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Crohn Disease: HELP
Articles by F. O. Hartmann
Based on 6 articles published since 2009
(Why 6 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, F. Hartmann wrote the following 6 articles about Crohn Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline [Updated German clinical practice guideline on "Diagnosis and treatment of Crohn's disease" 2014]. 2014

Preiß, J C / Bokemeyer, B / Buhr, H J / Dignaß, A / Häuser, W / Hartmann, F / Herrlinger, K R / Kaltz, B / Kienle, P / Kruis, W / Kucharzik, T / Langhorst, J / Schreiber, S / Siegmund, B / Stallmach, A / Stange, E F / Stein, J / Hoffmann, J C / Anonymous2240814. ·Medizinische Klinik für Gastroenterologie, Infektiologie und Rheumatologie, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin. · Gastroenterologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Minden. · Deutsche Gesellschaft für Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie, Berlin. · Medizinische Klinik I, Agaplesion Markus-Krankenhaus, Frankfurt/Main. · Klinik Innere Medizin I, Klinikum Saarbrücken. · Agaplesion MVZ, Frankfurt/Main. · Innere Medizin I, Asklepios Klinik Nord, Hamburg. · Deutsche Morbus Crohn/Colitis ulcerosa Vereinigung (DCCV) e. V., Berlin. · Chirurgische Klinik, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim. · Abteilung für Innere Medizin, Evangelisches Krankenhaus Kalk, Köln. · Klinik für Allgemeine Innere Medizin & Gastroenterologie, Klinikum Lüneburg. · Integrative Gastroenterologie, Klinik für Naturheilkunde und Integrative Medizin, Kliniken Essen-Mitte. · Medizinische Klinik I, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel. · Klinik für Innere Medizin IV, Universitätsklinikum Jena. · Abteilung für Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und Endokrinologie, Robert-Bosch-Krankenhaus, Stuttgart. · Abteilung Gastroenterologie/Ernährungsmedizin, DGD Kliniken Frankfurt Sachsenhausen, Frankfurt/Main. · Medizinische Klinik I, St. Marien- und St. Annastiftskrankenhaus, Ludwigshafen. ·Z Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25474283.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline [IBD ahead 2010--Answering important questions in Crohn's disease treatment]. 2011

Schmidt, C / Dignass, A / Hartmann, F / Hüppe, D / Kruis, W / Layer, P / Lüers, A / Stallmach, A / Teich, N / Sturm, A / Anonymous6160703. ·Universitätklinikum Jena, Klinik für Innere Medizin II, Abteilung für Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und Infektiologie. ·Z Gastroenterol · Pubmed #21866492.

ABSTRACT: The treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease has become more complex in recent years through the introduction of various immunosuppressive agents as well as the approval of monoclonal antibodies against TNF-α and patients receiving such treatment must be carefully monitored. National and international guidelines define a diagnostic and therapeutic context for the practitioner, but can only partially respond to specific questions on the procedure for individual patients. Within the framework of a project initiated by Abbott entitled "IBD ahead" 38 German IBD experts have elaborated concrete proposals for dealing with corticosteroids, immunosuppressants and TNF-α antibodies on the basis of the published literature and their own personal experience in order to close the gap between these guidelines and daily clinical practice. Statements were developed on the choice of correct timing of initiation, dose and duration of the individual substances and on how to proceed with patients exhibiting treatment failure. Moreover, recommendations are also made on drug combination strategies, safety monitoring and the risks regarding the development of infectious complications and malignancies. These recommendations are illustrated by case studies from everyday practice in participating centres.

3 Review [Rational and efficient diagnosis in different stages of Crohn's disease]. 2012

Teich, N / Helwig, U / Pace, A / Dignass, A U / Hartmann, F / Hüppe, D / Schmidt, C / Stallmach, A / Sturm, A / Kruis, W / Layer, P. ·Internistische Gemeinschaftspraxis für Verdauungs- und Stoffwechselkrankheiten, Leipzig. teich@igvs.de ·Z Gastroenterol · Pubmed #22760681.

ABSTRACT: The treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease has become more complex in recent years through the introduction of various immunosuppressive agents as well as the approval of monoclonal antibodies. Patients receiving such treatment must be carefully monitored. National and international guidelines define a diagnostic and therapeutic context for the practitioner, but can only partially respond to specific questions on the procedure for individual patients. Within the framework of a project initiated by Abbott entitled "IBD ahead" 34 German IBD experts have elaborated concrete proposals for the utility of clinical symptom assessment, endoscopy and the use of laboratory parameters including foecal markers of inflammation. Furthermore, we discuss the significance of conventional X-rays, computed tomography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance tomography. These recommendations are illustrated by case studies from everyday practice in the participating centres.

