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Crohn Disease: HELP
Articles by Jochen Maul
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, J. Maul wrote the following 5 articles about Crohn Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article The Pathogenesis of Extraintestinal Manifestations: Implications for IBD Research, Diagnosis, and Therapy. 2019

Hedin, C R H / Vavricka, S R / Stagg, A J / Schoepfer, A / Raine, T / Puig, L / Pleyer, U / Navarini, A / van der Meulen-de Jong, A E / Maul, J / Katsanos, K / Kagramanova, A / Greuter, T / González-Lama, Y / van Gaalen, F / Ellul, P / Burisch, J / Bettenworth, D / Becker, M D / Bamias, G / Rieder, F. ·Gastroenterology unit, Patient Area Gastroenterology, Dermatovenereology and Rheumatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Centre for Immunobiology, Bart's and The London Medical School, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · University Eye Clinic, Uveitis Center, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. · Gastroenterologie am Bayerischen Platz, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology, Infectious Diseases, Rheumatology), Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, University of Ioannina School of Medical Sciences, Ioannina, Greece. · IBD Department, The Loginov Moscow Clinical Scientific Centre, Moscow, Russia. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Gastroenterology Research Unit, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · IBD Unit, Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department, Puerta de Hierro University Hospital, Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center [LUMC], Leiden, Netherlands. · Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Mater Dei Hospital, Msida, Malta. · Center for Clinical Research and Prevention, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Abdominal Center K, Medical Section, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Medicine B, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany. · Department of Ophthalmology, Triemli Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland & Department of Ophthalmology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, GI Unit, 3rd Academic Department of Internal Medicine, Sotiria Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition; Digestive Diseases and Surgery Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #30445584.

ABSTRACT: This article reports on the sixth scientific workshop of the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation [ECCO] on the pathogenesis of extraintestinal manifestations [EIMs] in inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]. This paper has been drafted by 15 ECCO members and 6 external experts [in rheumatology, dermatology, ophthalmology, and immunology] from 10 European countries and the USA. Within the workshop, contributors formed subgroups to address specific areas. Following a comprehensive literature search, the supporting text was finalized under the leadership of the heads of the working groups before being integrated by the group consensus leaders.

2 Article Cyclophosphamide Pulse Therapy in Severe Refractory Crohn's Disease: A Retrospective Multicenter Case Series. 2018

Bär, Florian / Krause, Thomas / Stallmach, Andreas / Teich, Niels / Maaser, Christian / Maul, Jochen / Helwig, Ulf / Fellermann, Klaus / Büning, Jürgen / Anonymous2440955. ·Department of Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, Germany. · Gastroenterology Opernstrasse, Kassel, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine IV (Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Infectious Diseases), University Hospital of Jena, Jena, Germany. · Practice for Digestive and Metabolic Diseases, Leipzig, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Lüneburg, Lüneburg, Germany. · Charité Medical School, University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Practice of Internal Medicine, Oldenburg, Germany. ·Inflamm Intest Dis · Pubmed #30018965.

ABSTRACT: Background and Aims: In Crohn's disease (CD) patients still remain refractory to current regimens, including biologicals. Previous data from small single-center studies indicated cyclophosphamide pulse therapy (CPT) to be effective for induction of remission at least in steroid-refractory cases. The aim of the present study was to study the efficacy and safety of CPT in mainly tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-refractory complicated CD patients. Methods: Patients with refractory CD undergoing CPT were identified in 13 centers of the German IBD Study Group and retrospectively registered. In total, 41 patients (12 male, 29 female, median age 36 years, range 18-72 years) were included for analysis. Seventy-eight percent of these had previously been treated with thiopurines and 90% had previously received anti-TNF antibodies. Former steroid treatment was found throughout the cohort. Results: Patients received a median number of 5 (1-13) pulses every 28 (13-54) days in a period of 120 (12-411) days. A median dose of 766 (600-1,200) mg and a median cumulative dose of 4,500 (750-9,750) mg was given. A clinical response (reduction in the Harvey-Bradshaw Index [HBI] ≥2 points) was found in 68% of the patients and clinical remission (HBI <5 points) in 32%. Steroids could be reduced from 31 to 12 mg per day over all patients. Side effects were recorded in 71% ( Conclusion: Our data point to CPT as a therapeutic alternative for induction of remission in patients with severe refractory courses of CD including TNF antagonists. CPT might serve as bridging for maintenance treatment.

3 Article Restless legs syndrome is a relevant comorbidity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. 2018

Becker, Janek / Berger, Felix / Schindlbeck, Katharina A / Poddubnyy, Denis / Koch, Peter M / Preiß, Jan C / Siegmund, Britta / Marzinzik, Frank / Maul, Jochen. ·Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology, Infectious Diseases, Rheumatology), Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Neurology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Center for Neurosciences, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA. · Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und Diabetologie, Vivantes Klinikum Neukölln, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology, Infectious Diseases, Rheumatology), Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. jochen.maul@charite.de. · Gastroenterologie am Bayerischen Platz, Innsbrucker Str. 58, 10825, Berlin, Germany. jochen.maul@charite.de. ·Int J Colorectal Dis · Pubmed #29610943.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: In patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), restless legs syndrome (RLS) may occur as an extraintestinal disease manifestation. Iron deficiency (ID) or folate deficiency/vitamin B METHODS: Patients were screened for ID and RLS by a gastroenterologist. If RLS was suspected, a neurologist was consulted for definitive diagnosis and severity. Patients with RLS and ID, FD, or VB RESULTS: A total of 353 IBD patients were included. Prevalence for RLS was 9.4% in Crohn's disease (CD) and 8% in ulcerative colitis (UC). Prevalence for the subgroup of clinically relevant RLS (symptoms ≥ twice/week with at least moderate distress) was 7.1% (n = 16) for CD and 4.8% (n = 6) for UC. 38.7% of RLS patients presented with ID, FD, and/or VB CONCLUSION: Although the overall prevalence of RLS in IBD did not differ to the general population, clinically relevant RLS was more frequent in IBD patients and, therefore, it is important for clinicians to be aware of RLS symptoms. Though for definite diagnosis and proper treatment of RLS, a neurologist must be consulted. Additionally, iron supplementation of IBD patients with ID can improve RLS symptoms. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov No. NCT03457571.

