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Depression: HELP
Articles by Louise Arseneault
Based on 17 articles published since 2010
(Why 17 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, L. Arseneault wrote the following 17 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Life Span Studies of ADHD-Conceptual Challenges and Predictors of Persistence and Outcome. 2016

Caye, Arthur / Swanson, James / Thapar, Anita / Sibley, Margaret / Arseneault, Louise / Hechtman, Lily / Arnold, L Eugene / Niclasen, Janni / Moffitt, Terrie / Rohde, Luis Augusto. ·ADHD Outpatient Program, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Department of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. · Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA. · MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at the Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA. · MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, Nisonger Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Centre for Collaborative Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. · ADHD Outpatient Program, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Department of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. lrohde@terra.com.br. · National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, São Paulo, Brazil. lrohde@terra.com.br. · Serviço de Psiquiatria da Infância e Adolescência, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, 4o andar, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2350, Porto Alegre, 90035-003, Brazil. lrohde@terra.com.br. ·Curr Psychiatry Rep · Pubmed #27783340.

ABSTRACT: There is a renewed interest in better conceptualizing trajectories of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) from childhood to adulthood, driven by an increased recognition of long-term impairment and potential persistence beyond childhood and adolescence. This review addresses the following major issues relevant to the course of ADHD in light of current evidence from longitudinal studies: (1) conceptual and methodological issues related to measurement of persistence of ADHD, (2) estimates of persistence rate from childhood to adulthood and its predictors, (3) long-term negative outcomes of childhood ADHD and their early predictors, and (4) the recently proposed new adult-onset ADHD. Estimates of persistence vary widely in the literature, and diagnostic criteria, sample characteristics, and information source are the most important factors explaining variability among studies. Evidence indicates that ADHD severity, comorbid conduct disorder and major depressive disorder, and treatment for ADHD are the main predictors of ADHD persistence from childhood to adulthood. Comorbid conduct disorder and ADHD severity in childhood are the most important predictors of adverse outcomes in adulthood among children with ADHD. Three recent population studies suggested the existence of a significant proportion of individuals who report onset of ADHD symptoms and impairments after childhood. Finally, we highlight areas for improvement to increase our understanding of ADHD across the life span.

2 Article Associations between ADHD and emotional problems from childhood to young adulthood: a longitudinal genetically sensitive study. 2020

Stern, Adi / Agnew-Blais, Jessica C / Danese, Andrea / Fisher, Helen L / Matthews, Timothy / Polanczyk, Guilherme V / Wertz, Jasmin / Arseneault, Louise. ·Social, Genetic, and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel. · Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK. · National and Specialist CAMHS Clinic for Trauma, Anxiety, and Depression, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Psychiatry, Faculdade de Medicina FMUSP, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. ·J Child Psychol Psychiatry · Pubmed #32112575.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with emotional problems, and their co-occurrence often leads to worse outcomes. We investigated the developmental associations between ADHD and emotional problems from childhood to early adolescence and examined the genetic and environmental contributions to their developmental link. We further tested whether this developmental association remained across the transition to young adulthood. METHODS: We used data from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a cohort of 2,232 British twins. In childhood, ADHD and emotional problems were assessed at ages 5, 7, 10 and 12 with mothers' and teachers' reports. At age 18, we used self-reported symptoms according to DSM-5 criteria for ADHD, and DSM-IV for anxiety and depression. RESULTS: Longitudinal analyses showed that earlier ADHD was associated with later emotional problems consistently across childhood. However, earlier emotional problems were not associated with later ADHD symptoms. The developmental association between ADHD and later emotional problems in childhood was entirely explained by common genetic factors. Consistent with results in childhood, earlier symptoms of ADHD were associated with later emotional problems during the transition to young adulthood. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that ADHD symptoms are predictors of the development of emotional problems, from childhood up to young adulthood, through shared genetic influences. Interventions targeting ADHD symptoms might prevent the development of emotional problems. Clinicians treating youth with ADHD must be aware of their risk for developing emotional problems and ought to assess, monitor and treat emotional problems alongside ADHD symptoms from childhood to adulthood.

