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Crohn Disease: HELP
Articles from St. Francis in Roslyn
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
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These are the 4 published articles about Crohn Disease that originated from St. Francis in Roslyn during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Drug-Herb Interactions in the Elderly Patient with IBD: a Growing Concern. 2017

Rahman, Haider / Kim, Marina / Leung, Galen / Green, Jesse A / Katz, Seymour. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Albany Medical Center, 47 New Scotland Ave, Albany, NY, 12208, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, New York Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital Weill Cornell College of Medicine, 506 Sixth Street Suite 312 Buckley Pavilion, Brooklyn, NY, 11215, USA. Mak9236@nyp.org. · New York University School of Medicine, 550 1st Avenue NBV 16 North 30, New York, NY, USA. · Perelman School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Pennsylvania, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, New York University School of Medicine NYC North Shore University - Long Island Jewish Hospital System, Manhasset, NY, USA. · St. Francis Hospital, Roslyn, NY, USA. ·Curr Treat Options Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28918484.

ABSTRACT: OPINION STATEMENT: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes conditions such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is becoming more prevalent with the elderly being the fastest growing group. Parallel to this, there is an increasing interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Nearly half of patients with IBD have used CAM at one time. The elderly patients, however, are burdened by comorbid conditions, polypharmacy, and altered functional status. With increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine in our elderly patients with IBD, it is vital for the provider to provide counsel on drug-herb potential interactions. CAM includes herbal products, diet, dietary supplements, acupuncture, and prayer. In this paper, we will review common CAM, specifically herbs, that are used in patients with IBD including the herb background, suggested use, evidence in IBD, and most importantly, potential interactions with IBD medications used in elderly patients. Most important evidence-based adverse events and drug-herb interactions are summarized. The herbs discussed include Triticum aestivum (wheat grass), Andrographis paniculata (chiretta), Boswellia serrata, tormentil, bilberry, curcumin (turmeric), Plantago ovata (blond psyllium), Oenothera biennis (evening primrose oil), germinated barley foodstuff, an herbal preparation of myrrh, chamomile and coffee extract, chios mastic gum, wormwood (absinthe, thujone), Cannabis sativa (marijuana, THC), tripterygium wilfordii (thunder god vine), Ulmus rubra (slippery elm bark), trigonella foenugraecum (fenugreek), Dioscorea mexicana (wild yam), Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw), ginger, cinnamon, licorice, and peppermint.

2 Article Functional variants in the 2018

Hui, Ken Y / Fernandez-Hernandez, Heriberto / Hu, Jianzhong / Schaffner, Adam / Pankratz, Nathan / Hsu, Nai-Yun / Chuang, Ling-Shiang / Carmi, Shai / Villaverde, Nicole / Li, Xianting / Rivas, Manual / Levine, Adam P / Bao, Xiuliang / Labrias, Philippe R / Haritunians, Talin / Ruane, Darren / Gettler, Kyle / Chen, Ernie / Li, Dalin / Schiff, Elena R / Pontikos, Nikolas / Barzilai, Nir / Brant, Steven R / Bressman, Susan / Cheifetz, Adam S / Clark, Lorraine N / Daly, Mark J / Desnick, Robert J / Duerr, Richard H / Katz, Seymour / Lencz, Todd / Myers, Richard H / Ostrer, Harry / Ozelius, Laurie / Payami, Haydeh / Peter, Yakov / Rioux, John D / Segal, Anthony W / Scott, William K / Silverberg, Mark S / Vance, Jeffery M / Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban / Foroud, Tatiana / Atzmon, Gil / Pe'er, Itsik / Ioannou, Yiannis / McGovern, Dermot P B / Yue, Zhenyu / Schadt, Eric E / Cho, Judy H / Peter, Inga. ·Section of Digestive Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. · Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. · Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA. · Departments of Neurology and Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA. · Department of Pharmacological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. · Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 9112102, Israel. · Department of Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. · Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Centre for Molecular Medicine, Division of Medicine, University College, London WC1E 6JF, UK. · Translational Genomics Group, F. Widjaja Foundation Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. · Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Tarrytown, NY 10591, USA. · Department of Genetics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. · Departments of Genetics and Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. · Harvey M. and Lyn P. Meyerhoff Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA. · Alan and Barbara Mirken Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY 10003, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA. · Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA. · Taub Institute for Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA. · Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. · Department of Human Genetics, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. · New York University School of Medicine, New York City, NY 10016, USA. · North Shore University-Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Manhasset, NY, USA. · St. Francis Hospital, Roslyn, NY 11576, USA. · Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA. · Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Departments of Pathology and Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. · Deparment of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Departments of Neurology and Genetics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA. · HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, Huntsville, AL 35805, USA. · Department of Biology, Touro College, Queens, NY 10033, USA. · Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY 10033, USA. · Research Center, Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Quebec H1T1C8, Canada. · Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H1T1C8, Canada. · Dr. John T. Macdonald Foundation Department of Human Genetics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA. · Zane Cohen Centre for Digestive Diseases, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5T3L9, USA. · Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G1X5, Canada. · Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. · Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa 3498838, Israel. · Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. · Institute for Genetics and Multiscale Biology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA. · Sema4, a Mount Sinai venture, Stamford, CT 06902, USA. · Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. · Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA. inga.peter@mssm.edu. ·Sci Transl Med · Pubmed #29321258.

ABSTRACT: Crohn's disease (CD), a form of inflammatory bowel disease, has a higher prevalence in Ashkenazi Jewish than in non-Jewish European populations. To define the role of nonsynonymous mutations, we performed exome sequencing of Ashkenazi Jewish patients with CD, followed by array-based genotyping and association analysis in 2066 CD cases and 3633 healthy controls. We detected association signals in the

3 Article Osteoporosis and gastrointestinal disease. 2010

Katz, Seymour / Weinerman, Stuart. ·Dr. Katz serves as Clinical Professor of Medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York and as Attending Gastroenterologist at both the North Shore University Hospital-Long Island Jewish Health System in Manhasset, New York and St. Francis Hospital in Roslyn, New York. ·Gastroenterol Hepatol (N Y) · Pubmed #20978554.

ABSTRACT: Gastrointestinal disease is often overlooked or simply forgotten as a cause of osteoporosis. Yet, the consequences of osteoporotic fractures can be devastating. Although the bulk of the published experience regarding osteoporosis is derived from the postmenopausal population, this review will focus on gastrointestinal disorders implicated in osteoporosis, with an emphasis on inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease. The unique aspects of gastrointestinal diseases associated with osteoporosis include early onset of disease (and, therefore, prolonged exposure to risk factors for developing osteoporosis, particularly with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease), malabsorption, and maldigestion of nutrients necessary for bone health and maintenance (eg, calcium, vitamin D), as well as the impact of glucocorticoids. These factors, when added to smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, hypogonadism, and a family history of osteoporosis, accumulate into an imposing package of predictors for osteoporotic fracture. This paper will review the identification and treatment strategies for patients with gastrointestinal disorders and osteoporosis.

4 Minor Increased hospitalizations in elderly with inflammatory bowel disease on anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy but not increased infections: a community practice experience. 2014

Shen, Huafeng / Lipka, Seth / Katz, Seymour. ·Department of Medicine, Nassau University Medical Center, East Meadow, NY, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA. · New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; North Shore University Hospital-Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset, NY, USA; St Francis Hospital, Roslyn, NY, USA. Electronic address: Seymourkatz.md@gmail.com. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #24434182.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --