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Crohn Disease: HELP
Articles by José Miguel Luz Parente
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Jose M. L. Parente wrote the following 4 articles about Crohn Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Relationship between selenium status and biomarkers of oxidative stress in Crohn's disease. 2020

Barros, Susy Érika de Lima / Dias, Thaline Milany da Silva / Moura, Mayara Storel Beserra de / Soares, Nina Rosa Mello / Pierote, Nayane Regina Araújo / Araújo, Camilla Oliveira Duarte de / Maia, Carla Soraya Costa / Henriques, Gilberto Simeone / Barros, Veruska Cavalcanti / Moita Neto, José Machado / Parente, José Miguel Luz / Marreiro, Dilina do Nascimento / Nogueira, Nadir do Nascimento. ·Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, Ininga, Teresina, Piauí, Brazil. · Department of Nutrition, State University of Ceará, Campus do Itaperi, Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. · School of Nursing, Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. · Department of Parasitology and Microbiology, Federal University of Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, Ininga, Teresina, Piauí, Brazil. · Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, Ininga, Teresina, Piauí, Brazil. · Hospital of the Federal University of Piauí, Federal University of Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, Ininga, Teresina, Piauí, Brazil. · Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, Ininga, Teresina, Piauí, Brazil. Electronic address: nadirn@uol.com.br. ·Nutrition · Pubmed #32244179.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Crohn disease (CD) is characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation and various factors involved in its pathogenesis including oxidative stress. The oxidative stress in CD may compromise antioxidant nutrients, such as selenium. The aim of this study was to assess the status of selenium and its relationship with markers of oxidative stress in patients with CD in comparison to controls. METHODS: The study included 47 patients with CD (20 with active disease and 27 in remission) and 25 healthy individuals. Blood samples were collected for the analysis of plasma and erythrocyte selenium concentrations using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Selenoprotein P (SepP) was evaluated by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) activity was assessed by using an automatic biochemistry analyzer, and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) was measured. Comparative analyses were performed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test. For correlations, Pearson's coefficient test was used. The determinants for CD and lipid peroxidation were indicated by odds ratio. RESULTS: Plasma and erythrocyte selenium levels and SepP concentrations were lower in the CD patient groups than in the healthy group. GPx1 activity and the concentration of TBARS were significantly higher in the CD groups. In the univariate analysis, plasma and erythrocyte selenium and TBARS were associated with CD. CONCLUSION: Patients with CD have impaired selenium status, which is related to the increased oxidative stress observed in these patients.

2 Article Quality of life, work productivity impairment and healthcare resources in inflammatory bowel diseases in Brazil. 2019

