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Crohn Disease: HELP
Articles from Belgium
Based on 408 articles published since 2009
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These are the 408 published articles about Crohn Disease that originated from Belgium during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17
1 Guideline Belgian IBD research group (BIRD) position statement 2017 on the use of biosimilars in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). 2018

Franchimont, D / Ferrante, M / Louis, E / De Vos, M / Dewit, O / Van Hootegem, P / Moreels, T / Liefferinckx, C / Bossuyt, P / Baert, F / Rahier, J F / Vermeire, S. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Hopital Erasme Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospitals Leuven, KU Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liege, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology - Ghent University Hospital - Ghent University, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc UCL Bruxelles, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, AZ Sint Lucas Brugge, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, Imeldaziekenhuis, Bonheiden, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, AZ Delta Roeselare, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, CHU UCL Mont-Godinne, Belgium. ·Acta Gastroenterol Belg · Pubmed #29562378.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline Second N-ECCO Consensus Statements on the European Nursing Roles in Caring for Patients with Crohn's Disease or Ulcerative Colitis. 2018

Kemp, Karen / Dibley, Lesley / Chauhan, Usha / Greveson, Kay / Jäghult, Susanna / Ashton, Katherine / Buckton, Stephanie / Duncan, Julie / Hartmann, Petra / Ipenburg, Nienke / Moortgat, Liesbeth / Theeuwen, Rosaline / Verwey, Marthe / Younge, Lisa / Sturm, Andreas / Bager, Palle. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Manchester NHS University Foundation Trust / School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of ManchesterManchester, UK. · Faculty of Education and Health, University of Greenwich, London. · Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK. · Digestive Disease, McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Canada. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. · Karolinska Institutet Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm Gastro Centre, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hull & East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Hull, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Sunshine Coast University Hospital, Birtinya QLD, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Gastroenterologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Minden, Minden, Germany. · IJsselland Hospital, Capelle a/d IJssel, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology, AZ Delta Roeselare-Menen, Roeselare, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, Leiden University Medical Center [LUMC], Leiden, The Netherlands. · IBD Nurse Specialist, Barts Health - Royal London Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, German Red Cross Hospital, DRK Kliniken Berlin I Westend, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #29509882.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline ECCO-ESCP Consensus on Surgery for Crohn's Disease. 2018

Bemelman, Willem A / Warusavitarne, Janindra / Sampietro, Gianluca M / Serclova, Zuzana / Zmora, Oded / Luglio, Gaetano / de Buck van Overstraeten, Anthony / Burke, John P / Buskens, Christianne J / Colombo, Francesco / Dias, Jorge Amil / Eliakim, Rami / Elosua, Tomás / Gecim, I Ethem / Kolacek, Sanja / Kierkus, Jaroslaw / Kolho, Kaija-Leena / Lefevre, Jérémie H / Millan, Monica / Panis, Yves / Pinkney, Thomas / Russell, Richard K / Shwaartz, Chaya / Vaizey, Carolynne / Yassin, Nuha / D'Hoore, André. ·Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center [AMC], Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, St. Mark's Hospital, Harrow, UK. · Department of Surgery, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco - Ospedale "Luigi Sacco" Polo Universitario, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, NH Hospital, a.s., Horovice, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. · Surgical Coloproctology Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Department of Abdominal Surgery, UZ Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Colorectal Surgery, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Hospital S. João [University Hospital], Porto, Portugal. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. · Servicio de Cirugía, Complejo Asistencial Universitario de León, León, Spain. · Colorectal Unit, Ankara University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey. · University Department of Paediatrics and Referral Center for Paediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition, Children's Hospital Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Feeding Disorders, and Pediatrics, Children's Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw, Poland. · Paediatric Gastroenterology of the Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of General and Digestive Surgery, Hôpital Saint-Antoine and University Paris VI, Paris, France. · Department of Surgery, Hospital Universitari Joan XXIII de Tarragona, Tarragona, Spain. · Department of Colorectal Surgery, Beaujon Hospital [APHP] and University Paris VII Denis-Diderot, Clichy, France. · Academic Department of Surgery, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Surgery, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan, Israel. · IBD Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, St Mark's Hospital, London, UK. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #28498901.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline A global consensus on the classification, diagnosis and multidisciplinary treatment of perianal fistulising Crohn's disease. 2014

