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Crohn Disease: HELP
Articles by Seymour Katz
Based on 18 articles published since 2010
(Why 18 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, S. Katz wrote the following 18 articles about Crohn Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Drug-Herb Interactions in the Elderly Patient with IBD: a Growing Concern. 2017

Rahman, Haider / Kim, Marina / Leung, Galen / Green, Jesse A / Katz, Seymour. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Albany Medical Center, 47 New Scotland Ave, Albany, NY, 12208, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, New York Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital Weill Cornell College of Medicine, 506 Sixth Street Suite 312 Buckley Pavilion, Brooklyn, NY, 11215, USA. Mak9236@nyp.org. · New York University School of Medicine, 550 1st Avenue NBV 16 North 30, New York, NY, USA. · Perelman School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Pennsylvania, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, New York University School of Medicine NYC North Shore University - Long Island Jewish Hospital System, Manhasset, NY, USA. · St. Francis Hospital, Roslyn, NY, USA. ·Curr Treat Options Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28918484.

ABSTRACT: OPINION STATEMENT: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes conditions such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is becoming more prevalent with the elderly being the fastest growing group. Parallel to this, there is an increasing interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Nearly half of patients with IBD have used CAM at one time. The elderly patients, however, are burdened by comorbid conditions, polypharmacy, and altered functional status. With increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine in our elderly patients with IBD, it is vital for the provider to provide counsel on drug-herb potential interactions. CAM includes herbal products, diet, dietary supplements, acupuncture, and prayer. In this paper, we will review common CAM, specifically herbs, that are used in patients with IBD including the herb background, suggested use, evidence in IBD, and most importantly, potential interactions with IBD medications used in elderly patients. Most important evidence-based adverse events and drug-herb interactions are summarized. The herbs discussed include Triticum aestivum (wheat grass), Andrographis paniculata (chiretta), Boswellia serrata, tormentil, bilberry, curcumin (turmeric), Plantago ovata (blond psyllium), Oenothera biennis (evening primrose oil), germinated barley foodstuff, an herbal preparation of myrrh, chamomile and coffee extract, chios mastic gum, wormwood (absinthe, thujone), Cannabis sativa (marijuana, THC), tripterygium wilfordii (thunder god vine), Ulmus rubra (slippery elm bark), trigonella foenugraecum (fenugreek), Dioscorea mexicana (wild yam), Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw), ginger, cinnamon, licorice, and peppermint.

2 Review Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in the Elderly. 2016

John, Elizabeth S / Katz, Kristina / Saxena, Mark / Chokhavatia, Sita / Katz, Seymour. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ, USA. elizabethjohn17@gmail.com. · Division of Gastroenterology, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ, USA. elizabethjohn17@gmail.com. · Division of Gastroenterology, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ, USA. · New York University School of Medicine, 1000 Northern Blvd, Great Neck, NY, 11020, USA. ·Curr Treat Options Gastroenterol · Pubmed #27387455.

ABSTRACT: OPINION STATEMENT: A substantial and growing proportion of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are elderly, and these patients require tailored treatment strategies. However, significant challenges exist in the management of this population due to the paucity of data. Establishing the initial diagnosis and assessing the etiology of future symptoms and flares can be challenging as several other prevalent diseases can masquerade as IBD, such as ischemic colitis, diverticular disease, and infectious colitis. Important pharmacologic considerations include reduced glomerular filtration rate and drug-drug interactions in the elderly. No drug therapy is absolutely contraindicated in this population; however, special risk and benefit assessments should be made. Older patients are more susceptible to side effects of steroids such as delirium, fractures, and cataracts. Budesonide can be an appropriate alternative for mild to moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) as it has limited systemic absorption. Pill size and quantity, nephrotoxicity, and difficulty of administration of rectal preparations should be considered with 5-aminosalicylic (5-ASA) therapy. Biologics are very effective, but modestly increase the risk of infection in a susceptible group. Based on their mechanisms, integrin receptor antagonists (e.g., vedolizumab) may reduce these risks. Use of antibiotics for anorectal or fistulizing CD or pouchitis in UC increases the risk of Clostridium difficile infection. Pre-existing comorbidities, functional status, and nutrition are important indicators of surgical outcomes. Morbidity and mortality are increased among IBD patients undergoing surgery, often due to postoperative complications or sepsis. Elderly adults with IBD, particularly UC, have very high rates of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Colonoscopy appears safe, but the optimal surveillance interval has not been well defined. Should the octogenarian, nonagenarian, and centurion undergo colonoscopy? The length of surveillance should likely account for the individual's overall life expectancy. Specific health maintenance should emphasize administering non-live vaccines to patients on thiopurines or biologics and regular skin exams for those on thiopurines. Smoking cessation is crucial to overall health and response to medical therapy, even among UC patients. This article will review management of IBD in the elderly.

