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Depression HELP
Based on 76,764 articles since 2006
|||| 11 

These are the 76764 published articles about Depression that originated from Worldwide during 2006-2015.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline [Update on Current Care Guideline: Depression]. 2015

Isometsä, Erkki / Kinnunen, Elina / Kivekäs, Teija / Koponen, Hannu / Lappalainen, Jarmo / Lindfors, Olavi / Marttunen, Mauri / Pirkola, Sami / Jousilahti, Pekka / Tuunainen, Arja / Anonymous2950811. · ·Duodecim · Pubmed #26245079.

ABSTRACT: Treatment of depression is based on comprehensive diagnostic, clinical and psychosocial evaluation. Brief psychotherapies (cognitive, interpersonal, psychodynamic or problem-solving) are effective in mild to moderate depression; antidepressants in mild to severe, and electroconvulsive therapy in severe or psychotic. Combining antidepressants and psychotherapy is more effective than either alone. After the acute phase, antidepressants should be continued for six months to prevent relapses, and maintenance treatment considered after three lifetime episodes. Primary care is responsible for treatment of mild to moderate depressions; developing psychiatric consultation services and use of nurse case managers are recommended.

2 Guideline Evidence-based guidelines for treating depressive disorders with antidepressants: A revision of the 2008 British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines. 2015

Cleare, Anthony / Pariante, C M / Young, A H / Anderson, I M / Christmas, D / Cowen, P J / Dickens, C / Ferrier, I N / Geddes, J / Gilbody, S / Haddad, P M / Katona, C / Lewis, G / Malizia, A / McAllister-Williams, R H / Ramchandani, P / Scott, J / Taylor, D / Uher, R / Anonymous540958. ·Professor of Psychopharmacology & Affective Disorders, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Centre for Affective Disorders, London, UK anthony.cleare@kcl.ac.uk. · Professor of Biological Psychiatry, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Centre for Affective Disorders, London, UK. · Professor of Psychiatry and Chair of Mood Disorders, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Centre for Affective Disorders, London, UK. · Professor and Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist, University of Manchester Department of Psychiatry, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Consultant Psychiatrist, Advanced Interventions Service, Ninewells Hospital & Medical School, Dundee, UK. · Professor of Psychopharmacology, Psychopharmacology Research Unit, Neurosciences Building, University Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK. · Professor of Psychological Medicine, University of Exeter Medical School and Devon Partnership Trust, Exeter, UK. · Professor of Psychiatry, Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist, School of Neurology, Neurobiology & Psychiatry, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Head, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK. · Director of the Mental Health and Addictions Research Group (MHARG), The Hull York Medical School, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, UK. · Consultant Psychiatrist, Cromwell House, Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK. · Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, UK. · Consultant in Neuropsychopharmacology and Neuromodulation, North Bristol NHS Trust, Rosa Burden Centre, Southmead Hospital, Bristol, UK. · Reader in Clinical Psychopharmacology, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Reader in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Centre for Mental Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Professor of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Professor of Psychopharmacology, King's College London, London, UK. · Associate Professor, Canada Research Chair in Early Interventions, Dalhousie University, Department of Psychiatry, Halifax, NS, Canada. · ·J Psychopharmacol · Pubmed #25969470.

ABSTRACT: A revision of the 2008 British Association for Psychopharmacology evidence-based guidelines for treating depressive disorders with antidepressants was undertaken in order to incorporate new evidence and to update the recommendations where appropriate. A consensus meeting involving experts in depressive disorders and their management was held in September 2012. Key areas in treating depression were reviewed and the strength of evidence and clinical implications were considered. The guidelines were then revised after extensive feedback from participants and interested parties. A literature review is provided which identifies the quality of evidence upon which the recommendations are made. These guidelines cover the nature and detection of depressive disorders, acute treatment with antidepressant drugs, choice of drug versus alternative treatment, practical issues in prescribing and management, next-step treatment, relapse prevention, treatment of relapse and stopping treatment. Significant changes since the last guidelines were published in 2008 include the availability of new antidepressant treatment options, improved evidence supporting certain augmentation strategies (drug and non-drug), management of potential long-term side effects, updated guidance for prescribing in elderly and adolescent populations and updated guidance for optimal prescribing. Suggestions for future research priorities are also made.

3 Guideline World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia. Part 3: Update 2015 Management of special circumstances: Depression, Suicidality, substance use disorders and pregnancy and lactation. 2015

Hasan, Alkomiet / Falkai, Peter / Wobrock, Thomas / Lieberman, Jeffrey / Glenthøj, Birte / Gattaz, Wagner F / Thibaut, Florence / Möller, Hans-Jürgen / Anonymous240830. ·Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilians-University , Munich , Germany. · ·World J Biol Psychiatry · Pubmed #25822804.

ABSTRACT: These updated guidelines are based on the first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in the years 2005 and 2006. For this 2015 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations which are clinically and scientifically relevant. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating patients with schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines a systematic review, as well as a data extraction from national guidelines have been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and subsequently categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5). This third part of the updated guidelines covers the management of the following specific treatment circumstances: comorbid depression, suicidality, various comorbid substance use disorders (legal and illegal drugs), and pregnancy and lactation. These guidelines are primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antipsychotic medication and other pharmacological treatment options) of patients with schizophrenia.

4 Guideline World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of unipolar depressive disorders. part 2: maintenance treatment of major depressive disorder-update 2015. 2015

Bauer, Michael / Severus, Emanuel / Köhler, Stephan / Whybrow, Peter C / Angst, Jules / Möller, Hans-Jürgen / Anonymous4180804. ·Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy , TU Dresden , Germany. · ·World J Biol Psychiatry · Pubmed #25677972.

ABSTRACT: These guidelines for the treatment of unipolar depressive disorders systematically review available evidence pertaining to the biological treatment of patients with major depression and produce a series of practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful based on the available evidence. These guidelines are intended for use by all physicians assessing and treating patients with these conditions. The relevant data have been extracted primarily from various treatment guidelines and panels for depressive disorders, as well as from meta-analyses/reviews on the efficacy of antidepressant medications and other biological treatment interventions identified by a search of the MEDLINE database and Cochrane Library. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and was then categorized into five levels of evidence (CE A-F) and five levels of recommendation grades (RG 1-5). This second part of the WFSBP guidelines on depressive disorders covers the management of the maintenance phase treatment, and is primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including pharmacological and hormonal medications, electroconvulsive therapy and other brain stimulation treatments) of adults and also, albeit to a lesser extent, children, adolescents and older adults.

5 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines on the use of integrative therapies as supportive care in patients treated for breast cancer. 2014

Greenlee, Heather / Balneaves, Lynda G / Carlson, Linda E / Cohen, Misha / Deng, Gary / Hershman, Dawn / Mumber, Matthew / Perlmutter, Jane / Seely, Dugald / Sen, Ananda / Zick, Suzanna M / Tripathy, Debu / Anonymous2270800. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health (HG, DH), Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, (HG, DH), and Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons (DH), Columbia University, New York, NY (HG, DH); School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (LGB); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada (LEC); Institute for Health and Aging, University of California San Francisco, CA (MC); Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA (MC); Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (GD); Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA (MM); Gemini Group, Ann Arbor, MI (JP); Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada (DS); Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada (DS); Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Health System (AS, SMZ), Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health (SMZ), and Department of Biostatistics (AS), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (AS, SMZ); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (DT). hg2120@columbia.edu. · Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health (HG, DH), Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, (HG, DH), and Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons (DH), Columbia University, New York, NY (HG, DH); School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (LGB); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada (LEC); Institute for Health and Aging, University of California San Francisco, CA (MC); Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA (MC); Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (GD); Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA (MM); Gemini Group, Ann Arbor, MI (JP); Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada (DS); Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada (DS); Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Health System (AS, SMZ), Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health (SMZ), and Department of Biostatistics (AS), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (AS, SMZ); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (DT). · ·J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr · Pubmed #25749602.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. METHODS: Following the Institute of Medicine's guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment. Trials were included if the majority of participants had breast cancer and/or breast cancer patient results were reported separately, and outcomes were clinically relevant. Recommendations were organized by outcome and graded based upon a modified version of the US Preventive Services Task Force grading system. RESULTS: The search (January 1, 1990-December 31, 2013) identified 4900 articles, of which 203 were eligible for analysis. Meditation, yoga, and relaxation with imagery are recommended for routine use for common conditions, including anxiety and mood disorders (Grade A). Stress management, yoga, massage, music therapy, energy conservation, and meditation are recommended for stress reduction, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and quality of life (Grade B). Many interventions (n = 32) had weaker evidence of benefit (Grade C). Some interventions (n = 7) were deemed unlikely to provide any benefit (Grade D). Notably, only one intervention, acetyl-l-carnitine for the prevention of taxane-induced neuropathy, was identified as likely harmful (Grade H) as it was found to increase neuropathy. The majority of intervention/modality combinations (n = 138) did not have sufficient evidence to form specific recommendations (Grade I). CONCLUSIONS: Specific integrative therapies can be recommended as evidence-based supportive care options during breast cancer treatment. Most integrative therapies require further investigation via well-designed controlled trials with meaningful outcomes.

6 Guideline The Korean Medication Algorithm for Depressive Disorder: second revision. 2014

Seok Seo, Jeong / Rim Song, Hoo / Bin Lee, Hwang / Park, Young-Min / Hong, Jeong-Wan / Kim, Won / Wang, Hee-Ryung / Lim, Eun-Sung / Jeong, Jong-Hyun / Jon, Duk-In / Joon Min, Kyung / Sup Woo, Young / Bahk, Won-Myong. ·Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Yeouido St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Ilsan Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Inje University, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Namwon Sungil Mental Hospital, Namwon, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Seoul Paik Hospital, School of Medicine, Inje University, Seoul, Korea/Stress Research Institute, Inje University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Shinsegae Hospital, KimJe, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, St. Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Anyang, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: kjoonmin@gmail.com. · Department of Psychiatry, Yeouido St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: wmbahk@catholic.ac.kr. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #25010375.

ABSTRACT: AIM: This study constitutes a revision of the guidelines for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) issued by the Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Depressive Disorder (KMAP-DD) 2006. In incorporates changes in the experts׳ consensus that occurred between 2006 and 2012 as well as information regarding newly developed and recently published clinical trials. METHODS: Using a 44-item questionnaire, an expert consensus was obtained on pharmacological treatment strategies for (1) non-psychotic MDD, (2) psychotic MDD, (3) dysthymia and depression subtypes, (4) continuous and maintenance treatment, and (5) special populations; consensus was also obtained regarding (6) the choice of an antidepressant (AD) in the context of safety and adverse effects, and (7) non-pharmacological biological therapies. RESULTS: AD monotherapy was recommended as the first-line strategy for nonpsychotic depression in adults, children and adolescents, elderly adults, and patients with postpartum depression or premenstrual dysphoric disorder. The combination of AD and atypical antipsychotics (AAP) was recommended for psychotic depression. The duration of the initial AD treatment for psychotic depression depends on the number of depressive episodes. Most experts recommended stopping the initial AD and AAP therapy after a certain period in patients with one or two depressive episodes. However, for those with three or more episodes, maintenance of the initial treatment was recommended for as long as possible. Monotherapy with various selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) was recommended for dysthymic disorder and melancholic type MDD. CONCLUSION: The pharmacological treatment strategy of KMAP-DD 2012 is similar to that of KMAP-DD 2006; however, the preference for the first-line use of AAPs was stronger in 2012 than in 2006.

7 Guideline [Guidelines of Sociedade Brasileira de Cardiologia for Unstable Angina and Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (II Edition, 2007) 2013-2014 Update]. 2014

Nicolau, J C / Timerman, A / Marin-Neto, J A / Piegas, L S / Barbosa, C J D G / Franci, A / Avezum, A / Carvalho, A C C / Markman Filho, B / Polanczyk, C A / Rochitte, C E / Serrano Júnior, C V / Precoma, D B / Silva Junior, D G / Albuquerque, D C / Stefanini, E / Knobel, E / Jatene, F B / Feres, F / Morcerf, F A P / Ganem, F / Lima Filho, F A / Feitosa Filho, G S / Ferreira, J F M / Meneghetti, J C / Saraiva, J F K / Silva, L S / Maia, L N / Baracioli, L M / Lisboa, L A F / Dallan, L A O / Bodanese, L C / Andrade, M D / Oliveira Júnior, M / Dutra, O P / Coelho, O R / Leães, P E / Albuquerque, P F / Lemos, P / Kalil, R / Costa, R V C / Esporcate, R / Marino, R L / Botellho, R V / Meneghelo, R S / Sprovieri, S R / Timerman, S / Mathias Júnior, W / Anonymous2470782. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #24862929.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Guideline Evidence-based, pharmacological treatment guideline for depression in Korea, revised edition. 2014

Won, Eunsoo / Park, Seon-Cheol / Han, Kyu-Man / Sung, Seung-Hwan / Lee, Hwa-Young / Paik, Jong-Woo / Jeon, Hong Jin / Lee, Moon-Soo / Shim, Se-Hoon / Ko, Young-Hoon / Lee, Kang-Joon / Han, Changsu / Ham, Byung-Joo / Choi, Joonho / Hwang, Tae-Yeon / Oh, Kang-Seob / Hahn, Sang-Woo / Park, Yong-Chon / Lee, Min-Soo / Clinical Research Center for Depression, ?. ·Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Yong-In Mental Hospital, Yongin, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Asan, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, KyungHee University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Inje Universtiy, Busan, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea. · ·J Korean Med Sci · Pubmed #24753693.

ABSTRACT: This paper aims to introduce, summarize, and emphasize the importance of the 'Evidence-Based, Pharmacological Treatment Guideline for Depression in Korea, Revised Edition'. The guideline broadly covers most aspects of the pharmacological treatment of patients in Korea diagnosed with moderate to severe major depression according to the DSM-IV TR. The guideline establishment process involved determining and answering a number of key questions, searching and selecting publications, evaluating recommendations, preparing guideline drafts, undergoing external expert reviews, and obtaining approval. A guideline adaptation process was conducted for the revised edition. The guideline strongly recommends pharmacological treatment considered appropriate to the current clinical situation in Korea, and should be considered helpful when selecting the appropriate pharmacological treatment of patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder. Therefore, the wide distribution of this guideline is recommended.

9 Guideline Screening, assessment, and care of anxiety and depressive symptoms in adults with cancer: an American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline adaptation. 2014

Andersen, Barbara L / DeRubeis, Robert J / Berman, Barry S / Gruman, Jessie / Champion, Victoria L / Massie, Mary Jane / Holland, Jimmie C / Partridge, Ann H / Bak, Kate / Somerfield, Mark R / Rowland, Julia H / Anonymous4090781. ·Barbara L. Andersen, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Robert J. DeRubeis, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; Barry S. Berman, Broward Health Medical Center, Fort Lauderdale, FL; Jessie Gruman, Center for Advancing Health, Washington, DC; Victoria L. Champion, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; Mary Jane Massie, Jimmie C. Holland, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute, New York, NY; Ann H. Partridge, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA; Kate Bak and Mark R. Somerfield, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA; Julia H. Rowland, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. · ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #24733793.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: A Pan-Canadian Practice Guideline on Screening, Assessment, and Care of Psychosocial Distress (Depression, Anxiety) in Adults With Cancer was identified for adaptation. METHODS: American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for adapting clinical practice guidelines developed by other organizations. The guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor and content applicability. RESULTS: On the basis of content review of the pan-Canadian guideline, the ASCO panel agreed that, in general, the recommendations were clear, thorough, based on the most relevant scientific evidence, and presented options that will be acceptable to patients. However, for some topics addressed in the pan-Canadian guideline, the ASCO panel formulated a set of adapted recommendations based on local context and practice beliefs of the ad hoc panel members. It is recommended that all patients with cancer be evaluated for symptoms of depression and anxiety at periodic times across the trajectory of care. Assessment should be performed using validated, published measures and procedures. Depending on levels of symptoms and supplementary information, differing treatment pathways are recommended. Failure to identify and treat anxiety and depression increases the risk for poor quality of life and potential disease-related morbidity and mortality. This guideline adaptation is part of a larger survivorship guideline series. CONCLUSION: Although clinicians may not be able to prevent some of the chronic or late medical effects of cancer, they have a vital role in mitigating the negative emotional and behavioral sequelae. Recognizing and treating effectively those who manifest symptoms of anxiety or depression will reduce the human cost of cancer.

10 Guideline Primary care behavioral interventions to reduce illicit drug and nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. 2014

Moyer, Virginia A / Anonymous4210780. · ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #24615535.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: Update of the 2008 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for illicit drug use. METHODS: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on interventions to help adolescents who have never used drugs to remain abstinent and interventions to help adolescents who are using drugs but do not meet criteria for a substance use disorder to reduce or stop their use. POPULATION: This recommendation applies to children and adolescents younger than age 18 years who have not been diagnosed with a substance use disorder. RECOMMENDATION: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care-based behavioral interventions to prevent or reduce illicit drug or nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents. (I statement).

11 Guideline Brazilian Medical Association guidelines for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of panic disorder. 2013

Levitan, Michelle Nigri / Chagas, Marcos H / Linares, Ila M / Crippa, José A / Terra, Mauro B / Giglio, Alcir T / Cordeiro, Joana L C / Garcia, Giovana J / Hasan, Rosa / Andrada, Nathalia C / Nardi, Antonio E. ·Laboratory of Panic & Respiration, Institute of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de JaneiroRJ, Brazil. · Department of Neurosciences and Behavioral Sciences, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Ribeirão PretoSP, Brazil. · Department of Clinical Medicine: Psychiatry, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto AlegreRS, Brazil. · Centro de Estudos Jose de Barros Falcão, Porto AlegreRS, Brazil. · Associação Brasileira de Neurologia, Associação Brasileira de NeurologiaBrazil, Brazil. · Associação Médica Brasileira, Associação Médica BrasileiraBrazil, Brazil. ·Rev Bras Psiquiatr · Pubmed #24402216.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To present the most relevant findings regarding the Brazilian Medical Association guidelines for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of panic disorder. METHODS: We used the methodology proposed by the Brazilian Medical Association for the Diretrizes Project. The MEDLINE (PubMed), Scopus, Web of Science, and LILACS online databases were queried for articles published from 1980 to 2012. Searchable questions were structured using the PICO format (acronym for "patient" [or population], "intervention" [or exposure], "comparison" [or control], and "outcome"). RESULTS: We present data on clinical manifestations and implications of panic disorder and its association with depression, drug abuse, dependence and anxiety disorders. In addition, discussions were held on the main psychiatric and clinical differential diagnoses. CONCLUSIONS: The guidelines are proposed to serve as a reference for the general practitioner and specialist to assist in and facilitate the diagnosis of panic disorder.

12 Guideline Diabetes: 8 strategies to put into practice. 2013

Adler, Ronald N / Harlan, David M / Anonymous4580761. ·UMass Memorial Health Care, Hahnemann Family Health Center, Worcester, MA, USA. Email: Ronald.adler@umass memorial.org. · ·J Fam Pract · Pubmed #24143345.

ABSTRACT: In search of ways to improve the way you approach diabetes care in your practice? Consider these strategies, which have worked for us-- and have evidence to support them.

13 Guideline Diabetes and mental health. 2013

Anonymous5510759 / Robinson, David J / Luthra, Meera / Vallis, Michael. · ·Can J Diabetes · Pubmed #24070971.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline Recommendations for high-priority research on cancer-related fatigue in children and adults. 2013

Barsevick, Andrea M / Irwin, Michael R / Hinds, Pamela / Miller, Andrew / Berger, Ann / Jacobsen, Paul / Ancoli-Israel, Sonia / Reeve, Bryce B / Mustian, Karen / O'Mara, Ann / Lai, Jin-Shei / Fisch, Michael / Cella, David / Anonymous1320760. ·Affiliations of authors: Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (AMB); University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (MRI); Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC (PH); Emory University, Atlanta, GA (AM); University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (AB); Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (PJ); University of California-San Diego, San Diego, CA (SA-I); University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (RBR); University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (KM); National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (AOM); Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (J-SL, DC); M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (MF). · ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #24047960.

ABSTRACT: Over the past decades, some scientific progress has been made in understanding and treating cancer-related fatigue (CRF). However, three major problems have limited further progress: lack of agreement about measurement, inadequate understanding of the underlying biology, and problems in the conduct of clinical trials for CRF. This commentary reports the recommendations of a National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials Planning Meeting and an ongoing National Cancer Institute working group to address these problems so that high-priority research and clinical trials can be conducted to advance the science of CRF and its treatment. Recommendations to address measurement issues included revising the current case definition to reflect more rigorous criteria, adopting the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System fatigue scales as standard measures of CRF, and linking legacy measures to the scales. With regard to the biology of CRF, the group identified the need for longitudinal research to examine biobehavioral mechanisms underlying CRF and testing mechanistic hypotheses within the context of intervention research. To address clinical trial issues, recommendations included using only placebo-controlled trial designs. setting eligibility to minimize sample heterogeneity or enable subgroup analysis, establishing a CRF severity threshold for participation in clinical trials, conducting dissemination trials of efficacious interventions (such as exercise), and combining nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions to exploit the potential synergy between these approaches. Accomplishing these goals has the potential to advance the science of CRF and improve the clinical management of this troubling symptom.

15 Guideline World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of unipolar depressive disorders, part 1: update 2013 on the acute and continuation treatment of unipolar depressive disorders. 2013

Bauer, Michael / Pfennig, Andrea / Severus, Emanuel / Whybrow, Peter C / Angst, Jules / Möller, Hans-Jürgen / Anonymous2910754. ·Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany. michael.bauer@uniklinikum-dresden.de · ·World J Biol Psychiatry · Pubmed #23879318.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This 2013 update of the practice guidelines for the biological treatment of unipolar depressive disorders was developed by an international Task Force of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP). The goal has been to systematically review all available evidence pertaining to the treatment of unipolar depressive disorders, and to produce a series of practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful based on the available evidence. The guidelines are intended for use by all physicians seeing and treating patients with these conditions. METHODS: The 2013 update was conducted by a systematic update literature search and appraisal. All recommendations were approved by the Guidelines Task Force. RESULTS: This first part of the guidelines (Part 1) covers disease definition, classification, epidemiology, and course of unipolar depressive disorders, as well as the management of the acute and continuation phase treatment. It is primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antidepressants, other psychopharmacological medications, electroconvulsive therapy, light therapy, adjunctive and novel therapeutic strategies) of adults. CONCLUSIONS: To date, there is a variety of evidence-based antidepressant treatment options available. Nevertheless there is still a substantial proportion of patients not achieving full remission. In addition, somatic and psychiatric comorbidities and other special circumstances need to be more thoroughly investigated. Therefore, further high-quality informative randomized controlled trials are urgently needed.

16 Guideline Recommendations on screening for depression in adults. 2013

Anonymous4550750 / Joffres, Michel / Jaramillo, Alejandra / Dickinson, James / Lewin, Gabriela / Pottie, Kevin / Shaw, Elizabeth / Connor Gorber, Sarah / Tonelli, Marcello. ·Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC. · ·CMAJ · Pubmed #23670157.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Guideline Second European evidence-based consensus on the diagnosis and management of ulcerative colitis part 3: special situations. 2013

Van Assche, Gert / Dignass, Axel / Bokemeyer, Bernd / Danese, Silvio / Gionchetti, Paolo / Moser, Gabriele / Beaugerie, Laurent / Gomollón, Fernando / Häuser, Winfried / Herrlinger, Klaus / Oldenburg, Bas / Panes, Julian / Portela, Francisco / Rogler, Gerhard / Stein, Jürgen / Tilg, Herbert / Travis, Simon / Lindsay, James O / Anonymous210739. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Mt. Sinai Hospital and University Health Network,University of Toronto and University of Leuven, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X5. gvanassche@mtsinai.on.ca · ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #23040453.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Guideline [Diabetes and social deprivation. National Academy of Medicine]. 2012

Anonymous2930736 / Jaffiol, Claude. · ·Bull Acad Natl Med · Pubmed #23596864.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline 2012 ACCF/AHA/ACP/AATS/PCNA/SCAI/STS Guideline for the diagnosis and management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines, and the American College of Physicians, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. 2012

Fihn, Stephan D / Gardin, Julius M / Abrams, Jonathan / Berra, Kathleen / Blankenship, James C / Dallas, Apostolos P / Douglas, Pamela S / Foody, Joanne M / Gerber, Thomas C / Hinderliter, Alan L / King, Spencer B / Kligfield, Paul D / Krumholz, Harlan M / Kwong, Raymond Y K / Lim, Michael J / Linderbaum, Jane A / Mack, Michael J / Munger, Mark A / Prager, Richard L / Sabik, Joseph F / Shaw, Leslee J / Sikkema, Joanna D / Smith, Craig R / Smith, Sidney C / Spertus, John A / Williams, Sankey V / Anonymous2230734 / Anonymous2240734 / Anonymous2250734 / Anonymous2260734 / Anonymous2270734 / Anonymous2280734 / Anonymous2290734. · ·J Am Coll Cardiol · Pubmed #23182125.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Guideline [Definition, diagnosis and therapy of chronic widespread pain and so-called fibromyalgia syndrome in children and adolescents. Systematic literature review and guideline]. 2012

Zernikow, B / Gerhold, K / Bürk, G / Häuser, W / Hinze, C H / Hospach, T / Illhardt, A / Mönkemöller, K / Richter, M / Schnöbel-Müller, E / Häfner, R / Anonymous2710721. ·Deutsches Kinderschmerzzentrum, Vestische Kinder- und Jugendklinik, Universität Witten/Herdecke, Dr.-Friedrich-Steiner-Str. 5, 45711, Datteln, Deutschland. b.zernikow@deutsches-kinderschmerzzentrum.de · ·Schmerz · Pubmed #22760465.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The scheduled update to the German S3 guidelines on fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies ("Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften", AWMF; registration number 041/004) was planned starting in March 2011. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The development of the guidelines was coordinated by the German Interdisciplinary Association for Pain Therapy ("Deutsche Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Schmerztherapie", DIVS), 9 scientific medical societies and 2 patient self-help organizations. Eight working groups with a total of 50 members were evenly balanced in terms of gender, medical field, potential conflicts of interest and hierarchical position in the medical and scientific fields. Literature searches were performed using the Medline, PsycInfo, Scopus and Cochrane Library databases (until December 2010). The grading of the strength of the evidence followed the scheme of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. The formulation and grading of recommendations was accomplished using a multi-step, formal consensus process. The guidelines were reviewed by the boards of the participating scientific medical societies. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The diagnosis FMS in children and adolescents is not established. In so-called juvenile FMS (JFMS) multidimensional diagnostics with validated measures should be performed. Multimodal therapy is warranted. In the case of severe pain-related disability, therapy should be primarily performed on an inpatient basis. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under "Supplemental").

21 Guideline [Drug therapy of fibromyalgia syndrome. Systematic review, meta-analysis and guideline]. 2012

Sommer, C / Häuser, W / Alten, R / Petzke, F / Späth, M / Tölle, T / Uçeyler, N / Winkelmann, A / Winter, E / Bär, K J / Anonymous2690721. ·Neurologische Klinik, Universitätsklinikum Würzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 11, 97080, Würzburg, Deutschland. sommer@uni-wuerzburg.de · ·Schmerz · Pubmed #22760463.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The scheduled update to the German S3 guidelines on fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies ("Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften", AWMF; registration number 041/004) was planned starting in March 2011. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The development of the guidelines was coordinated by the German Interdisciplinary Association for Pain Therapy ("Deutsche Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Schmerztherapie", DIVS), 9 scientific medical societies and 2 patient self-help organizations. Eight working groups with a total of 50 members were evenly balanced in terms of gender, medical field, potential conflicts of interest and hierarchical position in the medical and scientific fields. Literature searches were performed using the Medline, PsycInfo, Scopus and Cochrane Library databases (until December 2010). The grading of the strength of the evidence followed the scheme of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. The recommendations were based on level of evidence, efficacy (meta-analysis of the outcomes pain, sleep, fatigue and health-related quality of life), acceptability (total dropout rate), risks (adverse events) and applicability of treatment modalities in the German health care system. The formulation and grading of recommendations was accomplished using a multi-step, formal consensus process. The guidelines were reviewed by the boards of the participating scientific medical societies. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Amitriptyline and-in case of comorbid depressive disorder or generalized anxiety disorder-duloxetine are recommended. Off-label use of duloxetine and pregabalin can be considered in case of no comorbid mental disorder. Strong opioids are not recommended. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under "Supplemental").

22 Guideline [Fibromyalgia syndrome. Definition, classification, clinical diagnosis and prognosis]. 2012

Eich, W / Häuser, W / Arnold, B / Jäckel, W / Offenbächer, M / Petzke, F / Schiltenwolf, M / Settan, M / Sommer, C / Tölle, T / Uçeyler, N / Henningsen, P / Anonymous2630721. ·Klinik für Allgemeine Innere Medizin und Psychosomatik, Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 10, 69210, Heidelberg, Deutschland. wolfgang.eich@med.uni-heidelberg.de · ·Schmerz · Pubmed #22760457.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The scheduled update to the German S3 guidelines on fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies ("Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften", AWMF; registration number 041/004) was planned starting in March 2011. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The development of the guidelines was coordinated by the German Interdisciplinary Association for Pain Therapy ("Deutsche Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Schmerztherapie", DIVS), 9 scientific medical societies and 2 patient self-help organizations. Eight working groups with a total of 50 members were evenly balanced in terms of gender, medical field, potential conflicts of interest and hierarchical position in the medical and scientific fields. Literature searches were performed using the Medline, PsycInfo, Scopus and Cochrane Library databases (until December 2010). The grading of the strength of the evidence followed the scheme of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. The formulation and grading of recommendations was accomplished using a multi-step, formal consensus process. The guidelines were reviewed by the boards of the participating scientific medical societies. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The clinical diagnosis of FMS can be established by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 1990 classification criteria (with tender point examination), by the modified preliminary diagnostic ACR 2010 criteria or by the diagnostic criteria of the German interdisciplinary guideline (AWMF) on FMS. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under "Supplemental").

23 Guideline Managing medical and psychiatric comorbidity in individuals with major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. 2012

McIntyre, Roger S / Rosenbluth, Michael / Ramasubbu, Rajamannar / Bond, David J / Taylor, Valerie H / Beaulieu, Serge / Schaffer, Ayal / Anonymous4860716. ·Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. roger.mcintyre@uhn.on.ca · ·Ann Clin Psychiatry · Pubmed #22563572.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Most individuals with mood disorders experience psychiatric and/or medical comorbidity. Available treatment guidelines for major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) have focused on treating mood disorders in the absence of comorbidity. Treating comorbid conditions in patients with mood disorders requires sufficient decision support to inform appropriate treatment. METHODS: The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) task force sought to prepare evidence- and consensus-based recommendations on treating comorbid conditions in patients with MDD and BD by conducting a systematic and qualitative review of extant data. The relative paucity of studies in this area often required a consensus-based approach to selecting and sequencing treatments. RESULTS: Several principles emerge when managing comorbidity. They include, but are not limited to: establishing the diagnosis, risk assessment, establishing the appropriate setting for treatment, chronic disease management, concurrent or sequential treatment, and measurement-based care. CONCLUSIONS: Efficacy, effectiveness, and comparative effectiveness research should emphasize treatment and management of conditions comorbid with mood disorders. Clinicians are encouraged to screen and systematically monitor for comorbid conditions in all individuals with mood disorders. The common comorbidity in mood disorders raises fundamental questions about overlapping and discrete pathoetiology.

24 Guideline [Integrated approach to comorbidity in patients with psoriasis.Working Group on Psoriasis-associated Comorbidities]. 2012

Daudén, E / Castañeda, S / Suárez, C / García-Campayo, J / Blasco, A J / Aguilar, M D / Ferrándiz, C / Puig, L / Sánchez-Carazo, J L / Anonymous2550711. ·Servicio de Dermatología, IIS-Princesa, Hospital Universitario La Princesa, Madrid, España. · ·Actas Dermosifiliogr · Pubmed #22364603.

ABSTRACT: The relationship between psoriasis and associated diseases has drawn particular interest in recent years. To provide appropriate management of psoriasis from an early stage, it is necessary to include prompt diagnosis of concomitant disease and to prevent and treat any comorbidity found. Such an integrated approach also serves to ensure that the drugs used to treat associated diseases do not interfere with the management of psoriasis, and vice versa. This clinical practice guideline on the management of comorbidity in psoriasis has been drawn up to help dermatologists to achieve an integrated approach to this inflammatory disease. The guide focuses primarily on the diseases most often found in patients with psoriasis, which include psoriatic arthritis, cardiovascular disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, inflammatory bowel disease, lymphoma, skin cancer, anxiety, and depression. Cardiovascular disease is approached through the study of its major risk factors (obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome). Other cardiovascular risk factors related to lifestyle, such as smoking and alcohol consumption, are also discussed. The overall aim of this guide is to provide the dermatologist with a precise, easy to-use tool for systematizing the diagnosis of comorbidity in these patients and to facilitate decisions regarding referral and treatment once associated diseases have been found. The specific objectives are as follows: a) to review the most common diseases associated with psoriasis, including the prevalence of each one and its importance to the dermatologist; b) to provide guidelines for the physical examination, diagnostic tests, and clinical criteria on which to base a preliminary diagnosis; c) to establish criteria for the appropriate referral of patients with suspected comorbidity; d) to provide information on how therapies for psoriasis may modify the course of associated diseases, and e) to provide information concerning treatments prescribed for associated diseases that may have an impact on the course of psoriasis. This guide has been written by a working group of guideline methodologists and clinical experts. The selection of the diseases included was based on a systematic review of the literature and a summary of available evidence; information on the prevalence of each comorbidity was also taken from the literature. The recommendations on diagnostic criteria are based on the main clinical practice guidelines for each of the diseases discussed and on the recommendations of the expert advisory group. The information regarding the repercussions of psoriasis treatments on comorbid diseases was obtained from the summary of product characteristics of each drug. The statements concerning the impact on psoriasis of the associated diseases and their treatment are based on the review of the literature.

25 Guideline Ministry of Health clinical practice guidelines: depression. 2012

Chua, H C / Chan, L L / Chee, K S / Chen, Y H / Chin, S A / Chua, P L W / Fones, S L C / Fung, D / Khoo, C L / Kwek, S K D / Lim, E C L / Ling, J / Poh, P / Sim, K / Tan, B L / Tan, C H / Tan, L L / Tan, Y H C / Tay, W K / Yeo, C / Su, H C A / Anonymous4420710. ·Alexandra Hospital/Jurong Health Services, Singapore. · ·Singapore Med J · Pubmed #22337190.

ABSTRACT: The Ministry of Health (MOH) have updated the clinical practice guidelines on Depression to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for depression. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on Depression, for the information of readers of the Singapore Medical Journal. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/home/Publications/guidelines/cpg/2012/depression.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

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