Gecse, Krisztina B / Bemelman, Willem / Kamm, Michael A / Stoker, Jaap / Khanna, Reena / Ng, Siew C / Panés, Julián / van Assche, Gert / Liu, Zhanju / Hart, Ailsa / Levesque, Barrett G / D'Haens, Geert / Anonymous970798 / Anonymous980798. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Robarts Research Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · St. Vincent's Hospital and University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Institute of Digestive Disease, Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Clinic Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERehd, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai, China. · APRG, Imperial College, London, UK IBD Unit, St. Mark's Hospital, London, UK. · Robarts Research Institute, San Diego, CA, USA Division of Gastroenterology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #24951257.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop a consensus on the classification, diagnosis and multidisciplinary treatment of perianal fistulising Crohn's disease (pCD), based on best available evidence. METHODS: Based on a systematic literature review, statements were formed, discussed and approved in multiple rounds by the 20 working group participants. Consensus was defined as at least 80% agreement among voters. Evidence was assessed using the modified GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) criteria. RESULTS: Highest diagnostic accuracy can only be established if a combination of modalities is used. Drainage of sepsis is always first line therapy before initiating immunosuppressive treatment. Mucosal healing is the goal in the presence of proctitis. Whereas antibiotics and thiopurines have a role as adjunctive treatments in pCD, anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) is the current gold standard. The efficacy of infliximab is best documented although adalimumab and certolizumab pegol are moderately effective. Oral tacrolimus could be used in patients failing anti-TNF therapy. Definite surgical repair is only of consideration in the absence of luminal inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: Based on a multidisciplinary approach, items relevant for fistula management were identified and algorithms on diagnosis and treatment of pCD were developed.

5 Guideline Consensus guidelines of ECCO/ESPGHAN on the medical management of pediatric Crohn's disease. 2014

Ruemmele, F M / Veres, G / Kolho, K L / Griffiths, A / Levine, A / Escher, J C / Amil Dias, J / Barabino, A / Braegger, C P / Bronsky, J / Buderus, S / Martín-de-Carpi, J / De Ridder, L / Fagerberg, U L / Hugot, J P / Kierkus, J / Kolacek, S / Koletzko, S / Lionetti, P / Miele, E / Navas López, V M / Paerregaard, A / Russell, R K / Serban, D E / Shaoul, R / Van Rheenen, P / Veereman, G / Weiss, B / Wilson, D / Dignass, A / Eliakim, A / Winter, H / Turner, D / Anonymous4720796 / Anonymous4730796. ·Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, APHP Hôpital Necker Enfants Malades, 149 Rue de Sèvres 75015 Paris, France; Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 2 Rue de l'École de Médecine, 75006 Paris, France; INSERM U989, Institut IMAGINE, 24 Bd Montparnasse, 75015 Paris, France. Electronic address: frank.ruemmele@nck.aphp.fr. · Department of Paediatrics I, Semmelweis University, Bókay János str. 53, 1083 Budapest, Hungary. · Department of Gastroenterology, Helsinki University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Stenbäckinkatu 11, P.O. Box 281, 00290 Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Paediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, 555 University Avenue, M5G 1X8 Toronto, ON, Canada. · Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Unit, Tel Aviv University, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, 62 HaLohamim Street, 58100 Holon, Israel. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Erasmus Medical Center, Wytemaweg 80, 3015 CN Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Unit of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hospital S. João, A Hernani Monteiro, 4202-451, Porto, Portugal. · Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, Istituto G. Gaslini, Via G. Gaslini 5, 16148 Genoa, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, and Children's Research Center, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Steinwiesstrasse 75, 8032 Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Motol, Uvalu 84, 150 06 Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Paediatrics, St. Marien Hospital, Robert-Koch-Str.1, 53115 Bonn, Germany. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterolgoy, Hepatology and Nutrition, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Paseo Sant Joan de Déu 2, 08950 Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Pediatrics, Centre for Clinical Research, Entrance 29, Västmanland Hospital, 72189 Västerås/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Hopital Robert Debré, 48 Bd Sérurier, APHP, 75019 Paris, France; Université Paris-Diderot Sorbonne Paris-Cité, 75018 Paris France. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Feeding Disorders, Instytut Pomnik Centrum Zdrowia Dziecka, Ul. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Children's Hospital, University of Zagreb Medical School, Klaićeva 16, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Lindwurmstr. 4, 80337 Munich, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Meyer Children's Hospital, Viale Gaetano Pieraccini 24, 50139 Florence, Italy. · Department of Translational Medical Science, Section of Paediatrics, University of Naples "Federico II", Via S. Pansini, 5, 80131 Naples, Italy. · Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Unit, Hospital Materno Infantil, Avda. Arroyo de los Ángeles s/n, 29009 Málaga, Spain. · Department of Paediatrics 460, Hvidovre University Hospital, Kettegård Allé 30, 2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Yorkhill Hospital, Dalnair Street, Glasgow G3 8SJ, United Kingdom. · 2nd Department of Paediatrics, "Iuliu Hatieganu" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Emergency Children's Hospital, Crisan nr. 5, 400177 Cluj-Napoca, Romania. · Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Rambam Health Care Campus Rappaport Faculty Of Medicine, 6 Ha'alya Street, P.O. Box 9602, 31096 Haifa, Israel. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University Medical Center Groningen, P.O. Box 30001, 9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Children's University Hospital, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels, Belgium. · Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Unit, Edmond and Lily Safra Children's Hospital, Sheba Medical Center, 52625 Tel Hashomer, Israel. · Child Life and Health, Paediatric Gastroenterology, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, 9 Sciennes Road, Edinburgh EH9 1LF, United Kingdom. · Department of Medicine I, Agaplesion Markus Hospital, Wilhelm-Epstein-Str. 4, 60431 Frankfurt/Main, Gemany. · 33-Gastroenterology, Sheba Medical Center, 52621 Tel Hashomer, Israel. · Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Mass General Hospital for Children, 175 Cambridge Street, 02114 Boston, United States. · Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #24909831.

ABSTRACT: Children and adolescents with Crohn's disease (CD) present often with a more complicated disease course compared to adult patients. In addition, the potential impact of CD on growth, pubertal and emotional development of patients underlines the need for a specific management strategy of pediatric-onset CD. To develop the first evidenced based and consensus driven guidelines for pediatric-onset CD an expert panel of 33 IBD specialists was formed after an open call within the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation and the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterolog, Hepatology and Nutrition. The aim was to base on a thorough review of existing evidence a state of the art guidance on the medical treatment and long term management of children and adolescents with CD, with individualized treatment algorithms based on a benefit-risk analysis according to different clinical scenarios. In children and adolescents who did not have finished their growth, exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is the induction therapy of first choice due to its excellent safety profile, preferable over corticosteroids, which are equipotential to induce remission. The majority of patients with pediatric-onset CD require immunomodulator based maintenance therapy. The experts discuss several factors potentially predictive for poor disease outcome (such as severe perianal fistulizing disease, severe stricturing/penetrating disease, severe growth retardation, panenteric disease, persistent severe disease despite adequate induction therapy), which may incite to an anti-TNF-based top down approach. These guidelines are intended to give practical (whenever possible evidence-based) answers to (pediatric) gastroenterologists who take care of children and adolescents with CD; they are not meant to be a rule or legal standard, since many different clinical scenario exist requiring treatment strategies not covered by or different from these guidelines.

6 Guideline ESPGHAN revised porto criteria for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease in children and adolescents. 2014