Parra, Rogerio S / Chebli, Julio M F / Amarante, Heda M B S / Flores, Cristina / Parente, Jose M L / Ramos, Odery / Fernandes, Milene / Rocha, Jose J R / Feitosa, Marley R / Feres, Omar / Scotton, Antonio S / Nones, Rodrigo B / Lima, Murilo M / Zaltman, Cyrla / Goncalves, Carolina D / Guimaraes, Isabella M / Santana, Genoile O / Sassaki, Ligia Y / Hossne, Rogerio S / Bafutto, Mauro / Junior, Roberto L K / Faria, Mikaell A G / Miszputen, Sender J / Gomes, Tarcia N F / Catapani, Wilson R / Faria, Anderson A / Souza, Stella C S / Caratin, Rosana F / Senra, Juliana T / Ferrari, Maria L A. ·Department of Surgery and Anatomy, Ribeirao Preto Medical School, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP 14049-900, Brazil. rsparra@hcrp.usp.br. · Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-247, Brazil. · Hospital de Clinicas da Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR 80060-900, Brazil. · Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre - RS 90035-007, Brazil. · Universidade Federal do Piaui, Teresina, PI 64073-500, Brazil. · Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR 80060-900, Brazil. · CTI Clinical Trial & Consulting Services, Lisbon 1070-274, Portugal. · Department of Surgery and Anatomy, Ribeirao Preto Medical School, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP 14049-900, Brazil. · CMIP Centro Mineiro de Pesquisa, Juiz de Fora, MG 36010-570, Brazil. · Hospital Nossa Senhora das Gracas, Curitiba, PR 80810-040, Brazil. · Hospital Universitario da Universidade Federal do Piaui, Teresina, PI 64049-550, Brazil. · Carolina D Gonçalves, Isabella M Guimaraes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-913, Brazil. · Universidade do Estado da Bahia, - Salvador, BA 41150-000, Brazil. · Department of Internal Medicine, Botucatu Medical School at Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu, SP 18618-687, Brazil. · Instituto Goiano de Gastroenterologia e Endoscopia Digestiva Ltda, Goiania, GO 74535-170, Brazil. · Kaiser Clinica, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP 15015-110, Brazil. · Escola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo, SP 04023-900, Brazil. · UNIFESP, Disciplina de Gastroenterologia, Sao Paulo, SP 04040-002, Brazil. · Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo Andre, SP 09060-870, Brazil. · Faculdade de Medicina UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG, 30130-100, Brazil. · Takeda Pharmaceuticals Brazil, Sao Paulo, SP 04709-011, Brazil. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #31636478.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have been associated with a low quality of life (QoL) and a negative impact on work productivity compared to the general population. Information about disease control, patient-reported outcomes (PROs), treatment patterns and use of healthcare resources is relevant to optimizing IBD management. AIM: To describe QoL and work productivity and activity impairment (WPAI), treatment patterns and use of healthcare resources among IBD patients in Brazil. METHODS: A multicenter cross-sectional study included adult outpatients who were previously diagnosed with moderate to severe Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). At enrolment, active CD and UC were defined as having a Harvey Bradshaw Index ≥ 8 or a CD Activity Index ≥ 220 or calprotectin > 200 µg/g or previous colonoscopy results suggestive of inadequate control (per investigator criteria) and a 9-point partial Mayo score ≥ 5, respectively. The PRO assessment included the QoL questionnaires SF-36 and EQ-5D-5L, the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ), and the WPAI questionnaire. Information about healthcare resources and treatment during the previous 3 years was collected from medical records. Chi-square, Fisher's exact and Student's RESULTS: Of the 407 patients in this study (CD/UC: 64.9%/35.1%, mean age 42.9/45.9 years, 54.2%/56.6% female, 38.3%/37.1% employed), 44.7%/25.2% presented moderate-to-severe CD/UC activity, respectively, at baseline. Expressed in median values for CD/UC, respectively, the SF-36 physical component was 46.6/44.7 and the mental component was 45.2/44.2, the EQ-visual analog scale score was 80.0/70.0, and the IBDQ overall score was 164.0/165.0. Moderate to severe activity, female gender, being unemployed, a lower educational level and lower income were associated with lower QoL ( CONCLUSION: Moderate to severe IBD activity, especially among CD patients, is associated with a substantial impact on QoL, work productivity impairment and an increased number of IBD surgeries and hospitalizations in Brazil.

