Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Depression: HELP
Articles by Christal L. Badour
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Christal L. Badour wrote the following 8 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Does trauma-focused exposure therapy exacerbate symptoms among patients with comorbid PTSD and substance use disorders? 2019

Lancaster, Cynthia L / Gros, Daniel F / Mullarkey, Michael C / Badour, Christal L / Killeen, Therese K / Brady, Kathleen T / Back, Sudie E. ·Department of Psychology,University of Nevada Reno,Reno, NV,USA. · Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences,Medical University of South Carolina,Charleston, SC,USA. · Department of Psychology,University of Texas,Austin, TX,USA. · Department of Psychology,University of Kentucky,Lexington, KY,USA. ·Behav Cogn Psychother · Pubmed #31010449.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although exposure-based therapy is a well-established, effective treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), some practitioners report reluctance to implement it due to concerns that it may exacerbate symptoms of PTSD and commonly comorbid disorders, such as substance use disorders (SUD). AIM: This study compared the exacerbation of psychological symptoms among participants with comorbid PTSD and SUD who received either SUD treatment alone or SUD treatment integrated with exposure therapy for PTSD. METHOD: Participants (N = 71) were treatment-seeking, military Veterans with comorbid PTSD and SUD who were randomized to 12 individual sessions of either (1) an integrated, exposure-based treatment (Concurrent Treatment of PTSD and Substance Use Disorders using Prolonged Exposure; COPE); or (2) a non-exposure-based, SUD-only treatment (Relapse Prevention; RP). We examined between-group differences in the frequency of statistically reliable exacerbations of PTSD, SUD and depression symptoms experienced during treatment. RESULTS: At each of the 12 sessions, symptom exacerbation was minimal and generally equally likely in either treatment group. However, an analysis of treatment completers suggests that RP participants experienced slightly more exacerbations of PTSD symptoms during the course of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to investigate symptom exacerbation throughout trauma-focused exposure therapy for individuals with comorbid PTSD and SUD. Results add to a growing literature which suggests that trauma-focused, exposure-based therapy does not increase the risk of symptom exacerbation relative to non-exposure-based therapy.

2 Article Integrated Treatment of PTSD and Substance Use Disorders: Examination of Imaginal Exposure Length. 2017

Mills, Adam C / Badour, Christal L / Korte, Kristina J / Killeen, Therese K / Henschel, Aisling V / Back, Sudie E. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Addictions Sciences Division, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. · Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Mental Health Service Line, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA. ·J Trauma Stress · Pubmed #28329434.

ABSTRACT: Efforts to improve the efficiency of prolonged exposure (PE) therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have demonstrated that reducing the length of imaginal exposures does not negatively affect treatment outcome. A recent adaptation of PE, called Concurrent Treatment of PTSD and Substance Use Disorders Using Prolonged Exposure [COPE], integrates substance use disorder treatment with PE in the same timeframe (twelve 90-minute sessions, 8 of which include imaginal exposure). The current study, which represents a subanalysis of a larger randomized controlled trial, examined how the length of imaginal exposures (nonrandomized and measured continually) related to PTSD, substance use, and depression in a sample of military veterans (N = 31) who completed the COPE treatment. Participants completed an average of 11.5 of the 12 therapy sessions and 7.2 of the 8 imaginal exposures during treatment. Results of 3 linear mixed models indicate that PTSD, substance use, and depressive symptoms all improved over the course of treatment (ps < .001; η

3 Article Self-disgust as a potential mechanism underlying the association between PTSD and suicide risk. 2017

Brake, C Alex / Rojas, Sasha M / Badour, Christal L / Dutton, Courtney E / Feldner, Matthew T. ·Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40506, USA. Electronic address: alex.brake@uky.edu. · Department of Psychological Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 72701, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40506, USA. · Department of Psychological Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 72701, USA; Laureate Institute for Brain Research, 6655 S. Yale Ave., Tulsa, OK, 74136, USA. ·J Anxiety Disord · Pubmed #28126678.

ABSTRACT: Suicide risk is highly prevalent among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Self-disgust, defined as disgust directed internally and comprised of disgust with oneself (disgusting self) and with one's behaviors (disgusting ways), may impact this increased risk. The present study examined self-disgust as a putative mechanism linking PTSD symptoms with suicide risk. A sample of 347 trauma-exposed undergraduates completed measures of PTSD symptoms, suicide risk, self-disgust, and depressive symptoms. Controlling for depressive symptoms, a process model indicated PTSD symptoms were positively linked to suicide risk via increased disgusting self but not disgusting ways. Process models examining individual PTSD symptom clusters revealed positive, indirect links between all PTSD symptom clusters except alterations in arousal and reactivity and suicide risk via disgusting self. These findings expand on growing literature documenting the importance of self-disgust in trauma-related pathology by identifying connections with suicide risk. Future directions and clinical considerations are discussed.

4 Article Sexual Problems Predict PTSD and Depression Symptom Change Among Male OEF/OIF Veterans Completing Exposure Therapy. 2016

Badour, Christal L / Gros, Daniel F / Szafranski, Derek D / Acierno, Ron. · ·Psychiatry · Pubmed #27997327.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: A growing literature documents frequent sexual problems among Operations Enduring/Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, there has been no examination of how (1) sexual problems may be affected by evidenced-based psychotherapy for PTSD or (2) how the presence of sexual problems might impact effectiveness of evidenced-based psychotherapy for PTSD. As such, the present study investigated associations among symptoms of PTSD, depression, and problems with sexual desire and arousal among 45 male OEF/OIF veterans receiving behavioral activation and therapeutic exposure (BA-TE), an evidence-based behavior therapy targeting co-occurring symptoms of PTSD and depression. METHOD: Participants completed clinical interviews and several questionnaires including measures of sexual arousal, sexual desire, PTSD symptoms, and depression symptoms at baseline and after completion of 8 sessions of BA-TE treatment. A records review was also conducted to assess for relevant medication use. RESULTS: Overall, sexual desire and sexual arousal problems did not improve during the course of treatment. Moreover, veterans with co-occurring sexual problems at baseline evidenced significantly less improvement in symptoms of PTSD and depression across treatment as compared to veterans without sexual problems. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that veterans with co-occurring symptoms of PTSD and sexual problems may require additional assessment and treatment considerations in order to improve their treatment outcomes for both primary psychiatric symptoms as well as sexual problems. Future research on combination treatments of medication for sexual problems and psychotherapy for PTSD is needed.

5 Article Problems in sexual functioning among male OEF/OIF veterans seeking treatment for posttraumatic stress. 2015

Badour, Christal L / Gros, Daniel F / Szafranski, Derek D / Acierno, Ron. ·Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Administration Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: badour@musc.edu. · Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Administration Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA. · National Center for PTSD, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA. ·Compr Psychiatry · Pubmed #25596624.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Few studies have examined sexual dysfunction among Operations Enduring/Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present study investigated predictors of erectile dysfunction [ED] and self-reported sexual problems among 150 male combat veterans seeking outpatient treatment for PTSD within the Veterans Affairs healthcare system. METHOD: Participants completed clinical interviews and several questionnaires including measures of sexual arousal and sexual desire. A medical records review was also conducted to document evidence of an ED diagnosis or associated medication use. RESULTS: An ED diagnosis was present for 12% of the sample, and 10% were taking associated medications. Sexual arousal problems were reported by sixty-two percent of partnered veterans. Sexual desire problems were endorsed by 63% of the total sample, and by 72% of partnered veterans. Age was the only significant predictor of ED diagnosis or medication use. Age, race, PTSD diagnosis (versus subclinical symptoms), depression, and social support predicted self-reported sexual arousal problems; while race, combat exposure, social support, and avoidance/numbing symptoms of PTSD predicted self-reported sexual desire problems. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual problems are common among male OEF/OIF combat veterans seeking treatment for PTSD. Moreover, avoidance/numbing symptoms robustly predicted sexual desire problems. These findings highlight the importance of expanding assessment of sexual dysfunction and support the need for additional research in this area.

6 Article A multimodal examination of emotional responding to a trauma-relevant film among traumatic motor vehicle accident survivors. 2015

Bujarski, Sarah J / Craig, James T / Zielinski, Melissa J / Badour, Christal L / Feldner, Matthew T. ·University of Arkansas-Fayetteville, Fayetteville, AR, USA sbujarsk@uark.edu. · University of Arkansas-Fayetteville, Fayetteville, AR, USA. · University of Arkansas-Fayetteville, Fayetteville, AR, USA Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · University of Arkansas-Fayetteville, Fayetteville, AR, USA Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OK, USA. ·Assessment · Pubmed #25139384.

ABSTRACT: The Facial Action Coding System (Ekman & Friesen) has shown promise as a behavioral measure of emotional experience. The current study examined the degree of (de)synchrony between self-reported and facial expressions of fear, disgust, and sadness in response to a traumatic event-relevant film among individuals who had experienced a traumatic motor vehicle accident. Given high rates of comorbidity between posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and depressive symptoms, the potential impacts of both PTSS and depressive symptoms on emotional responding were examined. Results demonstrated synchrony between self-reported and facial expressions of disgust and sadness; however, no association between measures of fear was observed. Furthermore, depressive symptoms were associated with greater fear responding and PTSS were associated only with self-reported fear. Together, results support the importance of examining discrete negative emotions, rather than broad valence categories, when examining fear-based responding in traumatic event-exposed populations. Additional research examining the psychometric properties of the Facial Action Coding System as a measure of discrete emotional experiences among traumatic event-exposed individuals is needed to advance multimodal assessment approaches that yield incremental information for understanding emotional responding in this population.

7 Article Disgust as a unique affective predictor of mental contamination following sexual trauma. 2014

Badour, Christal L / Ojserkis, Rachel / McKay, Dean / Feldner, Matthew T. ·Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 67 President Street, MSC 861, 2nd Floor IOP South Building, Charleston, SC 29425, USA; Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, 109 Bee Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA; University of Arkansas, Department of Psychological Science, 216 Memorial Hall, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA. Electronic address: christalbadour@gmail.com. · Fordham University, Department of Psychology, Dealy 422, 441 East Fordham Road, Bronx, NY 10458, USA. · University of Arkansas, Department of Psychological Science, 216 Memorial Hall, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA; Laureate Institute for Brain Research, 6655 S Yale Avenue, Tulsa, OK 74136, USA. ·J Anxiety Disord · Pubmed #25129888.

ABSTRACT: Mental contamination has been described as an internal experience of dirtiness that can arise and persist in the absence of contact with observable physical contaminants. Recent research has examined mental contamination specifically related to unwanted physical contact and sexual trauma. This study evaluated the degree to which disgust propensity and both self-focused and perpetrator-focused peritraumatic disgust were associated with mental contamination in a sample of women who experienced sexual trauma (n=72). Results showed that peritraumatic self-focused disgust, but not peritraumatic perpetrator-focused disgust or fear, was significantly associated with mental contamination. Additionally, disgust propensity contributed significantly to the incremental validity of the model. These findings support the nascent literature showing that disgust plays a significant role in mental contamination, particularly following sexual trauma. Future research directions, and clinical/theoretical implications of these results are discussed.

8 Article Pubertal maturation and cortisol level in response to a novel social environment among female adolescents. 2014

Blumenthal, Heidemarie / Leen-Feldner, Ellen W / Badour, Christal L / Trainor, Casey D / Babson, Kimberly A. ·University of North Texas, Department of Psychology, United States. Electronic address: Heidemarie.Blumenthal@unt.edu. · University of Arkansas, Department of Psychological Science, United States. · Augustana College, Department of Psychology, United States. · Center for Health Care Evaluation, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, United States; Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, United States. ·J Adolesc · Pubmed #25014316.

ABSTRACT: Research indicates changes in HPA-axis activity across puberty. The current study extends existing work by evaluating pubertal status and cortisol level in a novel social environment (research laboratory) while controlling for several important biological, behavioral, and psychological variables. Participants were 30 girls (ages 9-16 years) from the United States. Pubertal status was assessed via the Pubertal Development Scale. Salivary samples were collected at laboratory-introduction and a matched at-home period; laboratory-introduction levels were regressed on basal cortisol levels to create standardized residual scores. After controlling for covariates, pubertal status was positively associated with residualized cortisol values. Findings indicate more advanced puberty related to greater cortisol response to the laboratory; data are discussed in terms of future research and building biopsychosocial models of the puberty-psychopathology linkage.