3 Article Identifying Adolescents at Risk for Depression: A Prediction Score Performance in Cohorts Based in Three Different Continents. 2020

Botter-Maio Rocha, Thiago / Fisher, Helen L / Caye, Arthur / Anselmi, Luciana / Arseneault, Louise / Barros, Fernando C / Caspi, Avshalom / Danese, Andrea / Gonçalves, Helen / Harrington, HonaLee / Houts, Renate / Menezes, Ana M B / Moffitt, Terrie E / Mondelli, Valeria / Poulton, Richie / Rohde, Luis Augusto / Wehrmeister, Fernando / Kieling, Christian. ·School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Brazil. · King's College London, Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, London, UK. · School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. · Post-Graduate Program in Epidemiology, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil. · King's College London, Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, London, UK; Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States. · King's College London, Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, London, UK; National and Specialist CAMHS Clinic for Trauma, Anxiety, and Depression, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, London, UK. · Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States. · King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, London, UK; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, King's College London, London, UK. · Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Research Unit, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. · School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, São Paulo, Brazil. · School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Brazil. Electronic address: ckieling@ufrgs.br. ·J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry · Pubmed #31953186.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Prediction models have become frequent in the medical literature, but most published studies are conducted in a single setting. Heterogeneity between development and validation samples has been posited as a major obstacle for the generalization of models. We aimed to develop a multivariable prognostic model using sociodemographic variables easily obtainable from adolescents at age 15 to predict a depressive disorder diagnosis at age 18, and to evaluate its generalizability in two samples from diverse socioeconomic and cultural settings. METHOD: Data from the 1993 Pelotas Birth Cohort were used to develop the prediction model, and its generalizability was evaluated in two representative cohort studies: the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study and the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study. RESULTS: At age 15, 2,192 adolescents with no evidence of current or previous depression were included (44.6% male). The apparent C-statistic of the models derived in Pelotas ranged from 0.76 to 0.79, and the model obtained from a penalized logistic regression was selected for subsequent external evaluation. Major discrepancies between the samples were identified, impacting the external prognostic performance of the model (Dunedin and E-Risk C-statistics of 0.63 and 0.59, respectively). The implementation of recommended strategies to account for this heterogeneity among samples improved the model's calibration in both samples. CONCLUSION: An adolescent depression risk score comprising easily obtainable predictors was developed with good prognostic performance in a Brazilian sample. Heterogeneity among settings was not trivial, but strategies to deal with sample diversity were identified as pivotal for providing better risk stratification across samples. Future efforts should focus on developing better methodological approaches for incorporating heterogeneity in prognostic research.

4 Article Mental Health and Functional Outcomes in Young Adulthood of Children With Psychotic Symptoms: A Longitudinal Cohort Study. 2020

Trotta, Antonella / Arseneault, Louise / Caspi, Avshalom / Moffitt, Terrie E / Danese, Andrea / Pariante, Carmine / Fisher, Helen L. ·Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London UK. · Tony Hillis Unit, Lambeth Hospital, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical School, Durham, NC. · Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London UK. · National & Specialist CAMHS Clinic for Trauma, Anxiety and Depression, South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London UK. ·Schizophr Bull · Pubmed #31361314.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Childhood psychotic symptoms have been associated with various psychiatric disorders in adulthood but their role as early markers of poor outcomes during the crucial transition to adulthood is largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated associations between age-12 psychotic symptoms and a range of mental health problems and functional outcomes at age 18. METHODS: Data were used from the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally representative birth cohort of 2232 twins born in 1994-1995 in England and Wales, followed to age 18 with 93% retention. Childhood psychotic symptoms were assessed in structured interviews at age 12. At age 18, study members' mental health problems, functional outcomes, risky behaviors, and offending were measured using self-reports and official records. RESULTS: Children with psychotic symptoms (N = 125, 5.9%) were more likely to experience a range of mental health problems in young adulthood than children without such symptoms. They were also more likely to be obese, smoke cigarettes, be lonely, be parents, and report a lower quality of life, but not more likely to commit crimes. Childhood psychotic symptoms predicted these poor outcomes over and above other emotional and behavioral problems during childhood. Nevertheless, twin analyses indicated that these associations were largely accounted for by shared family factors. CONCLUSIONS: Psychotic symptoms in childhood signal risk for pervasive mental health and functional difficulties in young adulthood and thus may provide a useful screen for an array of later problems. However, early psychotic symptoms and poor outcomes may be manifestations of shared environmental and genetic risks.

