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Crohn Disease: HELP
Articles from Rome, IT
Based on 366 articles published since 2010
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These are the 366 published articles about Crohn Disease that originated from Rome, IT during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15
1 Guideline Use of corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs in inflammatory bowel disease: Clinical practice guidelines of the Italian Group for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2017

Gionchetti, Paolo / Rizzello, Fernando / Annese, Vito / Armuzzi, Alessandro / Biancone, Livia / Castiglione, Fabiana / Comberlato, Michele / Cottone, Mario / Danese, Silvio / Daperno, Marco / D'Incà, Renata / Fries, Walter / Kohn, Anna / Orlando, Ambrogio / Papi, Claudio / Vecchi, Maurizio / Ardizzone, Sandro / Anonymous2840898. ·Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, IBD Unit, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. Electronic address: Paolo.gionchetti@unibo.it. · Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, IBD Unit, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · AOU Gastroenterology, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. · IBD Unit Complesso Integrato Columbus-Gemelli Hospital Catholic University Foundation, Rome, Italy. · University "Tor Vergata", Department of Systems Medicine, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Gastrointestinal Unit, Ospedale Central Hospital, Bolzano, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Pneumology and Nutrition Clinic, V. Cervello Hospital, Ospedali Riuniti Villa Sofia-Cervello University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · IBD Center, Humanitas Clinical and Research Centre, Milan, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, A.O. Ordine Mauriziano Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Department of Surgical and Gastroenterological Sciences, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Clinical Unit for Chronic Bowel Disorders, Department of Internal Medicine, IBD Unit Messina, University of Messina, Messina, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, San Camillo-Forlanini Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, San Filippo Neri Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, IRCCS San Donato Hospital, San Donato Milanese, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #28254463.

ABSTRACT: The two main forms of intestinal bowel disease, namely ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are not curable but can be controlled by various medical therapies. The Italian Group for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IG-IBD) has prepared clinical practice guidelines to help physicians prescribe corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs for these patients. The guidelines consider therapies that induce remission in patients with active disease as well as treatment regimens that maintain remission. These guidelines complement already existing guidelines from IG-IBD on the use of biological drugs in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases.

2 Guideline European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation Topical Review on Transitional Care in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2017

van Rheenen, Patrick F / Aloi, Marina / Biron, Irit Avni / Carlsen, Katrine / Cooney, Rachel / Cucchiara, Salvatore / Cullen, Garret / Escher, Johanna C / Kierkus, Jaroslaw / Lindsay, James O / Roma, Eleftheria / Russell, Richard K / Sieczkowska-Golub, Joanna / Harbord, Marcus. ·Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen,Groningen, The Netherlands. · Paediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, University Hospital Umberto I, Rome, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Rabin Medical Center - Beilinson Hospital, Petah Tikva, Israel. · Department of Paediatrics, Hvidovre University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. · Department of Gastroenterology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital,Birmingham, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Centre for Colorectal Disease, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Feeding Disorders and Paediatrics, Children's Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Barts Health NHS Trust, The Royal London Hospital, London, UK. · First Department of Paediatrics, Gastroenterology Unit, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, The Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow, UK. · Imperial College, London; and Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, UK. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #28158494.

ABSTRACT: Background: This European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation [ECCO] topical review focuses on the transition of adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] from child-centred to adult-oriented care. The aim was to provide evidence-supported, expert consensus for health professionals taking part in the transition. Methods: An online survey determined the areas of importance for health professionals involved in the transition of adolescents with IBD. Thereafter an expert panel of nine paediatric and five adult gastroenterologists was formed to identify the critical elements of the transition programme, and to prepare core messages defined as 'current practice points'. There is limited literature about transition, therefore this review is mainly based on expert opinion and consensus, rather than on specific evidence. Results: A total of 21 practice points were generated before the first [online] voting round. Practice points that reached >80% agreement were accepted, while those that did not reach 80% agreement were refined during a consensus meeting and subjected to voting. Ultimately, 14 practice points were retained by this review. Conclusion: We present a consensus-based framework for transitional care in IBD that provides a guidance for clinical practice.