3 Review Smoking and early infliximab response in Crohn’s disease: a meta-analysis. 2015

Inamdar, Sumant / Volfson, Ariy / Rosen, Lisa / Sunday, Suzanne / Katz, Seymour / Sultan, Keith. · ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #25518060.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Infliximab is used to treat moderate to severe Crohn’s disease (CD), but its efficacy varies. Although cigarette smoking worsens CD, its impact on the infliximab response is unknown. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials to determine the effect of smoking on the induction response to infliximab. METHODS: A systematic search was performed of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane central register of controlled trials, the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Trials Register for publications, and abstracts from major conferences from January 1996 to December 2010. Random effects meta-analysis using the Mantel–Haenszel method was conducted. Heterogeneity across studies was assessed using the Q statistic, the I2 statistic, and τ2. RESULTS: We identified 12 articles; four were excluded due to use of non-validated scoring systems.The remaining eight included a total of 1658 patients, with 649 active smokers. Luminal response was assessed by the Crohn’s Disease Activity Index in four studies (three of which included fistula response) and the Harvey–Bradshaw index in two (both including fistula response), and two studies examined only the fistula response. The relative risk for response to infliximab among smokers was 0.99 (95% CI 0.88–1.11) (τ2 = 0.0143). Analyses of the five studies examining both inflammatory and fistulizing CD were similar to the analysis of all eight studies. The pooled relative risk was 0.92 (95% CI 0.80–1.06) (τ2 = 0.0154). CONCLUSION: Though smoking worsens CD, this meta-analysis does not show a negative effect of smoking on initial response to infliximab. This must be viewed in the proper context, as long-term maintenance of response may yet be influenced by smoking status.

4 Clinical Trial Ustekinumab as Induction and Maintenance Therapy for Crohn's Disease. 2016

Feagan, Brian G / Sandborn, William J / Gasink, Christopher / Jacobstein, Douglas / Lang, Yinghua / Friedman, Joshua R / Blank, Marion A / Johanns, Jewel / Gao, Long-Long / Miao, Ye / Adedokun, Omoniyi J / Sands, Bruce E / Hanauer, Stephen B / Vermeire, Severine / Targan, Stephan / Ghosh, Subrata / de Villiers, Willem J / Colombel, Jean-Frédéric / Tulassay, Zsolt / Seidler, Ursula / Salzberg, Bruce A / Desreumaux, Pierre / Lee, Scott D / Loftus, Edward V / Dieleman, Levinus A / Katz, Seymour / Rutgeerts, Paul / Anonymous2870890. ·From Robarts Clinical Trials, Robarts Research Institute, Western University, London, ON (B.G.F.), University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (S.G.), and the Division of Gastroenterology and CEGIIR, University of Alberta, Edmonton (L.A.D.) - all in Canada · University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (W.J.S.), and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles (S.T.) - both in California · Janssen Research and Development, Spring House (C.G., D.J., Y.L., J.R.F., J.J., L.-L.G., Y.M., O.J.A.), and Janssen Scientific Affairs, Horsham (M.A.B.) - both in Pennsylvania · the Dr. Henry D. Janowitz Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (B.E.S., J.-F.C.), and New York University School of Medicine (S.K.) - both in New York · Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago (S.B.H.) · University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium (S.V., P.R.) · Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa (W.J.V.) · Semmelweis University of Budapest, Budapest, Hungary (Z.T.) · the Department of Gastroenterology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany (U.S.) · Atlanta Gastroenterology Specialists, Atlanta (B.A.S.) · Hôpital Claude Huriez, Lille, France (P.D.) · University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle (S.D.L.) · and the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (E.V.L.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #27959607.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ustekinumab, a monoclonal antibody to the p40 subunit of interleukin-12 and interleukin-23, was evaluated as an intravenous induction therapy in two populations with moderately to severely active Crohn's disease. Ustekinumab was also evaluated as subcutaneous maintenance therapy. METHODS: We randomly assigned patients to receive a single intravenous dose of ustekinumab (either 130 mg or approximately 6 mg per kilogram of body weight) or placebo in two induction trials. The UNITI-1 trial included 741 patients who met the criteria for primary or secondary nonresponse to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists or had unacceptable side effects. The UNITI-2 trial included 628 patients in whom conventional therapy failed or unacceptable side effects occurred. Patients who completed these induction trials then participated in IM-UNITI, in which the 397 patients who had a response to ustekinumab were randomly assigned to receive subcutaneous maintenance injections of 90 mg of ustekinumab (either every 8 weeks or every 12 weeks) or placebo. The primary end point for the induction trials was a clinical response at week 6 (defined as a decrease from baseline in the Crohn's Disease Activity Index [CDAI] score of ≥100 points or a CDAI score <150). The primary end point for the maintenance trial was remission at week 44 (CDAI score <150). RESULTS: The rates of response at week 6 among patients receiving intravenous ustekinumab at a dose of either 130 mg or approximately 6 mg per kilogram were significantly higher than the rates among patients receiving placebo (in UNITI-1, 34.3%, 33.7%, and 21.5%, respectively, with P≤0.003 for both comparisons with placebo; in UNITI-2, 51.7%, 55.5%, and 28.7%, respectively, with P<0.001 for both doses). In the groups receiving maintenance doses of ustekinumab every 8 weeks or every 12 weeks, 53.1% and 48.8%, respectively, were in remission at week 44, as compared with 35.9% of those receiving placebo (P=0.005 and P=0.04, respectively). Within each trial, adverse-event rates were similar among treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with moderately to severely active Crohn's disease, those receiving intravenous ustekinumab had a significantly higher rate of response than did those receiving placebo. Subcutaneous ustekinumab maintained remission in patients who had a clinical response to induction therapy. (Funded by Janssen Research and Development; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01369329 , NCT01369342 , and NCT01369355 .).