5 Article The epidemiology of trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder in a representative cohort of young people in England and Wales. 2019

Lewis, Stephanie J / Arseneault, Louise / Caspi, Avshalom / Fisher, Helen L / Matthews, Timothy / Moffitt, Terrie E / Odgers, Candice L / Stahl, Daniel / Teng, Jia Ying / Danese, Andrea. ·Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK; Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK; Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. · Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK; Department of Psychological Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK; Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK; National and Specialist CAMHS Clinic for Trauma, Anxiety, and Depression, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. Electronic address: andrea.danese@kcl.ac.uk. ·Lancet Psychiatry · Pubmed #30798897.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Despite the emphasis placed on childhood trauma in psychiatry, comparatively little is known about the epidemiology of trauma and trauma-related psychopathology in young people. We therefore aimed to evaluate the prevalence, clinical features, and risk factors associated with trauma exposure and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in young people. METHODS: We carried out a comprehensive epidemiological study based on participants from the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, a population-representative birth-cohort of 2232 children born in England and Wales in 1994-95. At the follow-up home visit at age 18 years, participants were assessed with structured interviews for trauma exposure, PTSD, other psychopathology, risk events, functional impairment, and service use. Risk factors for PTSD were measured prospectively over four previous assessments between age 5 and 12 years. The key outcomes were the prevalence, clinical features, and risk factors associated with trauma exposure and PTSD. We also derived and tested the internal validity of a PTSD risk calculator. FINDINGS: We found that 642 (31·1%) of 2064 participants reported trauma exposure and 160 (7·8%) of 2063 experienced PTSD by age 18 years. Trauma-exposed participants had high rates of psychopathology (187 [29·2%] of 641 for major depressive episode, 146 [22·9%] of 638 for conduct disorder, and 102 [15·9%] of 641 for alcohol dependence), risk events (160 [25·0%] of 641 for self-harm, 53 [8·3%] of 640 for suicide attempt, and 42 [6·6%] of 640 for violent offence), and functional impairment. Participants with lifetime PTSD had even higher rates of psychopathology (87 [54·7%] of 159 for major depressive episode, 43 [27·0%] of 159 for conduct disorder, and 41 [25·6%] of 160 for alcohol dependence), risk events (78 [48·8%] of 160 for self-harm, 32 [20·1%] of 159 for suicide attempt, and 19 [11·9%] of 159 for violent offence), and functional impairment. However, only 33 (20·6%) of 160 participants with PTSD received help from mental health professionals. The PTSD risk calculator had an internally validated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0·74, indicating adequate discrimination of trauma-exposed participants with and without PTSD, and internally validated calibration-in-the-large of -0·10 and calibration slope of 0·90, indicating adequate calibration. INTERPRETATION: Trauma exposure and PTSD are associated with complex psychiatric presentations, high risk, and significant impairment in young people. Improved screening, reduced barriers to care provision, and comprehensive clinical assessment are needed to ensure that trauma-exposed young people and those with PTSD receive appropriate treatment. FUNDING: The Medical Research Council, the National Institute of Child Health and Development, the Jacobs Foundation, the Nuffield Foundation, the National Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children, the Economic and Social Research Council, the National Institute for Health Research, MQ, and Canadian Institutes for Advanced Research.

