Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Depression HELP
Based on 76,774 articles since 2008
|||| 13 

These are the 76774 published articles about Depression that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2017.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Clinical Pharmacogenetic Testing and Application: Laboratory Medicine Clinical Practice Guidelines. 2017

Kim, Sollip / Yun, Yeo Min / Chae, Hyo Jin / Cho, Hyun Jung / Ji, Misuk / Kim, In Suk / Wee, Kyung A / Lee, Woochang / Song, Sang Hoon / Woo, Hye In / Lee, Soo Youn / Chun, Sail. ·Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Konyang University Hospital, College of Medicine, Konyang University, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Veterans Health Service Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital and College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Genetics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. suddenbz@skku.edu. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. sailchun@amc.seoul.kr. ·Ann Lab Med · Pubmed #28029011.

ABSTRACT: Pharmacogenetic testing for clinical applications is steadily increasing. Correct and adequate use of pharmacogenetic tests is important to reduce unnecessary medical costs and adverse patient outcomes. This document contains recommended pharmacogenetic testing guidelines for clinical application, interpretation, and result reporting through a literature review and evidence-based expert opinions for the clinical pharmacogenetic testing covered by public medical insurance in Korea. This document aims to improve the utility of pharmacogenetic testing in routine clinical settings.

2 Guideline Screening for Depression in Adults: Recommendation Statement. 2016

Anonymous1991105. · ·Am Fam Physician · Pubmed #27548605.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. 2016

Cohen, Ezra E W / LaMonte, Samuel J / Erb, Nicole L / Beckman, Kerry L / Sadeghi, Nader / Hutcheson, Katherine A / Stubblefield, Michael D / Abbott, Dennis M / Fisher, Penelope S / Stein, Kevin D / Lyman, Gary H / Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L. ·Medical Oncologist, Moores Cancer Center, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA. · Retired Head and Neck Surgeon, Former Associate Professor of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Louisiana State University Health and Science Center, New Orleans, LA. · Program Manager, National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Research Analyst-Survivorship, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Professor of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Cancer Surgery, and Director of Head and Neck Surgical Oncology, George Washington University, Washington, DC. · Associate Professor, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Section of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · Medical Director for Cancer Rehabilitation, Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, West Orange, NJ. · Chief Executive Officer, Dental Oncology Professionals, Garland, TX. · Clinical Instructor of Otolaryngology and Nurse, Miller School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Miami, Miami, FL. · Vice President, Behavioral Research, and Director, Behavioral Research Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Co-Director, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Professor of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. · Director, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC. ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #27002678.

ABSTRACT: Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

4 Guideline Screening for Depression in Children and Adolescents: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2016

Siu, Albert L / Anonymous6340859. ·Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York. · ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #26908686.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: This article describes the update of the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for major depressive disorder (MDD) in children and adolescents. METHODS: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening, accuracy of primary care-feasible screening tests, and benefits and harms of treatment with psychotherapy, medications, and collaborative care models in patients aged 7 to 18 years. POPULATION: This recommendation applies to children and adolescents aged ≤18 years who do not have an MDD diagnosis. RECOMMENDATION: The USPSTF recommends screening for MDD in adolescents aged 12 to 18 years. Screening should be implemented with adequate systems in place to ensure accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and appropriate follow-up (B recommendation). The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for MDD in children aged ≤11 years (I statement).

5 Guideline Screening for Depression in Children and Adolescents: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2016

Siu, Albert L / Anonymous2480858. · ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #26858097.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: Update of the 2009 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for major depressive disorder (MDD) in children and adolescents. METHODS: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening; the accuracy of primary care-feasible screening tests; and the benefits and harms of treatment with psychotherapy, medications, and collaborative care models in patients aged 7 to 18 years. POPULATION: This recommendation applies to children and adolescents aged 18 years or younger who do not have a diagnosis of MDD. RECOMMENDATION: The USPSTF recommends screening for MDD in adolescents aged 12 to 18 years. Screening should be implemented with adequate systems in place to ensure accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and appropriate follow-up. (B recommendation) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for MDD in children aged 11 years or younger. (I statement).

6 Guideline Nonpharmacologic Versus Pharmacologic Treatment of Adult Patients With Major Depressive Disorder: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians. 2016

Qaseem, Amir / Barry, Michael J / Kansagara, Devan / Anonymous2430858. · ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #26857948.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on the comparative effectiveness of treatment with second-generation antidepressants versus nonpharmacologic treatments for major depressive disorder in adults. METHODS: This guideline is based on a systematic review of published, English-language, randomized, controlled trials from 1990 through September 2015 identified using several databases and through hand searches of references of relevant studies. Interventions evaluated include psychotherapies, complementary and alternative medicines (including acupuncture, ω-3 fatty acids, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, St. John's wort [Hypericum perforatum]), exercise, and second-generation antidepressants. Evaluated outcomes included response, remission, functional capacity, quality of life, reduction of suicidality or hospitalizations, and harms. The target audience for this guideline includes all clinicians, and the target patient population includes adults with major depressive disorder. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations using ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. RECOMMENDATION: ACP recommends that clinicians select between either cognitive behavioral therapy or second-generation antidepressants to treat patients with major depressive disorder after discussing treatment effects, adverse effect profiles, cost, accessibility, and preferences with the patient (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence).

