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Cytomegalovirus Infections HELP
Based on 7,317 articles published since 2008
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These are the 7317 published articles about Cytomegalovirus Infections that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline The Third International Consensus Guidelines on the Management of Cytomegalovirus in Solid-organ Transplantation. 2018

Kotton, Camille N / Kumar, Deepali / Caliendo, Angela M / Huprikar, Shirish / Chou, Sunwen / Danziger-Isakov, Lara / Humar, Atul / Anonymous2081033. ·Transplant and Immunocompromised Host Infectious Diseases Infectious Diseases Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Transplant Infectious Diseases and Multi-Organ Transplant Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI. · Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. · Division of Infectious Diseases, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR. · Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH. · Multi Organ Transplant Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·Transplantation · Pubmed #29596116.

ABSTRACT: Despite recent advances, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections remain one of the most common complications affecting solid organ transplant recipients, conveying higher risks of complications, graft loss, morbidity, and mortality. Research in the field and development of prior consensus guidelines supported by The Transplantation Society has allowed a more standardized approach to CMV management. An international multidisciplinary panel of experts was convened to expand and revise evidence and expert opinion-based consensus guidelines on CMV management including prevention, treatment, diagnostics, immunology, drug resistance, and pediatric issues. Highlights include advances in molecular and immunologic diagnostics, improved understanding of diagnostic thresholds, optimized methods of prevention, advances in the use of novel antiviral therapies and certain immunosuppressive agents, and more savvy approaches to treatment resistant/refractory disease. The following report summarizes the updated recommendations.

2 Guideline [How to manage EBV reactivation and EBV-PTLD, CMV and human herpesvirus 6 reactivation and infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: A report of the SFGM-TC (update)]. 2017

Brissot, Eolia / Alsuliman, Tamim / Gruson, Bérengère / Hermet, Eric / Tirefort, Yordanka / Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim / Alain, Sophie. ·Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie, 4, place Jussieu, 75005 Paris, France; Inserm, UMRs 938, centre de Recherche Saint-Antoine, 27, rue Chaligny, 75571 Paris, France; AP-HP, hôpital Saint-Antoine, service d'hématologie clinique et thérapie cellulaire, 184, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Antoine, 75571 Paris cedex 12, France. Electronic address: eolia.brissot@gmail.com. · CHU de Lille, université de Lille 2, LIRIC, Inserm U995, 59000 Lille, France. · CHU d'Amiens, service d'hématologie, 80054 Amiens, France. · CHU de Clermont-Ferrand, université d'Auvergne EA3846, CIC-501, hôpital Estaing, service de thérapie cellulaire et d'hématologie clinique adulte, 58, rue Montalembert, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Hôpitaux universitaires de Genève, service d'hématologie, 4, rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1205 Genève, Suisse. · Université de Limoges, faculté de médecine, 2, rue du docteur Marcland, 87025 Limoges, France; CHU de Limoges, service de bactériologie virologie-hygiène, 2, avenue Martin-Luther-King, 87042 Limoges, France; Centre national de référence des cytomégalovirus, 87000 Limoges, France; Inserm UMR 1092, 87000 Limoges, France. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #29169653.

ABSTRACT: The French society of bone marrow transplantation and cell therapy (SFGM-TC) organizes annually workshops in the attempt to harmonize clinical practices between different francophone transplantation center. Here, we report our recommendations regarding the management of Epstein Barr virus reactivation and lymphoproliferative disorders, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human herpes virus 6 (HHV6) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

3 Guideline Practice bulletin no. 151: Cytomegalovirus, parvovirus B19, varicella zoster, and toxoplasmosis in pregnancy. 2015

Anonymous30831. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #26000539.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline [Diagnosis and treatment of CMV and EBV Reactivation as well as Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation: An SFGM-TC report]. 2013

Bay, J-O / Peffault de Latour, R / Bruno, B / Coiteux, V / Guillaume, T / Hicheri, Y / Paillard, C / Suarez, F / Turlure, P / Alain, S / Bulabois, C-E / Socié, G / Bauters, F / Yakoub-Agha, I / Anonymous40769. ·Service de thérapie cellulaire et hématologie clinique, CHU Estaing, 1, place Lucie et Raymond Aubrac, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand cedex 1, France. ·Pathol Biol (Paris) · Pubmed #24011961.

