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology, Research, and Informatics Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: william.boden@va.gov. · VA Connecticut Health Care System, Yale University School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, New Haven, Connecticut. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28279381.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Biomarkers of High-Grade Coronary Stenosis: Searching for Seventies. 2017

Vogel, Robert A. ·Cardiology Section, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado. Electronic address: rvogelmd@gmail.com. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #28254178.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Vasodilator stress agents for myocardial perfusion imaging. 2017

Saab, Rayan / Hage, Fadi G. ·Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Lyons Harrison Research Building 306, 1720 2nd Ave S, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0007, USA. rsaab@uabmc.edu. · Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Lyons Harrison Research Building 306, 1720 2nd Ave S, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0007, USA. · Section of Cardiology, Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL, USA. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #26829956.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Coronary Artery Calcium Progression and Residual Risk. 2016

Hecht, Harvey / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Minnesota School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27931531.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Comparing Drug-Eluting Stents to Bare-Metal Stents for Saphenous Vein Graft Lesion PCI. 2016

Banerjee, Subhash / Brilakis, Emmanouil S. ·University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Veterans Affairs Southwestern Medical Center, 4500 S. Lancaster Road (111a), Dallas, TX 75230 USA. subhash.banerjee@utsouthwestern.edu. ·J Invasive Cardiol · Pubmed #27922807.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Serenity, courage, and wisdom: The keys to successful coronary calcification treatment. 2016

Danek, Barbara Anna / Brilakis, Emmanouil S. ·VA North Texas Healthcare System and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27886457.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial Does the AToMIC trial explode concerns of contrast coagulopathy? 2016

Seto, Arnold H / Kern, Morton J. ·Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Long Beach Medical Center, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, California. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27865075.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial Risk Detection Among Asymptomatic Patients With Diabetes: Is It Time for a Varied Approach? 2016

Shaw, Leslee J / Chandrashekhar, Y / Narula, Jagat. ·Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Minnesota School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27832904.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial CAD-RADS: A Giant First Step Toward a Common Lexicon? 2016

Chandrashekhar, Y / Min, James K / Hecht, Harvey / Narula, Jagat. ·University of Minnesota School of Medicine, and VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical College and New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: narula@mountsinai.org. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27609154.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial Mental Stress and Myocardial Ischemia: Young Women at Risk. 2016

Wokhlu, Anita / Pepine, Carl J. ·Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL North Florida/South Georgia VA Medical Center, Gainesville, FL. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL carl.pepine@medicine.ufl.edu. ·J Am Heart Assoc · Pubmed #27559073.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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