3 Guideline Small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline. 2015

Pennazio, Marco / Spada, Cristiano / Eliakim, Rami / Keuchel, Martin / May, Andrea / Mulder, Chris J / Rondonotti, Emanuele / Adler, Samuel N / Albert, Joerg / Baltes, Peter / Barbaro, Federico / Cellier, Christophe / Charton, Jean Pierre / Delvaux, Michel / Despott, Edward J / Domagk, Dirk / Klein, Amir / McAlindon, Mark / Rosa, Bruno / Rowse, Georgina / Sanders, David S / Saurin, Jean Christophe / Sidhu, Reena / Dumonceau, Jean-Marc / Hassan, Cesare / Gralnek, Ian M. ·Division of Gastroenterology, San Giovanni Battista University Teaching Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University Tel-Hashomer, Israel. · Klinik für Innere Medizin, Bethesda Krankenhaus Bergedorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, Sana Klinikum, Offenbach, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Gastroenterology Unit, Ospedale Valduce, Como, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. · Department of Medicine I, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany. · Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Européen Georges-Pompidou, Service d'Hépato-gastro-entérologie, Paris, France. · Medizinische Klinik, Evangelisches Krankenhaus, Düsseldorf, Germany. · Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, University Hospital of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France. · Royal Free Unit for Endoscopy and Centre for Gastroenterology, The Royal Free Hospital and University College London, London, UK. · Department of Medicine B, University of Münster, Münster, Germany. · Institute of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Ha'emek Medical Center Afula, Israel, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology Haifa, Israel. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK. · Gastroenterology Department, Centro Hospitalar do Alto Ave, Guimarães, Portugal. · Clinical Psychology Unit, Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield. · Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Bénite, Lyon, France. · Gedyt Endoscopy Center, Buenos Aires, Argentina. ·Endoscopy · Pubmed #25826168.

ABSTRACT: This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). It addresses the roles of small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends small-bowel video capsule endoscopy as the first-line investigation in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 In patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, ESGE recommends performing small-bowel capsule endoscopy as soon as possible after the bleeding episode, optimally within 14 days, in order to maximize the diagnostic yield (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 ESGE does not recommend the routine performance of second-look endoscopy prior to small-bowel capsule endoscopy; however whether to perform second-look endoscopy before capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding or iron-deficiency anaemia should be decided on a case-by-case basis (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 In patients with positive findings at small-bowel capsule endoscopy, ESGE recommends device-assisted enteroscopy to confirm and possibly treat lesions identified by capsule endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends ileocolonoscopy as the first endoscopic examination for investigating patients with suspected Crohn's disease (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). In patients with suspected Crohn's disease and negative ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as the initial diagnostic modality for investigating the small bowel, in the absence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence).ESGE does not recommend routine small-bowel imaging or the use of the PillCam patency capsule prior to capsule endoscopy in these patients (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). In the presence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis, ESGE recommends that dedicated small bowel cross-sectional imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance enterography/enteroclysis or computed tomography enterography/enteroclysis should be used first (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 6 In patients with established Crohn's disease, based on ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends dedicated cross-sectional imaging for small-bowel evaluation since this has the potential to assess extent and location of any Crohn's disease lesions, to identify strictures, and to assess for extraluminal disease (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). In patients with unremarkable or nondiagnostic findings from such cross-sectional imaging of the small bowel, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as a subsequent investigation, if deemed to influence patient management (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). When capsule endoscopy is indicated, ESGE recommends use of the PillCam patency capsule to confirm functional patency of the small bowel (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 7 ESGE strongly recommends against the use of small-bowel capsule endoscopy for suspected coeliac disease but suggests that capsule endoscopy could be used in patients unwilling or unable to undergo conventional endoscopy (strong recommendation, low quality evidence).

4 Guideline ESPGHAN revised porto criteria for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease in children and adolescents. 2014