ABSTRACT: In the attempt to harmonize clinical practices between different French transplantation centers, the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapy (SFGM-TC) set up the third annual series of workshops which brought together practitioners from all member centers and took place in October 2012 in Lille. Here the SFGM-TC addressed the issue of post-transplant CMV and EBV reactivation, and EBV-related Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

5 Guideline [How to handle unexpected biological abnormalities observed in the pre-donation workup for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: an SFGM-TC report on pre-transplant cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Toxoplasma gondii, or syphilis IgM positive serology test]. 2013

Duléry, R / Giraud, C / Beaumont, J-L / Bilger, K / Borel, C / Dhedin, N / Thiebaut, A / Willems, E / Alain, S / Alfandari, S / Dewilde, A / Jouet, J-P / Milpied, N / Yakoub-Agha, I / Anonymous30769. ·Service des maladies du sang, EA 2686, CHRU de Lille, 2, avenue Oscar-Lambret, 59037 Lille cedex, France. ·Pathol Biol (Paris) · Pubmed #24011960.

ABSTRACT: In the attempt to harmonize clinical practices between different French transplantation centers, the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapy (SFGM-TC) set up the third annual series of workshops which brought together practitioners from all member centers and took place in October 2012 in Lille. Here we report our results and recommendations regarding the management of pre-transplant donor's cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Toxoplasma gondii, or syphilis IgM positive serology test.

6 Guideline Updated international consensus guidelines on the management of cytomegalovirus in solid-organ transplantation. 2013

Kotton, Camille N / Kumar, Deepali / Caliendo, Angela M / Asberg, Anders / Chou, Sunwen / Danziger-Isakov, Lara / Humar, Atul / Anonymous2040765. ·Transplant and Immunocompromised Host Infectious Diseases, Infectious Diseases Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA. ckotton@partners.org ·Transplantation · Pubmed #23896556.

ABSTRACT: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) continues to be one of the most common infections after solid-organ transplantation, resulting in significant morbidity, graft loss, and adverse outcomes. Management of CMV varies considerably among transplant centers but has been become more standardized by publication of consensus guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Section of The Transplantation Society. An international panel of experts was reconvened in October 2012 to revise and expand evidence and expert opinion-based consensus guidelines on CMV management, including diagnostics, immunology, prevention, treatment, drug resistance, and pediatric issues. The following report summarizes the recommendations.

7 Guideline Management of cytomegalovirus infection in haemopoietic stem cell transplantation. 2013

Emery, Vincent / Zuckerman, Mark / Jackson, Graham / Aitken, Celia / Osman, Husam / Pagliuca, Anthony / Potter, Mike / Peggs, Karl / Clark, Andrew / Anonymous4220757 / Anonymous4230757 / Anonymous4240757. ·Department of Virology, University College London School of Life and Medical Sciences, London, UK. ·Br J Haematol · Pubmed #23647436.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Guideline Evidence based management guidelines for the detection and treatment of congenital CMV. 2011

Kadambari, S / Williams, E J / Luck, S / Griffiths, P D / Sharland, M. ·Paediatric Infectious Diseases Unit, St George's University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London, United Kingdom. skadamba@sgul.ac.uk ·Early Hum Dev · Pubmed #21962770.

ABSTRACT: CMV is the most common congenital infection in newborns worldwide. Congenital CMV causes sensorineural hearing loss in a significant proportion of infected newborns, while the majority of newborns are asymptomatic. In the last three years there have been significant advances in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital CMV. We have developed practical evidence based guidelines for the management of congenital CMV.