6 Article Exploration of NO 2019

Roberts, Susanna / Arseneault, Louise / Barratt, Benjamin / Beevers, Sean / Danese, Andrea / Odgers, Candice L / Moffitt, Terrie E / Reuben, Aaron / Kelly, Frank J / Fisher, Helen L. ·King's College London, Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, 16 De Crespigny Park, SE5 8AF, London, UK. · King's College London, Environmental Research Group, MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, London, UK. · King's College London, Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, 16 De Crespigny Park, SE5 8AF, London, UK; King's College London, Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, London, UK; National & Specialist CAMHS Clinic for Trauma, Anxiety and Depression, South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA. · King's College London, Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, 16 De Crespigny Park, SE5 8AF, London, UK; Departments of Psychology and Neuroscience, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Centre for Genomic and Computational Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. · Departments of Psychology and Neuroscience, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Centre for Genomic and Computational Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. · King's College London, Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, 16 De Crespigny Park, SE5 8AF, London, UK. Electronic address: helen.2.fisher@kcl.ac.uk. ·Psychiatry Res · Pubmed #30576995.

ABSTRACT: Air pollution is a worldwide environmental health issue. Increasingly, reports suggest that poor air quality may be associated with mental health problems, but these studies often use global measures and rarely focus on early development when psychopathology commonly emerges. To address this, we combined high-resolution air pollution exposure estimates and prospectively-collected phenotypic data to explore concurrent and longitudinal associations between air pollutants of major concern in urban areas and mental health problems in childhood and adolescence. Exploratory analyses were conducted on 284 London-based children from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study. Exposure to annualized PM

7 Article Maternal depression in the intergenerational transmission of childhood maltreatment and its sequelae: Testing postpartum effects in a longitudinal birth cohort. 2019

Choi, Karmel W / Houts, Renate / Arseneault, Louise / Pariante, Carmine / Sikkema, Kathleen J / Moffitt, Terrie E. ·Duke University. · King's College London. ·Dev Psychopathol · Pubmed #29562945.

ABSTRACT: Mothers who have experienced childhood maltreatment are more likely to have children also exposed to maltreatment, a phenomenon known as intergenerational transmission. Factors in the perinatal period may contribute uniquely to this transmission, but timing effects have not been ascertained. Using structural equation modeling with 1,016 mothers and their 2,032 children in the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, we tested the mediating role of postpartum depression between maternal childhood maltreatment and a cascade of negative child outcomes, specifically child exposure to maltreatment, internalizing symptoms, and externalizing symptoms: (a) adjusting for later maternal depression, (b) comparing across sex differences, and (c) examining the relative role of maltreatment subtypes. Mothers who had been maltreated as children, especially those who had experienced emotional or sexual abuse, were at increased risk for postpartum depression. In turn, postpartum depression predicted children's exposure to maltreatment, followed by emotional and behavioral problems. Indirect effects from maternal childhood maltreatment to child outcomes were robust across child sex and supported significant mediation through postpartum depression; however, this appeared to be carried by mothers' depression beyond the postpartum period. Identifying and treating postpartum depression, and preventing its recurrence, may help interrupt the intergenerational transmission of maltreatment and its sequelae.

8 Article Concurrent and Longitudinal Contribution of Exposure to Bullying in Childhood to Mental Health: The Role of Vulnerability and Resilience. 2017

Singham, Timothy / Viding, Essi / Schoeler, Tabea / Arseneault, Louise / Ronald, Angelica / Cecil, Charlotte M / McCrory, Eamon / Rijsdijk, Frülhing / Pingault, Jean-Baptiste. ·Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, London, England. · Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, King's College London, London, England. · Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Birkbeck, London, England. · Department of Psychology, King's College London, London, England. ·JAMA Psychiatry · Pubmed #28979965.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Exposure to bullying is associated with poor mental health. However, the degree to which observed associations reflect direct detrimental contributions of exposure to bullying to mental health remains uncertain, as noncausal relationships may arise from genetic and environmental confounding (eg, preexisting vulnerabilities). Determining to what extent exposure to bullying contributes to mental health is an important concern, with implications for primary and secondary interventions. Objective: To characterize the concurrent and longitudinal contribution of exposure to bullying to mental health in childhood and adolescence using a twin differences design to strengthen causal inference. Design, Setting, and Participants: Participants were drawn from the Twins Early Development Study, a population-based cohort recruited from population records of births in England and Wales between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 1996. Data collection took place when the participants were between 11 and 16 years of age from December 1, 2005, to January 31, 2013. Data analysis was conducted from January 1, 2016, to June 20, 2017. Exposures: Participants completed the Multidimensional Peer-Victimization Scale at 11 and 14 years of age. Main Outcomes and Measures: Mental health assessments at 11 and 16 years of age included anxiety, depression, hyperactivity and impulsivity, inattention, conduct problems, and psychotic-like experiences (eg, paranoid thoughts or cognitive disorganization). Results: The 11 108 twins included in the final sample (5894 girls and 5214 boys) were a mean age of 11.3 years at the first assessment and 16.3 years at the last assessment. The most stringent twin differences estimates (monozygotic) were consistent with causal contribution of exposure to bullying at 11 years to concurrent anxiety, depression, hyperactivity and impulsivity, inattention, and conduct problems. Effects decreased over time; that is, substantial concurrent contributions to anxiety (β = 0.27; 95% CI, 0.22-0.33) persisted for 2 years (β = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.04-0.20) but not 5 years. Direct contributions to paranoid thoughts and cognitive disorganization persisted for 5 years. Conclusions and Relevance: This study is the largest to date to characterize the contribution of exposure to bullying in childhood to mental health using a twin differences design and multi-informant, multiscale data. Stringent evidence of the direct detrimental contribution of exposure to bullying in childhood to mental health is provided. Findings also suggest that childhood exposure to bullying may partly be viewed as a symptom of preexisting vulnerabilities. Finally, the dissipation of effects over time for many outcomes highlights the potential for resilience in children who were bullied. In addition to programs that aim to reduce exposure to bullying, interventions may benefit from addressing preexisting vulnerabilities and focus on resilience.

9 Article Buffering effects of safe, supportive, and nurturing relationships among women with childhood histories of maltreatment. 2017

Jaffee, S R / Takizawa, R / Arseneault, L. ·Department of Psychology,University of Pennsylvania,Philadelphia,USA. · Department of Clinical Psychology,Graduate School of Education,The University of Tokyo,Tokyo 113-0033,Japan. · MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre,Institute of Psychiatry,Psychology and Neuroscience,King's College London,London SE5 8AF,UK. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #28803556.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Adults who were victims of childhood maltreatment tend to have poorer health compared with adults who did not experience abuse. However, many are in good health. We tested whether safe, supportive, and nurturing relationships buffer women with a history of childhood maltreatment from poor health outcomes in later life. METHODS: Participants included women from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study who were involved in an intimate relationship at some point by the time their twin children were 10 years old. Women were initially interviewed in 1999-2000 (mean age = 33 years) and 2, 5, and 7 years later. They reported on their physical and mental health, and their health-risk behaviours. RESULTS: Compared with women who did not experience abuse in childhood, women with histories of maltreatment were at elevated risk for mental, physical, and health-risk behaviours, including major depressive disorder, sleep, and substance use problems. Cumulatively, safe, supportive, and nurturing relationships characterized by a lack of violence, emotional intimacy, and social support buffered women with a history of maltreatment from poor health outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings emphasize that negative social determinants of health - such as a childhood history of maltreatment - confer risk for psychopathology and other physical health problems. If, however, a woman's current social circumstances are sufficiently positive, they can promote good health, particularly in the face of past adversity.

10 Article Why Are Children in Urban Neighborhoods at Increased Risk for Psychotic Symptoms? Findings From a UK Longitudinal Cohort Study. 2016

Newbury, Joanne / Arseneault, Louise / Caspi, Avshalom / Moffitt, Terrie E / Odgers, Candice L / Fisher, Helen L. ·MRC Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · MRC Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK; Departments of Psychology and Neuroscience, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Centre for Genomic and Computational Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC. · Center for Child and Family Policy and the Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC. · MRC Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK; helen.2.fisher@kcl.ac.uk helen.2.fisher@kcl.ac.uk. ·Schizophr Bull · Pubmed #27153864.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Urban upbringing is associated with a 2-fold adulthood psychosis risk, and this association replicates for childhood psychotic symptoms. No study has investigated whether specific features of urban neighborhoods increase children's risk for psychotic symptoms, despite these early psychotic phenomena elevating risk for schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders in adulthood. METHODS: Analyses were conducted on over 2000 children from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally-representative cohort of UK-born twins. Neighborhood-level characteristics were assessed for each family via: a geodemographic discriminator indexing neighborhood-level deprivation, postal surveys of over 5000 residents living alongside the children, and in-home interviews with the children's mothers. Children were interviewed about psychotic symptoms at age 12. Analyses were adjusted for important family-level confounders including socioeconomic status (SES), psychiatric history, and maternal psychosis. RESULTS: Urban residency at age-5 (OR = 1.80, 95% CI = 1.16-2.77) and age-12 (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.15-2.69) were both significantly associated with childhood psychotic symptoms, but not with age-12 anxiety, depression, or antisocial behavior. The association was not attributable to family SES, family psychiatric history, or maternal psychosis, each implicated in childhood mental health. Low social cohesion, together with crime victimization in the neighborhood explained nearly a quarter of the association between urbanicity and childhood psychotic symptoms after considering family-level confounders. CONCLUSIONS: Low social cohesion and crime victimization in the neighborhood partly explain why children in cities have an elevated risk of developing psychotic symptoms. Greater understanding of the mechanisms leading from neighborhood-level exposures to psychotic symptoms could help target interventions for emerging childhood psychotic symptoms.

11 Article Social isolation, loneliness and depression in young adulthood: a behavioural genetic analysis. 2016

Matthews, Timothy / Danese, Andrea / Wertz, Jasmin / Odgers, Candice L / Ambler, Antony / Moffitt, Terrie E / Arseneault, Louise. ·MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · National and Specialist Child Traumatic Stress and Anxiety Clinic, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. · Departments of Psychology and Neuroscience, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. · MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. louise.arseneault@kcl.ac.uk. ·Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol · Pubmed #26843197.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To investigate the association between social isolation and loneliness, how they relate to depression, and whether these associations are explained by genetic influences. METHODS: We used data from the age-18 wave of the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, a birth cohort of 1116 same-sex twin pairs born in England and Wales in 1994 and 1995. Participants reported on their levels of social isolation, loneliness and depressive symptoms. We conducted regression analyses to test the differential associations of isolation and loneliness with depression. Using the twin study design, we estimated the proportion of variance in each construct and their covariance that was accounted for by genetic and environmental factors. RESULTS: Social isolation and loneliness were moderately correlated (r = 0.39), reflecting the separateness of these constructs, and both were associated with depression. When entered simultaneously in a regression analysis, loneliness was more robustly associated with depression. We observed similar degrees of genetic influence on social isolation (40 %) and loneliness (38 %), and a smaller genetic influence on depressive symptoms (29 %), with the remaining variance accounted for by the non-shared environment. Genetic correlations of 0.65 between isolation and loneliness and 0.63 between loneliness and depression indicated a strong role of genetic influences in the co-occurrence of these phenotypes. CONCLUSIONS: Socially isolated young adults do not necessarily experience loneliness. However, those who are lonely are often depressed, partly because the same genes influence loneliness and depression. Interventions should not only aim at increasing social connections but also focus on subjective feelings of loneliness.

12 Article Committed to work but vulnerable: self-perceptions and mental health in NEET 18-year olds from a contemporary British cohort. 2016

