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Crohn Disease: HELP
Articles by Espen Thiis-Evensen
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Espen Thiis-Evensen wrote the following 3 articles about Crohn Disease.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Early anti-TNF treatment in pediatric Crohn's disease. Predictors of clinical outcome in a population-based cohort of newly diagnosed patients. 2014

Olbjørn, Christine / Nakstad, Britt / Småstuen, Milada C / Thiis-Evensen, Espen / Vatn, Morten H / Perminow, Gøri. ·Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Akershus University Hospital , Lørenskog , Norway. ·Scand J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25310799.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Pediatric Crohn's disease (CD) is often debilitating, with upper gastrointestinal (GI) involvement and complications over time. Treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers can induce and maintain remission. We wanted to evaluate the outcome of patients medically treated for CD to investigate whether clinical, endoscopic and biochemical factors at diagnosis are associated with the early initiation of treatment with the TNF blocker infliximab. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients aged <18 years, diagnosed with CD were characterized according to the Porto criteria, with endoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging and biochemical tests before individual treatment. They were followed prospectively until a prescheduled examination within 2 years. RESULTS: Thirty-six pediatric patients were included, 18 (50%) received infliximab. Infliximab-treated patients had shorter disease duration, more upper GI involvement (p = 0.03) and higher median C-reactive protein (CRP) (28 vs. 7.5 mg/l, p = 0.02), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (32 vs. 18 mm/h, p = 0.01) and fecal calprotectin (1506 vs. 501 mg/kg, p = 0.01) levels. Infliximab treatment was well tolerated, and 15/18 of patients achieved clinical remission. At follow-up, 11/17 in the infliximab group and 8/13 in the non-infliximab group achieved ileocolonic mucosal healing. A majority in the infliximab group had a marked reduction of CD-specific upper GI lesions but persistence of unspecific upper GI inflammation at follow-up. CONCLUSION: High levels of inflammatory markers and upper GI lesions were associated with initiation of infliximab treatment. A substantial proportion of patients still had unspecific lesions in the upper GI tract regardless of treatment. Future studies must clarify the prognostic role of persistent upper GI-involvement despite mucosal healing in the ileocolon.

2 Article Fecal microbiota profiles in treatment-naïve pediatric inflammatory bowel disease - associations with disease phenotype, treatment, and outcome. 2019

Olbjørn, Christine / Cvancarova Småstuen, Milada / Thiis-Evensen, Espen / Nakstad, Britt / Vatn, Morten Harald / Jahnsen, Jørgen / Ricanek, Petr / Vatn, Simen / Moen, Aina E F / Tannæs, Tone M / Lindstrøm, Jonas C / Söderholm, Johan D / Halfvarson, Jonas / Gomollón, Fernando / Casén, Christina / Karlsson, Magdalena K / Kalla, Rahul / Adams, Alex T / Satsangi, Jack / Perminow, Gøri. ·Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway, chrisolb@gmail.com. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, Campus Ahus, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway, chrisolb@gmail.com. · Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Gastroenterology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Clinical Molecular Biology (EpiGen), Division of Medicine, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, and University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Gastroenterology, Akerhus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Health Services Research Unit, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. · Digestive Diseases Unit, IIS Aragón, Zaragoza, Spain. · Genetic-Analysis AS, Oslo, Norway. · Gastrointestinal Unit, Centre for Genomics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Translational Gastroenterology Unit, Experimental Medicine Division, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Pediatrics, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Oslo, Norway. ·Clin Exp Gastroenterol · Pubmed #30774408.

ABSTRACT: Purpose: Imbalance in the microbiota, dysbiosis, has been identified in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We explored the fecal microbiota in pediatric patients with treatment-naïve IBD, non-IBD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms and healthy children, its relation to IBD subgroups, and treatment outcomes. Patients and methods: Fecal samples were collected from 235 children below 18 years of age. Eighty children had Crohn's disease (CD), 27 ulcerative colitis (UC), 3 IBD unclassified, 50 were non-IBD symptomatic patients, and 75 were healthy. The bacterial abundance of 54 predefined DNA markers was measured with a 16S rRNA DNA-based test using GA-Map Results: Bacterial abundance was similarly reduced in IBD and non-IBD patients in 51 of 54 markers compared to healthy patients ( Conclusion: Fecal microbiota profiles differentiated IBD and non-IBD symptomatic children from healthy children, but displayed similar dysbiosis in IBD and non-IBD symptomatic patients. Pretreatment fecal microbiota profiles may be of prognostic value and aid in treatment individualization in pediatric IBD as severe dysbiosis was associated with an extensive, complicated phenotype, biologic therapy, and nonmucosal healing. The dysbiosis persisted after therapy, regardless of treatments and mucosal healing.

3 Article Serological markers in diagnosis of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease and as predictors for early tumor necrosis factor blocker therapy. 2017

Olbjørn, Christine / Cvancarova Småstuen, Milada / Thiis-Evensen, Espen / Nakstad, Britt / Vatn, Morten Harald / Perminow, Gøri. ·a Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine , Akershus University Hospital , Lørenskog, Norway. · b Institute for Clinical Medicine, Campus Ahus , University of Oslo , Oslo, Norway. · c Faculty of Health Sciences , Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences , Oslo , Norway. · d Department of Gastroenterology, Rikshospitalet , Oslo University Hospital , Oslo , Norway. · e Epigen , Institute for Clinical Medicine, Campus Ahus, University of Oslo , Oslo , Norway. · f Department of Pediatrics, Ullevål , Oslo University Hospital , Oslo , Norway. ·Scand J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #27887202.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of serological markers in newly diagnosed treatment-naïve pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), their utility in differentiating Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and symptomatic non-IBD patients and whether serological markers are associated with early TNF blocker treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ninety-six children and adolescents <18 years, 58 with IBD and 38 symptomatic non-IBD controls were included. At diagnosis and after 1-2 years, serological antibodies (anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (pANCA), flagellin expressed by Clostridial phylum (anti-CBir1), outer membrane porin of Escherichia coli (anti-OmpC), Pseudomonas fluorescens-associated sequence (anti-I2), CRP, ESR and fecal calprotectin were analyzed. The choice of treatment was made at the discretion of the treating pediatrician. RESULTS: Of the IBD patients, 20 (36%) and 26 (47%) were positive for ASCA and pANCA compared to 3(8%), p < .01 and 10 (27%), p = .04 of the controls. Thirteen (72%) of UC patients were pANCA positive, versus 13 (35%) of CD patients (p < .01). None of the UC patients was ASCA positive versus 20 (54%) of CD patients (p < .0001). Compared to conventionally treated patients, the 18 (49%) TNF blocker treated CD patients had higher presence of ASCA (p < .01), lower presence of pANCA (p = .02) and higher levels of fecal calprotectin, CRP and ESR at diagnosis. In multivariate analyses ASCA and pANCA status, but not CRP, ESR or calprotectin, were independently associated with early TNF blocker treatment. CONCLUSIONS: ASCA and pANCA status were associated with having IBD and with early TNF blocker treatment in CD.