Levine, Arie / Koletzko, Sibylle / Turner, Dan / Escher, Johanna C / Cucchiara, Salvatore / de Ridder, Lissy / Kolho, Kaija-Leena / Veres, Gabor / Russell, Richard K / Paerregaard, Anders / Buderus, Stephan / Greer, Mary-Louise C / Dias, Jorge A / Veereman-Wauters, Gigi / Lionetti, Paolo / Sladek, Malgorzata / Martin de Carpi, Javier / Staiano, Annamaria / Ruemmele, Frank M / Wilson, David C / Anonymous3360775. ·*Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Unit, Wolfson Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel †Dr von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich, Germany ‡Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel §Pediatric Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands ||Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy ¶Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland #Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary **Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Yorkhill Children's Hospital, Glasgow, UK ††Department of Paediatrics, Hvidovre University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark ‡‡St.-Marien-Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Bonn, Germany §§Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children ||||Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto Canada ¶¶Hospital S. João, Porto, Portugal ##Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, UZ Brussels, Brussels, Belgium ***Departement Neurofarba, University of Florence, Meyer Children Hospital, Florence, Italy †††Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland ‡‡‡Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, Spain §§§Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Section of Pediatrics, University of Naples "Federico II," Naples, Italy ||||||Université Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris Descartes, INSERM U989, AP-HP, Hôpital Necker Enfants Malades, Service de Gastroentérologie Pédiatrique, Paris, France ¶¶¶Child Life and Health, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. ·J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr · Pubmed #24231644.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of pediatric-onset inflammatory bowel disease (PIBD) can be challenging in choosing the most informative diagnostic tests and correctly classifying PIBD into its different subtypes. Recent advances in our understanding of the natural history and phenotype of PIBD, increasing availability of serological and fecal biomarkers, and the emergence of novel endoscopic and imaging technologies taken together have made the previous Porto criteria for the diagnosis of PIBD obsolete. METHODS: We aimed to revise the original Porto criteria using an evidence-based approach and consensus process to yield specific practice recommendations for the diagnosis of PIBD. These revised criteria are based on the Paris classification of PIBD and the original Porto criteria while incorporating novel data, such as for serum and fecal biomarkers. A consensus of at least 80% of participants was achieved for all recommendations and the summary algorithm. RESULTS: The revised criteria depart from existing criteria by defining 2 categories of ulcerative colitis (UC, typical and atypical); atypical phenotypes of UC should be treated as UC. A novel approach based on multiple criteria for diagnosing IBD-unclassified (IBD-U) is proposed. Specifically, these revised criteria recommend upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and ileocolonscopy for all suspected patients with PIBD, with small bowel imaging (unless typical UC after endoscopy and histology) by magnetic resonance enterography or wireless capsule endoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: These revised Porto criteria for the diagnosis of PIBD have been developed to meet present challenges and developments in PIBD and provide up-to-date guidelines for the definition and diagnosis of the IBD spectrum.

5 Editorial Lesson from epidemiology of paediatric Crohn's disease. 2019

Cucchiara, Salvatore / Isoldi, Sara / Nobili, Valerio. ·Women's and Children's Department, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. Electronic address: salvatore.cucchiara@uniroma1.t. · Women's and Children's Department, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #30712953.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Editorial: Intestinal Inflammation. 2018

Pastorelli, Luca / Scaldaferri, Franco. ·Gastroenterology Unit, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Italy. · Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatic Diseases Unit, Gastroenterological Area, Gastroenterological and Endocrino-Metabolical Sciences Department, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy. ·Front Med (Lausanne) · Pubmed #30483509.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Histologic features in pediatric ileitis: Is it possible to tip the balance towards Crohn's disease? 2018

Oliva, Salvatore / Bassotti, Gabrio / Villanacci, Vincenzo. ·Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Sapienza - University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology Section, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia School of Medicine, Perugia, Italy. · Pathology Section, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, Brescia, Italy. Electronic address: villanacci@spedalicivili.brescia.it. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #29397324.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Beyond remission and mucosal healing in Crohn's disease. Exploring the deep with cross sectional imaging. 2017

Maconi, Giovanni / Armuzzi, Alessandro. ·Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: giovanni.maconi@unimi.it. · IBD Unit, Presidio Columbus, Fondazione Policlinico Gemelli Università Cattolica, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: alearmuzzi@yahoo.com. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #28449813.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Predicting the Durability of Biological Therapy in Pediatric Crohn's Disease: Do the Immunomodulators Matter? 2015

Aloi, Marina / Cucchiara, Salvatore. ·Department of Pediatrics and Childhood Neuropsychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Digestive Endoscopy Unit, University Hospital Umberto I, Rome, Italy. ·Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #26091738.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Crohn's disease, the mycobacterium paratuberculosis and the genetic bond: An unexpected trio. 2015