7 Guideline European Psychiatric Association Guidance on psychotherapy in chronic depression across Europe. 2016

Jobst, A / Brakemeier, E-L / Buchheim, A / Caspar, F / Cuijpers, P / Ebmeier, K P / Falkai, P / Jan van der Gaag, R / Gaebel, W / Herpertz, S / Kurimay, T / Sabaß, L / Schnell, K / Schramm, E / Torrent, C / Wasserman, D / Wiersma, J / Padberg, F. ·Department of Psychiatry und Psychotherapy, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany. · Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Berlin University of Psychology, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Psychology, Clinical Psychology, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. · Institute of Psychology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Division of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · University Medical Centre, St. Radboud, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry und Psychotherapy, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Medical Faculty, Düsseldorf, Germany. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Behaviour Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Clinical Institute of Neuroscience, Hospital Clinic Barcelona, CIBERSAM, IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental lll-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Psychiatry, GGZinGeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry und Psychotherapy, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany. Electronic address: padberg@med.uni-muenchen.de. ·Eur Psychiatry · Pubmed #26854984.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Patients with chronic depression (CD) by definition respond less well to standard forms of psychotherapy and are more likely to be high utilizers of psychiatric resources. Therefore, the aim of this guidance paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of current psychotherapy for CD. The evidence of efficacy is critically reviewed and recommendations for clinical applications and research are given. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search to identify studies on psychotherapy in CD, evaluated the retrieved documents and developed evidence tables and recommendations through a consensus process among experts and stakeholders. RESULTS: We developed 5 recommendations which may help providers to select psychotherapeutic treatment options for this patient group. The EPA considers both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy to be effective in CD and recommends both approaches. The best effect is achieved by combined treatment with psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy, which should therefore be the treatment of choice. The EPA recommends psychotherapy with an interpersonal focus (e.g. the Cognitive Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy [CBASP]) for the treatment of CD and a personalized approach based on the patient's preferences. DISCUSSION: The DSM-5 nomenclature of persistent depressive disorder (PDD), which includes CD subtypes, has been an important step towards a more differentiated treatment and understanding of these complex affective disorders. Apart from dysthymia, ICD-10 still does not provide a separate entity for a chronic course of depression. The differences between patients with acute episodic depression and those with CD need to be considered in the planning of treatment. Specific psychotherapeutic treatment options are recommended for patients with CD. CONCLUSION: Patients with chronic forms of depression should be offered tailored psychotherapeutic treatments that address their specific needs and deficits. Combination treatment with psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy is the first-line treatment recommended for CD. More research is needed to develop more effective treatments for CD, especially in the longer term, and to identify which patients benefit from which treatment algorithm.

8 Guideline Screening for Depression in Adults: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2016

Siu, Albert L / Anonymous6250856 / Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten / Grossman, David C / Baumann, Linda Ciofu / Davidson, Karina W / Ebell, Mark / García, Francisco A R / Gillman, Matthew / Herzstein, Jessica / Kemper, Alex R / Krist, Alex H / Kurth, Ann E / Owens, Douglas K / Phillips, William R / Phipps, Maureen G / Pignone, Michael P. ·Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York2James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, New York. · · University of California, San Francisco. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington. · University of Wisconsin, Madison. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Georgia, Athens. · Pima County Department of Health, Tucson, Arizona. · Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Independent consultant, Washington, DC. · Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · Fairfax Family Practice, Fairfax, Virginia13Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · New York University, New York. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California16Stanford University, Stanford, California. · University of Washington, Seattle. · Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. ·JAMA · Pubmed #26813211.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: Update of the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for depression in adults. METHODS: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for depression in adult populations, including older adults and pregnant and postpartum women; the accuracy of depression screening instruments; and the benefits and harms of depression treatment in these populations. POPULATION: This recommendation applies to adults 18 years and older. RECOMMENDATION: The USPSTF recommends screening for depression in the general adult population, including pregnant and postpartum women. Screening should be implemented with adequate systems in place to ensure accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and appropriate follow-up. (B recommendation).

9 Guideline American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. 2016

Runowicz, Carolyn D / Leach, Corinne R / Henry, N Lynn / Henry, Karen S / Mackey, Heather T / Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L / Cannady, Rachel S / Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L / Edge, Stephen B / Jacobs, Linda A / Hurria, Arti / Marks, Lawrence B / LaMonte, Samuel J / Warner, Ellen / Lyman, Gary H / Ganz, Patricia A. ·Carolyn D. Runowicz, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University; Karen S. Henry, Sylvester Cancer Center at the University of Miami, Miami, FL; Corinne R. Leach, Rebecca L. Cowens-Alvarado, Rachel S. Cannady, and Samuel J. LaMonte, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA; N. Lynn Henry, University of Michigan, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; Heather T. Mackey, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh; Linda A. Jacobs, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; Mandi L. Pratt-Chapman, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC; Stephen B. Edge, Baptist Cancer Center, Memphis, TN; Arti Hurria, City of Hope, Duarte; Patricia A. Ganz, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA; Lawrence B. Marks, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; Ellen Warner, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and Gary H. Lyman, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA doi: 10.3322/caac.21319. Available online at cacancerjournal.com. · Carolyn D. Runowicz, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University; Karen S. Henry, Sylvester Cancer Center at the University of Miami, Miami, FL; Corinne R. Leach, Rebecca L. Cowens-Alvarado, Rachel S. Cannady, and Samuel J. LaMonte, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA; N. Lynn Henry, University of Michigan, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; Heather T. Mackey, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh; Linda A. Jacobs, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; Mandi L. Pratt-Chapman, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC; Stephen B. Edge, Baptist Cancer Center, Memphis, TN; Arti Hurria, City of Hope, Duarte; Patricia A. Ganz, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA; Lawrence B. Marks, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; Ellen Warner, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and Gary H. Lyman, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA doi: 10.3322/caac.21319. Available online at cacancerjournal.com. corinne.leach@cancer.org. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #26644543.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians and Journal of Clinical Oncology. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission by the American Cancer Society or the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

