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Depression: HELP
Articles by Allan A. Abbass
Based on 19 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, A. Abbass wrote the following 19 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Bona Fide Psychotherapy Models Are Equally Effective for Major Depressive Disorder: Future Research Directions. 2016

Abbass, Allan A / Town, Joel M. ·Centre for Emotions and Health, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Centre for Emotions and Health, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada2National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care South West Peninsula, Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, Plymouth, England. ·JAMA Psychiatry · Pubmed #27487423.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Review The Emergence of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Treatment Resistant Patients: Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy. 2016

Abbass, Allan. ·FRCPC, Professor and Director, Centre for Emotions and Health, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. ·Psychodyn Psychiatry · Pubmed #27200465.

ABSTRACT: Intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy (ISTDP) was developed out of the need for relatively short psychodynamic psychotherapeutic treatment approaches to complex and resistant patient populations so common in public health systems. Based on extensive study of video recordings, Habib Davanloo discovered, and other researchers have validated, some important clinical ingredients that align the therapist with healthy aspects of the patient striving for resolution of chronic neurotic disorders and fragile character structure. In the case of character neurotic highly resistant patients, these approaches including "pressure," "clarification," "challenge to defenses," and "head on collision" can be used in a tailored and properly timed way to help the chronically suffering patient to overcome his or her own resistance and access core drivers of these pathologies. In this article the meta-psychological basis of ISTDP is reviewed and illustrated with an extended case vignette.

3 Review The efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression: A meta-analysis update. 2015

Driessen, Ellen / Hegelmaier, Lisa M / Abbass, Allan A / Barber, Jacques P / Dekker, Jack J M / Van, Henricus L / Jansma, Elise P / Cuijpers, Pim. ·VU University Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: e.driessen@vu.nl. · VU University Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Dalhousie University, Centre for Emotions and Health, Halifax, NS, Canada. · Adelphi University, The Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies, NY, USA. · VU University Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · VU University Amsterdam, University Library, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · VU University Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Clin Psychol Rev · Pubmed #26281018.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) for depression is debated. Recently, a number of large-scale and high-quality studies have been conducted. We examined the efficacy of STPP by updating our 2010 meta-analysis. RESULTS: After a thorough literature search, 54 studies (33 randomized clinical trials) totaling 3946 subjects were included. STPP was significantly more effective than control conditions at post-treatment on depression, general psychopathology and quality of life measures (d=0.49 to 0.69). STPP pre-treatment to post-treatment changes (d=0.57 to 1.18) indicated significant improvements on all outcome measures, which either significantly improved further (d=0.20 to 1.04) or were maintained from post-treatment to follow-up. No significant differences were found between individual STPP and other psychotherapies at post-treatment (d=-0.14) and follow-up (d=-0.06) in analyses that were adequately powered to detect a clinically relevant difference. STPP was significantly more efficacious than other psychotherapies on anxiety measures at both post-treatment (d=0.35) and follow-up (d=0.76). CONCLUSION: We found clear indications that STPP is effective in the treatment of depression in adults. Although more high-quality studies are needed, particularly to assess the efficacy of STPP compared to control conditions at follow-up and to antidepressants, these findings add to the evidence-base of STPP for depression.

4 Review Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for personality disorders: a critical review of randomized controlled trials. 2011

Town, Joel M / Abbass, Allan / Hardy, Gillian. ·Dalhousie University Department of Psychiatry, Canada. joel.town@dal.ca ·J Pers Disord · Pubmed #22217220.

ABSTRACT: The research evidence for Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP) in the treatment of personality disorders (PD) was examined through consideration of studies utilizing randomized controlled designs. An extensive literature search revealed eight published Randomized Controlled Trials (RCT) of moderate study quality. A critical review of this literature is offered to provide an evidence-based guidance for clinicians and implications for treatments are discussed. Preliminary conclusions suggest STPP may be considered an efficacious empirically-supported treatment option for a range of PDs, producing significant and medium to long-term improvements for a large percentage of patients. Further research is recommended to allow comparisons with alternative evidence-based approaches.

5 Review The efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy for depressive disorders with comorbid personality disorder. 2011

Abbass, Allan / Town, Joel / Driessen, Ellen. ·Centre for Emotions and Health at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. allan.abbass@dal.ca ·Psychiatry · Pubmed #21463171.