Perricone, Carlo / Borgiani, Paola. ·Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: carlo.perricone@gmail.com. · Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, Section of Genetic, School of Medicine, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy. ·Clin Res Hepatol Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25771330.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Treatment of peri-anal fistula in Crohn's disease. 2014

Sica, Giuseppe S / Di Carlo, Sara / Tema, Giorgia / Montagnese, Fabrizio / Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna / Fiaschetti, Valeria / Maggi, Giulia / Biancone, Livia. ·Giuseppe S Sica, Sara Di Carlo, Giorgia Tema, Giulia Maggi, Department of Surgery, Tor Vergata University Hospital, Rome 00133, Italy. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25309057.

ABSTRACT: Anal fistulas are a common manifestation of Crohn's disease (CD). The first manifestation of the disease is often in the peri-anal region, which can occur years before a diagnosis, particularly in CD affecting the colon and rectum. The treatment of peri-anal fistulas is difficult and always multidisciplinary. The European guidelines recommend combined surgical and medical treatment with biologic drugs to achieve best results. Several different surgical techniques are currently employed. However, at the moment, none of these techniques appear superior to the others in terms of healing rate. Surgery is always indicated to treat symptomatic, simple, low intersphincteric fistulas refractory to medical therapy and those causing disabling symptoms. Utmost attention should be paid to correcting the balance between eradication of the fistula and the preservation of fecal continence.

12 Editorial Editorial: long-term safety and efficacy of certolizumab pegol for Crohn's disease. 2014

Cesarini, M / Danese, S. ·Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Specialità Mediche, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. cesarini.monica@yahoo.it. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #25303376.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Mucosal healing as a treatment for IBD? 2014

Papi, Claudio / Aratari, Annalisa. ·Gastroenterology and Hepatology Unit, San Filippo Neri Hospital, Rome, Italy. ·Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #24654957.

ABSTRACT: In the last years mucosal healing has emerged as an important therapeutic goal for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Growing evidence suggests that mucosal healing can improve patient outcomes and, potentially, can alter the natural course of the disease by inducing sustained clinical remission and reducing hospitalizations and surgery. However several questions remain to be answered. A validated definition of mucosal healing is still lacking and the effect size of different drugs is difficult to assess because of different definitions, different study design, and different timing of endoscopic evaluation. The evidence that mucosal healing has a high positive predictive value for long-term good clinical outcome is still limited and, therefore, mucosal healing remains a weak surrogate end point of disease course. Future studies are needed to develop a standardized definition of mucosal healing and to prospectively assess the impact of mucosal healing on long-term clinical outcomes.

14 Editorial Regulatory T-cell therapy for Crohn's disease: in vivo veritas. 2012

Danese, Silvio / Fiorino, Gionata / Rutella, Sergio. ·IBD Center, Gastroenterology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: sdanese@hotmail.com. · IBD Center, Gastroenterology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. · Pediatric Hematology/Oncology and Transfusion Medicine, IRCCS Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #23000230.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Review Preventing Infections by Encapsulated Bacteria Through Vaccine Prophylaxis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2020

Lenti, Marco Vincenzo / Mengoli, Caterina / Vernero, Marta / Aronico, Nicola / Conti, Laura / Borrelli de Andreis, Federica / Cococcia, Sara / Di Sabatino, Antonio. ·First Department of Internal Medicine, San Matteo Hospital Foundation, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · Medical-Surgical Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. ·Front Immunol · Pubmed #32269571.

ABSTRACT: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which comprises ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is an immune-mediated, chronic-relapsing, disabling disorder which is associated with increased mortality and poor patients' quality of life. Patients with IBD are at increased risk of infections for many reasons. In fact, IBD often requires a lifelong immunosuppressive and/or biologic therapy, both commonly associated with respiratory and opportunistic infections, but also gastrointestinal, urinary tract infections, and sepsis. Moreover, impaired spleen function has been found in a considerable proportion of IBD patients, further increasing the risk of developing infections sustained by encapsulated bacteria, such as

16 Review Transcriptional Regulators of T Helper 17 Cell Differentiation in Health and Autoimmune Diseases. 2020

Capone, Alessia / Volpe, Elisabetta. ·Neuroimmunology Unit, IRCSS Fondazione Santa Lucia, Rome, Italy. · Department of Biology and Biotechnology Charles Darwin, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. ·Front Immunol · Pubmed #32226427.

