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Coronary Artery Disease: HELP
Articles from Washington, DC
Based on 303 articles published since 2008
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These are the 303 published articles about Coronary Artery Disease that originated from Washington, DC during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13
1 Guideline SCCT guidelines for the performance and acquisition of coronary computed tomographic angiography: A report of the society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee: Endorsed by the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI). 2016

Abbara, Suhny / Blanke, Philipp / Maroules, Christopher D / Cheezum, Michael / Choi, Andrew D / Han, B Kelly / Marwan, Mohamed / Naoum, Chris / Norgaard, Bjarne L / Rubinshtein, Ronen / Schoenhagen, Paul / Villines, Todd / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. Electronic address: Suhny.Abbara@UTSouthwestern.edu. · Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. · Cardiology Service Ft. Belvoir Community Hospital, Ft. Belvoir, VA, United States. · Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington DC, United States. · Minneapolis Heart Institute and Children's Heart Clinic, Minneapolis, MN, United States. · Cardiology Department, University Hospital, Erlangen, Germany. · Concord Hospital, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Cardiology B, Aarhus University Hospital-Skejby, Aarhus N, Denmark. · Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center & Rappaport School of Medicine- Technion- IIT, Haifa, Israel. · Cardiovascular Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, United States. · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #27780758.

ABSTRACT: In response to recent technological advancements in acquisition techniques as well as a growing body of evidence regarding the optimal performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA), the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee has produced this update to its previously established 2009 "Guidelines for the Performance of Coronary CTA" (1). The purpose of this document is to provide standards meant to ensure reliable practice methods and quality outcomes based on the best available data in order to improve the diagnostic care of patients. Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines for the Interpretation is published separately (2). The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee ensures compliance with all existing standards for the declaration of conflict of interest by all authors and reviewers for the purpose ofclarity and transparency.

2 Guideline SCCT guidelines for the interpretation and reporting of coronary computed tomographic angiography. 2009

Raff, Gilbert L / Abidov, Aiden / Achenbach, Stephan / Berman, Daniel S / Boxt, Lawrence M / Budoff, Matthew J / Cheng, Victor / DeFrance, Tony / Hellinger, Jeffrey C / Karlsberg, Ronald P / Anonymous4580623. ·Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, 2400 N Street NW, Washington, DC 20037, USA. GRaff@beaumont.edu ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #19272853.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Cardiovascular computed tomographic angiography: Entering into the 5th stage. 2018

Min, James K / Feuchtner, Gudrun M / Villines, Todd C. ·New York-Presbyterian Hospital and the Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, 413 E. 69th Street, Suite 108, New York City, NY 10021, United States. Electronic address: jkm2001@med.cornell.edu. · Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. · Uniformed Services University School of Medicine and the Walter Reed Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, United States. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #29759895.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Does FFR 2017

Hulten, Edward A. ·Cardiology Service, Division of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD, 20889, USA. edward.a.hulten.mil@mail.mil. · Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA. edward.a.hulten.mil@mail.mil. ·J Nucl Cardiol · Pubmed #28681339.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography - The evidence dominates! 2017

Shaw, Leslee J / Villines, Todd / Blankstein, Ron / Abbara, Suhny / Weigold, Guy / Slim, Ahmad / Leipsic, Jonathon. ·Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: lshaw3@emory.edu. · Walter Reed Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, United States. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States. · University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States. · MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington DC, United States. · Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States. · The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #28017553.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial The Essence of STRATEGY Is Choosing What Not to Do. 2016

Hulten, Edward / Blankstein, Ron. ·From the Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Departments of Medicine and Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (E.H., R.B.) · and Cardiology Service, Division of Medicine, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (E.H.). ·Circ Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #27894071.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Janus Face of Coronary Artery Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease. 2016

Barrows, Ian R / Raj, Dominic S. ·George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. · Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC draj@mfa.gwu.edu. ·J Am Heart Assoc · Pubmed #27108249.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial FFRCT: Solid PLATFORM or Thin Ice? 2015

Hulten, Edward / Di Carli, Marcelo F. ·Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Department of Medicine (Cardiovascular Division), Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Medicine (Cardiology Service), Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. · Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Department of Medicine (Cardiovascular Division), Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: mdicarli@partners.org. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #26475206.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Coronary artery calcium score, distribution, and future revascularization. 2014