ABSTRACT: The presence of comorbid personality disorder (PD) is one of the factors that can make the treatment of depression unsuccessful. Short-term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP) has been shown efficacious in the treatment of personality and depressive disorders (DD). However, the efficacy of STPP for comorbid DD and PD has not been systematically evaluated. In this study, data from patients meeting criteria for both DD and PD participating from randomized controlled trials of STPP was collected, systematically reviewed, and meta-analyzed where possible. Eight studies were included, 6 with major depression and 2 with minor depressive disorders. Pre- to post- treatment effects sizes were large (d = 1.00-1.27), suggesting symptom improvement during STPP, and these gains were maintained in follow-ups averaging over 1.5 years. For major depression, no differences were found comparing STPP to other psychotherapies, and STPP was found superior to a wait-list condition in one study. STPP may have had an advantage over other therapy controls in treating minor depression as noted in ratings of general psychopathology. Patients with Cluster A/B and C PD were responsive to STPP, with the majority of all studied patients showing clinically significant change on self-report measures. Within the limits of this study, these findings suggest that STPP warrants consideration as a first line treatment for combined personality disorder and depression. Future research directions are proposed.

6 Clinical Trial Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy Trial Therapy: Effectiveness and Role of "Unlocking the Unconscious". 2017

Abbass, Allan / Town, Joel / Ogrodniczuk, John / Joffres, Michel / Lilliengren, Peter. ·*Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Halifax; †Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia; ‡Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada; and §Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden. ·J Nerv Ment Dis · Pubmed #28459728.

ABSTRACT: This study examined the effects of trial therapy interviews using intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy with 500 mixed sample, tertiary center patients. Furthermore, we investigated whether the effect of trial therapy was larger for patients who had a major unlocking of the unconscious during the interview compared with those who did not. Outcome measures were the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP), measured at baseline and at 1-month follow-up. Significant outcome effects were observed for both the BSI and the IIP with small to moderate preeffect/posteffect sizes, Cohen's d = 0.52 and 0.23, respectively. Treatment effects were greater in patients who had a major unlocking of the unconscious compared with those who did not. The trial therapy interview appears to be beneficial, and its effects may relate to certain therapeutic processes. Further controlled research is warranted.

7 Clinical Trial Symptom- and personality disorder changes in intensive short-term dynamic residential treatment for treatment-resistant anxiety and depressive disorders. 2016

Solbakken, Ole André / Abbass, Allan. ·1The Department of Psychology,University of Oslo,Oslo,Norway. · 3The Centre for Emotions and Health,Dalhousie University,Halifax, NS,Canada. ·Acta Neuropsychiatr · Pubmed #26916592.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The study investigated the effectiveness of an 8-week intensive residential treatment programme based on principles from intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy for patients with known treatment-resistant anxiety- and/or depressive disorders (mainly with comorbid personality disorders). METHODS: Patients (N=95) with prior repeated treatment failure were included. Changes in self-reported target complaints, symptom severity, and overall interpersonal problems have been presented for these patients in two previous articles. We now expand upon the existing knowledge by presenting novel data from a number of important observer-based and self-reported outcome domains (diagnostic changes on Axis I and II, changes in overall personality dysfunction, disorder complexity, medication use, health care utilisation, and occupational activity). RESULTS: There were pervasive and significant improvements on all measures during treatment, which were maintained or further improved during follow-up. Fourteen months after the end of treatment, 46.26% of patients had recovered in terms of Axis I pathology, 63.79% had recovered in terms of Axis II pathology, 71.18% had returned to work, and there was a 28.62% reduction in regular use of psychotropic medications. Health care utilisation was reduced by 65.55%, and there were large improvements in disorder complexity and levels of personality dysfunction. CONCLUSION: The treatment programme was highly effective for patients with common and complex treatment-resistant mental disorders. Results are encouraging for the relatively large number of patients who tend not to benefit from standard formats of treatment for debilitating psychological problems.

8 Article Which patients benefit specifically from short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) for depression? Study protocol of a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data. 2018