9 Guideline GESITRA-SEIMC/REIPI recommendations for the management of cytomegalovirus infection in solid-organ transplant patients. 2011

de la Torre-Cisneros, Julian / Fariñas, M Carmen / Castón, Juan José / Aguado, José María / Cantisán, Sara / Carratalá, Jordi / Cervera, Carlos / Cisneros, José Miguel / Cordero, Elisa / Crespo-Leiro, Maria G / Fortún, Jesús / Frauca, Esteban / Gavaldá, Joan / Gil-Vernet, Salvador / Gurguí, Mercé / Len, Oscar / Lumbreras, Carlos / Marcos, María Ángeles / Martín-Dávila, Pilar / Monforte, Victor / Montejo, Miguel / Moreno, Asunción / Muñoz, Patricia / Navarro, David / Pahissa, Albert / Pérez, José Luis / Rodriguez-Bernot, Alberto / Rumbao, José / San Juan, Rafael / Santos, Francisco / Varo, Evaristo / Zurbano, Felipe / Anonymous3270705. ·UGC Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía-IMIBIC, Córdoba, Spain. julian.torre.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es ·Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin · Pubmed #21925772.

ABSTRACT: Cytomegalovirus infection remains a major complication of solid organ transplantation. In 2005 the Spanish Transplantation Infection Study Group (GESITRA) of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) developed consensus guidelines for the prevention and treatment of CMV infection in solid organ transplant recipients. Since then, numerous publications have clarified or questioned the aspects covered in the previous document. These aspects include the situations and populations who must receive prophylaxis and its duration, the selection of the best diagnosis and monitoring technique and the best therapeutic strategy. For these reasons, we have developed new consensus guidelines to include the latest recommendations on post-transplant CMV management based on new evidence available.

10 Guideline [Review and guidelines on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of post-natal cytomegalovirus infection]. 2011

Alarcón Allen, A / Baquero-Artigao, F / Anonymous8080665. ·Servicio de Neonatología, Hospital Sant Joan De Déu, Esplugues De Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. anaalarcon@hsjdbcn.org ·An Pediatr (Barc) · Pubmed #20630814.

ABSTRACT: Postnatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in the newborn can occur from exposure to maternal cervical secretions during birth, ingestion of breast milk, transfusion of blood products or transmission by body fluids of infected people. Breast milk is the main source of infection, given the high rate of CMV-positive mothers excreting CMV in milk. Freezing reduces the risk of CMV transmission by breastfeeding, although it does not eliminate it completely. Pasteurisation prevents such transmission, but it can alter the immunological properties of breast milk. Postnatal CMV infection is usually asymptomatic, as it normally results from viral reactivation in the mother, and the neonate is born with protective antibodies. However, in the very low birth weight premature infant the amount of transferred antibodies is smaller and a symptomatic infection can occur. Symptomatic post-natal CMV infection in the newborn typically causes hepatitis, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia or sepsis-like syndrome. Pneumonitis and enteritis are less common, but very characteristic. Diagnosis is based on urine virus detection at the time of onset of symptoms. Postnatal CMV infection in the newborn generally resolves spontaneously without antiviral treatment. Ganciclovir should be reserved for severe cases. Unlike congenital CMV disease, post-natal CMV infection in the preterm infant does not seem to be associated with hearing loss or abnormal neuro-development in long term follow-up.

11 Guideline [Cytomegalovirus infection in pregnancy]. 2010

Yinon, Yoav / Farine, Dan / Yudin, Mark H / Anonymous6430661 / Anonymous6440661. ·Toronto (Ont.). ·J Obstet Gynaecol Can · Pubmed #20500944.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Guideline Cytomegalovirus infection in pregnancy. 2010

Yinon, Yoav / Farine, Dan / Yudin, Mark H / Anonymous6410661 / Anonymous6420661. ·Toronto ON. ·J Obstet Gynaecol Can · Pubmed #20500943.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To review the principles of prenatal diagnosis of congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and to describe the outcomes of the affected pregnancies. OUTCOMES: Effective management of fetal infection following primary and secondary maternal CMV infection during pregnancy. Neonatal signs include intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), microcephaly, hepatosplenomegaly, petechiae, jaundice, chorioretinitis, thrombocytopenia and anemia, and long-term sequelae consist of sensorineural hearing loss, mental retardation, delay of psychomotor development, and visual impairment. These guidelines provide a framework for diagnosis and management of suspected CMV infections. EVIDENCE: Medline was searched for articles published in English from 1966 to 2009, using appropriate controlled vocabulary (congenital CMV infection) and key words (intrauterine growth restriction, microcephaly). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. RECOMMENDATIONS The quality of evidence reported in this document has been assessed using the evaluation of evidence criteria in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). 1. Diagnosis of primary maternal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in pregnancy should be based on de-novo appearance of virus-specific IgG in the serum of a pregnant woman who was previously seronegative, or on detection of specific IgM antibody associated with low IgG avidity. (II-2A) 2. In case of primary maternal infection, parents should be informed about a 30% to 40% risk for intrauterine transmission and fetal infection, and a risk of 20% to 25% for development of sequelae postnatally if the fetus is infected. (II-2A) 3. The prenatal diagnosis of fetal CMV infection should be based on amniocentesis, which should be done at least 7 weeks after presumed time of maternal infection and after 21 weeks of gestation. This interval is important because it takes 5 to 7 weeks following fetal infection and subsequent replication of the virus in the kidney for a detectable quantity of the virus to be secreted to the amniotic fluid. (II-2A) 4. The diagnosis of secondary infection should be based on a significant rise of IgG antibody titre with or without the presence of IgM and high IgG avidity. In cases of proven secondary infection, amniocentesis may be considered, but the risk-benefit ratio is different because of the low transmission rate. (III-C) 5. Following a diagnosis of fetal CMV infection, serial ultrasound examinations should be performed every 2 to 4 weeks to detect sonographic abnormalities, which may aid in determining the prognosis of the fetus, although it is important to be aware that the absence of sonographic findings does not guarantee a normal outcome. (II-2B) 6. Quantitative determination of CMV DNA in the amniotic fluid may assist in predicting the fetal outcome. (II-3B) 7. Routine screening of pregnant women for CMV by serology testing is currently not recommended. (III-B) 8. Serologic testing for CMV may be considered for women who develop influenza-like illness during pregnancy or following detection of sonographic findings suggestive of CMV infection. (III-B) 9. Seronegative health care and child care workers may be offered serologic monitoring during pregnancy. Monitoring may also be considered for seronegative pregnant women who have a young child in day care. (III-B).

13 Guideline International consensus guidelines on the management of cytomegalovirus in solid organ transplantation. 2010

Kotton, Camille N / Kumar, Deepali / Caliendo, Angela M / Asberg, Anders / Chou, Sunwen / Snydman, David R / Allen, Upton / Humar, Atul / Anonymous330653. ·Transplant and Immunocompromised Host Infectious Diseases, Infectious Diseases Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. ckotton@partners.org ·Transplantation · Pubmed #20224515.

ABSTRACT: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains one of the most common infections after solid organ transplantation, resulting in significant morbidity, graft loss, and occasional mortality. Management of CMV varies considerably among transplant centers. A panel of experts on CMV and solid organ transplant was convened by The Infectious Diseases Section of The Transplantation Society to develop evidence and expert opinion-based consensus guidelines on CMV management including diagnostics, immunology, prevention, treatment, drug resistance, and pediatric issues.

14 Guideline [Consensus document from the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) on the diagnosis and treatment of congenital cytomegalovirus infection]. 2009

Baquero-Artigao, F / Anonymous1740640. ·Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario Materno-Infantil La Paz, Madrid, España. fbaquero@terra.es ·An Pediatr (Barc) · Pubmed #19815469.