Levine, Arie / Koletzko, Sibylle / Turner, Dan / Escher, Johanna C / Cucchiara, Salvatore / de Ridder, Lissy / Kolho, Kaija-Leena / Veres, Gabor / Russell, Richard K / Paerregaard, Anders / Buderus, Stephan / Greer, Mary-Louise C / Dias, Jorge A / Veereman-Wauters, Gigi / Lionetti, Paolo / Sladek, Malgorzata / Martin de Carpi, Javier / Staiano, Annamaria / Ruemmele, Frank M / Wilson, David C / Anonymous3320775. ·*Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Unit, Wolfson Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel †Dr von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich, Germany ‡Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel §Pediatric Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands ||Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy ¶Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland #Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary **Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Yorkhill Children's Hospital, Glasgow, UK ††Department of Paediatrics, Hvidovre University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark ‡‡St.-Marien-Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Bonn, Germany §§Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children ||||Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto Canada ¶¶Hospital S. João, Porto, Portugal ##Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, UZ Brussels, Brussels, Belgium ***Departement Neurofarba, University of Florence, Meyer Children Hospital, Florence, Italy †††Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland ‡‡‡Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, Spain §§§Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Section of Pediatrics, University of Naples "Federico II," Naples, Italy ||||||Université Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris Descartes, INSERM U989, AP-HP, Hôpital Necker Enfants Malades, Service de Gastroentérologie Pédiatrique, Paris, France ¶¶¶Child Life and Health, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. ·J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr · Pubmed #24231644.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of pediatric-onset inflammatory bowel disease (PIBD) can be challenging in choosing the most informative diagnostic tests and correctly classifying PIBD into its different subtypes. Recent advances in our understanding of the natural history and phenotype of PIBD, increasing availability of serological and fecal biomarkers, and the emergence of novel endoscopic and imaging technologies taken together have made the previous Porto criteria for the diagnosis of PIBD obsolete. METHODS: We aimed to revise the original Porto criteria using an evidence-based approach and consensus process to yield specific practice recommendations for the diagnosis of PIBD. These revised criteria are based on the Paris classification of PIBD and the original Porto criteria while incorporating novel data, such as for serum and fecal biomarkers. A consensus of at least 80% of participants was achieved for all recommendations and the summary algorithm. RESULTS: The revised criteria depart from existing criteria by defining 2 categories of ulcerative colitis (UC, typical and atypical); atypical phenotypes of UC should be treated as UC. A novel approach based on multiple criteria for diagnosing IBD-unclassified (IBD-U) is proposed. Specifically, these revised criteria recommend upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and ileocolonscopy for all suspected patients with PIBD, with small bowel imaging (unless typical UC after endoscopy and histology) by magnetic resonance enterography or wireless capsule endoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: These revised Porto criteria for the diagnosis of PIBD have been developed to meet present challenges and developments in PIBD and provide up-to-date guidelines for the definition and diagnosis of the IBD spectrum.

7 Editorial Treating Inflammatory Bowel Disease With Diet: A Taste Test. 2019

Sabino, João / Lewis, James D / Colombel, Jean-Fréderic. ·The Dr. Henry D. Janowitz Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York; Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospitals of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · The Dr. Henry D. Janowitz Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: jean-frederic.colombel@mssm.edu. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #31254503.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Persistent Mesorectal Inflammatory Activity is Associated With Complications After Proctectomy in Crohn's Disease: Immediate Surgical Implications! 2019

D'Hoore, André. ·Department of Abdominal Surgery, University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #30496367.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Management of Postoperative Crohn's Disease: Missing Pieces of the Puzzle. 2017

Rivière, Pauline / Ferrante, Marc. ·Department of Hepatogastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospitals Leuven, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #28961940.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Editorial: variability in adalimumab trough and peak serum concentrations. 2017

Vande Casteele, N / Gils, A. ·Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. · Robarts Clinical Trials Inc., Robarts Research Institute, London, ON, Canada. · Laboratory for Therapeutic and Diagnostic Antibodies, Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #28474834.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Endoscopic Balloon Dilation vs Surgery for Crohn's Disease-related Strictures. 2017

Bessissow, Talat / Van Assche, Gert. ·Division of Gastroenterology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Canada. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospitals, Leuven, Belgium, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. ·Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #28442316.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial How Failure Can Fuel Improvements in Early Drug Development for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. 2016

Schreiber, Stefan / Vermeire, Séverine. ·1st Department of Internal Medicine and Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospitals Leuven Belgium. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #27018485.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Preemptive Dose Optimization Using Therapeutic Drug Monitoring for Biologic Therapy of Crohn's Disease: Avoiding Failure While Lowering Costs? 2015

Vande Casteele, Niels / Gils, Ann. ·Laboratory for Therapeutic and Diagnostic Antibodies, Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Herestraat 49, PO 820, 3000, Leuven, Belgium, niels.vandecasteele@kuleuven.be. ·Dig Dis Sci · Pubmed #25917050.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Oral SMAD7 antisense drug for Crohn's disease. 2015

Vermeire, Severine. ·From the Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospitals, Leuven, Belgium. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #25785975.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Review Performance measures for small-bowel endoscopy: A European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Quality Improvement Initiative. 2019