4 Article Vedolizumab provides clinical benefit over 1 year in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease - a prospective multicenter observational study. 2016

Stallmach, A / Langbein, C / Atreya, R / Bruns, T / Dignass, A / Ende, K / Hampe, J / Hartmann, F / Neurath, M F / Maul, J / Preiss, J C / Schmelz, R / Siegmund, B / Schulze, H / Teich, N / von Arnim, U / Baumgart, D C / Schmidt, C. ·Jena, Germany. · Erlangen, Germany. · Frankfurt/Main, Germany. · Erfurt, Germany. · Dresden, Germany. · Berlin, Germany. · Leipzig, Germany. · Magdeburg, Germany. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #27714831.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Vedolizumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the α4β7-integrin, is effective in inducing and maintaining clinical remission in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis according to randomised clinical trials. AIM: To determine the long-term effectiveness of vedolizumab in a real-world clinical setting. METHODS: This observational registry assessed the clinical outcome in patients treated with vedolizumab for clinically active Crohn's disease (n = 67) or ulcerative colitis (n = 60). Primary endpoint was clinical remission (HBI ≤ 4/pMayo ≤ 1) at week 54. Secondary endpoints included clinical response rates (HBI/pMayo score drop ≥3) and steroid-free clinical remission at weeks 30 and 54. RESULTS: Vedolizumab was stopped in 69/127 (56%) patients after a median time of 18 weeks (range 2-49) predominantly owing to lack or loss of response. Using nonresponder imputation analysis, clinical remission and steroid-free remission rates were 21% and 15% in Crohn's disease and 25% and 22% in ulcerative colitis, respectively. Lack of clinical remission was associated with prior treatment with anti-TNF or with steroids for more than 3 months in the last 6 months in ulcerative colitis. At week 14, the absence of remission in Crohn's disease or nonresponse in ulcerative colitis indicated a low likelihood of clinical remission at week 54 [2/31 (7%) in Crohn's disease, 4/41 (10%) in ulcerative colitis]. Accordingly, declining C-reactive protein in inflammatory bowel disease and/or lower faecal calprotectin in ulcerative colitis at week 14 predicted remission at week 54. CONCLUSION: Among patients who started vedolizumab for active inflammatory bowel disease, clinical remission rates are 21-25% after 54 weeks.

5 Article Female patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases are treated less frequently with immunosuppressive medication and have a higher disease activity: a subgroup analysis of a large multi-centre, prospective, internet-based study. 2011

Blumenstein, I / Herrmann, E / Filmann, N / Zosel, C / Tacke, W / Bock, H / Dignass, A / Hartmann, F / Zeuzem, S / Stein, J / Schröder, O. ·First Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Goethe-University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt/Main, Germany. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #21575882.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The introduction of immunosuppressants and biologic agents has led to active debate and research about optimal therapeutic strategies considering risk factors and predictors of clinical outcome in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Data about gender-specific treatment differences and risk factors is lacking for IBD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate gender-related differences in the treatment of a distinct IBD patient population treated in the Rhein-Main region, Germany. METHODS: Data about past medical history, disease status and medical treatment of 986 outpatients treated in ten gastroenterological practices and three hospitals were collected from November 1st 2005-July 31st 2007 and analyzed with regard to gender-related differences in therapy and disease management. RESULTS: With the exception of an extended disease duration in women, no significant gender-related differences in demographic and clinical characteristics were observed. Men showed a significantly higher remission rate than women (p=0.025), while women received significantly less immunosuppressive medication compared to men (p=0.011). In addition, treatment with immunosuppressants was not different in women with child-bearing potential compared to menopausal women. CONCLUSION: Our investigation demonstrates for the first time gender-specific differences in the therapeutic management in a large cohort of IBD patients.

6 Article Misinterpretation of NSAID-induced Colopathy as Crohn's disease. 2010

Stolte, M / Hartmann, F O. ·Pathology, Klinikum Kulmbach, Kulmbach, Germany. prof.m.stolte@t-online.de ·Z Gastroenterol · Pubmed #20140840.

ABSTRACT: Although NSAID-induced colonopathy characterised by erosions, ulcers, strictures and diaphragms has been known for quite some time, it is not infrequently misinterpreted endoscopically and histologically as Crohn's disease. This is exemplified by the present case history of a 39-year-old man with bloody diarrhoea and a stenosis in the transverse colon that was histologically interpreted as "consistent with Crohn's disease". Treatment with glucocorticoids, however, merely gave rise to adverse reactions. After surgical treatment of the stenosis, the episodes of bloody diarrhoea persisted, and endoscopy continued to reveal erosions and ulcers in the transverse colon. Changing treatment to azathioprine also failed to produce any positive response, merely causing side effects. Subsequent evaluation of the histological specimens by a consultant pathologist turned up the tentative diagnosis of NSAID-induced colonopathy. An analysis of the patient's medical history revealed that he was suffering from Bechterew's disease, for which he had long been taking diclofenac. This case history is a good example of the fact that NSAID-induced enterocolopathy is still too poorly recognised among internists, gastroenterologists and pathologists, and, on the basis of the discontinuous endoscopic and histological findings, is often misinterpreted as Crohn's disease.