ABSTRACT: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the leading cause of congenital infection in developed countries, affecting 0.3 to 0.6% of all live births in Europe. Primary CMV infection occurs in 1 to 4% of seronegative women during pregnancy and may be transmitted to the fetus in 40% of cases. Up to 10% of intrauterine CMV infections result in symptomatic congenital disease at birth. Half of these children and 13% of those born with asymptomatic infection will develop long-term sequelae, especially neurosensory hearing loss and mental retardation. Accurate diagnosis of primary maternal and fetal infection is now possible using the avidity index of anti-CMV IgG and virological testing to detect the virus in amniotic fluid. Symptomatic congenital infection may be preventable using CMV hyperimmune globulin during pregnancy. The gold standard for diagnosis of congenital CMV infection is the detection of the virus in urine within the first 2 weeks of life by rapid cell culture techniques (shell vial) or nucleic acid amplification of viral DNA (PCR). Retrospective diagnosis can be achieved by detection of viral DNA by PCR in dried blood spots (Guthrie card) collected on filter paper in the first days of life. Currently available drugs for the treatment of congenital CMV include ganciclovir and its oral prodrug valganciclovir. Treatment with intravenous ganciclovir for six weeks may prevent hearing deterioration in children with symptomatic congenital CMV infection and central nervous system involvement. Valganciclovir may be an excellent alternative because of its good bio-availability, providing plasma concentrations similar to those achieved with intravenous ganciclovir.

15 Guideline Guidelines on CMV congenital infection. 2009

Coll, Oriol / Benoist, Guillaume / Ville, Yves / Weisman, Leonard E / Botet, Francesc / Anceschi, Maurizio M / Greenough, Anne / Gibbs, Ronald S / Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier / Anonymous7070635. ·Department of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Institut Clínic de Ginecologia, Obstetrícia i Neonatologia, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. ·J Perinat Med · Pubmed #19673682.

ABSTRACT: Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurs in 0.6-0.7% of all newborns and is the most prevalent infection-related cause of congenital neurological handicap. Vertical transmission occurs in around 30% of cases, but the fetus is not always affected. Symptomatic newborns at birth have a much higher risk of suffering severe neurological sequelae. Detection of specific IgG and IgM and IgG avidity seem to be the most reliable tests to identify a primary infection but interpretation in a clinical context may be difficult. If a seroconversion is documented or a fetal infection is suspected by ultrasound markers, an amniocentesis should be performed to confirm a vertical transmission. In the absence of a confirmed fetal infection with fetal structural anomalies, a pregnancy termination should be discouraged. Fetal prognosis is mainly correlated to the presence of brain damage. Despite promising results with the use of antiviral drugs and CMV hyperimmune globulin (HIG), results have to be interpreted with caution. Pregnant women should not be systematically tested for CMV during pregnancy. Managing CMV screening should be restricted to pregnancies where a primary infection is suspected or among women at high risk. The magnitude of congenital CMV disease and the value of interventions to prevent its transmission or to decrease the sequelae need to be established before implementing public health interventions. In this paper, aspects of CMV infection in the pregnant woman and her infant are reviewed.

16 Guideline Contemporary management of cytomegalovirus infection in transplant recipients: guidelines from an IHMF workshop, 2007. 2008

Griffiths, Paul / Whitley, Richard / Snydman, David R / Singh, Nina / Boeckh, Michael / Anonymous3620614. ·Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, UK. p.griffiths@medsch.ucl.ac.uk ·Herpes · Pubmed #18983762.

ABSTRACT: An international workshop reviewed the evidence base for deploying antiviral drugs to prevent cytomegalovirus (CMV) end-organ diseases (EOD) as well as the indirect effects of CMV in transplant recipients. Published studies demonstrate that both prophylaxis and pre-emptive therapy can be effective strategies for preventing EOD. However, the optimal drug, dosage and duration of treatment have not been defined for either prophylaxis or pre-emptive therapy and vary by transplant population. Each of these strategies presents practical challenges, including ensuring compliance with the planned management protocol. Furthermore, there is no evidence that either strategy is superior to the other. Non-randomized clinical trials suggest that late-onset disease and antiviral resistance are more problematic with prophylaxis than pre-emptive therapy, while prophylaxis more clearly controls some of the indirect effects of CMV than does pre-emptive therapy. Because of the medical importance of these indirect effects, especially graft rejection, future studies should be powered to directly address their control. Because pre-emptive therapy for CMV disease is used widely in clinical practice, the ability of newer drugs administered prophylactically to reduce the need for pre-emptive therapy is an appropriate primary endpoint for the conduct of randomized controlled trials. International agreement is required on the standard comparator drug(s) against which new drugs should be compared. For debate, we suggest that baseline pre-emptive therapy with oral valganciclovir should be the comparator for new drug evaluation because it is widely used in clinical practice in many groups of transplant patients.