10 Guideline AHNS Series--Do you know your guidelines? Guideline recommended follow-up and surveillance of head and neck cancer survivors. 2016

Roman, Benjamin R / Goldenberg, David / Givi, Babak / Anonymous2740941. ·The Education Committee of American Head and Neck Society (AHNS) and Head and Neck Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · The Education Committee of American Head and Neck Society (AHNS) and Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania. · The Education Committee of American Head and Neck Society (AHNS) and Department of Otolaryngology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York. · ·Head Neck · Pubmed #25916656.

ABSTRACT: In this first article of the "Do You Know Your Guidelines" series, we review National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) recommendations and underlying evidence for the follow-up and surveillance of head and neck cancer survivors. The goals of follow-up and surveillance care are (1) to maximize long-term oncologic outcomes of therapy with appropriate evaluation for recurrence, (2) to maximize functional and quality of life outcomes, and (3) minimizing unnecessary and harmful low-value care. Finding the right balance of testing and surveillance is a challenge for providers and patients. Herein, we review all NCCN recommendations for head and neck cancer survivors. We pay particular attention to an area of controversy: the use of ongoing surveillance imaging, in particular, PET/CT scans.

11 Guideline Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disorders. 2015

Malhi, Gin S / Bassett, Darryl / Boyce, Philip / Bryant, Richard / Fitzgerald, Paul B / Fritz, Kristina / Hopwood, Malcolm / Lyndon, Bill / Mulder, Roger / Murray, Greg / Porter, Richard / Singh, Ajeet B. ·Discipline of Psychiatry, Kolling Institute, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia CADE Clinic, Department of Psychiatry, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, Australia gin.malhi@sydney.edu.au. · School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, Perth, WA, Australia. · Discipline of Psychiatry, Sydney Medical School, Westmead Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre (MAPrc), Monash University Central Clinical School and The Alfred, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · CADE Clinic, Discipline of Psychiatry, Sydney Medical School - Northern, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Mood Disorders Unit, Northside Clinic, Greenwich, NSW, Australia ECT Services Northside Group Hospitals, Greenwich, NSW, Australia. · Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Otago-Christchurch, Christchurch, New Zealand. · Department of Psychological Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia. ·Aust N Z J Psychiatry · Pubmed #26643054.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To provide guidance for the management of mood disorders, based on scientific evidence supplemented by expert clinical consensus and formulate recommendations to maximise clinical salience and utility. METHODS: Articles and information sourced from search engines including PubMed and EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Google Scholar were supplemented by literature known to the mood disorders committee (MDC) (e.g., books, book chapters and government reports) and from published depression and bipolar disorder guidelines. Information was reviewed and discussed by members of the MDC and findings were then formulated into consensus-based recommendations and clinical guidance. The guidelines were subjected to rigorous successive consultation and external review involving: expert and clinical advisors, the public, key stakeholders, professional bodies and specialist groups with interest in mood disorders. RESULTS: The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disorders (Mood Disorders CPG) provide up-to-date guidance and advice regarding the management of mood disorders that is informed by evidence and clinical experience. The Mood Disorders CPG is intended for clinical use by psychiatrists, psychologists, physicians and others with an interest in mental health care. CONCLUSIONS: The Mood Disorder CPG is the first Clinical Practice Guideline to address both depressive and bipolar disorders. It provides up-to-date recommendations and guidance within an evidence-based framework, supplemented by expert clinical consensus. MOOD DISORDERS COMMITTEE: Professor Gin Malhi (Chair), Professor Darryl Bassett, Professor Philip Boyce, Professor Richard Bryant, Professor Paul Fitzgerald, Dr Kristina Fritz, Professor Malcolm Hopwood, Dr Bill Lyndon, Professor Roger Mulder, Professor Greg Murray, Professor Richard Porter and Associate Professor Ajeet Singh. INTERNATIONAL EXPERT ADVISORS: Professor Carlo Altamura, Dr Francesco Colom, Professor Mark George, Professor Guy Goodwin, Professor Roger McIntyre, Dr Roger Ng, Professor John O'Brien, Professor Harold Sackeim, Professor Jan Scott, Dr Nobuhiro Sugiyama, Professor Eduard Vieta, Professor Lakshmi Yatham. AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND EXPERT ADVISORS: Professor Marie-Paule Austin, Professor Michael Berk, Dr Yulisha Byrow, Professor Helen Christensen, Dr Nick De Felice, A/Professor Seetal Dodd, A/Professor Megan Galbally, Dr Josh Geffen, Professor Philip Hazell, A/Professor David Horgan, A/Professor Felice Jacka, Professor Gordon Johnson, Professor Anthony Jorm, Dr Jon-Paul Khoo, Professor Jayashri Kulkarni, Dr Cameron Lacey, Dr Noeline Latt, Professor Florence Levy, A/Professor Andrew Lewis, Professor Colleen Loo, Dr Thomas Mayze, Dr Linton Meagher, Professor Philip Mitchell, Professor Daniel O'Connor, Dr Nick O'Connor, Dr Tim Outhred, Dr Mark Rowe, Dr Narelle Shadbolt, Dr Martien Snellen, Professor John Tiller, Dr Bill Watkins, Dr Raymond Wu.