5 Article Functional variants in the 2018

Hui, Ken Y / Fernandez-Hernandez, Heriberto / Hu, Jianzhong / Schaffner, Adam / Pankratz, Nathan / Hsu, Nai-Yun / Chuang, Ling-Shiang / Carmi, Shai / Villaverde, Nicole / Li, Xianting / Rivas, Manual / Levine, Adam P / Bao, Xiuliang / Labrias, Philippe R / Haritunians, Talin / Ruane, Darren / Gettler, Kyle / Chen, Ernie / Li, Dalin / Schiff, Elena R / Pontikos, Nikolas / Barzilai, Nir / Brant, Steven R / Bressman, Susan / Cheifetz, Adam S / Clark, Lorraine N / Daly, Mark J / Desnick, Robert J / Duerr, Richard H / Katz, Seymour / Lencz, Todd / Myers, Richard H / Ostrer, Harry / Ozelius, Laurie / Payami, Haydeh / Peter, Yakov / Rioux, John D / Segal, Anthony W / Scott, William K / Silverberg, Mark S / Vance, Jeffery M / Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban / Foroud, Tatiana / Atzmon, Gil / Pe'er, Itsik / Ioannou, Yiannis / McGovern, Dermot P B / Yue, Zhenyu / Schadt, Eric E / Cho, Judy H / Peter, Inga. ·Section of Digestive Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. · Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. · Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA. · Departments of Neurology and Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA. · Department of Pharmacological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. · Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 9112102, Israel. · Department of Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. · Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Centre for Molecular Medicine, Division of Medicine, University College, London WC1E 6JF, UK. · Translational Genomics Group, F. Widjaja Foundation Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. · Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Tarrytown, NY 10591, USA. · Department of Genetics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. · Departments of Genetics and Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. · Harvey M. and Lyn P. Meyerhoff Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA. · Alan and Barbara Mirken Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY 10003, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA. · Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA. · Taub Institute for Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA. · Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. · Department of Human Genetics, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. · New York University School of Medicine, New York City, NY 10016, USA. · North Shore University-Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Manhasset, NY, USA. · St. Francis Hospital, Roslyn, NY 11576, USA. · Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA. · Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Departments of Pathology and Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. · Deparment of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Departments of Neurology and Genetics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA. · HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, Huntsville, AL 35805, USA. · Department of Biology, Touro College, Queens, NY 10033, USA. · Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY 10033, USA. · Research Center, Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Quebec H1T1C8, Canada. · Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H1T1C8, Canada. · Dr. John T. Macdonald Foundation Department of Human Genetics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA. · Zane Cohen Centre for Digestive Diseases, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5T3L9, USA. · Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G1X5, Canada. · Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. · Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa 3498838, Israel. · Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. · Institute for Genetics and Multiscale Biology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA. · Sema4, a Mount Sinai venture, Stamford, CT 06902, USA. · Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. · Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA. inga.peter@mssm.edu. ·Sci Transl Med · Pubmed #29321258.

ABSTRACT: Crohn's disease (CD), a form of inflammatory bowel disease, has a higher prevalence in Ashkenazi Jewish than in non-Jewish European populations. To define the role of nonsynonymous mutations, we performed exome sequencing of Ashkenazi Jewish patients with CD, followed by array-based genotyping and association analysis in 2066 CD cases and 3633 healthy controls. We detected association signals in the

6 Article Therapeutic Use of Cannabis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2016

Ahmed, Waseem / Katz, Seymour. ·Dr Ahmed is an internal medicine resident at the New York University Medical Center in New York, New York. Dr Katz is a clinical professor in the Division of Gastroenterology at the New York University Medical Center and an associate director of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Program at the Tisch Hospital and Ambulatory Care Center in New York, New York. ·Gastroenterol Hepatol (N Y) · Pubmed #28035196.

ABSTRACT: The marijuana plant

7 Article A Frameshift in CSF2RB Predominant Among Ashkenazi Jews Increases Risk for Crohn's Disease and Reduces Monocyte Signaling via GM-CSF. 2016

Chuang, Ling-Shiang / Villaverde, Nicole / Hui, Ken Y / Mortha, Arthur / Rahman, Adeeb / Levine, Adam P / Haritunians, Talin / Evelyn Ng, Sok Meng / Zhang, Wei / Hsu, Nai-Yun / Facey, Jody-Ann / Luong, Tramy / Fernandez-Hernandez, Heriberto / Li, Dalin / Rivas, Manuel / Schiff, Elena R / Gusev, Alexander / Schumm, L Phillip / Bowen, Beatrice M / Sharma, Yashoda / Ning, Kaida / Remark, Romain / Gnjatic, Sacha / Legnani, Peter / George, James / Sands, Bruce E / Stempak, Joanne M / Datta, Lisa W / Lipka, Seth / Katz, Seymour / Cheifetz, Adam S / Barzilai, Nir / Pontikos, Nikolas / Abraham, Clara / Dubinsky, Marla J / Targan, Stephan / Taylor, Kent / Rotter, Jerome I / Scherl, Ellen J / Desnick, Robert J / Abreu, Maria T / Zhao, Hongyu / Atzmon, Gil / Pe'er, Itsik / Kugathasan, Subra / Hakonarson, Hakon / McCauley, Jacob L / Lencz, Todd / Darvasi, Ariel / Plagnol, Vincent / Silverberg, Mark S / Muise, Aleixo M / Brant, Steven R / Daly, Mark J / Segal, Anthony W / Duerr, Richard H / Merad, Miriam / McGovern, Dermot P B / Peter, Inga / Cho, Judy H. ·Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut; Section of Digestive Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Centre for Molecular Medicine, Division of Medicine, University College, London, United Kingdom. · Section of Digestive Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. · F. Widjaja Foundation Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics Research, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Health Studies, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. · Section of Digestive Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; Department of Genetics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York; Section of Digestive Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. · Section of Digestive Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; Department of Molecular and Computational Biology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Zane Cohen Centre for Digestive Diseases, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Harvey M. and Lyn P. Meyerhoff Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. · Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York; Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Division of Genomic Outcomes, Harbor-University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, California. · The Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Sanford I. Weill College of Cornell University-New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida. · Department of Biostatistics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Computer Science, Columbia University, New York, New York. · Department of Pediatrics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Centre for Applied Genomics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Division of Human Genetics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida; Dr John T. Macdonald Foundation Department of Human Genetics, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida. · Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset, New York. · Department of Genetics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel. · Genetics Institute, Division of Biosciences, University College, London, United Kingdom. · Inflammatory Bowel Disease Centre and Cell Biology Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Center for Human Genetic Research, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York; Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York; The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: Judy.cho@mssm.edu. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #27377463.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Crohn's disease (CD) has the highest prevalence in Ashkenazi Jewish populations. We sought to identify rare, CD-associated frameshift variants of high functional and statistical effects. METHODS: We performed exome sequencing and array-based genotype analyses of 1477 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals with CD and 2614 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals without CD (controls). To validate our findings, we performed genotype analyses of an additional 1515 CD cases and 7052 controls for frameshift mutations in the colony-stimulating factor 2-receptor β common subunit gene (CSF2RB). Intestinal tissues and blood samples were collected from patients with CD; lamina propria leukocytes were isolated and expression of CSF2RB and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-responsive cells were defined by adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) time-of-flight mass cytometry (CyTOF analysis). Variants of CSF2RB were transfected into HEK293 cells and the expression and functions of gene products were compared. RESULTS: In the discovery cohort, we associated CD with a frameshift mutation in CSF2RB (P = 8.52 × 10(-4)); the finding was validated in the replication cohort (combined P = 3.42 × 10(-6)). Incubation of intestinal lamina propria leukocytes with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor resulted in high levels of phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT5) and lesser increases in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AK straining transforming (AKT). Cells co-transfected with full-length and mutant forms of CSF2RB had reduced pSTAT5 after stimulation with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, compared with cells transfected with control CSF2RB, indicating a dominant-negative effect of the mutant gene. Monocytes from patients with CD who were heterozygous for the frameshift mutation (6% of CD cases analyzed) had reduced responses to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and markedly decreased activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase; activity of this enzyme has been associated with immune tolerance. CONCLUSIONS: In a genetic analysis of Ashkenazi Jewish individuals, we associated CD with a frameshift mutation in CSF2RB. Intestinal monocytes from carriers of this mutation had reduced responses to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, providing an additional mechanism for alterations to the innate immune response in individuals with CD.

8 Article Risk of New or Recurrent Cancer in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Previous Cancer Exposed to Immunosuppressive and Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Agents. 2016

Axelrad, Jordan / Bernheim, Oren / Colombel, Jean-Frederic / Malerba, Stefano / Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin / Yajnik, Vijay / Hoffman, Gila / Agrawal, Manasi / Lukin, Dana / Desai, Amit / McEachern, Elisa / Bosworth, Brian / Scherl, Ellen / Reyes, Andre / Zaidi, Hina / Mudireddy, Prashant / DiCaprio, David / Sultan, Keith / Korelitz, Burton / Wang, Erwin / Williams, Renee / Chen, LeaAnn / Katz, Seymour / Itzkowitz, Steven / Anonymous5970838. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York; Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, New York Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Health Evidence and Policy, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, New York. · Department of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, New York. · Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. · Department of Medicine, North Shore-Long Island Jewish University Hospital, Manhasset, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, North Shore-Long Island Jewish North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, New York. · Department of Medicine, North Shore- Long Island Jewish Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, New York. · Department of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: steven.itzkowitz@mountsinai.org. ·Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #26247164.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Our understanding of malignancy associated with immunosuppression in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comes from studies of individuals with no history of cancer. We investigated whether patients with IBD and a history of cancer who were subsequently immunosuppressed have an increased risk of developing incident cancer. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 333 patients with IBD treated at 8 academic medical centers who developed cancer and subsequently received treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF), anti-TNF with an antimetabolite (thiopurines, methotrexate), antimetabolites, or no subsequent exposure to immunosuppressive agents (controls). We collected data on their primary outcomes of incident cancers (new or recurrent). Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated by using Cox proportional hazards and Kaplan-Meier survival curves; study groups were compared by using the log-rank test. RESULTS: During the follow-up period, 90 patients (27%) developed an incident cancer. Patient characteristics between groups differed, but matching was not possible because of the relatively small sample sizes. There was no difference in time to incident cancer (P = .14) or type of incident cancer (P = .61) among the 4 groups. After adjusting for recurrence risk for type of prior cancer, there was no difference in risk of incident cancer (HR for anti-TNF, 0.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.09-1.09; HR for anti-TNF with an antimetabolite, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.26-1.59; HR for an antimetabolite, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.54-2.15) or time to subsequent cancer between study arms (P = .22). CONCLUSION: On the basis of a retrospective study, in patients with IBD and a history of cancer, exposure to an anti-TNF agent or an antimetabolite after cancer was not associated with an increased risk of incident cancer, compared with patients who did not receive immunosuppression. Larger, matched, prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

9 Article Extended haplotype association study in Crohn's disease identifies a novel, Ashkenazi Jewish-specific missense mutation in the NF-κB pathway gene, HEATR3. 2013

Zhang, W / Hui, K Y / Gusev, A / Warner, N / Ng, S M E / Ferguson, J / Choi, M / Burberry, A / Abraham, C / Mayer, L / Desnick, R J / Cardinale, C J / Hakonarson, H / Waterman, M / Chowers, Y / Karban, A / Brant, S R / Silverberg, M S / Gregersen, P K / Katz, S / Lifton, R P / Zhao, H / Nuñez, G / Pe'er, I / Peter, I / Cho, J H. ·Section of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. ·Genes Immun · Pubmed #23615072.

ABSTRACT: The Ashkenazi Jewish population has a several-fold higher prevalence of Crohn's disease (CD) compared with non-Jewish European ancestry populations and has a unique genetic history. Haplotype association is critical to CD etiology in this population, most notably at NOD2, in which three causal, uncommon and conditionally independent NOD2 variants reside on a shared background haplotype. We present an analysis of extended haplotypes that showed significantly greater association to CD in the Ashkenazi Jewish population compared with a non-Jewish population (145 haplotypes and no haplotypes with P-value <10(-3), respectively). Two haplotype regions, one each on chromosomes 16 and 21, conferred increased disease risk within established CD loci. We performed exome sequencing of 55 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals and follow-up genotyping focused on variants in these two regions. We observed Ashkenazi Jewish-specific nominal association at R755C in TRPM2 on chromosome 21. Within the chromosome 16 region, R642S of HEATR3 and rs9922362 of BRD7 showed genome-wide significance. Expression studies of HEATR3 demonstrated a positive role in NOD2-mediated NF-κB signaling. The BRD7 signal showed conditional dependence with only the downstream rare CD-causal variants in NOD2, but not with the background haplotype; this elaborates NOD2 as a key illustration of synthetic association.

10 Article Preoperative pelvic radiation increases the risk for ileal pouch failure in patients with colitis-associated colorectal cancer. 2013

Wu, Xian-rui / Kiran, Ravi P / Remzi, Feza H / Katz, Seymour / Mukewar, Saurabh / Shen, Bo. ·Department of Colorectal Surgery, the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #23453430.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To evaluate the impact of preoperative radiation on pouch outcomes in patients with colitis-associated cancer (CAC). METHODS: CAC patients who underwent restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) from 1984 to 2009 were identified from our registry. The impact of preoperative pelvic radiation for CAC or other pelvic cancer on pouch related outcomes was evaluated. RESULTS: Sixty-three pouch patients with confirmed CAC were included (37 male, 58.7%). The mean age at pouch construction was 46.9±10.6 years. Seven patients were excluded due to the presence of persistent diverting ileostomy (n=2) or no follow-up (n=5). The remaining 56 patients were analyzed, including 9 who received pelvic radiation prior to IPAA creation for CRC or other cancers. Preoperative pelvic radiation was significantly associated with chronic pouchitis (P=0.024). There was, however, no correlation between pelvic radiation and pouch/anal transitional zone neoplasia, pouch stricture, pelvic abscess and pouch fistula/sinus. Pouch failure occurred in 13 patients after a median follow-up of 66.4 (range: 2.7-322.2) months. Although a simple statistical analysis based on the number of patients with pouch failure did not achieve significance (4/9 vs. 9/47, P=0.19), Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a strong association between preoperative pelvic radiation and the risk for pouch failure (P<0.001). A subgroup analysis of rectal cancer patients revealed that 3/7 patients (42.9%) with radiation and 3/17 (17.6%) without had pouch failure (P=0.31). Again, the association between pelvic radiation and pouch failure was confirmed using Kaplan-Meier analysis (P=0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Pelvic radiation administered prior to IPAA creation appears to be associated with poor pouch outcomes. Oncological benefits and pouch functional outcomes should be carefully balanced before pelvic radiation is considered prior to restorative proctocolectomy.

11 Article A randomised, double-blind, sham-controlled study of granulocyte/monocyte apheresis for moderate to severe Crohn's disease. 2013

Sands, Bruce E / Katz, Seymour / Wolf, Douglas C / Feagan, Brian G / Wang, Tao / Gustofson, Lisa-Marie / Wong, Cindy / Vandervoort, Margaret K / Hanauer, Stephen. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Mount Sinai Medical Center and Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA. bruce.sands@mssm.edu ·Gut · Pubmed #22760005.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Activated granulocytes and monocytes may contribute to the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). In small, uncontrolled studies, granulocyte/monocyte apheresis (GMA) has shown promise in treating CD. We conducted a randomised, double-blind study to compare GMA with a sham procedure in patients with moderate to severe CD. DESIGN: Patients with active CD as defined by a Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) of 220-450 were randomly allocated in a 2:1 ratio to treatment with GMA using the Adacolumn Apheresis System (JIMRO, Takasaki, Japan) or sham apheresis. Ten apheresis sessions were scheduled over a 9-week period, and efficacy was evaluated at week 12. The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving clinical remission (CDAI score ≤ 150 without use of prohibited drugs). RESULTS: Clinical remission was achieved by 17.8% of patients in the GMA group (n = 157) compared with 19.2% of those in the sham control group (n = 78) (absolute difference--1.4% (95% CI--12.8% to 8.5%), p = 0.858). Clinical response (defined as a ≥ 100-point decrease in CDAI) was achieved by 28.0% and 26.9% of patients in the GMA and sham groups, respectively (p = 1.000). The two treatments produced similar changes from baseline in CDAI and quality of life, as well as in disease severity assessed endoscopically. The incidence and types of adverse events did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: GMA was well tolerated, but this study did not demonstrate its effectiveness over a sham procedure in inducing clinical remission or response in patients with moderate to severe CD.

12 Article Mimicry and deception in inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal behçet disease. 2012

Grigg, Erika L / Kane, Sunanda / Katz, Seymour. ·Dr. Grigg is a Gastroenterology Fellow at Georgia Health Sciences University in Augusta, Georgia. Dr. Kane is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Dr. Katz is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Great Neck, New York. ·Gastroenterol Hepatol (N Y) · Pubmed #22485077.

ABSTRACT: Behçet disease (BD) is a rare, chronic, multisystemic, inflammatory disease characterized by recurrent oral aphthous ulcers, genital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. Intestinal BD occurs in 10-15% of BD patients and shares many clinical characteristics with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), making differentiation of the 2 diseases very difficult and occasionally impossible. The diagnosis of intestinal BD is based on clinical findings-as there is no pathognomonic laboratory test-and should be considered in patients who present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, and rectal bleeding and who are susceptible to intestinal BD. Treatment for intestinal BD is similar to that for IBD, but overall prognosis is worse for intestinal BD. Although intestinal BD is extremely rare in the United States, physicians will increasingly encounter these challenging patients in the future due to increased immigration rates of Asian and Mediterranean populations.

13 Article A genome-wide scan of Ashkenazi Jewish Crohn's disease suggests novel susceptibility loci. 2012

Kenny, Eimear E / Pe'er, Itsik / Karban, Amir / Ozelius, Laurie / Mitchell, Adele A / Ng, Sok Meng / Erazo, Monica / Ostrer, Harry / Abraham, Clara / Abreu, Maria T / Atzmon, Gil / Barzilai, Nir / Brant, Steven R / Bressman, Susan / Burns, Edward R / Chowers, Yehuda / Clark, Lorraine N / Darvasi, Ariel / Doheny, Dana / Duerr, Richard H / Eliakim, Rami / Giladi, Nir / Gregersen, Peter K / Hakonarson, Hakon / Jones, Michelle R / Marder, Karen / McGovern, Dermot P B / Mulle, Jennifer / Orr-Urtreger, Avi / Proctor, Deborah D / Pulver, Ann / Rotter, Jerome I / Silverberg, Mark S / Ullman, Thomas / Warren, Stephen T / Waterman, Matti / Zhang, Wei / Bergman, Aviv / Mayer, Lloyd / Katz, Seymour / Desnick, Robert J / Cho, Judy H / Peter, Inga. ·Department of Computer Sciences, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States of America. ·PLoS Genet · Pubmed #22412388.

ABSTRACT: Crohn's disease (CD) is a complex disorder resulting from the interaction of intestinal microbiota with the host immune system in genetically susceptible individuals. The largest meta-analysis of genome-wide association to date identified 71 CD-susceptibility loci in individuals of European ancestry. An important epidemiological feature of CD is that it is 2-4 times more prevalent among individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) descent compared to non-Jewish Europeans (NJ). To explore genetic variation associated with CD in AJs, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) by combining raw genotype data across 10 AJ cohorts consisting of 907 cases and 2,345 controls in the discovery stage, followed up by a replication study in 971 cases and 2,124 controls. We confirmed genome-wide significant associations of 9 known CD loci in AJs and replicated 3 additional loci with strong signal (p<5×10⁻⁶). Novel signals detected among AJs were mapped to chromosomes 5q21.1 (rs7705924, combined p = 2×10⁻⁸; combined odds ratio OR = 1.48), 2p15 (rs6545946, p = 7×10⁻⁹; OR = 1.16), 8q21.11 (rs12677663, p = 2×10⁻⁸; OR = 1.15), 10q26.3 (rs10734105, p = 3×10⁻⁸; OR = 1.27), and 11q12.1 (rs11229030, p = 8×10⁻⁹; OR = 1.15), implicating biologically plausible candidate genes, including RPL7, CPAMD8, PRG2, and PRG3. In all, the 16 replicated and newly discovered loci, in addition to the three coding NOD2 variants, accounted for 11.2% of the total genetic variance for CD risk in the AJ population. This study demonstrates the complementary value of genetic studies in the Ashkenazim.

14 Article Prognosis of lymphoma in patients following treatment with 6-mercaptopurine/azathioprine for inflammatory bowel disease. 2012

Sultan, Keith / Korelitz, Burton I / Present, Daniel / Katz, Seymour / Sunday, Suzanne / Shapira, Iuliana. ·North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York, USA. ·Inflamm Bowel Dis · Pubmed #22241664.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) and azathioprine (AZA) are effective for induction and maintenance therapy of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). There is an increased risk of lymphoma in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treated with 6-MP/AZA. Little, however, is known about the prognosis of IBD patients treated with 6-MP/AZA who develop lymphoma. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of 8780 records from three tertiary IBD centers and the records of 600 lymphoma patients from an academic Hematology and Oncology Center. The primary endpoint variable was survival of IBD patients with a lymphoma diagnosis treated or not treated with 6-MP/AZA. A secondary endpoint was the relative survival rate (by gender, race, and ethnicity) extrapolated from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database, computed for each subject. RESULTS: Fourteen IBD patients were diagnosed with lymphoma. Twelve had CD and two had UC. Seven patients had treatment with 6-MP/AZA and seven had not. Two patients who received 6-MP/AZA died (both 1 year after diagnosis) and two patients who had not received 6-MP/AZA died (one after 2 years, another 3 years after diagnosis), all from lymphoma. Survival at last follow-up was similar to expected survival based on extrapolated SEER data for both 6-MP/AZA treated and untreated patients. CONCLUSIONS: We found no differences of survival with lymphoma between IBD patients and expected survival for the general population. Also, the prognosis for those IBD patients treated with 6-MP/AZA was not worse than lymphoma patients not treated with 6-MP/AZA. Statistical analysis, however, was limited by the small sample size and heterogeneity of the patients studied.

15 Article Osteoporosis and gastrointestinal disease. 2010

Katz, Seymour / Weinerman, Stuart. ·Dr. Katz serves as Clinical Professor of Medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York and as Attending Gastroenterologist at both the North Shore University Hospital-Long Island Jewish Health System in Manhasset, New York and St. Francis Hospital in Roslyn, New York. ·Gastroenterol Hepatol (N Y) · Pubmed #20978554.

ABSTRACT: Gastrointestinal disease is often overlooked or simply forgotten as a cause of osteoporosis. Yet, the consequences of osteoporotic fractures can be devastating. Although the bulk of the published experience regarding osteoporosis is derived from the postmenopausal population, this review will focus on gastrointestinal disorders implicated in osteoporosis, with an emphasis on inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease. The unique aspects of gastrointestinal diseases associated with osteoporosis include early onset of disease (and, therefore, prolonged exposure to risk factors for developing osteoporosis, particularly with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease), malabsorption, and maldigestion of nutrients necessary for bone health and maintenance (eg, calcium, vitamin D), as well as the impact of glucocorticoids. These factors, when added to smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, hypogonadism, and a family history of osteoporosis, accumulate into an imposing package of predictors for osteoporotic fracture. This paper will review the identification and treatment strategies for patients with gastrointestinal disorders and osteoporosis.

16 Minor Increased hospitalizations in elderly with inflammatory bowel disease on anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy but not increased infections: a community practice experience. 2014

Shen, Huafeng / Lipka, Seth / Katz, Seymour. ·Department of Medicine, Nassau University Medical Center, East Meadow, NY, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA. · New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; North Shore University Hospital-Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset, NY, USA; St Francis Hospital, Roslyn, NY, USA. Electronic address: Seymourkatz.md@gmail.com. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #24434182.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Minor Retained capsule extraction 6 years after wireless bowel capsule endoscopy: the importance of follow up. 2013

Lipka, Seth / Vacchio, Anthony / Katz, Seymour / Ginzburg, Lev. · ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #23332558.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Minor Massive pyoderma gangrenosum in a 77 year old female with Crohn's disease responsive to adalimumab. 2013

Lipka, Seth / Katz, Seymour / Ginzburg, Lev. · ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #22926276.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --