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Depression HELP
Based on 99,923 articles published since 2010
|||| 16 

These are the 99923 published articles about Depression that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Italian Association of Sleep Medicine (AIMS) position statement and guideline on the treatment of menopausal sleep disorders. 2019

Silvestri, R / Aricò, I / Bonanni, E / Bonsignore, M / Caretto, M / Caruso, D / Di Perri, M C / Galletta, S / Lecca, R M / Lombardi, C / Maestri, M / Miccoli, M / Palagini, L / Provini, F / Puligheddu, M / Savarese, M / Spaggiari, M C / Simoncini, T. ·Center of Sleep Medicine, UOSD of Neurophysiopathology and Disorders of Movement, AOU G Martino, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, Italy. Electronic address: rsilvestri@unime.it. · Center of Sleep Medicine, UOSD of Neurophysiopathology and Disorders of Movement, AOU G Martino, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, Italy. · Division of Neurology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Italy. · Division of Pneumology, University Hospital AOUP "Paolo Giaccone" PROMISE Department, University of Palermo, Italy. · Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Italy. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatric Clinic, University of Pisa, Italy. · Sleep Disorder Centre, Department of Medical Sciences and Public Health, University of Cagliari, Italy. · Istituto Auxologico Italiano, IRCCS, Sleep Disorders Center & Department of Cardiovascular, Neural and Metabolic Sciences, San Luca Hospital, Milan, Italy; Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Italy. · IRCCS, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Bologna, Italy; Department of BioMedical and NeuroMotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Italy. · "FM Puca" Neurology Unit, University Hospital Consortium Corporation Polyclinic of Bari, Italy. · Neurological Day Care Unit - Local Health Authority (AUSL 4), Parma, Italy. ·Maturitas · Pubmed #31547910.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia, vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and depression often co-occur after the menopause, with consequent health problems and reductions in quality of life. The aim of this position statement is to provide evidence-based advice on the management of postmenopausal sleep disorders derived from a systematic review of the literature. The latter yielded results on VMS, insomnia, circadian rhythm disorders, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and restless leg syndrome (RLS). Overall, the studies show that menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) improves VMS, insomnia, and mood. Several antidepressants can improve insomnia, either on their own or in association with MHT; these include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and mirtazapine. Long-term benefits for postmenopausal insomnia may also be achieved with non-drug strategies such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and aerobic exercise. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and mandibular advancement devices (MADs) both reduce blood pressure and cortisol levels in postmenopausal women suffering from OSA. However, the data regarding MHT on postmenopausal restless legs syndrome are conflicting.

2 Guideline Thyroid hormones treatment for subclinical hypothyroidism: a clinical practice guideline. 2019

Bekkering, G E / Agoritsas, T / Lytvyn, L / Heen, A F / Feller, M / Moutzouri, E / Abdulazeem, H / Aertgeerts, B / Beecher, D / Brito, J P / Farhoumand, P D / Singh Ospina, N / Rodondi, N / van Driel, M / Wallace, E / Snel, M / Okwen, P M / Siemieniuk, R / Vandvik, P O / Kuijpers, T / Vermandere, M. ·Academic Centre for General Practice, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Belgium trudy.bekkering@kuleuven.be. · Belgian Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, Cochrane Belgium. · Division of General Internal Medicine and Division of Clinical Epidemiology, University. · Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Innlandet Hospital Trust-division, Gjøvik, Norway. · Institute of Primary Health Care (BIHAM), University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of General Internal Medicine, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Munich, Germany. · Academic Centre for General Practice, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Belgium. · Milan, Italy. · Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit in Endocrinology (KER_Endo), Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. · Division General Internal Medicine, University Hospitals of Geneva, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA. · Primary Care Clinical Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane Qld 4029, Australia. · HRB Centre for Primary Care Research and Department of General Practice, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Endocrinology/General Internal Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands. · Effective Basic Services (eBASE), Bamenda, Cameroon. · Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. · Dutch College of General Practitioners, Utrecht, Netherlands. ·BMJ · Pubmed #31088853.

ABSTRACT: CLINICAL QUESTION: What are the benefits and harms of thyroid hormones for adults with subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH)? This guideline was triggered by a recent systematic review of randomised controlled trials, which could alter practice. CURRENT PRACTICE: Current guidelines tend to recommend thyroid hormones for adults with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels >10 mIU/L and for people with lower TSH values who are young, symptomatic, or have specific indications for prescribing. RECOMMENDATION: The guideline panel issues a strong recommendation against thyroid hormones in adults with SCH (elevated TSH levels and normal free T4 (thyroxine) levels). It does not apply to women who are trying to become pregnant or patients with TSH >20 mIU/L. It may not apply to patients with severe symptoms or young adults (such as those ≤30 years old). HOW THIS GUIDELINE WAS CREATED: A guideline panel including patients, clinicians, and methodologists produced this recommendation in adherence with standards for trustworthy guidelines using the GRADE approach. THE EVIDENCE: The systematic review included 21 trials with 2192 participants. For adults with SCH, thyroid hormones consistently demonstrate no clinically relevant benefits for quality of life or thyroid related symptoms, including depressive symptoms, fatigue, and body mass index (moderate to high quality evidence). Thyroid hormones may have little or no effect on cardiovascular events or mortality (low quality evidence), but harms were measured in only one trial with few events at two years' follow-up. UNDERSTANDING THE RECOMMENDATION: The panel concluded that almost all adults with SCH would not benefit from treatment with thyroid hormones. Other factors in the strong recommendation include the burden of lifelong management and uncertainty on potential harms. Instead, clinicians should monitor the progression or resolution of the thyroid dysfunction in these adults. Recommendations are made actionable for clinicians and their patients through visual overviews. These provide the relative and absolute benefits and harms of thyroid hormones in multilayered evidence summaries and decision aids available in MAGIC (https://app.magicapp.org/) to support shared decisions and adaptation of this guideline.