Villines, Todd C. ·Department of Medicine (Cardiology Service), Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. Electronic address: todd.c.villines.mil@mail.mil. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #24831209.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial C-reactive protein prior to percutaneous coronary intervention: do we still need to check the lipid panel? 2014

Lipinski, Michael J / Waksman, Ron. ·MedStar Cardiovascular Research Network, MedStar Heart Institute, Medstar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC, USA. Electronic address: michael.j.lipinksi@medstar.net. · MedStar Cardiovascular Research Network, MedStar Heart Institute, Medstar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC, USA. ·Cardiovasc Revasc Med · Pubmed #24767312.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Comparing outcomes and costs following cardiovascular imaging: a SPARC…but further illumination is needed. 2014

Villines, Todd C / Min, James K. ·Department of Medicine (Cardiology Service), Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. Electronic address: todd.c.villines@health.mil. · Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York-Presbyterian Hospital and the Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #24412452.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Review The Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography year in review - 2018. 2018

Al'Aref, Subhi J / Mrsic, Zorana / Feuchtner, Gudrun / Min, James K / Villines, Todd C. ·Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, USA. · Cardiac CT Program and Cardiovascular Research, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria. · Cardiac CT Program and Cardiovascular Research, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA. Electronic address: todd.c.villines.mil@mail.mil. ·J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr · Pubmed #30361179.

ABSTRACT: Since the introduction of ≥64 detector row coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) as a noninvasive imaging modality, various clinical trials have established its diagnostic performance and prognostic significance when compared to other anatomic and functional tests for coronary artery disease (CAD). CCTA has been increasingly utilized for a wide range of clinical scenarios, driven by both advances in technology as well as data showing improvement in outcomes. Accumulating evidence has continually refined and supported the central role of CCTA within clinical care, and this year has witnessed continued evolution of the application of CCTA within healthcare and translational research. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the year of the Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (JCCT), highlighting the evidence base supporting the appropriate application of cardiac computed tomography across numerous clinical domains.

13 Review Imaging the myocardial ischemic cascade. 2018

Stillman, Arthur E / Oudkerk, Matthijs / Bluemke, David A / de Boer, Menko Jan / Bremerich, Jens / Garcia, Ernest V / Gutberlet, Matthias / van der Harst, Pim / Hundley, W Gregory / Jerosch-Herold, Michael / Kuijpers, Dirkjan / Kwong, Raymond Y / Nagel, Eike / Lerakis, Stamatios / Oshinski, John / Paul, Jean-François / Slart, Riemer H J A / Thourani, Vinod / Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn / Wintersperger, Bernd J. ·Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, 1365 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA. aestill@emory.edu. · Center of Medical Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Department of Cardiology, Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology, University of Basel Hospital, Basel, Switzerland. · Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, 1365 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA. · Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. · Department of Genetics, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Departments of Internal Medicine & Radiology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. · Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Radiology, Haaglanden Medical Center, The Hague, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Institute for Experimental and Translational Cardiovascular Imaging, DZHK Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, University Hospital, Frankfurt/Main, Germany. · Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Department of Radiology, Institut Mutualiste Montsouris, Paris, France. · Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Cardiac Surgery, MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA. · Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #29556943.

ABSTRACT: Non-invasive imaging plays a growing role in the diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease from its earliest manifestations of endothelial dysfunction to myocardial infarction along the myocardial ischemic cascade. Experts representing the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging and the European Society of Cardiac Radiology have worked together to organize the role of non-invasive imaging along the framework of the ischemic cascade. The current status of non-invasive imaging for ischemic heart disease is reviewed along with the role of imaging for guiding surgical planning. The issue of cost effectiveness is also considered. Preclinical disease is primarily assessed through the coronary artery calcium score and used for risk assessment. Once the patient becomes symptomatic, other imaging tests including echocardiography, CCTA, SPECT, PET and CMR may be useful. CCTA appears to be a cost-effective gatekeeper. Post infarction CMR and PET are the preferred modalities. Imaging is increasingly used for surgical planning of patients who may require coronary artery bypass.

14 Review Duration of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy Following Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. 2018

Sharma, Abhishek / Garg, Aakash / Elmariah, Sammy / Drachman, Douglas / Obiagwu, Chukwudi / Vallakati, Ajay / Sharma, Samin K / Lavie, Carl J / Mukherjee, Debabrata / Waksman, Ron / Stefanini, Giulio G / Feres, Fausto / Marmur, Jonathan D / Helft, Gérard. ·Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Technology, Brooklyn, NY, USA. Electronic address: abhisheksharma4mamc@gmail.com. · Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Technology, Brooklyn, NY, USA; Division of Cardiology, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Newark, NJ, USA. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Harvard Clinical Research Institute, Boston, USA. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Metrohealth Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Heart & Vascular Institute, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinical School-the University of Queensland School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Texas Tech University, El Paso, TX, USA. · Division of Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC, USA. · Cardiovascular Department, Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. · Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, Ave Dante Pazzanense, 500, Ibirapuera, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA. · Institut de Cardiologie, Hôpital Pitié-Salpétrière, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, boulevard de l'Hôpital, Paris, France; Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition, Hôpital Pitié-Salpétrière, Paris, France. ·Prog Cardiovasc Dis · Pubmed #29277295.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Diabetic patients account for an increasing number of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased residual platelet activity during dual antiplatelet treatment (DAPT) and DM patients have worse clinical outcomes after PCI as compared to non-DM. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate efficacy and safety of short duration DAPT (S-DAPT) and long duration DAPT (L-DAPT) after drug eluting stent (DES) implantation in DM and non-DM patients. METHODS: We searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of S-DAPT versus L-DAPT after DES implantation in DM and non-DM patients. Efficacy endpoints were all-cause mortality, cardiac mortality, myocardial infarction (MI), stent thrombosis (ST), target vessel revascularization (TVR), and composite end point of net adverse clinical events (NACE) (all-cause mortality, cardiac mortality, MI, ST, TVR, stroke, major bleeding). Safety endpoints were major bleeding and stroke. Event rates were compared using a forest plot of relative risk using a random effects model. RESULTS: We included eight RCTs that randomized 28,318 patients to S-DAPT versus L-DAPT (8234 DM and 20,084 non-DM). S-DAPT was associated with an increased rate of ST in non-DM patients [3.67 (2.04, 6.59)]. There was no significant difference in the rate of all-cause mortality, cardiac mortality, ST, MI, TVR, major bleeding, stroke and NACE with S-DAPT and L-DAPT in DM patients [1.19 (0.72-1.95); 1.25 (0.69, 2.25); 1.52 (0.70, 3.29); 1.33 (0.88, 2.01); 1.39 (0.89, 2.17); 0.92 (0.19, 4.42); 0.98 (0.29, 3.28); and 0.94 (0.57, 1.54) respectively]. Further, there was no significant difference in the rate of all-cause mortality, cardiac mortality, MI, TVR, major bleeding, stroke and NACE with S-DAPT and L-DAPT in non-DM patients [0.93 (0.58, 1.48); 0.75 (0.42, 1.35); 1.52 (0.81, 2.83); 0.99 (0.71, 1.39); 0.72 (0.28, 1.84); 1.01 (0.40, 2.56); and 1.01 (0.77, 1.32) respectively]. CONCLUSION: Compared to L-DAPT, S-DAPT was associated with significant increase in rate of ST in non-DM patients. Duration of DAPT had no significant impact on rates of all-cause mortality, cardiac mortality, MI, ST and TVR among DM patients.

15 Review A comparison of the ultrathin Orsiro Hybrid sirolimus-eluting stent with contemporary drug-eluting stents: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. 2018

