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Crohn Disease HELP
Based on 16,186 articles published since 2010
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These are the 16186 published articles about Crohn Disease that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Clinical Practice Guideline for the Medical Management of Pediatric Luminal Crohn's Disease. 2019

Mack, David R / Benchimol, Eric I / Critch, Jeff / deBruyn, Jennifer / Tse, Frances / Moayyedi, Paul / Church, Peter / Deslandres, Colette / El-Matary, Wael / Huynh, Hien / Jantchou, Prévost / Lawrence, Sally / Otley, Anthony / Sherlock, Mary / Walters, Thomas / Kappelman, Michael D / Sadowski, Dan / Marshall, John K / Griffiths, Anne. ·Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Inflammatory Bowel Disease Centre, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Ch.I.L.D. Foundation Canadian Children IBD Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Inflammatory Bowel Disease Centre, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Ch.I.L.D. Foundation Canadian Children IBD Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Ch.I.L.D. Foundation Canadian Children IBD Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. · Ch.I.L.D. Foundation Canadian Children IBD Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Division of Gastroenterology and Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Ch.I.L.D. Foundation Canadian Children IBD Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; IBD Centre, Department of Paediatrics, SickKids Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Ch.I.L.D. Foundation Canadian Children IBD Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Sainte-Justine, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Ch.I.L.D. Foundation Canadian Children IBD Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Ch.I.L.D. Foundation Canadian Children IBD Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Department of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology), Stollery Children's Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Ch.I.L.D. Foundation Canadian Children IBD Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Ch.I.L.D. Foundation Canadian Children IBD Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Ch.I.L.D. Foundation Canadian Children IBD Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, University of North Carolina, Hospital-Children's Specialty Clinic, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. · Division of Gastroenterology, Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Ch.I.L.D. Foundation Canadian Children IBD Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; IBD Centre, Department of Paediatrics, SickKids Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: anne.griffiths@sickkids.ca. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #31320109.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: We aim to provide guidance for medical treatment of luminal Crohn's disease in children. METHODS: We performed a systematic search of publication databases to identify studies of medical management of pediatric Crohn's disease. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations were rated according to the GRADE (Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) approach. We developed statements through an iterative online platform and then finalized and voted on them. RESULTS: The consensus includes 25 statements focused on medical treatment options. Consensus was not reached, and no recommendations were made, for 14 additional statements, largely due to lack of evidence. The group suggested corticosteroid therapies (including budesonide for mild to moderate disease). The group suggested exclusive enteral nutrition for induction therapy and biologic tumor necrosis factor antagonists for induction and maintenance therapy at diagnosis or at early stages of severe disease, and for patients failed by steroid and immunosuppressant induction therapies. The group recommended against the use of oral 5-aminosalicylate for induction or maintenance therapy in patients with moderate disease, and recommended against thiopurines for induction therapy, corticosteroids for maintenance therapy, and cannabis in any role. The group was unable to clearly define the role of concomitant immunosuppressants during initiation therapy with a biologic agent, although thiopurine combinations are not recommended for male patients. No consensus was reached on the role of aminosalicylates in treatment of patients with mild disease, antibiotics or vedolizumab for induction or maintenance therapy, or methotrexate for induction therapy. Patients in clinical remission who are receiving immunomodulators should be assessed for mucosal healing within 1 year of treatment initiation. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence-based medical treatment of Crohn's disease in children is recommended, with thorough ongoing assessments to define treatment success.

2 Guideline Crohn's disease - treatment with biological medication. 2019

Zaltman, Cyrla / Amarante, Heda / Brenner, Marta Machado / Costa, Marcia Henriques Magalhaes / Flores, Cristina / Leal, Raquel Franco / Grain, Jair Francisco de Santana / Zeroncio, Marco. ·Brazilian Study Group on Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Avenida Brigadeiro Faria Lima, 2391 CJ 102 - 100 Andar - Jardim Paulistano, São Paulo - SP, Brasil. · Brazilian Gastroenterology Federation, Avenida Brigadeiro Faria Lima, 2391 CJ 102 - 100 Andar - Jardim Paulistano, São Paulo - SP, Brasil. · Brazilian Coloproctology Society, Avenida Marechal Câmara, 160 sala 916 - Centro, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brasil. ·Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) · Pubmed #31066809.

ABSTRACT: The Guidelines Project, an initiative of the Brazilian Medical Association, aims to combine information from the medical field in order to standardize producers to assist the reasoning and decision-making of doctors. The information provided through this project must be assessed and criticized by the physician responsible for the conduct that will be adopted, depending on the conditions and the clinical status of each patient.

3 Guideline The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland consensus guidelines in surgery for inflammatory bowel disease. 2018

Brown, S R / Fearnhead, N S / Faiz, O D / Abercrombie, J F / Acheson, A G / Arnott, R G / Clark, S K / Clifford, S / Davies, R J / Davies, M M / Douie, W J P / Dunlop, M G / Epstein, J C / Evans, M D / George, B D / Guy, R J / Hargest, R / Hawthorne, A B / Hill, J / Hughes, G W / Limdi, J K / Maxwell-Armstrong, C A / O'Connell, P R / Pinkney, T D / Pipe, J / Sagar, P M / Singh, B / Soop, M / Terry, H / Torkington, J / Verjee, A / Walsh, C J / Warusavitarne, J H / Williams, A B / Williams, G L / Wilson, R G / Anonymous3050971. ·Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK. · Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. · St Mark's Hospital, Middlesex, Harrow, UK. · Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK. · Patient Liaison Group, Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland, Royal College of Surgeons of England, London, UK. · IA, Danehurst Court, Rochford, UK. · University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK. · University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, Plymouth, UK. · Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, UK. · Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK. · Morriston Hospital, Morriston, Swansea, UK. · Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. · Manchester Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · The Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. · St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK. · Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. · University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK. · Crohn's and Colitis UK, St Albans, UK. · Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Arrowe Park Hospital, Upton, UK. · Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, UK. ·Colorectal Dis · Pubmed #30508274.