12 Guideline Clinical pathway for the screening, assessment and management of anxiety and depression in adult cancer patients: Australian guidelines. 2015

Butow, Phyllis / Price, Melanie A / Shaw, Joanne M / Turner, Jane / Clayton, Josephine M / Grimison, Peter / Rankin, Nicole / Kirsten, Laura. ·Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG), The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.; Centre for Medical Psychology and Evidence-based Decision-making (CeMPED), School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG), The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. · Centre for Medical Psychology and Evidence-based Decision-making (CeMPED), School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.; HammondCare Palliative & Supportive Care Service, Pallister House, Greenwich Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia.; Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.; Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. · Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. · Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG), The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.; Centre for Medical Psychology and Evidence-based Decision-making (CeMPED), School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.; Nepean Cancer Care Centre, Sydney West Cancer Network, Kingswood, UK. ·Psychooncology · Pubmed #26268799.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: A clinical pathway for anxiety and depression in adult cancer patients was developed to guide best practice in Australia. METHODS: The pathway was based on a rapid review of existing guidelines, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, stakeholder interviews, a Delphi process with 87 multidisciplinary stakeholders and input from a multidisciplinary advisory panel. RESULTS: The pathway recommends formalized routine screening for anxiety and depression in patients with cancer at key points in the patient's journey. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment System or distress thermometer with problem checklist is recommended as brief screening tools, combined with a more detailed tool, such as the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, to identify possible cases. A structured clinical interview will be required to confirm diagnosis. When anxiety or depression is identified, it is recommended that one person in a treating team takes responsibility for coordinating appropriate assessment, referral and follow-up (not necessarily carrying these out themselves). A stepped care model of intervention is proposed, beginning with the least intensive available that is still likely to provide significant health gain. The exact intervention, treatment length and follow-up timelines, as well as professionals involved, are provided as a guide only. Each service should identify their own referral network based on local resources and current service structure, as well as patient preference. DISCUSSION: This clinical pathway will assist cancer services to design their own systems to detect and manage anxiety and depression in their patients, to improve the quality of care.

13 Guideline [Update on Current Care Guideline: Depression]. 2015

Isometsä, Erkki / Kinnunen, Elina / Kivekäs, Teija / Koponen, Hannu / Lappalainen, Jarmo / Lindfors, Olavi / Marttunen, Mauri / Pirkola, Sami / Jousilahti, Pekka / Tuunainen, Arja / Anonymous380839. · ·Duodecim · Pubmed #26245079.

ABSTRACT: Treatment of depression is based on comprehensive diagnostic, clinical and psychosocial evaluation. Brief psychotherapies (cognitive, interpersonal, psychodynamic or problem-solving) are effective in mild to moderate depression; antidepressants in mild to severe, and electroconvulsive therapy in severe or psychotic. Combining antidepressants and psychotherapy is more effective than either alone. After the acute phase, antidepressants should be continued for six months to prevent relapses, and maintenance treatment considered after three lifetime episodes. Primary care is responsible for treatment of mild to moderate depressions; developing psychiatric consultation services and use of nurse case managers are recommended.

14 Guideline ABM Clinical Protocol #18: Use of Antidepressants in Breastfeeding Mothers. 2015

Sriraman, Natasha K / Melvin, Kathryn / Meltzer-Brody, Samantha. ·1 Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters/Eastern Virginia Medical School , Norfolk, Virginia. · 2 Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill School of Medicine , Chapel Hill, North Carolina. · 2 Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill School of Medicine , Chapel Hill, North Carolina.; 3 Perinatal Psychiatry Program, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Center for Women's Mood Disorders , Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ·Breastfeed Med · Pubmed #26204124.

ABSTRACT: A central goal of The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine is the development of clinical protocols for managing common medical problems that may impact breastfeeding success. These protocols serve only as guidelines for the care of breastfeeding mothers and infants and do not delineate an exclusive course of treatment or serve as standards of medical care. Variations in treatment may be appropriate according to the needs of an individual patient.

15 Guideline Evidence-based guidelines for treating depressive disorders with antidepressants: A revision of the 2008 British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines. 2015

Cleare, Anthony / Pariante, C M / Young, A H / Anderson, I M / Christmas, D / Cowen, P J / Dickens, C / Ferrier, I N / Geddes, J / Gilbody, S / Haddad, P M / Katona, C / Lewis, G / Malizia, A / McAllister-Williams, R H / Ramchandani, P / Scott, J / Taylor, D / Uher, R / Anonymous10971089. ·Professor of Psychopharmacology & Affective Disorders, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Centre for Affective Disorders, London, UK anthony.cleare@kcl.ac.uk. · Professor of Biological Psychiatry, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Centre for Affective Disorders, London, UK. · Professor of Psychiatry and Chair of Mood Disorders, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Centre for Affective Disorders, London, UK. · Professor and Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist, University of Manchester Department of Psychiatry, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Consultant Psychiatrist, Advanced Interventions Service, Ninewells Hospital & Medical School, Dundee, UK. · Professor of Psychopharmacology, Psychopharmacology Research Unit, Neurosciences Building, University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK. · Professor of Psychological Medicine, University of Exeter Medical School and Devon Partnership Trust, Exeter, UK. · Professor of Psychiatry, Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist, School of Neurology, Neurobiology & Psychiatry, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Head, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK. · Director of the Mental Health and Addictions Research Group (MHARG), The Hull York Medical School, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, UK. · Consultant Psychiatrist, Cromwell House, Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK. · Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, UK. · Consultant in Neuropsychopharmacology and Neuromodulation, North Bristol NHS Trust, Rosa Burden Centre, Southmead Hospital, Bristol, UK. · Reader in Clinical Psychopharmacology, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Reader in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Centre for Mental Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Professor of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Professor of Psychopharmacology, King's College London, London, UK. · Associate Professor, Canada Research Chair in Early Interventions, Dalhousie University, Department of Psychiatry, Halifax, NS, Canada. · ·J Psychopharmacol · Pubmed #25969470.

ABSTRACT: A revision of the 2008 British Association for Psychopharmacology evidence-based guidelines for treating depressive disorders with antidepressants was undertaken in order to incorporate new evidence and to update the recommendations where appropriate. A consensus meeting involving experts in depressive disorders and their management was held in September 2012. Key areas in treating depression were reviewed and the strength of evidence and clinical implications were considered. The guidelines were then revised after extensive feedback from participants and interested parties. A literature review is provided which identifies the quality of evidence upon which the recommendations are made. These guidelines cover the nature and detection of depressive disorders, acute treatment with antidepressant drugs, choice of drug versus alternative treatment, practical issues in prescribing and management, next-step treatment, relapse prevention, treatment of relapse and stopping treatment. Significant changes since the last guidelines were published in 2008 include the availability of new antidepressant treatment options, improved evidence supporting certain augmentation strategies (drug and non-drug), management of potential long-term side effects, updated guidance for prescribing in elderly and adolescent populations and updated guidance for optimal prescribing. Suggestions for future research priorities are also made.

16 Guideline World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia. Part 3: Update 2015 Management of special circumstances: Depression, Suicidality, substance use disorders and pregnancy and lactation. 2015

Hasan, Alkomiet / Falkai, Peter / Wobrock, Thomas / Lieberman, Jeffrey / Glenthøj, Birte / Gattaz, Wagner F / Thibaut, Florence / Möller, Hans-Jürgen / Anonymous6230825. ·Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilians-University , Munich , Germany. · ·World J Biol Psychiatry · Pubmed #25822804.

ABSTRACT: These updated guidelines are based on the first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in the years 2005 and 2006. For this 2015 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations which are clinically and scientifically relevant. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating patients with schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines a systematic review, as well as a data extraction from national guidelines have been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and subsequently categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5). This third part of the updated guidelines covers the management of the following specific treatment circumstances: comorbid depression, suicidality, various comorbid substance use disorders (legal and illegal drugs), and pregnancy and lactation. These guidelines are primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antipsychotic medication and other pharmacological treatment options) of patients with schizophrenia.

17 Guideline World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of unipolar depressive disorders. part 2: maintenance treatment of major depressive disorder-update 2015. 2015

Bauer, Michael / Severus, Emanuel / Köhler, Stephan / Whybrow, Peter C / Angst, Jules / Möller, Hans-Jürgen / Anonymous890821. ·Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy , TU Dresden , Germany. · ·World J Biol Psychiatry · Pubmed #25677972.

ABSTRACT: These guidelines for the treatment of unipolar depressive disorders systematically review available evidence pertaining to the biological treatment of patients with major depression and produce a series of practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful based on the available evidence. These guidelines are intended for use by all physicians assessing and treating patients with these conditions. The relevant data have been extracted primarily from various treatment guidelines and panels for depressive disorders, as well as from meta-analyses/reviews on the efficacy of antidepressant medications and other biological treatment interventions identified by a search of the MEDLINE database and Cochrane Library. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and was then categorized into five levels of evidence (CE A-F) and five levels of recommendation grades (RG 1-5). This second part of the WFSBP guidelines on depressive disorders covers the management of the maintenance phase treatment, and is primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including pharmacological and hormonal medications, electroconvulsive therapy and other brain stimulation treatments) of adults and also, albeit to a lesser extent, children, adolescents and older adults.