Driessen, Ellen / Abbass, Allan A / Barber, Jacques P / Connolly Gibbons, Mary Beth / Dekker, Jack J M / Fokkema, Marjolein / Fonagy, Peter / Hollon, Steven D / Jansma, Elise P / de Maat, Saskia C M / Town, Joel M / Twisk, Jos W R / Van, Henricus L / Weitz, Erica / Cuijpers, Pim. ·Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health research institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Centre for Emotions & Health, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Gordon F. Derner School of Psychology, Adelphi University, Garden City, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Methodology and Statistics, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands. · Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · University Library, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Dutch Psychoanalytic Institute, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #29463590.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) is an empirically supported treatment that is often used to treat depression. However, it is largely unclear if certain subgroups of depressed patients can benefit specifically from this treatment method. We describe the protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data (IPD) aimed at identifying predictors and moderators of STPP for depression efficacy. METHOD AND ANALYSIS: We will conduct a systematic literature search in multiple bibliographic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase.com, Web of Science and Cochrane's Central Register of Controlled Trials), 'grey literature' databases (GLIN and UMI ProQuest) and a prospective trial register (http://www.controlled-trials.com). We will include studies reporting (a) outcomes on standardised measures of (b) depressed (c) adult patients (d) receiving STPP. We will next invite the authors of these studies to share the participant-level data of their trials and combine these data to conduct IPD meta-analyses. The primary outcome for this study is post-treatment efficacy as assessed by a continuous depression measure. Potential predictors and moderators include all sociodemographic variables, clinical variables and psychological patient characteristics that are measured before the start of treatment and are assessed consistently across studies. One-stage IPD meta-analyses will be conducted using mixed-effects models. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Institutional review board approval is not required for this study. We intend to submit reports of the outcomes of this study for publication to international peer-reviewed journals in the fields of psychiatry or clinical psychology. We also intend to present the outcomes at international scientific conferences aimed at psychotherapy researchers and clinicians. The findings of this study can have important clinical implications, as they can inform expectations of STPP efficacy for individual patients, and help to make an informed choice concerning the best treatment option for a given patient. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42017056029.

9 Article Body talk: Sex differences in the influence of alexithymia on physical complaints among psychiatric outpatients. 2018

Ogrodniczuk, John S / Kealy, David / Joyce, Anthony S / Abbass, Allan A. ·Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Electronic address: john.ogrodniczuk@ubc.ca. · Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. ·Psychiatry Res · Pubmed #29309955.

ABSTRACT: This study investigated the relationship between alexithymia and physical complaints among psychiatric outpatients, and whether sex moderated this relationship. Participants (N = 185) completed measures of physical complaints (bodily symptom burden, pain severity, pain interference), alexithymia, current symptom (depression, anxiety) distress, and somatosensory amplification (i.e., a person's tendency to be bothered by physical sensations). Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted, controlling for the influence of current psychiatric symptom distress and somatosensory amplification. Findings revealed differential relationships between alexithymia and physical complaints (pain interference) for women and men, in addition to main effects for sex and alexithymia. The findings suggest that the negative influence of alexithymia on bodily-related problems may not be universal.

10 Article A randomised controlled trial of Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy for treatment resistant depression: the Halifax Depression Study. 2017

Town, Joel M / Abbass, Allan / Stride, Chris / Bernier, Denise. ·Centre for Emotions & Health, Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada; Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, Plymouth, UK. Electronic address: joel.town@plymouth.ac.uk. · Centre for Emotions & Health, Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. · The Institute of Work Psychology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #28266318.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: While short-term psychodynamic psychotherapies have been shown effective for major depression, it is unclear if this could be a treatment of choice for depressed patients, many of whom have chronic and complex health issues, who have not sufficiently responded to treatment. METHOD: This superiority trial used a single blind randomised parallel group design to test the efficacy of time-limited Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy (ISTDP) for treatment resistant depression (TRD). Patients referred to secondary care community mental health teams (CMHT) who met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive episode, had received antidepressant treatment ≥6 weeks, and had Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) scores of ≥16 were recruited. The effects of 20 sessions of ISTDP were judged through comparison against secondary care CMHT treatment as usual (TAU). The primary outcome was HAM-D scores at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) self-report measures for depression and dichotomous measures of both remission (defined as HAM-D score ≤7) and partial remission (defined as HAM-D score ≤12). RESULTS: Sixty patients were randomised to 2 groups (ISTDP=30 and TAU=30), with data collected at baseline, 3, and 6 months. Multi-level linear regression modelling showed that change over time on both depression scales was significantly greater in the ISTDP group in comparison to TAU. Statistically significant between-group treatment differences, in the moderate to large range, favouring ISTDP, were observed on both the observer rated (Cohen's d=0.75) and self-report measures (Cohen's d=0.85) of depression. Relative to TAU, patients in the ISTDP group were significantly more likely after 6 months to achieve complete remission (36.0% vs. 3.7%) and partial remission (48.0% vs. 18.5%). LIMITATIONS: It is unclear if the results are generalizable to other providers, geographical locations and cultures. CONCLUSIONS: Time-limited ISTDP appears an effective treatment option for TRD, showing large advantages over routine treatment delivered by secondary care services.