ABSTRACT: AIM: There is a requirement of an expansive and up to date review of surgical management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can dovetail with the medical guidelines produced by the British Society of Gastroenterology. METHODS: Surgeons who are members of the ACPGBI with a recognised interest in IBD were invited to contribute various sections of the guidelines. They were directed to produce a procedure based document using literature searches that were systematic, comprehensible, transparent and reproducible. Levels of evidence were graded. An editorial board was convened to ensure consistency of style, presentation and quality. Each author was asked to provide a set of recommendations which were evidence based and unambiguous. These recommendations were submitted to the whole guideline group and scored. They were then refined and submitted to a second vote. Only those that achieved >80% consensus at level 5 (strongly agree) or level 4 (agree) after 2 votes were included in the guidelines. RESULTS: All aspects of surgical care for IBD have been included along with 157 recommendations for management. CONCLUSION: These guidelines provide an up to date and evidence based summary of the current surgical knowledge in the management of IBD and will serve as a useful practical text for clinicians performing this type of surgery.

4 Guideline [Definition, epidemiology and risk factors of obstetric anal sphincter injuries: CNGOF Perineal Prevention and Protection in Obstetrics Guidelines]. 2018

Thubert, T / Cardaillac, C / Fritel, X / Winer, N / Dochez, V. ·Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, hôpitaux de Nantes, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 38, boulevard Jean-Monnet, 44000 Nantes, France; Université de Nantes, 1, rue Gaston-Veil, 44000 Nantes, France; GMC-UPMC 01, GREEN (Groupe de recherche clinique en neurourologie), 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. Electronic address: thibault.thubert@chu-nantes.fr. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, hôpitaux de Nantes, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 38, boulevard Jean-Monnet, 44000 Nantes, France; Université de Nantes, 1, rue Gaston-Veil, 44000 Nantes, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU de Poitiers, 2, rue de la Milétrie, 86021 Poitiers, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #30385355.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review was to agree on a definition of the obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), to determine the prevalence and risk factors. METHODS: A comprehensive review of the literature on the obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), establishment of levels of evidence (NP), and grades of recommendation according to the methodology of the recommendations for clinical practice. RESULTS: To classify obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), we have used the WHO-RCOG classification, which lists 4 degrees of severity. To designate obstetric anal sphincter injuries, we have used the acronym OASIS, rather than the standard French terms of "complete perineum" and "complicated complete perineum". OASIS with only isolated involvement of the EAS (3a and 3b) appears to have a better functional prognosis than OASIS affecting the IAS or the anorectal mucosa (3c and 4) (LE3). The prevalence of women with ano-rectal symptoms increases with the severity of the OASIS (LE3). In the long term, 35-60% of women who had an OASIS have anal or fecal incontinence (LE3). The prevalence of an OASI in the general population is between 0.25 to 6%. The prevalence of OASIS in primiparous women is between 1.4 and 16% and thus, should be considered more important than among the multiparous women (0.4 to 2.7%). In women with a history of previous OASIS, the risk of occurrence is higher and varies between 5.1 and 10.7% following childbirth. The priority in this context remains the training of childbirth professionals (midwives and obstetricians) to detect these injuries in the delivery room, immediately after the birth. The training and awareness of these practitioners of OASIS diagnosis improves its detection in the delivery room (LE2). Professional experience is associated with better detection of OASIS (LE3) (4). Continuing professional education of obstetrics professionals in the diagnosis and repair of OASIS must be encouraged (Grade C). In the case of second-degree perineal tear, the use of ultrasound in the delivery room improves the diagnosis of OASIS (LE2). Ultrasound decreases the prevalence of symptoms of severe anal incontinence at 1 year (LE2). The diagnosis of OASIS is improved by the use of endo-anal ultrasonography in post-partum (72h-6weeks) (LE2). The principal factors associated with OASIS are nulliparity and instrumental (vaginal operative) delivery; the others are advanced maternal age, history of OASIS, macrosomia, midline episiotomy, posterior cephalic positions, and long labour (LE2). The presence of a perianal lesion (perianal fissure, or anorectal or rectovaginal fistula) is associated with an increased risk of 4th degree lacerations (LE3). Crohn's disease without perianal involvement is not associated with an excess risk of OASIS (LE3). For women with type III genital mutilation, deinfibulation before delivery is associated with a reduction in the risk of OASIS (LE3); in this situation, deinfibulation is recommended before delivery (grade C). CONCLUSION: It is necessary to use a consensus definition of the OASIS to be able to better detect and treat them.

5 Guideline Recommendations of the Spanish Working Group on Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis (GETECCU) on the utility of the determination of faecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease. 2018

Guardiola, Jordi / Lobatón, Triana / Cerrillo, Elena / Ferreiro-Iglesias, Rocío / Gisbert, Javier P / Domènech, Eugeni / Chaparro, María / Esteve, Maria / Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco / Anonymous3170964. ·Servei d'Aparell Digestiu, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL), Universitat de Barcelona, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, España. Electronic address: jguardiola@bellvitgehospital.cat. · Servei d'Aparell Digestiu, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, España; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), España. · Servei d'Aparell Digestiu, Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia, España; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), España. · Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, La Coruña, España. · Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Princesa (IIS-IP), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, España; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), España. · Servei d'Aparell Digestiu, Hospital Universitari Mútua Terrassa, Terrassa, Barcelona, España; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), España. · Servei d'Aparell Digestiu, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL), Universitat de Barcelona, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, España. ·Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #30293556.

ABSTRACT: The management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is currently based on the objective evaluation of intestinal lesions. It would therefore be interesting to have access to simple and non-invasive tools to monitor IBD activity and to identify the presence of lesions. Faecal calprotectin (FC) is the main cytosolic protein of neutrophils, it is resistant to bacterial degradation and it is stable at room temperature for several days, characteristics that make it suitable for use in clinical practice. It can be used to differentiate between inflammatory and functional processes, it correlates with endoscopic activity, it is associated with clinical and endoscopic response to treatment and it has short-term prognostic value. This paper offers an up-to-date perspective on the information that FC can provide clinicians to aid diagnosis, monitoring and management of IBD.

6 Guideline ACG Clinical Guideline: Management of Crohn's Disease in Adults. 2018

Lichtenstein, Gary R / Loftus, Edward V / Isaacs, Kim L / Regueiro, Miguel D / Gerson, Lauren B / Sands, Bruce E. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA. · Dr Henry D. Janowitz Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #29610508.