Spada, Cristiano / McNamara, Deirdre / Despott, Edward J / Adler, Samuel / Cash, Brooks D / Fernández-Urién, Ignacio / Ivekovic, Hrvoje / Keuchel, Martin / McAlindon, Mark / Saurin, Jean-Christophe / Panter, Simon / Bellisario, Cristina / Minozzi, Silvia / Senore, Carlo / Bennett, Cathy / Bretthauer, Michael / Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario / Domagk, Dirk / Hassan, Cesare / Kaminski, Michal F / Rees, Colin J / Valori, Roland / Bisschops, Raf / Rutter, Matthew D. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit and Gastroenterology, Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli - IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · TAGG Research Centre, Department of Clinical Medicine, Tallaght Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. · Royal Free Unit for Endoscopy, The Royal Free Hospital and UCL Institute for Liver and Digestive Health, London, UK. · Division of Gastroenterology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, UT Health Science Center at Houston/Memorial Hermann, Houston, TX, USA. · McGovern Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Navarra Hospital Complex, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Centre, Zagreb, Croatia. · Clinic for Internal Medicine, Bethesda Krankenhaus Bergedorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Academic Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Sheffield, UK. · Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital E. Herriot, Lyon, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust, South Shields, UK. · CPO Piemonte, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza, Turin, Italy. · Office of Research and Innovation, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Coláiste Ríoga na Máinleá in Éirinn, Dublin, Ireland. · Clinical Effectiveness Research Group, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Servicio de Gastroenterologia, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Porto, Portugal. · Department of Medicine I, Josephs-Hospital Warendorf, Academic Teaching Hospital, University of Muenster, Warendorf, Germany. · Endoscopy Unit, Nuovo Regina Margherita Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Oncology, Medical Center for Postgraduate Education, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterological Oncology and Department of Cancer Prevention, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Health Management and Health Economics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Northern Institute for Cancer Research, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Gloucestershire, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of North Tees, Stockton-on-Tees, Cleveland, UK. ·United European Gastroenterol J · Pubmed #31210941.

ABSTRACT: The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) together with the United European Gastroenterology (UEG) recently developed a short list of performance measures for small-bowel endoscopy (i.e. small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy) with the final goal of providing endoscopy services across Europe with a tool for quality improvement. Six key performance measures both for small-bowel capsule endoscopy and for device-assisted enteroscopy were selected for inclusion, with the intention being that practice at both a service and endoscopist level should be evaluated against them. Other performance measures were considered to be less relevant, based on an assessment of their overall importance, scientific acceptability, and feasibility. Unlike lower and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, for which performance measures had already been identified, this is the first time small-bowel endoscopy quality measures have been proposed.

16 Review A Review on the Use of Anti-TNF in Children and Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2019

Aardoom, Martine A / Veereman, Gigi / de Ridder, Lissy. ·Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, The Erasmus MC Sophia Children's Hospital, 3015 GD Rotterdam, The Netherlands. m.aardoom@erasmusmc.nl. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Kidz Health Castle UZ Brussels, Free University Brussels, B-1090 Brussels, Belgium. gveereman@gmail.com. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, The Erasmus MC Sophia Children's Hospital, 3015 GD Rotterdam, The Netherlands. l.deridder@erasmusmc.nl. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #31126015.

ABSTRACT: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) presents with disabling symptoms and may lead to insufficient growth and late pubertal development in cases of disease onset during childhood or adolescence. During the last decade, the role of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in the treatment of paediatric-onset IBD has gained more ground. The number of biologicals presently available for children and adolescents with IBD has increased, biosimilars have become available, and practices in adult gastroenterology with regards to anti-TNF have changed. The aim of this study is to review the current evidence on the indications, judicious use, effectiveness and safety of anti-TNF agents in paediatric IBD. A PubMed literature search was performed and included articles published after 2000 using the following terms: child or paediatric, Crohn, ulcerative colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, anti-TNF, TNF alpha inhibitor, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab and biological. Anti-TNF agents, specifically infliximab and adalimumab, have proven to be effective in moderate and severe paediatric IBD. Therapeutic drug monitoring increases therapy effectiveness and safety. Clinical predictors for anti-TNF response are currently of limited value because of the variation in outcome definitions and follow-ups. Future research should comprise large cohorts and clinical trials comparing groups according to their risk profile in order to provide personalized therapeutic strategies.

17 Review Terminal ileitis after kidney transplantation : Crohn's disease or other? Case reports and literature review. 2019

Motté, E / Pipeleers, L / Wilgenhof, K / Reynaert, H / Urbain, D / Mana, F. ·Department of Gastroenterology, UZ Brussels. · Department of Nephrology, UZ Brussels. · Department of Anatomopathology, UZ Brussels. ·Acta Gastroenterol Belg · Pubmed #30888756.

ABSTRACT: The finding of a terminal ileitis after kidney transplantation can cause a diagnostic challenge. Because the development of Crohn's disease under immunosuppressive therapy is unlikely, this diagnosis should only be considered after exclusion of infectious disease and drug-related intestinal toxicity. Defining the underlying cause of terminal ileitis is often hampered by a shortage of specific diagnostic tests or their lack of sensitivity. We present three patients with terminal ileitis after kidney transplantation resulting from different etiologies. Subsequently, we describe the characteristics that can help to make the differential diagnosis.

18 Review Pharmacodynamic Monitoring of Biological Therapies in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases. 2019

Dreesen, Erwin / Gils, Ann. ·Therapeutic and Diagnostic Antibodies, Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. ·Ther Drug Monit · Pubmed #30883507.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn disease share similar underlying pathophysiological processes, providing the opportunity to treat the patients using similar biological therapies. Failure of biological treatments due to underexposure can be managed by therapeutic drug monitoring. Adjusting the treatment based on pharmacokinetic monitoring can be further improved by taking pharmacodynamic parameters such as clinical and molecular markers into account. METHODS: Here, we critically evaluate the existing evidence, the hurdles to be taken, and the opportunities for a widespread implementation of pharmacodynamic monitoring. RESULTS: Pharmacodynamic monitoring typically is the monitoring of biochemical markers. A pharmacodynamic marker preferably is specific for the pharmacological action of a drug, but most of the time nonspecific pharmacodynamic markers are used, such as C-reactive protein and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Clinical pharmacodynamic markers typically evaluate physical variables or symptoms. Although physician-reported outcomes have been studied for a longer time and often have been shown to correlate well with molecular pharmacodynamic markers and treatment outcomes, the introduction of mobile health or mHealth technologies caused a shift toward patient-reported outcomes, with the associated challenge to consistently reflect the inflammatory state, thereby preventing undertreatment or unnecessary overdosing of patients. CONCLUSIONS: The primary goal of pharmacodynamic monitoring is to optimize the response, but it can also have an impact on safety, costs, patient adherence, etc. Ideally, the constant remote monitoring of patient-reported disease activity is expected to become the standard, facilitated by mHealth technologies.

19 Review Laryngeal Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2019

Loos, Elke / Lemkens, Peter / Poorten, Vincent Vander / Humblet, Evelien / Laureyns, Griet. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Genk, Belgium; Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, KULeuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Genk, Belgium. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, KULeuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Genk, Belgium. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Genk, Belgium. Electronic address: Grietlaureyns@hotmail.com. ·J Voice · Pubmed #29605161.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Laryngeal involvement in inflammatory bowel disease is rare. Only 12 cases of laryngeal involvement in Crohn disease have been reported until now. Moreover, only one case of laryngeal manifestations in ulcerative colitis has been reported so far. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this article, we present a patient with ulcerative colitis, who consulted our ear, nose, and throat (ENT) clinic with laryngeal complaints. Furthermore, a review of current literature was performed. RESULTS: A concise overview of this rare extraintestinal manifestation and other ENT manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases is provided. CONCLUSIONS: Laryngeal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are very rare, but these manifestations should be known by the otorhinolaryngologist.

20 Review Integrated Care for Crohn's Disease: A Plea for the Development of Clinical Decision Support Systems. 2018

Pauwen, Nathalie Y / Louis, Edouard / Siegel, Corey / Colombel, Jean-Frederic / Macq, Jean. ·UCL: Université Catholique de Louvain - Institute of Health and Society, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology University Hospital CHU Liège, Belgium. · Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Icahn Medical School at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #30496446.

ABSTRACT: Evolution in the management of Crohn's disease [CD] has been characterized by recent paradigm changes. First, new biological therapies induce intestinal healing and full disease control in a substantial number of patients, particularly when introduced early in the disease course. However, they are expensive and associated with potentially severe side effects, raising the question of optimal treatment duration. Secondly, progress in biomarkers and medical imaging performance has enabled better refinement of the definition and prediction of remission or relapse of the disease through monitoring [tight control]. This progress may help to improve tailoring treatment in relation to target ['treat-to target' approach], applying patient-centred and collaborative perspectives, consistent with other chronic disease management. Such an approach requires the integration of a potentially large number of parameters coming from different stakeholders. This integration would be difficult based solely on implementation of classical guidelines and the clinician's intuition. To this end, clinical decision support systems should be developed that integrate a combination of various outcomes to facilitate the treatment decision and to share information between patients, primary care specialists, and health insurance companies or health authorities. This should ease complex therapeutic decisions and serve as a basis for continued research into effectiveness of CD management.

21 Review Differential diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease: imitations and complications. 2018

Gecse, Krisztina B / Vermeire, Severine. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: severine.vermeire@uzleuven.be. ·Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #30102183.

ABSTRACT: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterised by episodes of relapse and periods of remission. However, the clinical features, such as abdominal pain, diarrhoea, and rectal bleeding, are not specific. Therefore, the differential diagnosis can include a broad spectrum of inflammatory or infectious diseases that mimic IBD, as well as others that might complicate existing IBD. In this Review, we provide an overview of ileocolitis of diverse causes that are relevant in the differential diagnosis of IBD. We highlight the importance of accurate patient profiling and give a practical approach to identifying factors that should trigger the search for a specific cause of intestinal inflammation. Mimics of IBD include not only infectious causes of colitis-and particular attention is required for patients from endemic areas of tuberculosis-but also vascular diseases, diversion colitis, diverticula or radiation-related injuries, drug-induced inflammation, and monogenic diseases in very-early-onset refractory disease. A superinfection with cytomegalovirus or Clostridium difficile can aggravate intestinal inflammation in IBD, especially in patients who are immunocompromised. Special consideration should be made to the differential diagnosis of perianal disease.

22 Review Endoscopic management of Crohn's strictures. 2018

Bessissow, Talat / Reinglas, Jason / Aruljothy, Achuthan / Lakatos, Peter L / Van Assche, Gert. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC H3G1A4, Canada. talat.bessissow@mcgill.ca. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC H3G1A4, Canada. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium and University of Leuven, Leuven 3000, Belgium. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #29740201.

ABSTRACT: Symptomatic intestinal strictures develop in more than one third of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) within 10 years of disease onset. Strictures can be inflammatory, fibrotic or mixed and result in a significant decline in quality of life, frequently requiring surgery for palliation of symptoms. Patients under the age of 40 with perianal disease are more likely to suffer from disabling ileocolonic disease thus may have a greater risk for fibrostenotic strictures. Treatment options for fibrostenotic strictures are limited to endoscopic and surgical therapy. Endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) appears to be a safe, less invasive and effective alternative modality to replace or defer surgery. Serious complications are rare and occur in less than 3% of procedures. For non-complex strictures without adjacent fistulizaation or perforation that are less than 5 cm in length, EBD should be considered as first-line therapy. The aim of this review is to present the current literature on the endoscopic management of small bowel and colonic strictures in CD, which includes balloon dilatation, adjuvant techniques of intralesional injection of steroids and anti-tumor necrosis factor, and metal stent insertion. Short and long-term outcomes, complications and safety of EBD will be discussed.

23 Review Diffusion-weighted MRI in inflammatory bowel disease. 2018

Pouillon, Lieven / Laurent, Valérie / Pouillon, Marc / Bossuyt, Peter / Bonifacio, Christiana / Danese, Silvio / Deepak, Parakkal / Loftus, Edward V / Bruining, David H / Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Nancy University Hospital, Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France; Imelda GI Clinical Research Centre, Imeldaziekenhuis Bonheiden, Bonheiden, Belgium. · Department of Radiology, Nancy University Hospital, Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France. · Department of Radiology, GZA Ziekenhuizen, Antwerp, Belgium. · Imelda GI Clinical Research Centre, Imeldaziekenhuis Bonheiden, Bonheiden, Belgium. · Department of Radiology, Humanitas Research Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Humanitas Research Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Nancy University Hospital, Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France. Electronic address: peyrinbiroulet@gmail.com. ·Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #29739674.

ABSTRACT: Cross-sectional MRI is an attractive alternative to endoscopy for the objective assessment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Diffusion-weighted imaging is a specialised technique that maps the diffusion of water molecules in biological tissues and can be done without intravenous gadolinium contrast injection. Diffusion-weighted imaging further expands the capability of traditional MRI sequences in IBD. However, the use of quantitative parameters, such as the apparent diffusion coefficient, is limited by low reproducibility. The Nancy score is a luminal disease activity index applied in diffusion-weighted imaging, and comprises only qualitative parameters. The score is accurate in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and requires no fasting or bowel preparation for assessment of colonic disease. However, deficiency of anatomic detail limits the use of diffusion-weighted imaging for assessment of intra-abdominal Crohn's disease complications. The contribution of such imaging in the prediction of disease course and treatment response in patients with IBD remains to be determined.

24 Review Oral budesonide in gastrointestinal and liver disease: A practical guide for the clinician. 2018

Miehlke, Stephan / Acosta, Manuel Barreiro-de / Bouma, Gerd / Carpio, Daniel / Magro, Fernando / Moreels, Tom / Probert, Chris. ·Center for Digestive Diseases, Internal Medicine Center Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Intestinal Inflammatory Disease Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, University Clinical Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Vrije University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Digestive System Service, University Hospital of Pontevedra Complex, Pontevedra, Spain. · Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal. · MedInUP, Centre for Drug Discovery and Innovative Medicines, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal. · Hepato-Gastroenterology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Translational Medicine, Liverpool, UK. ·J Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #29603368.

ABSTRACT: Oral budesonide is a second-generation steroid that allows local, selective treatment of the gastrointestinal tract and the liver, minimizing systemic exposure. The results of randomized trials comparing budesonide versus placebo or active comparators have led to expert recommendations that budesonide be used to treat mild or moderate active ileocecal Crohn's disease, microscopic colitis (including both collagenous and lymphocytic colitis), ulcerative colitis, and non-cirrhotic autoimmune hepatitis. The mechanism of budesonide action obviates the need for dose tapering due to safety reasons after induction therapy. Where low-dose budesonide is used to maintain remission, usually in microscopic colitis, it does not appear to have adverse safety implications other than slight reductions in cortisol levels on rare occasions. As a gut-selective and liver-selective corticosteroid, budesonide offers an appealing alternative to conventional systemic glucocorticoids in diseases of these organs.

25 Review Identification of Endpoints for Development of Antifibrosis Drugs for Treatment of Crohn's Disease. 2018

Danese, Silvio / Bonovas, Stefanos / Lopez, Anthony / Fiorino, Gionata / Sandborn, William J / Rubin, David T / Kamm, Michael A / Colombel, Jean-Frederic / Sands, Bruce E / Vermeire, Severine / Panes, Julian / Rogler, Gerhard / D'Haens, Geert / Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent. ·Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Milan, Italy; IBD Center, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: sdanese@hotmail.com. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Milan, Italy; IBD Center, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. · Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology and Inserm U954, University Hospital of Nancy, University of Lorraine, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France. · IBD Center, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. · University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California. · University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Departments of Gastroenterology and Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital and University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Dr. Henry D. Janowitz Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERehd, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital of Zurich, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #29601825.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Intestinal fibrosis is a challenge to management of patients with Crohn's disease (CD); there is an urgent need to expedite development of antifibrosis drugs for this disease. The International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IOIBD) aimed to identify a set of endpoints that can be used to determine efficacy of antifibrosis agents tested in clinical trials of patients with CD. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review to identify clinical, radiologic, biochemical, endoscopic, and composite endpoints used in assessing activity of fibrostenosing CD and response to treatment, and determined their operational properties. A panel of IOIBD experts performed a consensus process to identify the best endpoints for inclusion in clinical trials, through a 2-round, Delphi-style online survey. RESULTS: A total of 36 potentially relevant endpoints for intestinal fibrosis were selected and assessed. Forty-eight physicians with expertise in inflammatory bowel disease, from 5 regions (North America, Europe, Middle East, Asia/Pacific, and Latin America), participated in the Delphi consensus process. A core set of 13 endpoints (complete clinical response, long-term efficacy, sustained clinical benefit, treatment failure, radiological remission, normal quality of life, clinical remission without steroids, therapeutic failure, deep remission, complete absence of occlusive symptoms, symptom-free survival, bowel damage progression, and no disability) were rated as critical. Agreement was high among the experts. CONCLUSIONS: Members of the IOIBD reached expert consensus on a set of endpoints that can be used to assess antifibrosis agents in trials of patients with CD. Studies are needed to clarify methods for measuring these outcomes and validate measurement instruments.

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