3 Article Effect of mineral status and glucocorticoid use on bone mineral density in patients with Crohn's disease. 2018

Pierote, Nayane R / Braz, Amanda F / Barros, Susy L / Moita Neto, José M / Parente, José Miguel L / Silva, Maria da Cruz M / Beserra, Mayara S / Soares, Nina Rosa M / Marreiro, Dilina N / do Noscimento Nogueira, Nadir. ·Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, Ininga, Teresina, Piauí, Brazil. · Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, Ininga, Teresina, Piauí, Brazil. · Hospital of the Federal University of Piauí, Federal University of Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, Ininga, Teresina, Piauí, Brazil. · Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, Ininga, Teresina, Piauí, Brazil. Electronic address: Nadirn@uol.com.br. ·Nutrition · Pubmed #29469014.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Crohn's disease (CD) is a condition that is characterized by chronic inflammation. The presence of multifactorial pathogenesis that results from inflammation is associated with low micronutrient consumption and glucocorticoid use, which may be related to bone health. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between dietary mineral intake and glucocorticoid use in bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with CD. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 62 patients with CD ages 20 y to 40 y measured their macro- and micronutrient intake with a 3-d food record. The lumbar spine and femoral neck BMDs were determined using a bone densitometry technique. The C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) values were also noted. RESULTS: Dietary intake of calcium, zinc, and magnesium was below the reference values but the phosphorus intake level was within the normal value range. Patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis accounted for 17.7% and 14.5%, respectively, of the total number of participants. Significant bone loss was found in 22.6% of patients taking glucocorticoid medications. BMD was significantly reduced and also observed in patients in the active phase of their disease. Zinc and calcium intakes were found to be correlated with reduced femoral neck BMD. The mean CRP and ESR values were above the normal ranges. Significant differences in age and ESR were observed between patients with normal and reduced BMD (P <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Low calcium and zinc intake, glucocorticoid use, and active disease phase are favorable conditions for bone loss in patients with Crohn's disease.

4 Article Inflammatory bowel disease in an underdeveloped region of Northeastern Brazil. 2015

Parente, José Miguel Luz / Coy, Claudio Saddy Rodrigues / Campelo, Viriato / Parente, Mírian Perpétua Palha Dias / Costa, Leonardo Araújo / da Silva, Renata Mendes / Stephan, Celso / Zeitune, José Murilo Robilotta. ·José Miguel Luz Parente, Viriato Campelo, Center for Health Sciences, Federal University of Piaui (Universidade Federal do Piauí - UFPI), Teresina, Piauí 64049-550, Brazil. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25632193.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To evaluate the demographic characteristics and clinical phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a geographic area in Northeastern Brazil. METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted at the Hospital of the Federal University of Piauí in Northeastern Brazil. Demographic characteristics and clinical phenotypes of IBD were analyzed in relation to the time of diagnostic confirmation, which was defined as the date of disease onset. Data were collected between January 2011 and December 2012 and included all census patients 18 years of age or older during that period for whom there was diagnostic confirmation of Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), or unclassified colitis according to the Montreal criteria. We also analyzed the period of time between the onset of clinical manifestations and the diagnosis of IBD (delay in the diagnosis). Statistical analyses included means and standard deviations for numeric variables and the Pearson χ2 adherence test for nominal variables. The annual index occurrence and overall prevalence of IBD at our institution were also calculated, with P values<0.05 indicating statistical significance. This study was approved by the Institutional Ethics and Research Committee. RESULTS: A total of 252 patients with IBD were included, including 152 (60.3%) UC patients and 100 (39.7%) CD patients. The clinical and demographic characteristics of all patients with IBD showed a female to male ratio of 1.3:1.0 and a mean age of 35.2 (SD=14.5) years. In addition, the majority of patients were miscegenated (171, 67.9%), had received higher education (157, 62.4%), lived in urban areas (217, 86.1%), and were under the age of 40 years (97, 62.5%). For patients with CD, according to the Montreal classification, the predominant features present from the onset of disease were an age between 17 and 40 years (A2); colonic disease location (L2); and nonstricturing, nonfistulizing disease behavior (B1). However, approximately one-quarter of all CD patients demonstrated perineal involvement. We also observed considerable delay in the diagnosis of IBD throughout the entire study period (mean=35.5 mo). In addition, the annual index occurrence rose from 0.08 to 1.53 cases/10(5) inhabitants/year during the study period, and the prevalence rate was 12.8 cases/10(5) inhabitants in 2012. Over the last two decades, there was a noted increase in the frequency of IBD in the study area. CONCLUSION: In this study, there was a predominance of patients with UC, young people under 40 years of age, individuals with racial miscegenation, and low annual incomes.