17 Guideline Management of CMV, HHV-6, HHV-7 and Kaposi-sarcoma herpesvirus (HHV-8) infections in patients with hematological malignancies and after SCT. 2008

Ljungman, P / de la Camara, R / Cordonnier, C / Einsele, H / Engelhard, D / Reusser, P / Styczynski, J / Ward, K / Anonymous2670602. ·Department of Hematology, Karolinska University Hospital/Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. Per.Ljungman@ki.se ·Bone Marrow Transplant · Pubmed #18587440.

ABSTRACT: These recommendations were prepared by the European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia following a predefined methodology. Literature searches were made to identify studies pertinent to management of CMV, HHV-6, -7 and -8 infections. For CMV, 76 studies were reviewed: 72 published and 4 presented as abstracts. Twenty-nine of these studies were prospective randomized trials. For the other herpesviruses, HHV-6, -7 and -8, no randomized controlled trial has been performed, although data from some studies with other primary endpoints have been used to assess the management of HHV-6 infection. Works presented only as abstracts were used to a very limited extent. The quality of evidence and level of recommendation were graded according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) criteria.

18 Guideline Prevention and treatment of cancer-related infections. 2008

Segal, Brahm H / Freifeld, Alison G / Baden, Lindsey Robert / Brown, Arthur E / Casper, Corey / Dubberke, Erik / Gelfand, Michael / Greene, John N / Ison, Michael G / Ito, James I / Karp, Judith E / Kaul, Daniel R / King, Earl / Mackler, Emily / Marcucci, Guido / Montoya, Jose G / Engemann, Ashley Morris / Rolston, Ken / The, Angelina S. ·Roswell Park Cancer Institute, USA. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #18319048.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Cytomegalovirus vaccine: timing is important. 2018

Griffiths, P D. · ·Rev Med Virol · Pubmed #29921027.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Closer to Universal Newborn Screening for Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection but Far Away from Antiviral Therapy in All Infected Infants. 2018

Ross, Shannon / Long, Sarah S / Kimberlin, David W. ·Department of Pediatrics Department of Microbiology The University of Alabama at Birmingham; The Section of Infectious Diseases The Children's Hospital of Alabama Birmingham, Alabama. · Department of Pediatrics Drexel University College of Medicine; Section of Infectious Diseases St Christopher's Hospital for Children Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Pediatrics The University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham, Alabama. Electronic address: dkimberlin@peds.uab.edu. ·J Pediatr · Pubmed #29703574.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial CMV pneumonia in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected infants: a neglected disease? 2017

Gie, Robert P / Goussard, Pierre. ·Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa. rpg1@sun.ac.za. · Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa. ·Int J Tuberc Lung Dis · Pubmed #29297438.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial Cytomegalovirus is still in intensive care. 2017

Griffiths, P D. · ·Rev Med Virol · Pubmed #29143387.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial Time to Consider Cytomegalovirus Prevention in Critically Ill Patients? 2017

Kumar, Deepali / Humar, Atul. ·Multi-Organ Transplant Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·JAMA · Pubmed #28829852.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial Congenital CMV international guidelines are needed to guide diagnosis, prevention and management. 2017

Rawlinson, William. ·Serology and Virology Division - SEALS, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia. ·Acta Paediatr · Pubmed #28795502.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial Disruption of gastrointestinal integrity in patients with HIV infection. 2017

Griffiths, P D. ·University College London Medical School, UK. ·Rev Med Virol · Pubmed #28677223.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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