ABSTRACT: T helper (Th) 17 cells are a subtype of CD4 T lymphocytes characterized by the expression of retinoic acid-receptor (RAR)-related orphan receptor (ROR)γt transcription factor, encoded by gene

17 Review TGF-β activity restoration and phosphodiesterase 4 inhibition as therapeutic options for inflammatory bowel diseases. 2020

Marafini, Irene / Troncone, Edoardo / Salvatori, Silvia / Monteleone, Giovanni. ·Chair of Gastroenterology, Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy; Gastroenterology Unit, Fondazione Policlinico Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. ·Pharmacol Res · Pubmed #32194176.

ABSTRACT: In the last decades, the better understanding of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) pathogenesis has contributed to the identification of new therapeutic targets that can be modulated to induce and maintain disease remission. Monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-12/IL-23p40, and the integrin α4β7 and inhibitors of Janus kinase molecules are valid compounds to limit the function of molecules implicated in the control of IBD-related inflammation. However, not all patients respond to treatment with such drugs, some of them lose response over time and others develop serious side effects, such as infections or malignancies, which lead to the discontinuation of the therapy. Thus, an intensive research is ongoing with the goal to identify new targets and develop novel therapeutic options. In this context, restoration of TGF-β activity and inhibition of phosphodiesterase 4 (PD4) represent two relevant strategies. TGF-β is an immunesuppressive cytokine, whose activity is severely impaired in IBD due to the abundance of the intracellular inhibitor Smad7. Knockdown of Smad7 with a specific antisense oligonucleotide restores TGF-β signalling and dampens effector immune responses in pre-clinical studies and initial clinical trials in Crohn's disease patients, even though a recent phase 3 trial was discontinued due to an apparent inefficacy. PD4 inhibition determines the increase of intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, a mechanism that decreases pro-inflammatory cytokine production. A recent phase 2 study has shown that oral administration of PD4 associates with clinical benefit in patients with ulcerative colitis. In this article, we review the rationale and the available data relative to the use of these two agents in IBD.

18 Review Inflammatory bowel disease position statement of the Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery (SICCR): Crohn's disease. 2020

Pellino, G / Keller, D S / Sampietro, G M / Angriman, I / Carvello, M / Celentano, V / Colombo, F / Di Candido, F / Laureti, S / Luglio, G / Poggioli, G / Rottoli, M / Scaringi, S / Sciaudone, G / Sica, G / Sofo, L / Leone, S / Danese, S / Spinelli, A / Delaini, G / Selvaggi, F / Anonymous6791172. ·Colorectal Surgery, Department of Advanced Medical and Surgical Sciences, Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Policlinico CS, Piazza Miraglia 2, 80138, Naples, Italy. gipe1984@gmail.com. · Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, New York-Presbyterian, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy. · General Surgery Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera di Padova, Padua, Italy. · Colon and Rectal Surgery Division, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. · Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK. · Surgery of the Alimentary Tract, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Sant'Orsola Hospital, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Surgical Unit, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Firenze, Florence, Italy. · Colorectal Surgery, Department of Advanced Medical and Surgical Sciences, Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Policlinico CS, Piazza Miraglia 2, 80138, Naples, Italy. · Minimally Invasive and Gastro-Intestinal Unit, Department of Surgery, Policlinico Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. · Abdominal Surgery Department, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Catholic University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · CEO, Associazione nazionale per le Malattie Infiammatorie Croniche dell'Intestino "A.M.I.C.I. Onlus", Milan, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology, IBD Center, Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, "Pederzoli" Hospital, Peschiera del Garda, Verona, Italy. ·Tech Coloproctol · Pubmed #32172396.

ABSTRACT: The Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery (SICCR) promoted the project reported here, which consists of a position statement of Italian colorectal surgeons to address the surgical aspects of Crohn's disease management. Members of the society were invited to express their opinions on several items proposed by the writing committee, based on evidence available in the literature. The results are presented, focusing on relevant points. The present paper is not an alternative to available guidelines; rather, it offers a snapshot of the attitudes of SICCR surgeons about the surgical treatment of Crohn's disease. The committee was able to identify some points of major disagreement and suggested strategies to improve quality of available data and acceptance of guidelines.