4 Article Vedolizumab provides clinical benefit over 1 year in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease - a prospective multicenter observational study. 2016

Stallmach, A / Langbein, C / Atreya, R / Bruns, T / Dignass, A / Ende, K / Hampe, J / Hartmann, F / Neurath, M F / Maul, J / Preiss, J C / Schmelz, R / Siegmund, B / Schulze, H / Teich, N / von Arnim, U / Baumgart, D C / Schmidt, C. ·Jena, Germany. · Erlangen, Germany. · Frankfurt/Main, Germany. · Erfurt, Germany. · Dresden, Germany. · Berlin, Germany. · Leipzig, Germany. · Magdeburg, Germany. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #27714831.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Vedolizumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the α4β7-integrin, is effective in inducing and maintaining clinical remission in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis according to randomised clinical trials. AIM: To determine the long-term effectiveness of vedolizumab in a real-world clinical setting. METHODS: This observational registry assessed the clinical outcome in patients treated with vedolizumab for clinically active Crohn's disease (n = 67) or ulcerative colitis (n = 60). Primary endpoint was clinical remission (HBI ≤ 4/pMayo ≤ 1) at week 54. Secondary endpoints included clinical response rates (HBI/pMayo score drop ≥3) and steroid-free clinical remission at weeks 30 and 54. RESULTS: Vedolizumab was stopped in 69/127 (56%) patients after a median time of 18 weeks (range 2-49) predominantly owing to lack or loss of response. Using nonresponder imputation analysis, clinical remission and steroid-free remission rates were 21% and 15% in Crohn's disease and 25% and 22% in ulcerative colitis, respectively. Lack of clinical remission was associated with prior treatment with anti-TNF or with steroids for more than 3 months in the last 6 months in ulcerative colitis. At week 14, the absence of remission in Crohn's disease or nonresponse in ulcerative colitis indicated a low likelihood of clinical remission at week 54 [2/31 (7%) in Crohn's disease, 4/41 (10%) in ulcerative colitis]. Accordingly, declining C-reactive protein in inflammatory bowel disease and/or lower faecal calprotectin in ulcerative colitis at week 14 predicted remission at week 54. CONCLUSION: Among patients who started vedolizumab for active inflammatory bowel disease, clinical remission rates are 21-25% after 54 weeks.

5 Article Colesevelam for the treatment of bile acid malabsorption-associated diarrhea in patients with Crohn's disease: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. 2014

Beigel, Florian / Teich, Niels / Howaldt, Stefanie / Lammert, Frank / Maul, Jochen / Breiteneicher, Simone / Rust, Christian / Göke, Burkhard / Brand, Stephan / Ochsenkühn, Thomas. ·Department of Medicine II, University Hospital Munich-Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germany. Electronic address: florian.beigel@med.uni-muenchen.de. · Internal Practice, Leipzig, Germany. · Internal Practice, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg, Germany. · Department for Gastroenterology, Infectious Diseases and Rheumatology Charité-Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, University Hospital Munich-Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, University Hospital Munich-Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germany; Department of Medicine II, Krankenhaus Barmherzige Brüder, Munich, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, University Hospital Munich-Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germany; Isarmedizin Zentrum, Munich, Germany. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #24953836.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Bile acid malabsorption (BAM)-associated diarrhea is an important clinical issue in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). We analyzed the efficacy and safety of the bile acid sequestrant colesevelam for treatment of BAM-associated diarrhea in CD patients in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. METHODS: The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with >30% reduction of liquid stools/day from baseline to termination visit at week 4. Secondary endpoints were reduction of the number of liquid stools/day, improvement of stool consistency and quality of life. RESULTS: 26 patients were analyzed in the intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis. The primary endpoint was reached by 10 patients (69.7%) in the colesevelam group compared to 3 patients (27.3%) in the placebo group (risk difference RD=.394, 95%CI:[-0.012; 0.706]; P=.0566). In the per-protocol analysis (n=22), the risk difference was statistically significant (RD=.470, 95%CI:[0.018; 0.788], P(H0: RD=0)=0.0364; 95% CI:[1.3;54.7]). Regarding secondary endpoints, in the ITT population colesevelam-treated patients had a significant reduction of liquid stools/day at week 4 (median 5.0 to 2.0; P=0.01), while patients treated with placebo had no significant reduction (median 4.0 to 3.0; P=0.42). Significantly more patients in the colesevelam group had improvement of stool consistency of at least one level in the Bristol stool chart, as compared to the placebo group (P=0.003). CONCLUSIONS: We found significant differences in favor for colesevelam treatment compared to placebo treatment for CD patients with BAM regarding the reduction of the number of liquid stools/day and stool consistency. ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01203254.