ABSTRACT: Crohn's disease is an idiopathic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology with genetic, immunologic, and environmental influences. The incidence of Crohn's disease has steadily increased over the past several decades. The diagnosis and treatment of patients with Crohn's disease has evolved since the last practice guideline was published. These guidelines represent the official practice recommendations of the American College of Gastroenterology and were developed under the auspices of the Practice Parameters Committee for the management of adult patients with Crohn's disease. These guidelines are established for clinical practice with the intent of suggesting preferable approaches to particular medical problems as established by interpretation and collation of scientifically valid research, derived from extensive review of published literature. When exercising clinical judgment, health-care providers should incorporate this guideline along with patient's needs, desires, and their values in order to fully and appropriately care for patients with Crohn's disease. This guideline is intended to be flexible, not necessarily indicating the only acceptable approach, and should be distinguished from standards of care that are inflexible and rarely violated. To evaluate the level of evidence and strength of recommendations, we used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The Committee reviews guidelines in depth, with participation from experienced clinicians and others in related fields. The final recommendations are based on the data available at the time of the production of the document and may be updated with pertinent scientific developments at a later time.

7 Guideline Belgian IBD research group (BIRD) position statement 2017 on the use of biosimilars in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). 2018

Franchimont, D / Ferrante, M / Louis, E / De Vos, M / Dewit, O / Van Hootegem, P / Moreels, T / Liefferinckx, C / Bossuyt, P / Baert, F / Rahier, J F / Vermeire, S. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Hopital Erasme Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospitals Leuven, KU Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liege, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology - Ghent University Hospital - Ghent University, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc UCL Bruxelles, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, AZ Sint Lucas Brugge, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, Imeldaziekenhuis, Bonheiden, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, AZ Delta Roeselare, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, CHU UCL Mont-Godinne, Belgium. ·Acta Gastroenterol Belg · Pubmed #29562378.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Guideline Second N-ECCO Consensus Statements on the European Nursing Roles in Caring for Patients with Crohn's Disease or Ulcerative Colitis. 2018

Kemp, Karen / Dibley, Lesley / Chauhan, Usha / Greveson, Kay / Jäghult, Susanna / Ashton, Katherine / Buckton, Stephanie / Duncan, Julie / Hartmann, Petra / Ipenburg, Nienke / Moortgat, Liesbeth / Theeuwen, Rosaline / Verwey, Marthe / Younge, Lisa / Sturm, Andreas / Bager, Palle. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Manchester NHS University Foundation Trust / School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of ManchesterManchester, UK. · Faculty of Education and Health, University of Greenwich, London. · Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK. · Digestive Disease, McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Canada. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. · Karolinska Institutet Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm Gastro Centre, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hull & East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Hull, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Sunshine Coast University Hospital, Birtinya QLD, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Gastroenterologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Minden, Minden, Germany. · IJsselland Hospital, Capelle a/d IJssel, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology, AZ Delta Roeselare-Menen, Roeselare, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, Leiden University Medical Center [LUMC], Leiden, The Netherlands. · IBD Nurse Specialist, Barts Health - Royal London Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, German Red Cross Hospital, DRK Kliniken Berlin I Westend, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #29509882.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Guideline Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for inflammatory bowel disease. 2018

Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi / Kobayashi, Taku / Ueno, Fumiaki / Matsui, Toshiyuki / Hirai, Fumihito / Inoue, Nagamu / Kato, Jun / Kobayashi, Kenji / Kobayashi, Kiyonori / Koganei, Kazutaka / Kunisaki, Reiko / Motoya, Satoshi / Nagahori, Masakazu / Nakase, Hiroshi / Omata, Fumio / Saruta, Masayuki / Watanabe, Toshiaki / Tanaka, Toshiaki / Kanai, Takanori / Noguchi, Yoshinori / Takahashi, Ken-Ichi / Watanabe, Kenji / Hibi, Toshifumi / Suzuki, Yasuo / Watanabe, Mamoru / Sugano, Kentaro / Shimosegawa, Tooru. ·Guidelines Committee for Creating and Evaluating the ''Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Japan'', The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE), 6F Shimbashi i-MARK Building, 2-6-2 Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 105-0004, Japan. · Guidelines Committee for Creating and Evaluating the ''Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Japan'', The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE), 6F Shimbashi i-MARK Building, 2-6-2 Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 105-0004, Japan. tiger44@wa2.so-net.ne.jp. · Ofuna Central Hospital, 6-2-24 Ofuna, Kamakura-shi, Kanagawa, 247-0056, Japan. tiger44@wa2.so-net.ne.jp. ·J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #29429045.

ABSTRACT: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disorder involving mainly the intestinal tract, but possibly other gastrointestinal and extraintestinal organs. Although etiology is still uncertain, recent knowledge in pathogenesis has accumulated, and novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities have become available for clinical use. Therefore, the previous guidelines were urged to be updated. In 2016, the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology revised the previous versions of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) in Japanese. A total of 59 clinical questions for 9 categories (1. clinical features of IBD; 2. diagnosis; 3. general consideration in treatment; 4. therapeutic interventions for IBD; 5. treatment of UC; 6. treatment of CD; 7. extraintestinal complications; 8. cancer surveillance; 9. IBD in special situation) were selected, and a literature search was performed for the clinical questions with use of the MEDLINE, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases. The guidelines were developed with the basic concept of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Recommendations were made using Delphi rounds. This English version was produced and edited based on the existing updated guidelines in Japanese.

10 Guideline Recommendations of the Spanish Working Group on Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis (GETECCU) on the use of thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease. 2018

Bermejo, Fernando / Aguas, Mariam / Chaparro, María / Domènech, Eugeni / Echarri, Ana / García-Planella, Esther / Guerra, Iván / Gisbert, Javier P / López-Sanromán, Antonio / Anonymous550934. ·Servicio de Digestivo, Hospital Universitario de Fuenlabrada, Fuenlabrada, Madrid, España. Electronic address: fbermejos1@gmail.com. · Servicio de Digestivo, Hospital Universitari La Fe, Valencia, España; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), España. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), España; Servicios de Digestivo, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Princesa (IIS-IP), Madrid, España. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), España; Servicio de Digestivo, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, España. · Servicio de Digestivo, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Ferrol, Ferrol, España. · Servicio de Digestivo, Hospital Universitari Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Digestivo, Hospital Universitario de Fuenlabrada, Fuenlabrada, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. ·Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #29357999.