3 Guideline Depression in the workplace: screening and treatment. 2019

Anonymous2150987 / Domingos Neto, José / Myung, Eduardo / Murta, Guilherme / Vieira, Anielle / Lima, Paulo Rogério / Lessa, Leandro Araújo / Bernardo, Wanderley M. ·Brazilian National Association of Occupational Health. · Brazilian Medical Association. ·Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) · Pubmed #30994824.

ABSTRACT: The Guidelines Project, an initiative of the Brazilian Medical Association, aims to combine information from the medical field in order to standardize producers to assist the reasoning and decision-making of doctors. The information provided through this project must be assessed and criticized by the physician responsible for the conduct that will be adopted, depending on the conditions and the clinical status of each patient.

4 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

5 Guideline Interventions to Prevent Perinatal Depression: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2019

Anonymous1261035 / Curry, Susan J / Krist, Alex H / Owens, Douglas K / Barry, Michael J / Caughey, Aaron B / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Grossman, David C / Kemper, Alex R / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #30747971.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Perinatal depression, which is the occurrence of a depressive disorder during pregnancy or following childbirth, affects as many as 1 in 7 women and is one of the most common complications of pregnancy and the postpartum period. It is well established that perinatal depression can result in adverse short- and long-term effects on both the woman and child. Objective: To issue a new US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on interventions to prevent perinatal depression. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of preventive interventions for perinatal depression in pregnant or postpartum women or their children. The USPSTF reviewed contextual information on the accuracy of tools used to identify women at increased risk of perinatal depression and the most effective timing for preventive interventions. Interventions reviewed included counseling, health system interventions, physical activity, education, supportive interventions, and other behavioral interventions, such as infant sleep training and expressive writing. Pharmacological approaches included the use of nortriptyline, sertraline, and omega-3 fatty acids. Findings: The USPSTF found convincing evidence that counseling interventions, such as cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy, are effective in preventing perinatal depression. Women with a history of depression, current depressive symptoms, or certain socioeconomic risk factors (eg, low income or young or single parenthood) would benefit from counseling interventions and could be considered at increased risk. The USPSTF found adequate evidence to bound the potential harms of counseling interventions as no greater than small, based on the nature of the intervention and the low likelihood of serious harms. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence to assess the benefits and harms of other noncounseling interventions. The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that providing or referring pregnant or postpartum women at increased risk to counseling interventions has a moderate net benefit in preventing perinatal depression. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends that clinicians provide or refer pregnant and postpartum persons who are at increased risk of perinatal depression to counseling interventions. (B recommendation).

6 Guideline Standards for the diagnosis and management of complex regional pain syndrome: Results of a European Pain Federation task force. 2019

Goebel, Andreas / Barker, Chris / Birklein, Frank / Brunner, Florian / Casale, Roberto / Eccleston, Chris / Eisenberg, E / McCabe, Candy S / Moseley, G Lorimer / Perez, R / Perrot, Serge / Terkelsen, Astrid / Thomassen, Ilona / Zyluk, Andrzey / Wells, Chris. ·Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Pain Research Institute, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Neurology, University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany. · Physical Medicine and Rheumatology, Balgrist University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. · Pain Rehabilitation Unit, Habilita Hospitals, Zingonia di Ciserano, Italy. · Centre for Pain Research, The University of Bath, Bath, Uk. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. · European Pain Federation, Brussels, Belgium. · Rambam Health Care Campus, Institute of Pain Medicine, Haifa, Israel. · Florence Nightingale Foundation Clinical Professor of Nursing, University of West of England, Bristol & Royal United Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bath, UK. · Sansom Institute, University of South Australia, Adelade, Australia. · Department of Anaesthesiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Pain Center, Cochin Hospital, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. · Danish Pain Research Center and Department of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Patiëntenvereniging CRPS, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of General and Hand Surgery, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland. ·Eur J Pain · Pubmed #30620109.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Complex regional pain syndrome is a painful and disabling post-traumatic primary pain disorder. Acute and chronic complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) are major clinical challenges. In Europe, progress is hampered by significant heterogeneity in clinical practice. We sought to establish standards for the diagnosis and management of CRPS. METHODS: The European Pain Federation established a pan-European task force of experts in CRPS who followed a four-stage consensus challenge process to produce mandatory quality standards worded as grammatically imperative (must-do) statements. RESULTS: We developed 17 standards in 8 areas of care. There are 2 standards in diagnosis, 1 in multidisciplinary care, 1 in assessment, 3 for care pathways, 1 in information and education, 4 in pain management, 3 in physical rehabilitation and 2 on distress management. The standards are presented and summarized, and their generation and consequences were discussed. Also presented are domains of practice for which no agreement on a standard could be reached. Areas of research needed to improve the validity and uptake of these standards are discussed. CONCLUSION: The European Pain Federation task force present 17 standards of the diagnosis and management of CRPS for use in Europe. These are considered achievable for most countries and aspirational for a minority of countries depending on their healthcare resource and structures. SIGNIFICANCE: This position statement summarizes expert opinion on acceptable standards for CRPS care in Europe.

