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Crohn Disease: HELP
Articles by Ofir Har-Noy
Based on 3 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Ofir Har-Noy wrote the following 3 articles about Crohn Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Diagnostic yield of capsule endoscopy versus magnetic resonance enterography and small bowel contrast ultrasound in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease: Systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Kopylov, Uri / Yung, Diana E / Engel, Tal / Vijayan, Sanju / Har-Noy, Ofir / Katz, Lior / Oliva, Salvatore / Avni, Tomer / Battat, Robert / Eliakim, Rami / Ben-Horin, Shomron / Koulaouzidis, Anastasios. ·Gastroenterology Department, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat-Gan, and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Israel. Electronic address: ukopylov@gmail.com. · Centre for Liver & Digestive Disorders, The Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. · Gastroenterology Department, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat-Gan, and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Israel. · Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · Department of Medicine E, Davidoff Cancer Center, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, Petah-Tikva, and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Israel. · McGill University Health Center, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #28512034.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Capsule endoscopy (CE), magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and small bowel (SB) intestinal contrast ultrasound (SICUS) are the modalities of choice for SB evaluation. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic yield (DY) of CE to MRE and SICUS in detection and monitoring of SB CD through meta-analysis of the available literature. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search for trials comparing the accuracy of CE, MRE and SICUS for detection of active SB inflammation in patients with suspected and/or established CD. Only prospective studies comparing CE with another additional diagnostic modality were included in the final analysis. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) for the DY of the three modalities were calculated. RESULTS: A total of 112 studies were retrieved; following selection, 13 studies were eligible for analysis. The DY of CE for detection of active SB CD was similar to that of MRE (10 studies, 400 patients, OR 1.17; 95% CI 0.83-1.67) and SICUS (5 studies, 142 patients, OR 0.88; 95% CI 0.51-1.53). The outcomes were similar for the subgroups of suspected versus established CD and adult versus pediatric patients. CE was superior to MRE for proximal SB CD (7 studies, 251 patients, OR 2.79; 95% CI 1.2-6.48); the difference vs SICUS was not significant. CONCLUSION: CE, MRE and SICUS have similar DY for detection of SB CD in both suspected and established CD. CE is superior to MRE for detection of proximal SB disease, however the risk of capsule retention should be considered.

2 Article Capsule Endoscopy, Magnetic Resonance Enterography, and Small Bowel Ultrasound for Evaluation of Postoperative Recurrence in Crohn's Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 2017

Yung, Diana E / Har-Noy, Ofir / Tham, Yuen Sau / Ben-Horin, Shomron / Eliakim, Rami / Koulaouzidis, Anastasios / Kopylov, Uri. ·Centre for Liver and Digestive Disorders, The Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. · Department of Gastroenterology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat-Gan, and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel. ·Inflamm Bowel Dis · Pubmed #29272490.

ABSTRACT: Background: Anastomotic recurrence is frequent in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) following ileocecal resection. The degree of endoscopic recurrence, quantified by the Rutgeerts score (RS), is correlated with the risk of clinical and surgical recurrence. Noninvasive modalities such as capsule endoscopy (CE), magnetic resonance enterography (MRE), and intestinal ultrasound (US) may yield similar information without the need for ileocolonoscopy (IC). The aim of our meta-analysis was to evaluate the accuracy of those modalities for detection of endoscopic recurrence in postoperative CD patients. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search for studies comparing the accuracy of CE, MRE, and US with IC for detection of postoperative recurrence in CD. We calculated pooled diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and area under the curve (AUC) for each comparison. Results: A total of 135 studies were retrieved; 14 studies were eligible for analysis. For CE, the pooled sensitivity was 100% (95% CI, 91%-100%), specificity was 69% (95% CI, 52%-83%), DOR was 30.8 (95% CI, 6.9-138), and AUC was 0.94. MRE had pooled sensitivity of 97% (95% CI, 89%-100%), specificity of 84% (95% CI, 62%-96%), DOR of 129.5 (95% CI, 16.4-1024.7), and AUC of 0.98. US had pooled sensitivity of 89% (95% CI, 85%-92%), specificity of 86% (95% CI, 78%-93%), DOR of 42.3 (95% CI, 18.6-96.0), and AUC 0.93. Conclusions: CE, MRE, and US provide accurate assessment of postoperative endoscopic recurrence in CD. These modalities should gain wider use for detection of postoperative recurrence; the prognostic value of those diagnostic findings merits evaluation in further prospective studies.

3 Article The temporal evolution of antidrug antibodies in patients with inflammatory bowel disease treated with infliximab. 2014

Ungar, Bella / Chowers, Yehuda / Yavzori, Miri / Picard, Orit / Fudim, Ella / Har-Noy, Ofir / Kopylov, Uri / Eliakim, Rami / Ben-Horin, Shomron / Anonymous5260769. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Sheba Medical Center Tel Hashomer & Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat Gan, Israel. · Department of Gastroenterology, Rambam Health Care Campus & Bruce Rappaport School of Medicine, Technion Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. ·Gut · Pubmed #24041539.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To characterise the temporal evolution of antibodies to infliximab (ATI). DESIGN: Prospective observational study of infliximab-treated patients with inflammatory bowel disease between 2009 and 2012. INTERVENTIONS: Trough levels of infliximab and ATI were measured before each infusion by anti-λ ELISA. Patients were monitored for disease activity by clinical activity indexes and for dose-intensification or infliximab cessation. The occurrence of transient ATI disappearing spontaneously without intervention was recorded separately. RESULTS: 125 patients were included (98 Crohn's disease, 27 ulcerative colitis, median follow-up 11.5±22 months) and 1119 sera were analysed for infliximab and ATI levels. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that 42% of patients remained ATI-free by 4 years of treatment. Most (90%) of the patients who developed ATI did so within the first 12 months of therapy, whereas transient ATI were detected throughout the duration of infliximab therapy (p<0.001). ATI incidence was similar between patients who received infliximab previously (episodic/interrupted therapy patients, n=14) and scheduled-therapy patients (n=111). In the scheduled group, combination immunomodulator+infliximab resulted in longer ATI-free survival compared with monotherapy (p=0.003, logrank test). Survival free of clinical loss of response was enjoyed by 51% of patients, and serial measurements showed that ATI development often preceded the onset of clinical flare. CONCLUSIONS: When followed prospectively, most patients who develop ATI do so within the first 12 months of therapy. This incidence is reduced by concomitant immunomodulator even in scheduled-therapy patients. In contrast, transient ATI, which are of little clinical significance, can appear haphazardly at any time during treatment. The onset of clinical loss of response may lag behind the appearance of anti-infliximab antibodies.