18 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines on the use of integrative therapies as supportive care in patients treated for breast cancer. 2014

Greenlee, Heather / Balneaves, Lynda G / Carlson, Linda E / Cohen, Misha / Deng, Gary / Hershman, Dawn / Mumber, Matthew / Perlmutter, Jane / Seely, Dugald / Sen, Ananda / Zick, Suzanna M / Tripathy, Debu / Anonymous3400823. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health (HG, DH), Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, (HG, DH), and Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons (DH), Columbia University, New York, NY (HG, DH); School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (LGB); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada (LEC); Institute for Health and Aging, University of California San Francisco, CA (MC); Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA (MC); Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (GD); Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA (MM); Gemini Group, Ann Arbor, MI (JP); Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada (DS); Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada (DS); Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Health System (AS, SMZ), Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health (SMZ), and Department of Biostatistics (AS), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (AS, SMZ); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (DT). hg2120@columbia.edu. · Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health (HG, DH), Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, (HG, DH), and Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons (DH), Columbia University, New York, NY (HG, DH); School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (LGB); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada (LEC); Institute for Health and Aging, University of California San Francisco, CA (MC); Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA (MC); Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (GD); Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA (MM); Gemini Group, Ann Arbor, MI (JP); Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada (DS); Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada (DS); Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Health System (AS, SMZ), Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health (SMZ), and Department of Biostatistics (AS), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (AS, SMZ); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (DT). · ·J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr · Pubmed #25749602.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. METHODS: Following the Institute of Medicine's guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment. Trials were included if the majority of participants had breast cancer and/or breast cancer patient results were reported separately, and outcomes were clinically relevant. Recommendations were organized by outcome and graded based upon a modified version of the US Preventive Services Task Force grading system. RESULTS: The search (January 1, 1990-December 31, 2013) identified 4900 articles, of which 203 were eligible for analysis. Meditation, yoga, and relaxation with imagery are recommended for routine use for common conditions, including anxiety and mood disorders (Grade A). Stress management, yoga, massage, music therapy, energy conservation, and meditation are recommended for stress reduction, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and quality of life (Grade B). Many interventions (n = 32) had weaker evidence of benefit (Grade C). Some interventions (n = 7) were deemed unlikely to provide any benefit (Grade D). Notably, only one intervention, acetyl-l-carnitine for the prevention of taxane-induced neuropathy, was identified as likely harmful (Grade H) as it was found to increase neuropathy. The majority of intervention/modality combinations (n = 138) did not have sufficient evidence to form specific recommendations (Grade I). CONCLUSIONS: Specific integrative therapies can be recommended as evidence-based supportive care options during breast cancer treatment. Most integrative therapies require further investigation via well-designed controlled trials with meaningful outcomes.

19 Guideline Spanish consensus on the physical health of patients with depressive disorders. 2014

Giner, José / Saiz Ruiz, Jerónimo / Bobes, Julio / Zamorano, Enric / López, Francisco / Hernando, Teresa / Rico-Villademoros, Fernando / Álamo, Cecilio / Cervilla, Jorge A / Ibáñez Cuadrado, Ángela / Ibáñez Guerra, Elena / López, Silvia / Morán, Pedro / Palao, Diego J / Romacho, Montserrat / Anonymous270940. ·Cátedra de Psiquiatría, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Universidad de Sevilla, Servicio de Psiquiatría, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla, España. Electronic address: jginer@us.es. · Servicio de Psiquiatría, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Universidad de Alcalá, Instituto Ramón y Cajal de Investigación Sanitaria (IRYCIS), Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Madrid, España. · Área de Psiquiatría, Departamento de Medicina, Universidad de Oviedo, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Oviedo, España. · CAP Sant Antoni de Vilamajor, ABS Alt Mogent, Miembro del grupo de trabajo de Salud Mental de SEMERGEN, Barcelona, España. · Centro de Salud Vicente Muzas, Área Este, Madrid, España. · COCIENTE S.L., Madrid, España. · COCIENTE S.L., Madrid, España; Instituto de Neurociencias de la Universidad de Granada, Granada, España. · Cátedra Universitaria de Farmacología, Departamento de Ciencias Biomédicas, Facultad de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Alcalá, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, España. · CIBERSAM Universidad de Granada. Coordinador de la Unidad de Hospitalización de Salud Mental, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, España. · Cátedra de Psicología de la Personalidad, Departamento de Personalidad, Evaluación y Tratamientos Psicológicos, Universidad de Valencia, Valencia, España. · Atención Primaria, Centro de Salud Huerta de los Frailes, Miembro de los grupos de trabajo de Salud Mental, Comunicación y Tutores de SEMERGEN, Leganés, Madrid, España. · San Pedro de la Nave-Almendra, Zona Básica de Salud Zamora-Norte, Miembro del grupo de trabajo de Salud Mental de SEMERGEN, Zamora, España. · Direcció Executiva de Salut Mental, Parc Taulí Sabadell, Hospital Universitari, Sabadell, Barcelona, España. · Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital Platón, Barcelona, España. · ·Rev Psiquiatr Salud Ment · Pubmed #25087131.

ABSTRACT: Comorbidity between depression and physical illnesses is very common and has a significant impact on the health and management of the patient. With the support of the Sociedades Españolas de Psiquiatría y Psiquiatría Biológica, and Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN) a consensus was prepared on physical health in patients with depression and is summarized in the present work. The literature review highlighted the high frequency of cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic disorders in patients with depression such as diabetes and obesity, thus making the primary and secondary prevention recommendations for patients with cardiovascular or metabolic risk applicable to patients with depression. Comorbidity between depression and chronic pain is also frequent, and requires an integrated therapeutic approach. The presence of physical illness in patients with depression may condition, but not preclude, the pharmacological treatment; drug selection should take into account potential side-effect and drug-drug interactions. On the other hand, psychotherapy may contribute to the patient's recovery. Overall, coordination between the primary care physician, the psychiatrist and other health professionals involved is essential for the management of patients with depression and concomitant physical illness.

20 Guideline The Korean Medication Algorithm for Depressive Disorder: second revision. 2014

Seok Seo, Jeong / Rim Song, Hoo / Bin Lee, Hwang / Park, Young-Min / Hong, Jeong-Wan / Kim, Won / Wang, Hee-Ryung / Lim, Eun-Sung / Jeong, Jong-Hyun / Jon, Duk-In / Joon Min, Kyung / Sup Woo, Young / Bahk, Won-Myong. ·Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Yeouido St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Ilsan Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Inje University, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Namwon Sungil Mental Hospital, Namwon, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Seoul Paik Hospital, School of Medicine, Inje University, Seoul, Korea/Stress Research Institute, Inje University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Shinsegae Hospital, KimJe, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, St. Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Anyang, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: kjoonmin@gmail.com. · Department of Psychiatry, Yeouido St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: wmbahk@catholic.ac.kr. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #25010375.

ABSTRACT: AIM: This study constitutes a revision of the guidelines for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) issued by the Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Depressive Disorder (KMAP-DD) 2006. In incorporates changes in the experts׳ consensus that occurred between 2006 and 2012 as well as information regarding newly developed and recently published clinical trials. METHODS: Using a 44-item questionnaire, an expert consensus was obtained on pharmacological treatment strategies for (1) non-psychotic MDD, (2) psychotic MDD, (3) dysthymia and depression subtypes, (4) continuous and maintenance treatment, and (5) special populations; consensus was also obtained regarding (6) the choice of an antidepressant (AD) in the context of safety and adverse effects, and (7) non-pharmacological biological therapies. RESULTS: AD monotherapy was recommended as the first-line strategy for nonpsychotic depression in adults, children and adolescents, elderly adults, and patients with postpartum depression or premenstrual dysphoric disorder. The combination of AD and atypical antipsychotics (AAP) was recommended for psychotic depression. The duration of the initial AD treatment for psychotic depression depends on the number of depressive episodes. Most experts recommended stopping the initial AD and AAP therapy after a certain period in patients with one or two depressive episodes. However, for those with three or more episodes, maintenance of the initial treatment was recommended for as long as possible. Monotherapy with various selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) was recommended for dysthymic disorder and melancholic type MDD. CONCLUSION: The pharmacological treatment strategy of KMAP-DD 2012 is similar to that of KMAP-DD 2006; however, the preference for the first-line use of AAPs was stronger in 2012 than in 2006.

21 Guideline [Guidelines of Sociedade Brasileira de Cardiologia for Unstable Angina and Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (II Edition, 2007) 2013-2014 Update]. 2014

Nicolau, J C / Timerman, A / Marin-Neto, J A / Piegas, L S / Barbosa, C J D G / Franci, A / Avezum, A / Carvalho, A C C / Markman Filho, B / Polanczyk, C A / Rochitte, C E / Serrano Júnior, C V / Precoma, D B / Silva Junior, D G / Albuquerque, D C / Stefanini, E / Knobel, E / Jatene, F B / Feres, F / Morcerf, F A P / Ganem, F / Lima Filho, F A / Feitosa Filho, G S / Ferreira, J F M / Meneghetti, J C / Saraiva, J F K / Silva, L S / Maia, L N / Baracioli, L M / Lisboa, L A F / Dallan, L A O / Bodanese, L C / Andrade, M D / Oliveira Júnior, M / Dutra, O P / Coelho, O R / Leães, P E / Albuquerque, P F / Lemos, P / Kalil, R / Costa, R V C / Esporcate, R / Marino, R L / Botellho, R V / Meneghelo, R S / Sprovieri, S R / Timerman, S / Mathias Júnior, W / Anonymous4830795. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #24862929.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Guideline Evidence-based, pharmacological treatment guideline for depression in Korea, revised edition. 2014

Won, Eunsoo / Park, Seon-Cheol / Han, Kyu-Man / Sung, Seung-Hwan / Lee, Hwa-Young / Paik, Jong-Woo / Jeon, Hong Jin / Lee, Moon-Soo / Shim, Se-Hoon / Ko, Young-Hoon / Lee, Kang-Joon / Han, Changsu / Ham, Byung-Joo / Choi, Joonho / Hwang, Tae-Yeon / Oh, Kang-Seob / Hahn, Sang-Woo / Park, Yong-Chon / Lee, Min-Soo / Anonymous360977. ·Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Yong-In Mental Hospital, Yongin, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Asan, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, KyungHee University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Inje Universtiy, Busan, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea. · ·J Korean Med Sci · Pubmed #24753693.

ABSTRACT: This paper aims to introduce, summarize, and emphasize the importance of the 'Evidence-Based, Pharmacological Treatment Guideline for Depression in Korea, Revised Edition'. The guideline broadly covers most aspects of the pharmacological treatment of patients in Korea diagnosed with moderate to severe major depression according to the DSM-IV TR. The guideline establishment process involved determining and answering a number of key questions, searching and selecting publications, evaluating recommendations, preparing guideline drafts, undergoing external expert reviews, and obtaining approval. A guideline adaptation process was conducted for the revised edition. The guideline strongly recommends pharmacological treatment considered appropriate to the current clinical situation in Korea, and should be considered helpful when selecting the appropriate pharmacological treatment of patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder. Therefore, the wide distribution of this guideline is recommended.

23 Guideline Screening, assessment, and care of anxiety and depressive symptoms in adults with cancer: an American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline adaptation. 2014

Andersen, Barbara L / DeRubeis, Robert J / Berman, Barry S / Gruman, Jessie / Champion, Victoria L / Massie, Mary Jane / Holland, Jimmie C / Partridge, Ann H / Bak, Kate / Somerfield, Mark R / Rowland, Julia H / Anonymous4470791. ·Barbara L. Andersen, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Robert J. DeRubeis, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; Barry S. Berman, Broward Health Medical Center, Fort Lauderdale, FL; Jessie Gruman, Center for Advancing Health, Washington, DC; Victoria L. Champion, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; Mary Jane Massie, Jimmie C. Holland, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute, New York, NY; Ann H. Partridge, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA; Kate Bak and Mark R. Somerfield, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA; Julia H. Rowland, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. · ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #24733793.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: A Pan-Canadian Practice Guideline on Screening, Assessment, and Care of Psychosocial Distress (Depression, Anxiety) in Adults With Cancer was identified for adaptation. METHODS: American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for adapting clinical practice guidelines developed by other organizations. The guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor and content applicability. RESULTS: On the basis of content review of the pan-Canadian guideline, the ASCO panel agreed that, in general, the recommendations were clear, thorough, based on the most relevant scientific evidence, and presented options that will be acceptable to patients. However, for some topics addressed in the pan-Canadian guideline, the ASCO panel formulated a set of adapted recommendations based on local context and practice beliefs of the ad hoc panel members. It is recommended that all patients with cancer be evaluated for symptoms of depression and anxiety at periodic times across the trajectory of care. Assessment should be performed using validated, published measures and procedures. Depending on levels of symptoms and supplementary information, differing treatment pathways are recommended. Failure to identify and treat anxiety and depression increases the risk for poor quality of life and potential disease-related morbidity and mortality. This guideline adaptation is part of a larger survivorship guideline series. CONCLUSION: Although clinicians may not be able to prevent some of the chronic or late medical effects of cancer, they have a vital role in mitigating the negative emotional and behavioral sequelae. Recognizing and treating effectively those who manifest symptoms of anxiety or depression will reduce the human cost of cancer.

24 Guideline Primary care behavioral interventions to reduce illicit drug and nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. 2014

Moyer, Virginia A / Anonymous5900787. · ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #24615535.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: Update of the 2008 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for illicit drug use. METHODS: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on interventions to help adolescents who have never used drugs to remain abstinent and interventions to help adolescents who are using drugs but do not meet criteria for a substance use disorder to reduce or stop their use. POPULATION: This recommendation applies to children and adolescents younger than age 18 years who have not been diagnosed with a substance use disorder. RECOMMENDATION: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care-based behavioral interventions to prevent or reduce illicit drug or nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents. (I statement).

25 Guideline Brazilian Medical Association guidelines for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of panic disorder. 2013

Levitan, Michelle Nigri / Chagas, Marcos H / Linares, Ila M / Crippa, José A / Terra, Mauro B / Giglio, Alcir T / Cordeiro, Joana L C / Garcia, Giovana J / Hasan, Rosa / Andrada, Nathalia C / Nardi, Antonio E. ·Laboratory of Panic & Respiration, Institute of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de JaneiroRJ, Brazil. · Department of Neurosciences and Behavioral Sciences, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Ribeirão PretoSP, Brazil. · Department of Clinical Medicine: Psychiatry, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto AlegreRS, Brazil. · Centro de Estudos Jose de Barros Falcão, Porto AlegreRS, Brazil. · Associação Brasileira de Neurologia, Associação Brasileira de NeurologiaBrazil, Brazil. · Associação Médica Brasileira, Associação Médica BrasileiraBrazil, Brazil. ·Rev Bras Psiquiatr · Pubmed #24402216.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To present the most relevant findings regarding the Brazilian Medical Association guidelines for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of panic disorder. METHODS: We used the methodology proposed by the Brazilian Medical Association for the Diretrizes Project. The MEDLINE (PubMed), Scopus, Web of Science, and LILACS online databases were queried for articles published from 1980 to 2012. Searchable questions were structured using the PICO format (acronym for "patient" [or population], "intervention" [or exposure], "comparison" [or control], and "outcome"). RESULTS: We present data on clinical manifestations and implications of panic disorder and its association with depression, drug abuse, dependence and anxiety disorders. In addition, discussions were held on the main psychiatric and clinical differential diagnoses. CONCLUSIONS: The guidelines are proposed to serve as a reference for the general practitioner and specialist to assist in and facilitate the diagnosis of panic disorder.

Next