7 Guideline ACOG Committee Opinion No. 757: Screening for Perinatal Depression. 2018

Anonymous2330975. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #30629567.

ABSTRACT: Perinatal depression, which includes major and minor depressive episodes that occur during pregnancy or in the first 12 months after delivery, is one of the most common medical complications during pregnancy and the postpartum period, affecting one in seven women. It is important to identify pregnant and postpartum women with depression because untreated perinatal depression and other mood disorders can have devastating effects. Several screening instruments have been validated for use during pregnancy and the postpartum period. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that obstetrician-gynecologists and other obstetric care providers screen patients at least once during the perinatal period for depression and anxiety symptoms using a standardized, validated tool. It is recommended that all obstetrician-gynecologists and other obstetric care providers complete a full assessment of mood and emotional well-being (including screening for postpartum depression and anxiety with a validated instrument) during the comprehensive postpartum visit for each patient. If a patient is screened for depression and anxiety during pregnancy, additional screening should then occur during the comprehensive postpartum visit. There is evidence that screening alone can have clinical benefits, although initiation of treatment or referral to mental health care providers offers maximum benefit. Therefore, clinical staff in obstetrics and gynecology practices should be prepared to initiate medical therapy, refer patients to appropriate behavioral health resources when indicated, or both.

8 Guideline Guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of perimenopausal depression: summary and recommendations. 2018

Maki, Pauline M / Kornstein, Susan G / Joffe, Hadine / Bromberger, Joyce T / Freeman, Ellen W / Athappilly, Geena / Bobo, William V / Rubin, Leah H / Koleva, Hristina K / Cohen, Lee S / Soares, Claudio N / Anonymous31700960. ·Departments of Psychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago IL USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Institute of Women's Health, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA USA. · Connors Center for Women's Health and Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital, Bedford MA. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD USA. · University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Queen's University School of Medicine, Ontario CA. ·Menopause · Pubmed #30179986.

ABSTRACT: There is a new appreciation of the perimenopause - defined as the early and late menopause transition stages as well as the early postmenopause - as a window of vulnerability for the development of both depressive symptoms and major depressive episodes. However, clinical recommendations on how to identify, characterize and treat clinical depression are lacking. To address this gap, an expert panel was convened to systematically review the published literature and develop guidelines on the evaluation and management of perimenopausal depression. The areas addressed included: 1) epidemiology; 2) clinical presentation; 3) therapeutic effects of antidepressants; 4) effects of hormone therapy; and 5) efficacy of other therapies (eg, psychotherapy, exercise, and natural health products). Overall, evidence generally suggests that most midlife women who experience a major depressive episode during the perimenopause have experienced a prior episode of depression. Midlife depression presents with classic depressive symptoms commonly in combination with menopause symptoms (ie, vasomotor symptoms, sleep disturbance), and psychosocial challenges. Menopause symptoms complicate, co-occur, and overlap with the presentation of depression. Diagnosis involves identification of menopausal stage, assessment of co-occurring psychiatric and menopause symptoms, appreciation of the psychosocial factors common in midlife, differential diagnoses, and the use of validated screening instruments. Proven therapeutic options for depression (ie, antidepressants, psychotherapy) are the front-line treatments for perimenopausal depression. Although estrogen therapy is not approved to treat perimenopausal depression, there is evidence that it has antidepressant effects in perimenopausal women, particularly those with concomitant vasomotor symptoms. Data on estrogen plus progestin are sparse and inconclusive.

9 Guideline None 2018

Buitrago Ramírez, Francisco / Ciurana Misol, Ramón / Chocrón Bentata, Levy / Carmen Fernández Alonso, María Del / García Campayo, Javier / Montón Franco, Carmen / Tizón García, Jorge Luis / Anonymous3110950. ·Especialista en Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Centro de Salud Universitario La Paz, Badajoz. · Especialista en Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Centro de Salud La Mina, Sant Adrià del Besòs, Barcelona. · Especialista en Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Centro de Salud Alameda de Osuna, Madrid. · Especialista en Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria y Medicina Interna, Servicio de Salud de Castilla y León, Valladolid. · Especialista en Psiquiatría, Hospital Miguel Servet, Servicio Aragonés de Salud, Zaragoza. · Especialista en Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Centro de Salud Ramón y Cajal, Zaragoza. · Especialista en Psiquiatría, Neurología y Psicoanalista, Institut Català de la Salut. ·Aten Primaria · Pubmed #29866360.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline The Assessment of Pain in Older People: UK National Guidelines. 2018

Schofield, Pat. ·Positive Ageing Research Institute Anglia Ruskin University Chelmsford, Cambridge. ·Age Ageing · Pubmed #29579142.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline Guidelines of the International Headache Society for controlled trials of preventive treatment of chronic migraine in adults. 2018

Tassorelli, Cristina / Diener, Hans-Christoph / Dodick, David W / Silberstein, Stephen D / Lipton, Richard B / Ashina, Messoud / Becker, Werner J / Ferrari, Michel D / Goadsby, Peter J / Pozo-Rosich, Patricia / Wang, Shuu-Jiun / Anonymous6710938. ·1 Headache Science Center, C. Mondino Foundation, Pavia, Italy. · 2 Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · 3 Department of Neurology, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany. · 4 Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ, USA. · 5 Jefferson Headache Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · 6 Montefiore Headache Center, Department of Neurology and Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · 7 Danish Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark. · 8 Dept of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · 9 Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · 10 Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. · 11 National Institute for Health Research-Wellcome Trust King's Clinical Research Facility, King's College Hospital, London, England. · 12 Headache Research Group, VHIR, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona Spain. · 13 Neurology Department, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. · 14 Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. ·Cephalalgia · Pubmed #29504482.

ABSTRACT: Background Quality clinical trials form an essential part of the evidence base for the treatment of headache disorders. In 1991, the International Headache Society Clinical Trials Standing Committee developed and published the first edition of the Guidelines for Controlled Trials of Drugs in Migraine. In 2008, the Committee published the first specific guidelines on chronic migraine. Subsequent advances in drug, device, and biologicals development, as well as novel trial designs, have created a need for a revision of the chronic migraine guidelines. Objective The present update is intended to optimize the design of controlled trials of preventive treatment of chronic migraine in adults, and its recommendations do not apply to trials in children or adolescents.

12 Guideline Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disorders: major depression summary. 2018

Malhi, Gin S / Outhred, Tim / Hamilton, Amber / Boyce, Philip M / Bryant, Richard / Fitzgerald, Paul B / Lyndon, Bill / Mulder, Roger / Murray, Greg / Porter, Richard J / Singh, Ajeet B / Fritz, Kristina. ·CADE Clinic, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW gin.malhi@sydney.edu.au. · CADE Clinic, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW. · Westmead Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW. · UNSW Sydney, Sydney, NSW. · Epworth Clinic, Epworth Healthcare, Melbourne, VIC. · Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW. · University of Otago, Christchurch, NZ. · Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, VIC. · Deakin University, Geelong, VIC. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #29490210.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: In December 2015, the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists published a comprehensive set of mood disorder clinical practice guidelines for psychiatrists, psychologists and mental health professionals. This guideline summary, directed broadly at primary care physicians, is an abridged version that focuses on major depression. It emphasises the importance of shared decision making, tailoring personalised care to the individual, and delivering care in the context of a therapeutic relationship. In practice, the management of depression is determined by a multitude of factors, including illness severity and putative aetiology, with the principal objectives of regaining premorbid functioning and improving resilience against recurrence of future episodes. Main recommendations: The guidelines emphasise a biopsychosocial lifestyle approach and provide the following specific clinical recommendations: Alongside or before prescribing any form of treatment, consideration should be given to the implementation of strategies to manage stress, ensure appropriate sleep hygiene and enable uptake of healthy lifestyle changes. For mild to moderate depression, psychological management alone is an appropriate first line treatment, especially early in the course of illness. For moderate to severe depression, pharmacological management is usually necessary and is recommended first line, ideally in conjunction with psychosocial interventions. Changes in management as a result of the guidelines: The management of depression is anchored within a therapeutic relationship that attends to biopsychosocial lifestyle aspects and psychiatric diagnosis. The guidelines promote a broader approach to the formulation and management of depression, with treatments tailored to depressive subtypes and administered with clear steps in mind. Lifestyle and psychological therapies are favoured for less severe presentations, and concurrent antidepressant prescription is reserved for more severe and otherwise treatment-refractory cases.

13 Guideline Guidelines for Adolescent Depression in Primary Care (GLAD-PC): Part II. Treatment and Ongoing Management. 2018

Cheung, Amy H / Zuckerbrot, Rachel A / Jensen, Peter S / Laraque, Danielle / Stein, Ruth E K / Anonymous1390938. · ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #29483201.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To update clinical practice guidelines to assist primary care (PC) in the screening and assessment of depression. In this second part of the updated guidelines, we address treatment and ongoing management of adolescent depression in the PC setting. METHODS: By using a combination of evidence- and consensus-based methodologies, the guidelines were updated in 2 phases as informed by (1) current scientific evidence (published and unpublished) and (2) revision and iteration among the steering committee, including youth and families with lived experience. RESULTS: These updated guidelines are targeted for youth aged 10 to 21 years and offer recommendations for the management of adolescent depression in PC, including (1) active monitoring of mildly depressed youth, (2) treatment with evidence-based medication and psychotherapeutic approaches in cases of moderate and/or severe depression, (3) close monitoring of side effects, (4) consultation and comanagement of care with mental health specialists, (5) ongoing tracking of outcomes, and (6) specific steps to be taken in instances of partial or no improvement after an initial treatment has begun. The strength of each recommendation and the grade of its evidence base are summarized. CONCLUSIONS: The Guidelines for Adolescent Depression in Primary Care cannot replace clinical judgment, and they should not be the sole source of guidance for adolescent depression management. Nonetheless, the guidelines may assist PC clinicians in the management of depressed adolescents in an era of great clinical need and a shortage of mental health specialists. Additional research concerning the management of depressed youth in PC is needed, including the usability, feasibility, and sustainability of guidelines, and determination of the extent to which the guidelines actually improve outcomes of depressed youth.

14 Guideline Guidelines for Adolescent Depression in Primary Care (GLAD-PC): Part I. Practice Preparation, Identification, Assessment, and Initial Management. 2018

Zuckerbrot, Rachel A / Cheung, Amy / Jensen, Peter S / Stein, Ruth E K / Laraque, Danielle / Anonymous1380938. · ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #29483200.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To update clinical practice guidelines to assist primary care (PC) clinicians in the management of adolescent depression. This part of the updated guidelines is used to address practice preparation, identification, assessment, and initial management of adolescent depression in PC settings. METHODS: By using a combination of evidence- and consensus-based methodologies, guidelines were developed by an expert steering committee in 2 phases as informed by (1) current scientific evidence (published and unpublished) and (2) draft revision and iteration among the steering committee, which included experts, clinicians, and youth and families with lived experience. RESULTS: Guidelines were updated for youth aged 10 to 21 years and correspond to initial phases of adolescent depression management in PC, including the identification of at-risk youth, assessment and diagnosis, and initial management. The strength of each recommendation and its evidence base are summarized. The practice preparation, identification, assessment, and initial management section of the guidelines include recommendations for (1) the preparation of the PC practice for improved care of adolescents with depression; (2) annual universal screening of youth 12 and over at health maintenance visits; (3) the identification of depression in youth who are at high risk; (4) systematic assessment procedures by using reliable depression scales, patient and caregiver interviews, and CONCLUSIONS: This part of the guidelines is intended to assist PC clinicians in the identification and initial management of adolescents with depression in an era of great clinical need and shortage of mental health specialists, but they cannot replace clinical judgment; these guidelines are not meant to be the sole source of guidance for depression management in adolescents. Additional research that addresses the identification and initial management of youth with depression in PC is needed, including empirical testing of these guidelines.

15 Guideline Recommendations of the Spanish Working Group on Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis (GETECCU) and the Association of Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis Patients (ACCU) in the management of psychological problems in Inflammatory Bowel Disease patients. 2018

Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel / Marín-Jiménez, Ignacio / Panadero, Abel / Guardiola, Jordi / Cañas, Mercedes / Gobbo Montoya, Milena / Modino, Yolanda / Alcaín, Guillermo / Bosca-Watts, Marta Maia / Calvet, Xavier / Casellas, Francesc / Chaparro, María / Fernández Salazar, Luis / Ferreiro-Iglesias, Rocío / Ginard, Daniel / Iborra, Marisa / Manceñido, Noemí / Mañosa, Miriam / Merino, Olga / Rivero, Montserrat / Roncero, Oscar / Sempere, Laura / Vega, Pablo / Zabana, Yamile / Mínguez, Miguel / Nos, Pilar / Gisbert, Javier P. ·Unidad de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Complexo Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, España. Electronic address: manubarreiro@hotmail.com. · Unidad de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Servicio de Aparato digestivo e Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón (IiSGM), Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, España. · ACCU Madrid, Madrid, España. · Unidad de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Servicio de Aparato digestivo, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge-IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, España. · Unidad de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, España. · Positivamente Centro de Psicología, Madrid, España. · Confederación de Asociaciones de Enfermos de Crohn y Colitis Ulcerosa de España (ACCU España), Madrid. · Unidad de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, UGC Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga, España. · Hospital Clínico Universitario de Valencia, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia, España. · Corporación Sanitaria ParcTaulí, Sabadell, España. · Unidad de Atención Crohn-Colitis, Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Valld'Hebron, Barcelona, España. · Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Princesa (IIS-IP), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), Madrid, España. · Hospital Clínico Universitario de Valladolid, Valladolid, España. · Unidad de Enfermedad Inflamatoria Intestinal, Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Complexo Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, España. · Hospital Universitario Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, España. · Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, CIBEREHD, Valencia, España. · Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Infanta Sofía, San Sebastián de los Reyes, Madrid, España. · Hospital Universitario GermansTrias i Pujol, Badalona, España. · Hospital Universitario de Cruces, Baracaldo, España. · Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, España. · Complejo Hospitalario La Mancha Centro, Alcázar de San Juan, España. · Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, España. · Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Ourense, Orense, España. · Hospital Universitario Mutua de Terrassa CIBERehd, Terrasa, España. ·Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #29275001.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: To establish recommendations for the management of psychological problems affecting patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: A meeting of a group of IBD experts made up of doctors, psychologists, nurses and patient representatives was held. The following were presented: 1) Results of a previous focal group, 2) Results of doctor and patient surveys, 3) Results of a systematic review of tools for detecting anxiety and depression. A guided discussion was then held about the most important psychological and emotional problems associated with IBD, appropriate referral criteria and situations to be avoided. The validated instrument most applicable to clinical practice was selected. A recommendations document and a Delphi survey were designed. The survey was sent to the group and to a scientific committee of the GETECCU group in order to establish the level of agreement with these recommendations. RESULTS: Fifteen recommendations were established linked to 3 key processes: 1) What steps should be taken to identify psychological problems at an IBD appointment; 2) What are the criteria for referring patients to a mental health specialist; 3) How to approach psychological problems. CONCLUSIONS: Resources should be made available to healthcare professionals so that they can treat these problems during consultations, identify the disorders which could affect the clinical course of the disease and determine their impact on the patient's life in order that these can be treated and followed up by the most suitable professional. These recommendations could serve as a basis for redesigning IBD services or processes and as justification for the training of healthcare personnel.

16 Guideline Consensus Recommendations for the Clinical Application of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in the Treatment of Depression. 2018

McClintock, Shawn M / Reti, Irving M / Carpenter, Linda L / McDonald, William M / Dubin, Marc / Taylor, Stephan F / Cook, Ian A / O'Reardon, John / Husain, Mustafa M / Wall, Christopher / Krystal, Andrew D / Sampson, Shirlene M / Morales, Oscar / Nelson, Brent G / Latoussakis, Vassilios / George, Mark S / Lisanby, Sarah H / Anonymous3580907 / Anonymous3590907. ·Department of Psychiatry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75390-8898. shawn.mcclintock@utsouthwestern.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. · Division of Brain Stimulation and Neurophysiology, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Butler Hospital, Brown Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College, White Plains, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Bioengineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rowan University School of Medicine, Stratford, New Jersey, USA. · PrarieCare, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Psychiatric Neurotherapeutics Program, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, St Louis Park, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. · Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. ·J Clin Psychiatry · Pubmed #28541649.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide expert recommendations for the safe and effective application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). PARTICIPANTS: Participants included a group of 17 expert clinicians and researchers with expertise in the clinical application of rTMS, representing both the National Network of Depression Centers (NNDC) rTMS Task Group and the American Psychiatric Association Council on Research (APA CoR) Task Force on Novel Biomarkers and Treatments. EVIDENCE: The consensus statement is based on a review of extensive literature from 2 databases (OvidSP MEDLINE and PsycINFO) searched from 1990 through 2016. The search terms included variants of major depressive disorder and transcranial magnetic stimulation. The results were limited to articles written in English that focused on adult populations. Of the approximately 1,500 retrieved studies, a total of 118 publications were included in the consensus statement and were supplemented with expert opinion to achieve consensus recommendations on key issues surrounding the administration of rTMS for MDD in clinical practice settings. CONSENSUS PROCESS: In cases in which the research evidence was equivocal or unclear, a consensus decision on how rTMS should be administered was reached by the authors of this article and is denoted in the article as "expert opinion." CONCLUSIONS: Multiple randomized controlled trials and published literature have supported the safety and efficacy of rTMS antidepressant therapy. These consensus recommendations, developed by the NNDC rTMS Task Group and APA CoR Task Force on Novel Biomarkers and Treatments, provide comprehensive information for the safe and effective clinical application of rTMS in the treatment of MDD.

17 Guideline [French Society for Biological Psychiatry and Neuropsychopharmacology and Fondation FondaMental task force: Formal Consensus for the management of treatment-resistant depression]. 2017

Charpeaud, T / Genty, J-B / Destouches, S / Yrondi, A / Lancrenon, S / Alaïli, N / Bellivier, F / Bennabi, D / Bougerol, T / Camus, V / D'amato, T / Doumy, O / Haesebaert, F / Holtzmann, J / Lançon, C / Lefebvre, M / Moliere, F / Nieto, I / Richieri, R / Schmitt, L / Stephan, F / Vaiva, G / Walter, M / Leboyer, M / El-Hage, W / Haffen, E / Llorca, P-M / Courtet, P / Aouizerate, B. ·CHU de Clermont-Ferrand, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, service de psychiatrie de l'adulte B, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: tcharpeaud@chu-clermontferrand.fr. · CHU de Clermont-Ferrand, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, service de psychiatrie de l'adulte B, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · SYLIA-STAT, 10, boulevard du Maréchal-Joffre, 92340 Bourg-la-Reine, France. · CHRU de Toulouse, hôpital Purpan, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, service de psychiatrie de l'adulte, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Hôpital Fernand-Widal, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, service de psychiatrie adulte, 75010 Paris, France. · CHU de Besançon, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, service de psychiatrie de l'adulte, 25030 Besançon Cedex, France. · CHU de Grenoble, hôpital nord, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, service de psychiatrie de l'adulte, CS 10217, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9, France. · CHU de Tours, clinique psychiatrique universitaire, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, 37044 Tours Cedex 9, France. · Centre hospitalier Le Vinatier, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, service universitaire de psychiatrie adulte, BP 300 39, 69678 Bron Cedex, France. · CH Charles-Perrens, pôle de psychiatrie générale et universitaire, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex, France. · CHU La Conception, pôle psychiatrie centre, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, 13005 Marseille, France. · CHRU Lapeyronie, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, département des urgences et post-urgences psychiatriques, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5, France. · CHU de Brest, hôpital de Bohars, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, service de psychiatrie de l'adulte, 29820 Bohars, France. · CHRU de Lille, hôpital Fontan 1, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, service de psychiatrie adulte, 59037 Lille Cedex, France. · Hôpital Chenevier-Henri-Mondor, pôle de psychiatrie des hôpitaux universitaires, centre expert dépression résistante FondaMental, 94000 Créteil, France. ·Encephale · Pubmed #28822460.

ABSTRACT: Major depression represents among the most frequent psychiatric disorders in the general population with an estimated lifetime prevalence of 16-17%. It is characterized by high levels of comorbidities with other psychiatric conditions or somatic diseases as well as a recurrent or chronic course in 50 to 80% of the cases leading to negative repercussions on the daily functioning, with an impaired quality of life, and to severe direct/indirect costs. Large cohort studies have supported that failure of a first-line antidepressant treatment is observed in more than 60% of patients. In this case, several treatment strategies have been proposed by classical evidence-based guidelines from internationally recognized scientific societies, referring primarily on: I) the switch to another antidepressant of the same or different class; II) the combination with another antidepressant of complementary pharmacological profile; III) the addition of a wide range of pharmacological agents intending to potentiate the therapeutic effects of the ongoing antidepressant medication; IV) the association with appropriate psychological therapies; and, V) the use of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques. However, although based on the most recently available data and rigorous methodology, standard guidelines have the significant disadvantage of not covering a large variety of clinical conditions, while currently observed in everyday clinical practice. From these considerations, formalized recommendations by a large panel of French experts in the management of depressed patients have been developed under the shared sponsorship of the French Association of Biological Psychiatry and Neuropsychopharmacology (AFPBN) and the Fondation FondaMental. These French recommendations are presented in this special issue in order to provide relevant information about the treatment choices to make, depending particularly on the clinical response to previous treatment lines or the complexity of clinical situations (clinical features, specific populations, psychiatric comorbidities, etc.). Thus, the present approach will be especially helpful for the clinicians enabling to substantially facilitate and guide their clinical decision when confronted to difficult-to-treat forms of major depression in the daily clinical practice. This will be expected to significantly improve the poor prognosis of the treatment-resistant depression thereby lowering the clinical, functional and costly impact owing directly to the disease.

18 Guideline [Melatonin - known problems and perspectives of clinical usage]. 2017

Zakharov, A V / Khivintseva, E V / Pytin, V F / Sergeeva, M S / Antipov, O I. ·Samara State Medical University, Samara, Russia. · Povolzhsky state university of telecommunications and informatics, Samara, Russia. ·Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova · Pubmed #28777368.

ABSTRACT: The article discusses well-known and ongoing studies of mechanisms of action of melatonin. The main clinical effects of melatonin are discussed. The emphasis on the chronobiological effect of melatonin, its adaptogenic and anti-carcinogenic properties has been done in the article. The most frequent manifestations of epiphyseal melatonin deficiency are various functional disorders in the form of insomnia, anxiety or depressive disorders. Recommendations on the effective use of melatonin in its deficiency due to pathology are given.

19 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and after breast cancer treatment. 2017

Greenlee, Heather / DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J / Balneaves, Lynda G / Carlson, Linda E / Cohen, Misha R / Deng, Gary / Johnson, Jillian A / Mumber, Matthew / Seely, Dugald / Zick, Suzanna M / Boyce, Lindsay M / Tripathy, Debu. ·Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Member, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Doctoral Fellow, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Associate Professor, College of Nursing, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. · Professor, Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Adjunct Professor, American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine at California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco, CA. · Clinic Director, Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA. · Medical Director, Integrative Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Post-Doctoral Scholar, Department of Biobehavioral Health, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA. · Radiation Oncologist, Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA. · Executive Director, Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada. · Executive Director of Research, Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Research Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. · Research Associate Professor, Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. · Research Informationist, Memorial Sloan Kettering Library, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Professor, Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #28436999.

ABSTRACT: Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:194-232. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

20 Guideline ACG Clinical Guideline: Preventive Care in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. 2017

Farraye, Francis A / Melmed, Gil Y / Lichtenstein, Gary R / Kane, Sunanda V. ·Section of Gastroenterology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28071656.

ABSTRACT: Recent data suggest that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients do not receive preventive services at the same rate as general medical patients. Patients with IBD often consider their gastroenterologist to be the primary provider of care. To improve the care delivered to IBD patients, health maintenance issues need to be co-managed by both the gastroenterologist and primary care team. Gastroenterologists need to explicitly inform the primary care provider of the unique needs of the IBD patient, especially those on immunomodulators and biologics or being considered for such therapy. In particular, documentation of up to date vaccinations are crucial as IBD patients are often treated with long-term immune-suppressive therapies and may be at increased risk for infections, many of which are preventable with vaccinations. Health maintenance issues addressed in this guideline include identification, safety and appropriate timing of vaccinations, screening for osteoporosis, cervical cancer, melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer as well as identification of depression and anxiety and smoking cessation. To accomplish these health maintenance goals, coordination between the primary care provider, gastroenterology team and other specialists is necessary.