Goldman-Mellor, Sidra / Caspi, Avshalom / Arseneault, Louise / Ajala, Nifemi / Ambler, Antony / Danese, Andrea / Fisher, Helen / Hucker, Abigail / Odgers, Candice / Williams, Teresa / Wong, Chloe / Moffitt, Terrie E. ·Department of Public Health, University of California, Merced, CA, USA. · Center for Developmental Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA. · Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · National and Specialist Child Traumatic Stress and Anxiety Clinic, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. · Nuffield Foundation, London, UK. ·J Child Psychol Psychiatry · Pubmed #26791344.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Labour market disengagement among youths has lasting negative economic and social consequences, yet is poorly understood. We compared four types of work-related self-perceptions, as well as vulnerability to mental health and substance abuse problems, among youths not in education, employment or training (NEET) and among their peers. METHODS: Participants were from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) longitudinal study, a nationally representative UK cohort of 2,232 twins born in 1994-1995. We measured commitment to work, job-search effort, professional/technical skills, 'soft' skills (e.g. teamwork, decision-making, communication), optimism about getting ahead, and mental health and substance use disorders at age 18. We also examined childhood mental health. RESULTS: At age 18, 11.6% of participants were NEET. NEET participants reported themselves as committed to work and searching for jobs with greater diligence than their non-NEET peers. However, they reported fewer 'soft' skills (B = -0.98, p < .001) and felt less optimistic about their likelihood of getting ahead in life (B = -2.41, p < .001). NEET youths also had higher rates of concurrent mental health and substance abuse problems, but these did not explain the relationship with work-related self-perceptions. Nearly 60% of NEET (vs. 35% of non-NEET) youths had already experienced ≥1 mental health problem in childhood/adolescence. Associations of NEET status with concurrent mental health problems were independent of pre-existing mental health vulnerability. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that while NEET is clearly an economic and mental health issue, it does not appear to be a motivation issue. Alongside skills, work-related self-perceptions and mental health problems may be targets for intervention and service provision among this high-risk population.

13 Article Sibling bullying is associated with anxiety, depression and self-harm. 2015

Arseneault, Louise. ·King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, SGDP Centre, London, UK; louise.arseneault@kcl.ac.uk. ·Evid Based Ment Health · Pubmed #26002541.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Article Bullying victimization in childhood predicts inflammation and obesity at mid-life: a five-decade birth cohort study. 2015

Takizawa, R / Danese, A / Maughan, B / Arseneault, L. ·MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre,Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience,King's College London,London SE5 8AF,UK. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #25988703.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We aimed to test whether childhood bullying victimization increases risk for age-related disease at mid-life using biological markers including inflammation and adiposity, independent of other childhood risk factors and key adult variables. METHOD: The present study was a 50-year prospective longitudinal birth cohort study of all births in Britain in 1 week in 1958. Exposure to bullying was assessed prospectively when participants were aged 7 and 11 years (27.7% occasionally bullied; 14.6% frequently bullied). Blood inflammation biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen] and adiposity [body mass index (BMI) and waist:hip ratio] were measured at age 45 years. RESULTS: Participants who had been frequently bullied in childhood showed increased levels of CRP at mid-life [β = 0.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-0.10] and higher risk for clinically relevant inflammation cut-off [CRP > 3 mg/l: 20.4% v. 15.9%, odds ratio (OR) = 1.35, 95% CI 1.12-1.64]. Women who were bullied in childhood had higher BMI than non-bullied participants and were at increased risk of being obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2: occasionally bullied: 26.0% v. 19.4%, OR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.18-1.77; frequently bullied: 26.2% v. 19.4%, OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.83). Findings remained significant when controlling for childhood risk factors (e.g. parental social class; participants' BMI and psychopathology in childhood) and key adult variables (e.g. adult social class, smoking, diet and exercise). CONCLUSIONS: Bullied children show increases in risk factors for age-related disease in middle adulthood, independent of co-occurring childhood and adult risks. Given the high prevalence of bullying victimization in childhood, tackling this form of psychosocial stress early in life has the potential of reducing risk for age-related disease and its associated burden.

15 Article Intimate partner violence and new-onset depression: a longitudinal study of women's childhood and adult histories of abuse. 2015