Lipinski, Michael J / Forrestal, Brian J / Iantorno, Micaela / Torguson, Rebecca / Waksman, Ron. ·MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, 110 Irving St. NW, Suite 4B-1, Washington, DC 20010, USA. · MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, 110 Irving St. NW, Suite 4B-1, Washington, DC 20010, USA. Electronic address: ron.waksman@medstar.net. ·Cardiovasc Revasc Med · Pubmed #29221958.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest the Orsiro sirolimus-eluting stent (O-SES), which has ultrathin struts with a biodegradable sirolimus-eluting polymer coating, performed better than contemporary drug-eluting stents (DES). We performed a meta-analysis to compare clinical outcomes for all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of O-SES vs contemporary DES. METHODS/MATERIALS: PubMed, Cochrane CENTRAL, and meeting abstracts were searched for all RCTs comparing O-SES with contemporary DES. Pooled estimates of longest available clinical outcomes at a minimum of one-year follow-up, presented as odds ratios (OR) [95% confidence intervals], were generated with random-effect models. RESULTS: We included 8 RCTs with a total of 11,176 patients (5444 O-SES and 5732 contemporary DES [3537 EES, 1295 ZES, and 1264 BP-BES) with a mean age of 65±11, 74% were male, 40% underwent PCI for stable angina, and 56% for ACS. We assessed outcomes comparing O-SES vs. everolimus-eluting stents, vs. permanent-polymer DES, and vs. all DES including biodegradable-polymer DES. Orsiro performed comparably in all categories with a trend toward a reduction in myocardial infarction (0.83 [0.68, 1.02], p=0.07) and stent thrombosis (0.75 [0.54, 1.04], p=0.08). CONCLUSION: Overall, the Orsiro SES had similar clinical outcomes to contemporary DES with a trend toward reduction in myocardial infarction and stent thrombosis.

16 Review Optical coherence tomography-guided percutaneous coronary intervention compared with other imaging guidance: a meta-analysis. 2018

Kuku, Kayode O / Ekanem, Emmanuel / Azizi, Viana / Melaku, Gebremedhin / Bui, Anh / Meirovich, Yael F / Dheendsa, Aaphtaab / Beyene, Solomon / Hideo-Kajita, Alexandre / Lipinski, Michael J / Waksman, Ron / Garcia-Garcia, Hector M. ·Division of Interventional Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, 110 Irving Street NW, Washington, DC, 20010, USA. · MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA. · Division of Interventional Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, 110 Irving Street NW, Washington, DC, 20010, USA. hector.m.garciagarcia@medstar.net. ·Int J Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #29151138.

ABSTRACT: The use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in PCI guidance is limited perhaps by the lack of adequately powered studies which compare its efficacy and outcomes to the other more popular imaging modalities. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to compare clinical outcomes following OCT-guided PCI with the other imaging modalities in two separate comparisons. We abstracted data from randomized control trials and observational comparative studies focusing on OCT versus either angiography- or IVUS-guided PCI outcomes identified following a systematic search (April 2006 and May 2017). This meta-analysis included a total of 2781 patients; OCT-guidance versus Angiography guidance (n = 1753) and OCT-guidance versus IVUS-guidance (n = 1028). Pooled estimates of outcomes, presented as odds ratios (OR) [95% confidence intervals], were generated with random-effect models. OCT guidance showed lower rates of MACE (OR 0.70 [0.49, 1.00] p = 0.05) and cardiac deaths (OR 0.40 [0.18, 0.90] p = 0.03) compared to Angiography-guidance alone but no statistical significant results for myocardial infarction (OR 0.70 [0.42, 1.16] p = 0.17), stent thrombosis (OR 1.17 [0.40, 3.43] p = 0.77) and target lesion revascularizations (OR 1.07 [0.48, 2.38] p = 0.86).No statistical significance was observed in the OCT versus IVUS comparison; MACE (OR 0.89 [0.46, 1.73] p = 0.73), cardiac deaths (OR 0.56 [0.12, 2.70] p = 0.47), MI (OR 0.56 [0.12, 2.70] p = 0.47), ST (OR 0.43 [0.06, 2.95] p = 0.39), and TLR(OR 0.99 [0.45, 2.18] p = 0.99). OCT-guided PCI in comparison with angiography-guided was associated with reduction in adverse events for the composite of cardiac deaths, myocardial infarction and repeat revascularizations. There was no statistically significant difference in clinical outcomes observed in the comparison between OCT- and IVUS-guidance.

17 Review NAFLD-NASH: An Under-Recognized Epidemic. 2018

Jennings, Joseph / Faselis, Charles / Yao, Michael D. ·Gastroenterology/Hepatology, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, United States. · Gastroenterology/Hepatology, DC VA Medical Center, Washington, DC, United States. · Internal Medicine, DC VA Medical Center, Washington, DC, United States. · Internal Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC, United States. ·Curr Vasc Pharmacol · Pubmed #28676024.

ABSTRACT: First described in 1980, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become more common although the exact incidence and prevalence is unknown. While the exact prevalence varies from region to region, the overall trend shows an increased number of patients with NAFLD. Risk factors for the development of NAFLD includes advanced age, male gender, obesity, and having elements of the metabolic syndrome. There is also an association between the presence of NAFLD and coronary atherosclerosis. Persons of Hispanic descent tend to have higher rates of NAFLD when compared with other populations. Genetics, specifically polymorphisms in the gene PNPLA3, may explain the difference among these different groups. As the rates of obesity increases throughout the world, it is anticipated that the rate of NAFLD will continue to increase. This has large scale implications on the rates of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation and cardiovascular events that could impact hundreds of millions of people.

18 Review A new generation of drug-eluting stents: Indications and outcomes of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds. 2017

Waksman, Ron. ·Director, Cardiovascular Research Advanced Education, MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute, Washington, DC, USA. ron.waksman@medstar.net. ·Cleve Clin J Med · Pubmed #29281608.

ABSTRACT: Drug-eluting stents (DES) are increasingly being used as a less invasive alternative to coronary artery bypass grafting. Early generation DES had durable polymers that provided acceptable efficacy outcomes but had high rates of stent thrombosis leading to myocardial infarction and death. Second-generation DES have improved outcomes by reducing stent thrombosis and recurrent stenosis. Newer DES with biodegradable polymers have similar efficacy as second-generation DES, but have higher rates of stent thrombosis. This review compares outcomes of bioresorbable scaffolds and looks at stent technology developments that may improve outcomes.

19 Review The State of the Absorb Bioresorbable Scaffold: Consensus From an Expert Panel. 2017

Bangalore, Sripal / Bezerra, Hiram G / Rizik, David G / Armstrong, Ehrin J / Samuels, Bruce / Naidu, Srihari S / Grines, Cindy L / Foster, Malcolm T / Choi, James W / Bertolet, Barry D / Shah, Atman P / Torguson, Rebecca / Avula, Surendra B / Wang, John C / Zidar, James P / Maksoud, Aziz / Kalyanasundaram, Arun / Yakubov, Steven J / Chehab, Bassem M / Spaedy, Anthony J / Potluri, Srini P / Caputo, Ronald P / Kondur, Ashok / Merritt, Robert F / Kaki, Amir / Quesada, Ramon / Parikh, Manish A / Toma, Catalin / Matar, Fadi / DeGregorio, Joseph / Nicholson, William / Batchelor, Wayne / Gollapudi, Raghava / Korngold, Ethan / Sumar, Riyaz / Chrysant, George S / Li, Jun / Gordon, John B / Dave, Rajesh M / Attizzani, Guilherme F / Stys, Tom P / Gigliotti, Osvaldo S / Murphy, Bruce E / Ellis, Stephen G / Waksman, Ron. ·Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: sripalbangalore@gmail.com. · Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Department of Medicine, HonorHealth and the HonorHealth Heart Group, Scottsdale, Arizona. · Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado. · Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Medicine, Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, New York. · Department of Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York. · Department of Medicine, Tennova Healthcare, Knoxville, Tennessee. · Department of Medicine, Baylor Heart and Vascular Hospital, Dallas, Texas. · Department of Medicine, North Mississippi Medical Center, Tupelo, Mississippi. · Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Medicine, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC. · Department of Medicine, Advocate Christ Hospital and Medical Center, Oak Lawn, Illinois. · Department of Medicine, MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Medicine, UNC/Rex Healthcare, Raleigh, North Carolina. · Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Research Institute of Kansas, Kansas City, Kansas. · Department of Medicine, Seattle Heart and Vascular Institute, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Medicine, OhioHealth, Columbus, Ohio. · Department of Medicine, University of Kansas, Kansas City, Kansas. · Department of Medicine, Missouri Heart Center, Columbia, Missouri. · Department of Medicine, The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano, Plano, Texas. · Department of Medicine, St. Joseph's/Trinity Hospital, Syracuse, New York. · Department of Medicine, DMC Heart Hospital/Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. · Department of Medicine, Mercy Hospital and Clinic, Springfield, Missouri. · Department of Medicine, Heart & Vascular Institute, Detroit, Michigan. · Department of Medicine, Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute, Baptist Health, Miami, Florida. · Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. · Department of Medicine, Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, Englewood, New Jersey. · Department of Medicine, York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania. · Department of Medicine, Tallahassee Memorial Hospital/Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida. · Department of Medicine, San Diego Cardiac Center, San Diego, California. · Department of Medicine, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Medicine, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona. · Department of Medicine, INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Department of Medicine, Geisinger Holy Spirit, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. · Department of Medicine, Sanford Health, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. · Department of Medicine, Seton Heart Institute, Austin, Texas. · Department of Medicine, Arkansas Heart Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Department of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. ·JACC Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #29216997.

ABSTRACT: Significant progress has been made in the percutaneous coronary intervention technique from the days of balloon angioplasty to modern-day metallic drug-eluting stents (DES). Although metallic stents solve a temporary problem of acute recoil following balloon angioplasty, they leave behind a permanent problem implicated in very late events (in addition to neoatherosclerosis). BRS were developed as a potential solution to this permanent problem, but the promise of these devices has been tempered by clinical trials showing increased risk of safety outcomes, both early and late. This is not too dissimilar to the challenges seen with first-generation DES in which refinement of deployment technique, prolongation of dual antiplatelet therapy, and technical iteration mitigated excess risk of very late stent thrombosis, making DES the treatment of choice for coronary artery disease. This white paper discusses the factors potentially implicated in the excess risks, including the scaffold consideration and deployment technique, and outlines patient and lesion selection, implantation technique, and dual antiplatelet therapy considerations to potentially mitigate this excess risk with the first-generation thick strut Absorb scaffold (Abbott Vascular, Abbott Park, Illinois). It remains to be seen whether these considerations together with technical iterations will ultimately close the gap between scaffolds and metal stents for short-term events while at the same time preserving options for future revascularization once the scaffold bioresorbs.

20 Review Does the new generation of drug-eluting stents render bare metal stents obsolete? 2017

Buchanan, Kyle / Steinvil, Arie / Waksman, Ron. ·Section of Interventional Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC 20010, United States. · Section of Interventional Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC 20010, United States. Electronic address: ron.waksman@medstar.net. ·Cardiovasc Revasc Med · Pubmed #28941481.

ABSTRACT: The development of bare metal coronary stents revolutionized the treatment of coronary artery disease by reducing rates of acute vessel closure and restenosis associated with balloon angioplasty. However, bare metal stents (BMS) resulted in high rates of restenosis and led to the development of drug-eluting stents (DES). Those first-generation DES were followed by successive generations of DES that included improvements, such as biodegradable and more biocompatible polymers. Despite the superiority of the current DES compared to BMS, a subset of patients still receives BMS. The following paper reviews the literature comparing the safety and efficacy of newer generation DES to BMS in such patients and ultimately challenges the use of BMS in contemporary current DES era.

21 Review The Lipid-Rich Plaque Study of vulnerable plaques and vulnerable patients: Study design and rationale. 2017

Waksman, Ron / Torguson, Rebecca / Spad, Mia-Ashley / Garcia-Garcia, Hector / Ware, James / Wang, Rui / Madden, Sean / Shah, Priti / Muller, James. ·MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Section of Interventional Cardiology, Washington, DC. Electronic address: ron.waksman@medstar.net. · MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Section of Interventional Cardiology, Washington, DC. · Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, MA. · Infraredx, Burlington, MA. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Boston, MA. ·Am Heart J · Pubmed #28938968.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that the outcome post-PCI could be improved by the detection and subsequent treatment of vulnerable patients and lipid-rich vulnerable coronary plaques (LRP). A near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) catheter capable of detecting LRP is being evaluated in The Lipid-Rich Plaque Study. STUDY DESIGN: The LRP Study is an international, multicenter, prospective cohort study conducted in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent cardiac catheterization with possible ad hoc PCI for an index event. Patient level and plaque level events were detected by follow-up in the subsequent 2 years. Enrollment began in February 2014 and was completed in March 2016; a total of 1,562 patients were enrolled. Adjudication of new coronary event occurrence and de novo culprit lesion location during the 2-year follow-up is performed by an independent clinical end-points committee (CEC) blinded to NIRS-IVUS findings. The first analysis of the results will be performed when at least 20 de novo events have occurred for which follow-up angiographic data and baseline NIRS-IVUS measurements are available. It is expected that results of the study will be announced in 2018. SUMMARY: The LRP Study will test the hypotheses that NIRS-IVUS imaging to detect LRP in patients can identify vulnerable patients and vulnerable plaques. Identification of vulnerable patients will assist future studies of novel systemic therapies; identification of localized vulnerable plaques would enhance future studies of possible preventive measures.

22 Review The Identification of Calcified Coronary Plaque Is Associated With Initiation and Continuation of Pharmacological and Lifestyle Preventive Therapies: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 2017

Gupta, Ankur / Lau, Emily / Varshney, Ravi / Hulten, Edward A / Cheezum, Michael / Bittencourt, Marcio S / Blaha, Michael J / Wong, Nathan D / Blumenthal, Roger S / Budoff, Matthew J / Umscheid, Craig A / Nasir, Khurram / Blankstein, Ron. ·Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Washington, DC. · Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia. · Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Center for Clinical and Epidemiological Research, University Hospital, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil; Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein and Faculdade Israelita de Ciencias da Saude Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · John Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, Maryland. · University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California. · Harbor-University of California at Los Angeles, Torrance, California. · Penn Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · John Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Baltimore, Maryland; Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, Florida. · Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: rblankstein@bwh.harvard.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #28797402.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the odds of initiation or continuation of pharmacological and lifestyle preventive therapies in patients with nonzero versus zero coronary artery calcium (CAC) score detected on cardiac computed tomography. BACKGROUND: Detection of calcified coronary plaque could serve as a motivational tool for physicians and patients to intensify preventive therapies. METHODS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE (Excerpta Medica database), Web of Science, Cochrane CENTRAL (Cochrane central register of controlled trials), ClinicalTrials.gov, and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for studies evaluating the association of CAC scores with downstream pharmacological or lifestyle interventions for prevention of cardiovascular disease. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) of downstream interventions were obtained using the DerSimonian and Laird random effects model. RESULTS: After a review of 6,256 citations and 54 full-text papers, 6 studies (11,256 participants, mean follow-up time: 1.6 to 6.0 years) were included. Pooled estimates of the odds of aspirin initiation (OR: 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.8 to 3.8), lipid-lowering medication initiation (OR: 2.9; 95% CI: 1.9 to 4.4), blood pressure-lowering medication initiation (OR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.6 to 2.3), lipid-lowering medication continuation (OR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.6 to 3.3), increase in exercise (OR: 1.8; 95% CI: 1.4 to 2.4), and dietary change (OR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.5 to 2.5) were higher in individuals with nonzero CAC versus zero CAC scores, but not for aspirin or blood pressure-lowering medication continuation. When assessed within individual studies, these findings remained significant after adjustment for baseline patient characteristics and cardiovascular risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review and meta-analysis suggests that nonzero CAC score, identifying calcified coronary plaque, significantly increases the likelihood of initiation or continuation of pharmacological and lifestyle therapies for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

23 Review Hydrophilic vs lipophilic statins in coronary artery disease: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. 2017

Bytyçi, Ibadete / Bajraktari, Gani / Bhatt, Deepak L / Morgan, Charity J / Ahmed, Ali / Aronow, Wilbert S / Banach, Maciej / Anonymous4390906. ·Clinic of Cardiology, University Clinical Centre of Kosovo, Prishtina, Kosovo. · Clinic of Cardiology, University Clinical Centre of Kosovo, Prishtina, Kosovo; Medical Faculty, University of Prishtina, Prishtina, Kosovo. · Brigham and Women's Hospital Heart & Vascular Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · VA Medical Center and George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. · University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA. · Department of Hypertension, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland; Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital Research Institute (PMMHRI), Lodz, Poland; Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Zielona Gora, Zielona Gora, Poland. Electronic address: maciejbanach@aol.co.uk. ·J Clin Lipidol · Pubmed #28506385.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Some available experimental studies have reported that hydrophilic statins might have advantages compared with lipophilic statins in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the potential differences of lipophilic and hydrophilic statins in patients with CAD. METHODS: We systematically searched selected electronic databases up to September 2016 to select RCTs, which compared clinical outcomes of hydrophilic vs lipophilic statins. Primary endpoints were cardiovascular (CV) events: major adverse cardiac events, myocardial infarction, cardiac revascularization, stroke, CV death, CV hospitalization, and all-cause mortality. Secondary endpoints were safety parameters: drug discontinuation, statin-associated muscle symptoms and alanine aminotransferase level increase. RESULTS: A total of 11,697 patients from 11 RCTs, randomly allocated to lipophilic (n = 5736) or hydrophilic statins (n = 5961), with a mean follow-up 14 months, were included in the meta-analysis. In comparison with hydrophilic, the lipophilic statins showed similar risk reduction for major adverse cardiac events (relative risk = 0.969, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.835-1.125, P = .682), myocardial infarction (0.880, 95% CI: 0.731-1.058, P = .174), CV death (0.757, 95% CI: 0.486-1.180, P = .219), and all-cause mortality (0.797, 95% CI: 0.590-1.075, P = .137), as well as cardiac revascularization, stroke, drug discontinuation, and statin-associated muscle symptoms. CV hospitalization was lower (0.789, 95% CI: 0.643-0.969, P = .024) and alanine aminotransferase elevation was higher (2.689, 95% CI: 1.841-3.954, P ≤ .001) in lipophilic than in hydrophilic-treated patients. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, similarity between hydrophilic and lipophilic statins holds between various clinical CAD settings.

24 Review Breast arterial calcification association with coronary artery calcium scoring and implications for cardiovascular risk assessment in women. 2017

Ryan, Angela J / Choi, Andrew D / Choi, Brian G / Lewis, Jannet F. ·Division of Cardiology, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia. ·Clin Cardiol · Pubmed #28444996.

ABSTRACT: Breast arterial calcification (BAC) is a type of medial artery calcification that can be seen incidentally on mammography. Studies have suggested association of BAC with cardiovascular risk factors, coronary artery disease (CAD), and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recently published studies have also suggested a modest correlation of BAC with coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring. Roughly 40 million mammograms are already performed annually in the United States with overlap in patients that undergo CAD screening via CAC scoring. Thus, identification of cardiovascular risk by demonstrating an association between BAC and CAC may enable an instrumental sex-specific methodology to identify asymptomatic women at risk for CAD. The purpose of this article is to review the current state of the literature for BAC and its association with CAC, to review contemporary breast cancer screening guidelines, and to discuss the clinical implications of these findings.

25 Review Does direct stenting with drug-eluting stents improve outcome? A meta-analysis of 10,900 patients. 2017

Magalhaes, Marco A / Minha, Sa'ar / Lhermusier, Thibault / Pendyala, Lakshmana / Escarcega, Ricardo O / Baker, Nevin C / Torguson, Rebecca / Satler, Lowell F / Pichard, Augusto / Waksman, Ron. ·Department of Internal Medicine, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC. · Division of Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC. · Department of Cardiology/Division of Interventional Cardiology, Hospital Alemão Oswaldo Cruz, Sao Paulo, Brazil. ·Catheter Cardiovasc Interv · Pubmed #27862877.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to summarize the outcomes of patients undergoing direct stenting (DS) with drug-eluting stents (DES) compared to those who underwent balloon predilatation. BACKGROUND: DS has been associated with improved outcomes in the bare-metal stent era. Although DS with DES implantation has been increasingly adopted in clinical practice, its safety and effectiveness remain controversial. METHODS: The search criteria identified 546 studies in the Medline/PubMed, Cochrane, and EMBASE databases from 2001 to July 2014. From these, seven studies totaling 10,900 patients were selected. Summarized estimates [odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals] were obtained using a random-effects model. The primary outcomes were a composite of major adverse cardiac events (MACE), including all-cause death, myocardial infarction (MI), and repeat revascularization. The secondary outcomes included a composite of death and MI and the rates of target lesion revascularization (TLR). RESULTS: Overall, 4101 (38%) and 6799 (62%) patients underwent DS with DES and balloon pre-dilatation, respectively. DS with DES reduced the likelihood of MACE (OR: 0.81 [0.71-0.93]). Additionally, DS with DES was associated with reduced rates of death/MI (OR: 0.76 [0.62-0.92]), and TLR (OR: 0.66 [0.44-0.98]). CONCLUSIONS: DS with DES is safe and may be associated with better outcomes in selected patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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