19 Review Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) position statement of the Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery (SICCR): general principles of IBD management. 2020

Pellino, G / Keller, D S / Sampietro, G M / Annese, V / Carvello, M / Celentano, V / Coco, C / Colombo, F / Cracco, N / Di Candido, F / Franceschi, M / Laureti, S / Mattioli, G / Pio, L / Sciaudone, G / Sica, G / Villanacci, V / Zinicola, R / Leone, S / Danese, S / Spinelli, A / Delaini, G / Selvaggi, F / Anonymous4811168. ·Colorectal Surgery, Department of Advanced Medical and Surgical Sciences, Università Degli Studi Della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Policlinico CS, Piazza Miraglia 2, 80138, Naples, Italy. gipe1984@gmail.com. · Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, NewYork-Presbyterian, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, USA. · L. Sacco University Hospital Milano, Milan, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, DEA-Medicina E Chirurgia Generale E D'Urgenza, University Hospital Careggi, Firenze, Italy. · Colon and Rectal Surgery Division, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. · Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Portsmouth, UK. · University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK. · UOC Chirurgia Generale 2, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli-IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Department of General Surgery, IRCCS Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar, Verona, Italy. · IBD Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy. · Surgery of the Alimentary Tract, Sant'Orsola Hospital, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Pediatric Surgery Unit, Istituto Giannina Gaslini, and Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health (DINOGMI), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. · Pediatric Surgery Department, Hôpital Robert-Debré and Université de Paris, Paris, France. · Colorectal Surgery, Department of Advanced Medical and Surgical Sciences, Università Degli Studi Della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Policlinico CS, Piazza Miraglia 2, 80138, Naples, Italy. · Minimally Invasive and Gastro-Intestinal Unit, Department of Surgery, Policlinico Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. · Institute of Pathology, Spedali Civili Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Department of Emergency Surgery, University Hospital Parma, Parma, Italy. · CEO, Associazione Nazionale Per Le Malattie Infiammatorie Croniche Dell'Intestino "A.M.I.C.I. Onlus", Milan, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology, IBD Center, Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, "Pederzoli" Hospital, Peschiera del Garda, Verona, Italy. ·Tech Coloproctol · Pubmed #31983044.

ABSTRACT: The Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery (SICCR) promoted the project reported here, which consists of a Position Statement of Italian colorectal surgeons to address the surgical aspects of inflammatory bowel disease management. Members of the society were invited to express their opinions on several items proposed by the writing committee, based on evidence available in the literature. The results are presented, focusing on relevant points. The present paper is not an alternative to available guidelines; rather, it offers a snapshot of the attitudes of SICCR surgeons about the general principles of surgical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. The committee was able to identify some points of major disagreement and suggested strategies to improve quality of available data and acceptance of guidelines.

20 Review Management of patients with complex perianal fistulas in Crohn's disease: Optimal patient flow in the Italian clinical reality. 2020

Spinelli, Antonino / Armuzzi, Alessandro / Ciccocioppo, Rachele / Danese, Silvio / Gionchetti, Paolo / Luglio, Gaetano / Orlando, Ambrogio / Rispo, Antonio / Rizzello, Fernando / Sofo, Luigi / Solina, Gaspare / Poggioli, Gilberto. ·Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan, Italy; Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: antonino.spinelli@humanitas.it. · IBD Unit, A. Gemelli Hospital, Cattolica University, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Medicine, G.B. Rossi University Hospital, Verona, Italy. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan, Italy; IBD Center, Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. · Emilia-Romagna IBD Regional Referral Center, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Surgery Unit, Department of Public Health, Federico II University Hospital, Naples, Italy. · IBD Unit, "Villa Sofia-Cervello" Hospital, Palermo, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Federico II University Hospital, Naples, Italy. · Abdominal SUrgery Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, Endocrine-metabolic and Nephrourological Science, A. Gemelli Hospital, Cattolica University, Rome, Italy. · Unit of General and Oncological Surgery, Department of Surgery, "Villa Sofia-Cervello" Hospital, Palermo, Italy. · Digestive Surgery Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #31901310.

ABSTRACT: Perianal fistulizing Crohn's disease (PFCD) is a common, disabling and aggressive phenotype that negatively impacts on the quality of life of affected patients. Its successful treatment is still a struggle for both physicians and patients. Significant advances in the management of this condition have occurred in the last two decades holding promise for a better future. This culminated into the concept of a collaborative multidisciplinary approach using the latest medical therapies combined with modern surgical and endoscopic techniques. Despite this, PFCD management and treatment have not been standardized yet. Thus the gastroenterologist and surgeon have to be familiar with several approaches and/or techniques. The positioning of each therapeutic option will certainly evolve with new data, but for the time being it should be driven by patient's characteristics, physician's preference and/or experience, costs and availability in local practice. Additionally, patient's perception of benefits and risks of treatment may differ from those of physicians and recognition of this difference is a starting point for difficult clinical decision-making. In this paper, a multidisciplinary group of Italian IBD experts explore and discuss current medical and surgical therapeutic options, highlighting areas of unmet needs in PFCD, with particular focus on the optimal patient flow within the Italian clinical reality.

21 Review Herbal medicinal products for inflammatory bowel disease: A focus on those assessed in double-blind randomised controlled trials. 2020

Holleran, Grainne / Scaldaferri, Franco / Gasbarrini, Antonio / Currò, Diego. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Medicine, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, Tallaght Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Unità Operativa Complessa di Medicina Interna e Gastroenterologia, Dipartimento di Scienze Gastroenterologiche, Endocrino-Metaboliche e Nefro-Urologiche, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario "A. Gemelli" IRCCS, Rome, 00168, Italy. · Istituto di Patologia Speciale Medica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, 00168, Italy. · Unità Operativa Complessa di Farmacologia, Direzione Sanitaria, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario "A. Gemelli" IRCCS, Rome, 00168, Italy. · Istituto di Farmacologia, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, 00168, Italy. ·Phytother Res · Pubmed #31701598.

ABSTRACT: Inflammatory bowel disease patients frequently use herbal products as complementary or alternative medicines to current pharmacotherapies and obtain information on them mainly from the internet, social media, or unlicensed practitioners. Clinicians should therefore take a more active role and become knowledgeable of the mechanisms of action and potential drug interactions of herbal medicines for which evidence of efficacy is available. The therapeutic efficacy and safety of several herbal medicines have been studied in double-blind randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Evidence of efficacy is available for Andrographis paniculata extract; curcumin; a combination of myrrh, extract of chamomile flower, and coffee charcoal; and the Chinese herbal medicines Fufangkushen colon-coated capsule and Xilei san in patients with ulcerative colitis; and Artemisia absinthium extract and Boswellia serrata resin extract in patients with Crohn's disease. However, most of this evidence comes from single small RCTs with short follow-up, and the long-term effects and safety of their use have not yet been established. Thus, our findings indicate that further appropriately sized RCTs are necessary prior to the recommended use of these herbal medicines in therapy. In the meantime, increasing awareness of their use, and potential drug interactions among physicians may help to reduce unwanted effects and adverse disease outcomes.

22 Review Infections and malignancies risks related to TNF-α-blocking agents in pediatric inflammatory bowel diseases. 2019

Alvisi, Patrizia / Dipasquale, Valeria / Barabino, Arrigo / Martellossi, Stefano / Miele, Erasmo / Lionetti, Paolo / Lombardi, Giuliano / Cucchiara, Salvatore / Torre, Giuliano / Romano, Claudio. ·Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Human Pathology in Adulthood and Childhood "G. Barresi", University of Messina, Messina, Italy. · Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Institute Giannina Gaslini, Genova, Italy. · Pediatric Department, Gastroenterology, Digestive Endoscopy and Nutrition Unit, Institute for Maternal and Child Health I.R.C.C.S. Burlo Garofalo, Trieste, Italy. · Department of Translational Medical Science (Section of Pediatrics), and European Laboratory for the Investigation of Food-Induced Diseases, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Unit, University of Florence-Meyer Hospital, Florence, Italy. · Pediatric Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, Spirito Santo Hospital, Pescara, Italy. · Department of Pediatrics and Infantile Neuropsychiatry, Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Hepatology, Gastroenterology and Nutrition Unit, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy. ·Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #31490707.

ABSTRACT:

23 Review Inflammatory cytokines: from discoveries to therapies in IBD. 2019

Marafini, Irene / Sedda, Silvia / Dinallo, Vincenzo / Monteleone, Giovanni. ·Department of Systems Medicine, Gastroenterology, University of Rome "Tor Vergata" , Rome , Italy. ·Expert Opin Biol Ther · Pubmed #31373244.

ABSTRACT:

24 Review Novel Pharmacological Therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Beyond Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor. 2019

Pagnini, Cristiano / Pizarro, Theresa T / Cominelli, Fabio. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, S. Giovanni Addolorata Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Department of Medicine and Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Digestive Health Institute, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH, United States. ·Front Pharmacol · Pubmed #31316377.

ABSTRACT: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic conditions of the gastrointestinal tract in which dysregulated immune responses cause persistent inflammation of the gut mucosa. Biologic therapy with anti-TNF blockers has revolutionized the therapeutic management of IBD for their remarkable efficacy and potential impact on disease course and for many years has represented the sole treatment option for patients refractory or intolerant to conventional therapy. In recent years, more molecules, both biologically and chemically synthetized, have been developed as potential therapeutic options for IBD that target different molecular pathways aside from TNF blockade, and which have been proposed as targets for novel drugs. This is particularly relevant for the present, as well as future, management of IBD, considering that some patients are refractory to anti-TNF. This review will summarize the pharmacological options, either currently available or in the pipeline, for market approval to treat IBD, besides anti-TNF strategies, based on their mechanism(s) of action. We will also analyze the current evidence for effectiveness and safety, as well as offer perspective, regarding the potential implementation for such therapies in the future.

25 Review Performance measures for small-bowel endoscopy: A European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Quality Improvement Initiative. 2019

Spada, Cristiano / McNamara, Deirdre / Despott, Edward J / Adler, Samuel / Cash, Brooks D / Fernández-Urién, Ignacio / Ivekovic, Hrvoje / Keuchel, Martin / McAlindon, Mark / Saurin, Jean-Christophe / Panter, Simon / Bellisario, Cristina / Minozzi, Silvia / Senore, Carlo / Bennett, Cathy / Bretthauer, Michael / Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario / Domagk, Dirk / Hassan, Cesare / Kaminski, Michal F / Rees, Colin J / Valori, Roland / Bisschops, Raf / Rutter, Matthew D. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit and Gastroenterology, Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli - IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · TAGG Research Centre, Department of Clinical Medicine, Tallaght Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. · Royal Free Unit for Endoscopy, The Royal Free Hospital and UCL Institute for Liver and Digestive Health, London, UK. · Division of Gastroenterology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, UT Health Science Center at Houston/Memorial Hermann, Houston, TX, USA. · McGovern Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Navarra Hospital Complex, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Centre, Zagreb, Croatia. · Clinic for Internal Medicine, Bethesda Krankenhaus Bergedorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Academic Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Sheffield, UK. · Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital E. Herriot, Lyon, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust, South Shields, UK. · CPO Piemonte, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza, Turin, Italy. · Office of Research and Innovation, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Coláiste Ríoga na Máinleá in Éirinn, Dublin, Ireland. · Clinical Effectiveness Research Group, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Servicio de Gastroenterologia, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Porto, Portugal. · Department of Medicine I, Josephs-Hospital Warendorf, Academic Teaching Hospital, University of Muenster, Warendorf, Germany. · Endoscopy Unit, Nuovo Regina Margherita Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Oncology, Medical Center for Postgraduate Education, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterological Oncology and Department of Cancer Prevention, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Health Management and Health Economics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Northern Institute for Cancer Research, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Gloucestershire, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of North Tees, Stockton-on-Tees, Cleveland, UK. ·United European Gastroenterol J · Pubmed #31210941.

ABSTRACT: The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) together with the United European Gastroenterology (UEG) recently developed a short list of performance measures for small-bowel endoscopy (i.e. small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy) with the final goal of providing endoscopy services across Europe with a tool for quality improvement. Six key performance measures both for small-bowel capsule endoscopy and for device-assisted enteroscopy were selected for inclusion, with the intention being that practice at both a service and endoscopist level should be evaluated against them. Other performance measures were considered to be less relevant, based on an assessment of their overall importance, scientific acceptability, and feasibility. Unlike lower and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, for which performance measures had already been identified, this is the first time small-bowel endoscopy quality measures have been proposed.

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