21 Guideline Clinical Pharmacogenetic Testing and Application: Laboratory Medicine Clinical Practice Guidelines. 2017

Kim, Sollip / Yun, Yeo Min / Chae, Hyo Jin / Cho, Hyun Jung / Ji, Misuk / Kim, In Suk / Wee, Kyung A / Lee, Woochang / Song, Sang Hoon / Woo, Hye In / Lee, Soo Youn / Chun, Sail. ·Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Konyang University Hospital, College of Medicine, Konyang University, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Veterans Health Service Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital and College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon, Korea. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Genetics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. suddenbz@skku.edu. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. sailchun@amc.seoul.kr. ·Ann Lab Med · Pubmed #28029011.

ABSTRACT: Pharmacogenetic testing for clinical applications is steadily increasing. Correct and adequate use of pharmacogenetic tests is important to reduce unnecessary medical costs and adverse patient outcomes. This document contains recommended pharmacogenetic testing guidelines for clinical application, interpretation, and result reporting through a literature review and evidence-based expert opinions for the clinical pharmacogenetic testing covered by public medical insurance in Korea. This document aims to improve the utility of pharmacogenetic testing in routine clinical settings.

22 Guideline Screening for Depression in Adults: Recommendation Statement. 2016

Anonymous13840878. · ·Am Fam Physician · Pubmed #27548605.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline AAP Updates Recommendations for Routine Preventive Pediatric Health Care. 2016

Lambert, Mara. · ·Am Fam Physician · Pubmed #27548604.

ABSTRACT: Run by Jan 2017.

24 Guideline Management of Depression in Patients With Cancer: A Clinical Practice Guideline. 2016

Li, Madeline / Kennedy, Erin B / Byrne, Nelson / Gérin-Lajoie, Caroline / Katz, Mark R / Keshavarz, Homa / Sellick, Scott / Green, Esther. ·Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network; Cancer Care Ontario; and University of Toronto, Toronto; Cancer Care Ontario Program in Evidence-Based Care, McMaster University, Hamilton; Trillium Health Partners, Mississauga Halton-Central West Regional Cancer Program, Mississauga; Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa; Stronach Regional Cancer Centre and Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket; and Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada ccopgi@mcmaster.ca. · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network; Cancer Care Ontario; and University of Toronto, Toronto; Cancer Care Ontario Program in Evidence-Based Care, McMaster University, Hamilton; Trillium Health Partners, Mississauga Halton-Central West Regional Cancer Program, Mississauga; Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa; Stronach Regional Cancer Centre and Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket; and Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. ·J Oncol Pract · Pubmed #27382000.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: This report updates the Cancer Care Ontario Program in Evidence-Based Care guideline for the management of depression in adult patients with cancer. This guideline covers pharmacologic, psychological, and collaborative care interventions, with a focus on integrating practical management tools to assist clinicians in delivering appropriate treatments for depression in patients with cancer. METHODS: Recommendations were developed by synthesizing information from extant guidelines and reviews and searching for randomized controlled trials from the date of database inception (1964 for MEDLINE and 1974 for EMBASE) to January 2015. Quality assessment of guidelines and systematic reviews were conducted by using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II), Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR), and Cochrane Risk of Bias tools. Final recommendations were developed through a standardized Program in Evidence-Based Care multidisciplinary expert and knowledge user review process. RESULTS: Two high-quality relevant clinical practice guidelines, eight pharmacologic trials, nine psychological trials, and eight collaborative care intervention trials composed the evidence base upon which the recommendations were developed. Eight specific recommendations were made to establish a standard of care for the management of depression in patients with cancer. The recommendations and practical management tools were reviewed as being well organized and helpful, although systemic barriers to implementation were identified. CONCLUSION: This updated guideline supports the previous general recommendation that patients with cancer who have depression may benefit from psychological and/or pharmacologic interventions, without evidence for the superiority of any specific treatment over another. New recommendations for a collaborative care model that incorporates a stepped care approach suggest that multidisciplinary mental health care restructuring may be required for optimal management of depression.

25 Guideline American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. 2016

Cohen, Ezra E W / LaMonte, Samuel J / Erb, Nicole L / Beckman, Kerry L / Sadeghi, Nader / Hutcheson, Katherine A / Stubblefield, Michael D / Abbott, Dennis M / Fisher, Penelope S / Stein, Kevin D / Lyman, Gary H / Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L. ·Medical Oncologist, Moores Cancer Center, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA. · Retired Head and Neck Surgeon, Former Associate Professor of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Louisiana State University Health and Science Center, New Orleans, LA. · Program Manager, National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Research Analyst-Survivorship, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Professor of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Cancer Surgery, and Director of Head and Neck Surgical Oncology, George Washington University, Washington, DC. · Associate Professor, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Section of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · Medical Director for Cancer Rehabilitation, Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, West Orange, NJ. · Chief Executive Officer, Dental Oncology Professionals, Garland, TX. · Clinical Instructor of Otolaryngology and Nurse, Miller School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Miami, Miami, FL. · Vice President, Behavioral Research, and Director, Behavioral Research Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Co-Director, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Professor of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. · Director, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC. ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #27002678.

ABSTRACT: Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

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