Ouellet-Morin, Isabelle / Fisher, Helen L / York-Smith, Marianna / Fincham-Campbell, Stephanie / Moffitt, Terrie E / Arseneault, Louise. ·School of Criminology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; Research Center of the Montreal Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada; Research Group on Child Maladjustment, Montreal, QC, Canada. ·Depress Anxiety · Pubmed #25691224.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Studies indicate that women victims of intimate partner violence are at increased risk for poor mental health. This research disentangled the effect of partner violence on new-onset depression and psychosis spectrum symptoms from effects of child maltreatment and other confounding factors, including substance abuse and antisocial personality. METHODS: Participants were 1,052 mothers involved in the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally representative cohort of families followed prospectively. To test the directionality of associations between partner violence and depression, only women without a history of depression at the beginning of the study were considered (n = 978). Partner violence and mental health were assessed during face-to-face interviews with women across three time points. RESULTS: Four of 10 women reported being the victim of violence from their partner in a 10-year period. They represent 33% of our cohort and they account for 51% of new-onset depression. These women had a twofold increase in their risk of suffering from new-onset depression once the effect of childhood maltreatment, socioeconomic deprivation, antisocial personality, and young motherhood were controlled. Women who were abused both in childhood and adulthood were four to seven times more likely to suffer from depression than never-abused women. We observed similar associations with psychosis spectrum symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Women victims of partner violence account for more than their share of depression. Findings strengthen existing evidence that partner violence independently contributes to women's poor mental health. Psychological difficulties among a considerable number of women could be reduced by stopping partner violence.

16 Article Why some children with externalising problems develop internalising symptoms: testing two pathways in a genetically sensitive cohort study. 2015

Wertz, Jasmin / Zavos, Helena / Matthews, Timothy / Harvey, Kirsten / Hunt, Alice / Pariante, Carmine M / Arseneault, Louise. ·MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · Stress, Psychiatry and Immunology Laboratory, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. ·J Child Psychol Psychiatry · Pubmed #25292456.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Children with externalising problems are at risk of developing internalising problems as they grow older. The pathways underlying this developmental association remain to be elucidated. We tested two processes that could explain why some children with externalising problems develop internalising symptoms in preadolescence: a mediation model whereby the association between early externalising and later new internalising symptoms is explained by negative experiences; and a genetic model, whereby genes influence both problems. METHODS: We used data from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Study, a 1994-1995 birth cohort of 2,232 twins born in England and Wales. We assessed externalising and internalising problems using combined mothers' and teachers' ratings at age 5 and 12. We measured bullying victimisation, maternal dissatisfaction and academic difficulties between age 7 and 10 and used linear regression analyses to test the effects of these negative experiences on the association between early externalising and later internalising problems. We employed a Cholesky decomposition to examine the genetic influences on the association. RESULTS: Children with externalising problems at age 5 showed increased rates of new internalising problems at age 12 (r = .24, p < .001). Negative experiences accounted for some of the association between early externalising and later internalising problems. Behavioural-genetic analyses indicated that genes influencing early externalising problems also affected later internalising problems. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the role of genetic influences in explaining why some children with externalising problems develop internalising symptoms in preadolescence. Negative experiences also contribute to the association, possibly through gene-environment interplay. Mental health professionals should monitor the development of internalising symptoms in young children with externalising problems.

17 Article Etiological features of borderline personality related characteristics in a birth cohort of 12-year-old children. 2012

Belsky, Daniel W / Caspi, Avshalom / Arseneault, Louise / Bleidorn, Wiebke / Fonagy, Peter / Goodman, Marianne / Houts, Renate / Moffitt, Terrie E. ·University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA. dbelsky@unc.edu ·Dev Psychopathol · Pubmed #22293008.

ABSTRACT: It has been reported that borderline personality related characteristics can be observed in children, and that these characteristics are associated with increased risk for the development of borderline personality disorder. It is not clear whether borderline personality related characteristics in children share etiological features with adult borderline personality disorder. We investigated the etiology of borderline personality related characteristics in a longitudinal cohort study of 1,116 pairs of same-sex twins followed from birth through age 12 years. Borderline personality related characteristics measured at age 12 years were highly heritable, were more common in children who had exhibited poor cognitive function, impulsivity, and more behavioral and emotional problems at age 5 years, and co-occurred with symptoms of conduct disorder, depression, anxiety, and psychosis. Exposure to harsh treatment in the family environment through age 10 years predicted borderline personality related characteristics at age 12 years. This association showed evidence of environmental mediation and was stronger among children with a family history of psychiatric illness, consistent with diathesis-stress models of borderline etiology. Results indicate that borderline personality related characteristics in children share etiological features with borderline personality disorder in adults and suggest that inherited and environmental risk factors make independent and interactive contributions to borderline etiology.