ABSTRACT: Thiopurines (azathioprine and mercaptopurine) are widely used in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In this paper, we review the main indications for their use, as well as practical aspects on efficacy, safety and method of administration. They are mainly used to maintain remission in steroid-dependent disease or with ciclosporin to control a severe ulcerative colitis flare-up, as well as to prevent postoperative Crohn's disease recurrence, and also in combination therapy with biologics. About 30-40% of patients will not respond to treatment and 10-20% will not tolerate it due to adverse effects. Before they are prescribed, immunisation status against certain infections should be checked. Determination of thiopurine methyltransferase activity (TPMT) is not mandatory but it increases initial safety. The appropriate dose is 2.5mg/kg/day for azathioprine and 1.5mg/kg/day for mercaptopurine. Some adverse effects are idiosyncratic (digestive intolerance, pancreatitis, fever, arthromyalgia, rash and some forms of hepatotoxicity). Others are dose-dependent (myelotoxicity and other types of hepatotoxicity), and their surveillance should never be interrupted during treatment. If therapy fails or adverse effects develop, management can include switching from one thiopurine to the other, reducing the dose, combining low doses of azathioprine with allopurinol and assessing metabolites, before their use is ruled out. Non-melanoma skin cancer, lymphomas and urinary tract tumours have been linked to thiopurine therapy. Thiopurine use is safe during conception, pregnancy and breastfeeding.

11 Guideline Consensus Recommendations for Evaluation, Interpretation, and Utilization of Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Enterography in Patients With Small Bowel Crohn's Disease. 2018

Bruining, David H / Zimmermann, Ellen M / Loftus, Edward V / Sandborn, William J / Sauer, Cary G / Strong, Scott A / Anonymous1330933. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Gastroenterology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. · Division of Gastroenterology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Emory University, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia. · Division of GI Surgery, Northwestern Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #29329905.

ABSTRACT: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance enterography have become routine small bowel imaging tests to evaluate patients with established or suspected Crohn's disease, but the interpretation and use of these imaging modalities can vary widely. A shared understanding of imaging findings, nomenclature, and utilization will improve the utility of these imaging techniques to guide treatment options, as well as assess for treatment response and complications. Representatives from the Society of Abdominal Radiology Crohn's Disease-Focused Panel, the Society of Pediatric Radiology, the American Gastroenterological Association, and other experts, systematically evaluated evidence for imaging findings associated with small bowel Crohn's disease enteric inflammation and established recommendations for the evaluation, interpretation, and use of computed tomography and magnetic resonance enterography in small bowel Crohn's disease. This work makes recommendations for imaging findings that indicate small bowel Crohn's disease, how inflammatory small bowel Crohn's disease and its complications should be described, elucidates potential extra-enteric findings that may be seen at imaging, and recommends that cross-sectional enterography should be performed at diagnosis of Crohn's disease and considered for small bowel Crohn's disease monitoring paradigms. A useful morphologic construct describing how imaging findings evolve with disease progression and response is described, and standard impressions for radiologic reports that convey meaningful information to gastroenterologists and surgeons are presented.

12 Guideline Recommendations of the Spanish Working Group on Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis (GETECCU) and the Association of Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis Patients (ACCU) in the management of psychological problems in Inflammatory Bowel Disease patients. 2018

Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel / Marín-Jiménez, Ignacio / Panadero, Abel / Guardiola, Jordi / Cañas, Mercedes / Gobbo Montoya, Milena / Modino, Yolanda / Alcaín, Guillermo / Bosca-Watts, Marta Maia / Calvet, Xavier / Casellas, Francesc / Chaparro, María / Fernández Salazar, Luis / Ferreiro-Iglesias, Rocío / Ginard, Daniel / Iborra, Marisa / Manceñido, Noemí / Mañosa, Miriam / Merino, Olga / Rivero, Montserrat / Roncero, Oscar / Sempere, Laura / Vega, Pablo / Zabana, Yamile / Mínguez, Miguel / Nos, Pilar / Gisbert, Javier P. ·Unidad de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Complexo Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, España. Electronic address: manubarreiro@hotmail.com. · Unidad de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Servicio de Aparato digestivo e Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón (IiSGM), Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, España. · ACCU Madrid, Madrid, España. · Unidad de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Servicio de Aparato digestivo, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge-IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, España. · Unidad de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, España. · Positivamente Centro de Psicología, Madrid, España. · Confederación de Asociaciones de Enfermos de Crohn y Colitis Ulcerosa de España (ACCU España), Madrid. · Unidad de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, UGC Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga, España. · Hospital Clínico Universitario de Valencia, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia, España. · Corporación Sanitaria ParcTaulí, Sabadell, España. · Unidad de Atención Crohn-Colitis, Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Valld'Hebron, Barcelona, España. · Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Princesa (IIS-IP), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), Madrid, España. · Hospital Clínico Universitario de Valladolid, Valladolid, España. · Unidad de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Complexo Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, España. · Hospital Universitario Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, España. · Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, CIBEREHD, Valencia, España. · Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Infanta Sofía, San Sebastián de los Reyes, Madrid, España. · Hospital Universitario GermansTrias i Pujol, Badalona, España. · Hospital Universitario de Cruces, Baracaldo, España. · Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, España. · Complejo Hospitalario La Mancha Centro, Alcázar de San Juan, España. · Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, España. · Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Ourense, Orense, España. · Hospital Universitario Mutua de Terrassa CIBERehd, Terrasa, España. ·Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #29275001.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: To establish recommendations for the management of psychological problems affecting patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: A meeting of a group of IBD experts made up of doctors, psychologists, nurses and patient representatives was held. The following were presented: 1) Results of a previous focal group, 2) Results of doctor and patient surveys, 3) Results of a systematic review of tools for detecting anxiety and depression. A guided discussion was then held about the most important psychological and emotional problems associated with IBD, appropriate referral criteria and situations to be avoided. The validated instrument most applicable to clinical practice was selected. A recommendations document and a Delphi survey were designed. The survey was sent to the group and to a scientific committee of the GETECCU group in order to establish the level of agreement with these recommendations. RESULTS: Fifteen recommendations were established linked to 3 key processes: 1) What steps should be taken to identify psychological problems at an IBD appointment; 2) What are the criteria for referring patients to a mental health specialist; 3) How to approach psychological problems. CONCLUSIONS: Resources should be made available to healthcare professionals so that they can treat these problems during consultations, identify the disorders which could affect the clinical course of the disease and determine their impact on the patient's life in order that these can be treated and followed up by the most suitable professional. These recommendations could serve as a basis for redesigning IBD services or processes and as justification for the training of healthcare personnel.

13 Guideline ECCO-ESCP Consensus on Surgery for Crohn's Disease. 2018

Bemelman, Willem A / Warusavitarne, Janindra / Sampietro, Gianluca M / Serclova, Zuzana / Zmora, Oded / Luglio, Gaetano / de Buck van Overstraeten, Anthony / Burke, John P / Buskens, Christianne J / Colombo, Francesco / Dias, Jorge Amil / Eliakim, Rami / Elosua, Tomás / Gecim, I Ethem / Kolacek, Sanja / Kierkus, Jaroslaw / Kolho, Kaija-Leena / Lefevre, Jérémie H / Millan, Monica / Panis, Yves / Pinkney, Thomas / Russell, Richard K / Shwaartz, Chaya / Vaizey, Carolynne / Yassin, Nuha / D'Hoore, André. ·Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center [AMC], Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, St. Mark's Hospital, Harrow, UK. · Department of Surgery, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco - Ospedale "Luigi Sacco" Polo Universitario, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, NH Hospital, a.s., Horovice, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. · Surgical Coloproctology Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Department of Abdominal Surgery, UZ Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Colorectal Surgery, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Hospital S. João [University Hospital], Porto, Portugal. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. · Servicio de Cirugía, Complejo Asistencial Universitario de León, León, Spain. · Colorectal Unit, Ankara University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey. · University Department of Paediatrics and Referral Center for Paediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition, Children's Hospital Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Feeding Disorders, and Pediatrics, Children's Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw, Poland. · Paediatric Gastroenterology of the Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of General and Digestive Surgery, Hôpital Saint-Antoine and University Paris VI, Paris, France. · Department of Surgery, Hospital Universitari Joan XXIII de Tarragona, Tarragona, Spain. · Department of Colorectal Surgery, Beaujon Hospital [APHP] and University Paris VII Denis-Diderot, Clichy, France. · Academic Department of Surgery, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Surgery, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan, Israel. · IBD Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, St Mark's Hospital, London, UK. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #28498901.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline [Indications and follow-up for autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases: Guidelines from the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)]. 2017

Pugnet, Grégory / Castilla-Llorente, Christina / Puyade, Mathieu / Terriou, Louis / Badoglio, Manuela / Deligny, Christophe / Guillaume-Jugnot, Perrine / Labeyrie, Céline / Benzidia, Ilham / Faivre, Hélène / Lansiaux, Pauline / Marjanovic, Zora / Bourhis, Jean-Henri / Faucher, Catherine / Furst, Sabine / Huynh, Anne / Martin, Thierry / Vermersch, Patrick / Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim / Farge, Dominique. ·CHU de Toulouse, hôpital Purpan, service de médecine interne, 1, place Baylac, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Institut Gustave-Roussy, service d'hématologie, 114, rue Édouard-Vaillant, 94800 Villejuif, France. · Cité hospitalière de la Milétrie, hôpital Jean-Bernard, service d'hématologie, 2, rue de la Milétrie, 86021 Poitiers cedex, France. · CHRU, hôpital Claude-Huriez, service des maladies du sang, rue Michel-Polonovski, 59037 Lille cedex, France. · Hôpital Saint-Antoine, EBMT data office, 184, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Antoine, 75571 Paris cedex 12, France. · CHU de Fort-de-France, service de médecine interne-rhumatologie, 97261 Fort-de-France, Martinique. · Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, service de médecine interne, 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. · CHU Bicêtre, centre de référence national NNERf, service de neurologie, 78, rue du Général-Leclerc, 94270 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Hôpital Saint-Louis, UF04, unité de médecine interne, maladies auto-immunes et pathologie vasculaire, centre de référence des maladies auto-immunes systémiques rares d'Ile-de-France, Filière 'FAI2R', 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris, France. · AP-HP, hôpital Saint-Antoine, hématologie clinique et thérapie cellulaire, 184, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Antoine, 75571 Paris cedex 12, France. · Institut Paoli-Calmettes, unité de transplantation et de thérapie cellulaire (U2t), service oncologie et hématologie, 232, boulevard de Sainte-Marguerite, 13009 Marseille, France. · Oncopole, institut universitaire du cancer Toulouse, 1, avenue Irène-Joliot-Curie, 31059 Toulouse cedex 9, France. · Hôpital civil, service de médecine interne et immunologie clinique, 1, place de l'hôpital, BP 426, 67091 Strasbourg cedex, France. · CHRU de Lille, service de neurologie générale et pathologie neuro-inflammatoire, 2, avenue Oscar-Lambret, 59037 Lille cedex, France. · CHU de Lille, université de Lille 2, LIRIC Inserm U995, 59000 Lille, France. Electronic address: Ibrahim.YAKOUBAGHA@CHRU-LILLE.FR. · Hôpital Saint-Louis, UF04, unité de médecine interne, maladies auto-immunes et pathologie vasculaire, centre de référence des maladies auto-immunes systémiques rares d'Ile-de-France, Filière 'FAI2R', 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris, France. Electronic address: dominique.farge-bancel@aphp.fr. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #29173974.

ABSTRACT: The Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC) organized the 7th allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation clinical practices harmonization workshop series in September 2017 in Lille, France and updated recommendations for indications and follow-up in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases, previously published under the auspices of SFGM-TC.

15 Guideline Surgical Management of Crohn Disease in Children: Guidelines From the Paediatric IBD Porto Group of ESPGHAN. 2017

Amil-Dias, Jorge / Kolacek, Sanja / Turner, Dan / Pærregaard, Anders / Rintala, Risto / Afzal, Nadeem A / Karolewska-Bochenek, Katarzyna / Bronsky, Jiri / Chong, Sonny / Fell, John / Hojsak, Iva / Hugot, Jean-Pierre / Koletzko, Sibylle / Kumar, Devinder / Lazowska-Przeorek, Izabella / Lillehei, Craig / Lionetti, Paolo / Martin-de-Carpi, Javier / Pakarinen, Mikko / Ruemmele, Frank M / Shaoul, Ron / Spray, Christine / Staiano, Annamaria / Sugarman, Ian / Wilson, David C / Winter, Harland / Kolho, Kaija-Leena / Anonymous6590898. ·*Department of Pediatrics, Centro Hospitalar, S. João, Porto, Portugal †Children's Hospital Zagreb, Faculty of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia ‡The Juliet Keidan Institute of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel §Department of Pediatrics, Hvidovre University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark ||Pediatric Surgery, Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland ¶Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, University Hospital Southampton, Southampton, UK #Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland **Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech Republic ††Queen Mary's Hospital for Children, Epsom and St Helier NHS Trust, Surrey ‡‡Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, UK §§Paris-Diderot Sorbonne-Paris-Cité University and Robert Debré Hospital, Paris, France ||||Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany ¶¶St George's, University of London, London, UK ##Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ***Department NEUROFARBA, University of Florence - Meyer Hospital, Florence, Italy †††Unit for the Comprehensive Care of Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, Spain ‡‡‡Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Necker Enfants Malades University Hospital, Sorbonne Paris Cité University, Paris Descartes University, Institut IMAGINE - INSERM U1163, Paris, France §§§Pediatric Gastroenterology Institute, Ruth Children's Hospital, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel ||||||Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Bristol, UK ¶¶¶Department of Translational Medical Science, Section of Pediatrics, University of Naples "Federico II," Naples, Italy ###Department of Pediatric Surgery, Leeds Children's Hospital, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, UK ****Child Life and Health, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK ††††MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ‡‡‡‡Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. ·J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr · Pubmed #28267075.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of Crohn disease (CD) has been increasing and surgery needs to be contemplated in a substantial number of cases. The relevant advent of biological treatment has changed but not eliminated the need for surgery in many patients. Despite previous publications on the indications for surgery in CD, there was a need for a comprehensive review of existing evidence on the role of elective surgery and options in pediatric patients affected with CD. We present an expert opinion and critical review of the literature to provide evidence-based guidance to manage these patients. Indications, surgical options, risk factors, and medications in pre- and perioperative period are reviewed in the light of available evidence. Risks and benefits of surgical options are addressed. An algorithm is proposed for the management of postsurgery monitoring, timing for follow-up endoscopy, and treatment options.

16 Guideline Use of corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs in inflammatory bowel disease: Clinical practice guidelines of the Italian Group for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2017

Gionchetti, Paolo / Rizzello, Fernando / Annese, Vito / Armuzzi, Alessandro / Biancone, Livia / Castiglione, Fabiana / Comberlato, Michele / Cottone, Mario / Danese, Silvio / Daperno, Marco / D'Incà, Renata / Fries, Walter / Kohn, Anna / Orlando, Ambrogio / Papi, Claudio / Vecchi, Maurizio / Ardizzone, Sandro / Anonymous2840898. ·Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, IBD Unit, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. Electronic address: Paolo.gionchetti@unibo.it. · Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, IBD Unit, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · AOU Gastroenterology, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. · IBD Unit Complesso Integrato Columbus-Gemelli Hospital Catholic University Foundation, Rome, Italy. · University "Tor Vergata", Department of Systems Medicine, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Gastrointestinal Unit, Ospedale Central Hospital, Bolzano, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Pneumology and Nutrition Clinic, V. Cervello Hospital, Ospedali Riuniti Villa Sofia-Cervello University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · IBD Center, Humanitas Clinical and Research Centre, Milan, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, A.O. Ordine Mauriziano Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Department of Surgical and Gastroenterological Sciences, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Clinical Unit for Chronic Bowel Disorders, Department of Internal Medicine, IBD Unit Messina, University of Messina, Messina, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, San Camillo-Forlanini Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, San Filippo Neri Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, IRCCS San Donato Hospital, San Donato Milanese, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #28254463.

ABSTRACT: The two main forms of intestinal bowel disease, namely ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are not curable but can be controlled by various medical therapies. The Italian Group for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IG-IBD) has prepared clinical practice guidelines to help physicians prescribe corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs for these patients. The guidelines consider therapies that induce remission in patients with active disease as well as treatment regimens that maintain remission. These guidelines complement already existing guidelines from IG-IBD on the use of biological drugs in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases.

17 Guideline European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation Topical Review on Transitional Care in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2017

van Rheenen, Patrick F / Aloi, Marina / Biron, Irit Avni / Carlsen, Katrine / Cooney, Rachel / Cucchiara, Salvatore / Cullen, Garret / Escher, Johanna C / Kierkus, Jaroslaw / Lindsay, James O / Roma, Eleftheria / Russell, Richard K / Sieczkowska-Golub, Joanna / Harbord, Marcus. ·Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen,Groningen, The Netherlands. · Paediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, University Hospital Umberto I, Rome, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Rabin Medical Center - Beilinson Hospital, Petah Tikva, Israel. · Department of Paediatrics, Hvidovre University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. · Department of Gastroenterology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital,Birmingham, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Centre for Colorectal Disease, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Feeding Disorders and Paediatrics, Children's Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Barts Health NHS Trust, The Royal London Hospital, London, UK. · First Department of Paediatrics, Gastroenterology Unit, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, The Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow, UK. · Imperial College, London; and Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, UK. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #28158494.

ABSTRACT: Background: This European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation [ECCO] topical review focuses on the transition of adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] from child-centred to adult-oriented care. The aim was to provide evidence-supported, expert consensus for health professionals taking part in the transition. Methods: An online survey determined the areas of importance for health professionals involved in the transition of adolescents with IBD. Thereafter an expert panel of nine paediatric and five adult gastroenterologists was formed to identify the critical elements of the transition programme, and to prepare core messages defined as 'current practice points'. There is limited literature about transition, therefore this review is mainly based on expert opinion and consensus, rather than on specific evidence. Results: A total of 21 practice points were generated before the first [online] voting round. Practice points that reached >80% agreement were accepted, while those that did not reach 80% agreement were refined during a consensus meeting and subjected to voting. Ultimately, 14 practice points were retained by this review. Conclusion: We present a consensus-based framework for transitional care in IBD that provides a guidance for clinical practice.

18 Guideline [Second Korean Guidelines for the Management of Crohn's Disease]. 2017

Park, Jae Jun / Yang, Suk Kyun / Ye, Byong Duk / Kim, Jong Wook / Park, Dong Il / Yoon, Hyuk / Im, Jong Pil / Lee, Kang Moon / Yoon, Sang Nam / Lee, Heeyoung / Anonymous8570894. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Inje University College of Medicine Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon, Korea. · Department of Surgery, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea. · Center for Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. ·Korean J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28135790.

ABSTRACT: Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, progressive, and disabling inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with an uncertain etiopathogenesis. CD can involve any site of the gastrointestinal tract from the mouth to the anus, and is associated with serious complications, such as bowel strictures, perforations, and fistula formation. The incidence and prevalence rates of CD in Korea are still lower compared with those in Western countries, but they have been rapidly increasing during the recent decades. Although there are no definitive curative modalities for CD, various medical and surgical therapies have been applied for the treatment of this disease. Concerning CD management, there have been substantial discrepancies among clinicians according to their personal experience and preference. To suggest recommendable approaches to the diverse problems of CD and to minimize the variations in treatment among physicians, guidelines for the management of CD were first published in 2012 by the IBD Study Group of the Korean Association for the Study of the Intestinal Diseases. These are the revised guidelines based on updated evidence, accumulated since 2012. These guidelines were developed by using mainly adaptation methods, and encompass induction and maintenance treatment of CD, treatment based on disease location, treatment of CD complications, including stricture and fistula, surgical treatment, and prevention of postoperative recurrence. These are the second Korean guidelines for the management of CD and will be continuously revised as new evidence is collected.

19 Guideline French national consensus clinical guidelines for the management of Crohn's disease. 2017

Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent / Bouhnik, Yoram / Roblin, Xavier / Bonnaud, Guillaume / Hagège, Hervé / Hébuterne, Xavier / Anonymous9730893. ·University Hospital of Nancy, Department of Gastroenterology, Vandoeuvre, France. Electronic address: peyrinbiroulet@gmail.com. · CHU Paris Nord-Val de Seine, Beaujon Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, IBD and Nutritional Support, Clichy, France. · CHU Saint Etienne, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Saint-Etienne, France. · Clinique Ambroise Pare, Toulouse, France. · CHI Créteil, Department of Gastroenterology, Créteil, France. · Nice University Hospital, Hôpital de L'archet, Department of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Nice, France. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #28087156.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic and disabling condition. There is no curative medical treatment but current treatments provide increasingly sustainable control of the disease and allow patients a better quality of life. There is limited evidence supporting CD management in specific clinical situations, thus precluding an evidence-based approach. AIMS: To help clinicians in making informed treatment decisions, a group of 59 French gastroenterologists with experience in the management of CD met to develop straightforward and practical algorithms based on the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) recommendations. METHODS: This experts' opinion was developed following a Nominal Group consensus methodology. Nine clinical situations were identified: mildly active CD; uncomplicated moderately active CD, with, and without poor prognostic factors; uncomplicated severely active CD; perianal CD with a single fistula; perianal CD with complex fistula with or without abscess; complicated CD with abscess; intestinal stricture; and post-operative CD. Two working groups were formed and proposed algorithms that were then approved by a two-thirds majority of the Nominal Group. RESULTS: These algorithms represent the pragmatic consensus of a group of experts in gastroenterology on the modalities of therapeutic care in different clinical situations in CD. They are available via a web application at: www.algorithmici.com.

20 Guideline Diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: First Latin American Consensus of the Pan American Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. 2017

Yamamoto-Furusho, J K / Bosques-Padilla, F / de-Paula, J / Galiano, M T / Ibañez, P / Juliao, F / Kotze, P G / Rocha, J L / Steinwurz, F / Veitia, G / Zaltman, C. ·Clínica de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Departamento de Gastroenterología, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Ciudad de México, México. Electronic address: kazuofurusho@hotmail.com. · Gastroenterology Division, Hospital Universitario "Dr. José Eleuterio González", Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León, México; Escuela de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, México. · Servicio de Gastroenterología, Hospital Italiano, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Clínica de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Clínica Marly, Bogotá, Colombia. · Programa de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Departamento de Gastroenterología, Clínica Las Condes, Santiago, Chile. · Clínica de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Hospital Pablo Tobón Uribe, Medellín, Colombia. · Hospital Universitario Cajuru, Universidad Católica del Paraná (PUCPR), Curitiba, Brasil. · Grupo Académico y de Investigación sobre Enfermedad de Crohn y Colitis Ulcerosa Crónica Idiopática de México, Ciudad de México, México. · Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brasil. · Servicio de Gastroenterología, Hospital Vargas, Caracas, Venezuela. · Servicio de Gastroenterología, Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho, Departamento de Medicina Interna, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Río de Janeiro, Brasil. ·Rev Gastroenterol Mex · Pubmed #27979414.

ABSTRACT: The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased in recent years in several Latin American countries. There is a need to raise awareness in gastroenterologists and the population in general, so that early diagnosis and treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's Disease (CD) can be carried out. It is important for all physicians to have homogeneous criteria regarding the diagnosis and treatment of IBD in Latin America. The Pan American Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (PANCCO) is an organization that aims to include all the countries of the Americas, but it specifically concentrates on Latin America. The present Consensus was divided into two parts for publication: 1) Diagnosis and treatment and 2) Special situations. This is the first Latin American Consensus whose purpose is to promote a perspective adapted to our Latin American countries for the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of patients with UC and CD.

21 Guideline American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the Management of Crohn's Disease After Surgical Resection. 2017

Nguyen, Geoffrey C / Loftus, Edward V / Hirano, Ikuo / Falck-Ytter, Yngve / Singh, Siddharth / Sultan, Shahnaz / Anonymous2040887. ·Mount Sinai Hospital Centre for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Division of Gastroenterology, Case and VA Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Division of Gastroenterology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California. · Minneapolis VA Health Care System, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #27840074.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Guideline The Toronto Consensus Statements for the Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Pregnancy. 2016

Nguyen, Geoffrey C / Seow, Cynthia H / Maxwell, Cynthia / Huang, Vivian / Leung, Yvette / Jones, Jennifer / Leontiadis, Grigorios I / Tse, Frances / Mahadevan, Uma / van der Woude, C Janneke / Anonymous5510852 / Anonymous5520852. ·Mount Sinai Hospital Centre for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: geoff.nguyen@utoronto.ca. · Departments of Medicine & Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Division of Gastroenterology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #26688268.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: The management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) poses a particular challenge during pregnancy because the health of both the mother and the fetus must be considered. METHODS: A systematic literature search identified studies on the management of IBD during pregnancy. The quality of evidence and strength of recommendations were rated using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. RESULTS: Consensus was reached on 29 of the 30 recommendations considered. Preconception counseling and access to specialist care are paramount in optimizing disease management. In general, women on 5-ASA, thiopurine, or anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) monotherapy for maintenance should continue therapy throughout pregnancy. Discontinuation of anti-TNF therapy or switching from combination therapy to monotherapy may be considered in very select low-risk patients. Women who have a mild to moderate disease flare while on optimized 5-ASA or thiopurine therapy should be managed with systemic corticosteroid or anti-TNF therapy, and those with a corticosteroid-resistant flare should start anti-TNF therapy. Endoscopy or urgent surgery should not be delayed during pregnancy if indicated. Decisions regarding cesarean delivery should be based on obstetric considerations and not the diagnosis of IBD alone, with the exception of women with active perianal Crohn's disease. With the exception of methotrexate, the use of medications for IBD should not influence the decision to breast-feed and vice versa. Live vaccinations are not recommended within the first 6 months of life in the offspring of women who were on anti-TNF therapy during pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Optimal management of IBD before and during pregnancy is essential to achieving favorable maternal and neonatal outcomes.

23 Guideline The First European Evidence-based Consensus on Extra-intestinal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2016

Harbord, Marcus / Annese, Vito / Vavricka, Stephan R / Allez, Matthieu / Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel / Boberg, Kirsten Muri / Burisch, Johan / De Vos, Martine / De Vries, Anne-Marie / Dick, Andrew D / Juillerat, Pascal / Karlsen, Tom H / Koutroubakis, Ioannis / Lakatos, Peter L / Orchard, Tim / Papay, Pavol / Raine, Tim / Reinshagen, Max / Thaci, Diamant / Tilg, Herbert / Carbonnel, Franck / Anonymous2400850. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Emergency, University Hospital Careggi, Florence, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Triemli Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hôpital Saint Louis, Sorbonne Paris-Cité University, Paris, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Santiago De Compostela, A Coruña, Spain. · Department of Transplantation Medicine, Division of Cancer Medicine, Surgery and Transplantation, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Gastro Unit, Hvidovre University Hospital, Hvidovre, and Danish Centre for eHealth & Epidemiology, North Zealand University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Ghent , Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Academic Unit of Ophthalmology, School of Clinical Sciences, Bristol, and National Institute for Health Research, Moorfield's Eye Hospital and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK. · Clinic for Visceral Surgery and Medicine, University Hospital Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Heraklion, Heraklion, Greece. · Department of Medicine I, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. · Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hartmannspital Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Gastroenterology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. · Medizinische Klinik I, Klinikum Braunschweig, Germany. · Comprehensive Center of Inflammation Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Lubeck, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. · Service de Gastroentérologie CHU de Bicêtre, Université Paris Sud, Paris, France. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #26614685.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline Guideline for wireless capsule endoscopy in children and adolescents: A consensus document by the SEGHNP (Spanish Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) and the SEPD (Spanish Society for Digestive Diseases). 2015

Argüelles-Arias, Federico / Donat, Ester / Fernández-Urien, Ignacio / Alberca, Fernando / Argüelles-Martín, Federico / Martínez, María José / Molina, Manuel / Varea, Vicente / Herrerías-Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel / Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen. ·Digestivo, H. Universitarioa Virgen Macarena, España. · Pediatría, Hospital la Fe, Valencia, España. · Digestivo, Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, España. · DIGESTIVO/ENDOSCOPIAS, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca. Murcia, España. · Pediatría, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, España. · Pediatría, Hospital Niño Jesús, España. · Pediatría, Hospital La Paz, España. · Pediatría, Hospital San Joan de Deu, España. · Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, España. · Pediatría, Hospital la Fe, España. ·Rev Esp Enferm Dig · Pubmed #26671584.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Capsule Endoscopy (CE) in children has limitations based mainly on age. The objective of this consensus was reviewing the scientific evidence. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Some experts from the Spanish Society of Gastroenterology (SEPD) and Spanish Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (SEGHNP) were invited to answer different issues about CE in children. These sections were: a) Indications, contraindications and limitations; b) efficacy of CE in different clinical scenarios; c) CE performance; d) CE-related complications; e) Patency Capsule; and f) colon capsule endoscopy. They reviewed relevant questions on each topic. RESULTS: The main indication is Crohn's disease (CD). There is no contraindication for the age and in the event that the patient not to swallow it, it should be administered under deep sedation with endoscopy and specific device. The CE is useful in CD, for the management of OGIB in children and in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (in this indication has the most effectiveness). The main complication is retention, which should be specially taken into account in cases of CD already diagnosed with malnutrition. A preparation regimen based on a low volume of polyethylene glycol (PEG) the day before plus simethicone on the same day is the best one in terms of cleanliness although does not improve the results of the CE procedure. CONCLUSIONS: CE is safe and useful in children. Indications are similar to those of adults, the main one is CD to establish both a diagnosis and disease extension. Moreover, only few limitations are detected in children.

25 Guideline Clinical Practice Guideline for the Surgical Management of Crohn's Disease. 2015

Strong, Scott / Steele, Scott R / Boutrous, Marylise / Bordineau, Liliana / Chun, Jonathan / Stewart, David B / Vogel, Jon / Rafferty, Janice F / Anonymous140845. · ·Dis Colon Rectum · Pubmed #26445174.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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