11 Article Effects of Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy on Depressive Symptoms and Executive Functioning in Major Depression. 2016

Ajilchi, Bita / Nejati, Vahid / Town, Joel M / Wilson, Ryan / Abbass, Allan. ·*Department of Psychology, Faculty of Human Science, Sciences & Research Branch, Islamic Azad University (IAU); †Department of Psychology, Faculty of Human Science, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran; and ‡Department of Psychiatry, and §Centre for Emotions & Health, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. ·J Nerv Ment Dis · Pubmed #27065106.

ABSTRACT: This study examined the efficacy of intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy (ISTDP) on depressive symptoms and executive functioning in patients with major depression. We examined pretest, posttest, and follow-up depression scores as well as pretest-posttest executive functioning scores between 16 participants receiving ISTDP and 16 allocated to wait-list control. Participants in each group were matched according to age, sex, and educational level. Mixed-models analyses demonstrated significant interaction effects of group and time on depression scores when the group ISTDP was compared with the wait-list control group; participants receiving ISTDP had significantly reduced depression severity both after treatment and at follow-up. Next, a series of hierarchical regression models demonstrated modest improvements on most tests of executive functioning in participants receiving ISTDP. Depressed patients receiving ISTDP show a sustained reduction in depression severity after treatment and after 12-month follow-up and improvements in executive functioning after treatment compared with a wait-list control.

12 Article Intensive short-term dynamic residential treatment program for patients with treatment-resistant disorders. 2015

Solbakken, Ole André / Abbass, Allan. ·The Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Postboks 1094, Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: o.a.solbakken@psykologi.uio.no; Drammen DistrictPsychiatricCentre,DivisionforMentalHealthandAddiction,VestreVikenHealthTrust,Norway. · The Centre for Emotions and Health, Dalhousie University, 5909 Veterans Memorial Lane, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 2E2. Electronic address: allan.abbass@dal.ca. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #25917295.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The study investigated the effectiveness of an Intensive Short-Term Dynamic (ISTDP) residential treatment program for patients with treatment resistant anxiety- and/or depressive disorders, with and without comorbid personality disorders. METHOD: A non-randomized controlled trial examined the effects of an eight week intensive residential treatment program based on principles from ISTDP. Patients (N=60), who had repeated prior treatment failure for current mental disorder, sufficient dysfunction to warrant hospitalization, and evidencing capacity to take an intrapsychic perspective on own problems, were included. Outcome variables included measures of target complaints (depression/anxiety, social role dysfunction, and interpersonal distress), general symptom distress, and interpersonal functioning. Measures were administered throughout and after treatment. Change was assessed by multilevel growth curve modeling. Changes during and after treatment were compared to those reported by a sub-sample of wait-list controls taking treatment as usual (N=30). RESULTS: The treatment group evidenced significant improvements on all measures. By contrast, receiving treatment as usual while on the wait-list did not yield significant changes. Effect sizes in the treatment group were consistently large at both termination and follow-up. Fourteen months after treatment 50.0% of patients had recovered in terms of target complaints. Approximately 53.3% and 48.3%, respectively, had recovered in terms of general symptom distress and interpersonal functioning. LIMITATIONS: Limitations included a relatively small sample size, inability to discern the effectiveness of separate components of the treatment program, and lack of randomization of patients to wait-list and treatment. CONCLUSION: ISTDP-based residential treatment with an eight-week time-limit appears to be effective for alleviating common and severe, treatment resistant mental disorders. The treatment program was superior to receiving treatment as usual while on the wait-list. Participation in the program quickly reduced target complaints, symptoms and interpersonal problems for patients who, based on previous treatment experiences, were expected to fare poorly in treatment. Gains were consistently maintained or improved further at follow-up. Results are promising for patients with chronic debilitating problems who often do not profit from traditional psychiatric treatment.

13 Article Implementation of an intensive short-term dynamic treatment program for patients with treatment-resistant disorders in residential care. 2014

Solbakken, Ole André / Abbass, Allan. ·The Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Forskningsv, 3, Pb, 1094 Blindern, Oslo 0317, Norway. o.a.solbakken@psykologi.uio.no. ·BMC Psychiatry · Pubmed #24438222.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This protocol presents a systematic residential treatment- and research program aimed at patients who have not responded adequately to previous treatment attempts. Patients included in the program primarily suffer from anxiety and/or depressive disorders and usually from one or more comorbid personality disorders. The treatment program is time-limited (eight weeks) and has its basis in treatment principles specified in intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy (ISTDP). This treatment modality is theoretically well-suited for the handling of various forms of treatment resistance presumably central to these patients' previous non-response to psychological and psychiatric interventions. METHODS/DESIGN: The research component of the project entails a naturalistic longitudinal research design which aims at systematic evaluation of the effectiveness of the program. To our knowledge, this is one of the first treatment programs and corresponding research projects that systematically select patients with previous non- or negative response to treatment and subjects them to a broad and comprehensive, but theoretically unified and consistent treatment system. DISCUSSION: The present paper introduces the project, describes its theoretical and methodological underpinnings, and discusses possible future implications and contributions of the project. It thereby serves as a comprehensive background reference to future publications from the project.

14 Article Key clinical processes in intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy. 2013

Abbass, Allan A / Town, Joel M. ·Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 2E2, Canada. allan.abbass@dal.ca ·Psychotherapy (Chic) · Pubmed #24000866.

ABSTRACT: Davanloo's Intensive Short-term Dynamic Psychotherapy (ISTDP), while derived from traditional psychoanalytic theory, is a modified brief treatment with growing empirical support for its effectiveness with clients with psychoneurotic disorders and character pathology. This model describes key empirically derived processes that can bring ready access to unprocessed unconscious emotions that otherwise perpetuate widespread symptom and behavioral disorders. Herein we describe the metapsychological underpinnings, clinical application, and evidence for central interventions used in ISTDP through the use of a case example.

15 Article The efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression: a meta-analysis. 2010

Driessen, Ellen / Cuijpers, Pim / de Maat, Saskia C M / Abbass, Allan A / de Jonghe, Frans / Dekker, Jack J M. ·VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Psychology and Education, Department of Clinical Psychology, Van der Boechorststraat 1, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands. e.driessen@psy.vu.nl ·Clin Psychol Rev · Pubmed #19766369.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: It remains largely unclear, firstly whether short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) is an effective treatment for depression, and secondly, which study, participant, or intervention characteristics may moderate treatment effects. The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of STPP for depression and to identify treatment moderators. RESULTS: After a thorough literature search, 23 studies totaling 1365 subjects were included. STPP was found to be significantly more effective than control conditions at post-treatment (d=0.69). STPP pre-treatment to post-treatment changes in depression level were large (d=1.34), and these changes were maintained until 1-year follow-up. Compared to other psychotherapies, a small but significant effect size (d=-0.30) was found, indicating the superiority of other treatments immediately post-treatment, but no significant differences were found at 3-month (d=-0.05) and 12-month (d=-0.29) follow-up. Studies employing STPP in groups (d=0.83) found significantly lower pre-treatment to post-treatment effect sizes than studies using an individual format (d=1.48). Supportive and expressive STPP modes were found to be equally efficacious (d=1.36 and d=1.30, respectively). CONCLUSION: We found clear indications that STPP is effective in the treatment of depression in adults. Although more high-quality RCTs are necessary to assess the efficacy of the STPP variants, the current findings add to the evidence-base of STPP for depression.

16 Minor Updating the Evidence and Recommendations for Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder in Adults. 2017

Town, Joel M / Abbass, Allan / Driessen, Ellen / Luyten, Patrick / Weerasekera, Priyanthy. ·PenCLAHRC, Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, Plymouth, UK. · Centre for Emotions and Health, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. · Department of Clinical, Neuro, and Developmental Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam and VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Research Department of Clinical, Educational, and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK. · Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #28055257.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Minor What is the evidence for specific factors in the psychotherapeutic treatment of fibromyalgia? Comment on "Is brief psychodynamic psychotherapy in primary fibromyalgia syndrome with concurrent depression an effective treatment? A randomized controlled trial". 2013

Luyten, Patrick / Abbass, Allan. ·Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Leuven, Belgium; Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: patrick.luyten@ppw.kuleuven.be. ·Gen Hosp Psychiatry · Pubmed #23992628.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Minor Evidence for short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression. 2012

Abbass, Allan A / Shedler, Jonathan / Town, Joel M. · ·J Clin Psychiatry · Pubmed #22697196.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Minor The efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression: a summary of recent findings. 2010

Abbass, A / Driessen, E. · ·Acta Psychiatr Scand · Pubmed #20064127.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --