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Depression: HELP
Articles by Tom G. Bolwig
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, T. Bolwig wrote the following 8 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Electroconvulsive therapy reappraised. 2014

Bolwig, T G. ·Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. bolwig@tdcspace.dk. ·Acta Psychiatr Scand · Pubmed #24571063.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Review [Electroconvulsive therapy]. 2018

Jensen, Hans Mørch / Bolwig, Tom. ·hans.moerch.jensen@regionh.dk. ·Ugeskr Laeger · Pubmed #30070628.

ABSTRACT: Within psychiatry, no treatment is as effective - or controversial - as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and ECT is the only non-pharmacological treatment in widespread clinical psychiatry. The history of ECT as a psychiatric treatment is outlined in this review, and the efficacy in four diagnostic entities is reviewed along with side effects. The evidence shows compelling effect of ECT when administered within affective disorders, delirium and psychotic states.

3 Review ECT: its brain enabling effects: a review of electroconvulsive therapy-induced structural brain plasticity. 2014

Bouckaert, Filip / Sienaert, Pascal / Obbels, Jasmien / Dols, Annemieke / Vandenbulcke, Mathieu / Stek, Max / Bolwig, Tom. ·From the *University Psychiatric Center KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; †VUmc Amsterdam/GGZinGeest, Amsterdam, the Netherlands and ‡Institute of Neuropsychiatry, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·J ECT · Pubmed #24810772.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since the past 2 decades, new evidence for brain plasticity has caused a shift in both preclinical and clinical ECT research from falsifying the "brain damage hypothesis" toward exploring ECT's enabling brain (neuro)plasticity effects. METHODS: By reviewing the available animal and human literature, we examined the theory that seizure-induced structural changes are crucial for the therapeutic efficacy of ECT. RESULTS: Both animal and human studies suggest electroconvulsive stimulation/electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)-related neuroplasticity (neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, angiogenesis, or gliogenesis). CONCLUSION: It remains unclear whether structural changes might explain the therapeutic efficacy and/or be related to the (transient) learning and memory impairment after ECT. Methods to assess in vivo brain plasticity of patients treated with ECT will be of particular importance for future longitudinal studies to give support to the currently available correlational data.

4 Review Neuroimaging and electroconvulsive therapy: a review. 2014

Bolwig, Tom G. ·From the University of Copenhagen and Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Denmark. ·J ECT · Pubmed #24800687.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since the 1970s, a number of neuroimaging studies of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) have been conducted to elucidate the working action of this highly efficacious treatment modality. The technologies used are single photon emission tomography, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and quantitative electroencephalography. METHODS: A PubMed literature search with focus on clinical studies was made from the inception of the database until December 2013 using the search terms electroconvulsive therapy and neuroimaging. RESULTS: Early methods allowing only identification of global changes of cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolism show considerable ictal increases of these measures, which normalize during the postictal period. Later methodological developments have given access to measurements of minute activity changes in localized cortical and subcortical areas of the brain and have revealed differences in neurophysiology and metabolism between the hyperactive ictal state and the restorative interictal/postictal periods. Recent magnetic resonance imaging studies seem to pave way for new insights into ECT's effects on increased connectivity in the brain during depression. CONCLUSION: The existing data reveal considerable variations among studies and therefore do not yet allow the formulation of a unified hypothesis for the mechanism of ECT. The rapid developments in imaging technology, however, hold promises for further elucidation of the mode of action of ECT.

5 Article Structural changes induced by electroconvulsive therapy are associated with clinical outcome. 2020

Mulders, Peter C R / Llera, Alberto / Beckmann, Christian F / Vandenbulcke, Mathieu / Stek, Max / Sienaert, Pascal / Redlich, Ronny / Petrides, Georgios / Oudega, Mardien Leoniek / Oltedal, Leif / Oedegaard, Ketil J / Narr, Katherine L / Magnusson, Peter O / Kessler, Ute / Jorgensen, Anders / Espinoza, Randall / Enneking, Verena / Emsell, Louise / Dols, Annemieke / Dannlowski, Udo / Bolwig, Tom G / Bartsch, Hauke / Argyelan, Miklos / Anand, Amit / Abbott, Christopher C / van Eijndhoven, Philip F P / Tendolkar, Indira. ·Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Electronic address: petercr.mulders@radboudumc.nl. · Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. · Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB), University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, University Psychiatric Center (UPC), KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · GGZ InGeest Specialized Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Academic Center for ECT and Neurostimulation (AcCENT), University Psychiatric Center (UPC) - KU Leuven, Kortenberg, Belgium. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Münster, Münster, Germany. · - Department of Psychiatry, The Zucker Hillside Hospital, Glen Oaks, USA; Center for Neuroscience, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, USA; Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Department of Psychiatry, Hempstead, USA. · Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Mohn Medical Imaging and Visualization Centre, Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Departments of Neurology Psychiatry, Biobehavioral Sciences, Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Lund University, Box 118, SE-221 00, Lund, Sweden; Previous: Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. · Psychiatric Center Copenhagen & University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Previous: Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Centre for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. · Mohn Medical Imaging and Visualization Centre, Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Center for Multimodal Imaging and Genetics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. · Center of Behavioral Health, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany. ·Brain Stimul · Pubmed #32289700.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment option for major depressive disorder, so understanding whether its clinical effect relates to structural brain changes is vital for current and future antidepressant research. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether clinical response to ECT is related to structural volumetric changes in the brain as measured by structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and, if so, which regions are related to this clinical effect. We also determine whether a similar model can be used to identify regions associated with electrode placement (unilateral versus bilateral ECT). METHODS: Longitudinal MRI and clinical data (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale) was collected from 10 sites as part of the Global ECT-MRI research collaboration (GEMRIC). From 192 subjects, relative changes in 80 (sub)cortical areas were used as potential features for classifying treatment response. We used recursive feature elimination to extract relevant features, which were subsequently used to train a linear classifier. As a validation, the same was done for electrode placement. We report accuracy as well as the structural coefficients of regions included in the discriminative spatial patterns obtained. RESULTS: A pattern of structural changes in cortical midline, striatal and lateral prefrontal areas discriminates responders from non-responders (75% accuracy, p < 0.001) while left-sided mediotemporal changes discriminate unilateral from bilateral electrode placement (81% accuracy, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The identification of a multivariate discriminative pattern shows that structural change is relevant for clinical response to ECT, but this pattern does not include mediotemporal regions that have been the focus of electroconvulsive therapy research so far.

6 Article Regional brain volumes, diffusivity, and metabolite changes after electroconvulsive therapy for severe depression. 2016

Jorgensen, A / Magnusson, P / Hanson, L G / Kirkegaard, T / Benveniste, H / Lee, H / Svarer, C / Mikkelsen, J D / Fink-Jensen, A / Knudsen, G M / Paulson, O B / Bolwig, T G / Jorgensen, M B. ·Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen (Rigshospitalet), Denmark. · Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, Laboratory of Neuropsychiatry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Biomedical Engineering, DTU Elektro, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark. · Department of Anesthesiology, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA. · Department of Radiology, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA. · Neurobiology Research Unit, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Acta Psychiatr Scand · Pubmed #26138003.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of hippocampal plasticity in the antidepressant effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). METHOD: We used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and proton MR spectroscopy ( RESULTS: Hippocampal and amygdala volume increased significantly at TP2 and continued to be increased at TP3. DLPFC exhibited a transient volume reduction at TP2. DTI revealed a reduced anisotropy and diffusivity of the hippocampus at TP2. We found no significant post-ECT changes in brain metabolite concentrations, and we were unable to identify a spectral signature at ≈1.30 ppm previously suggested to reflect neurogenesis induced by ECT. None of the brain imaging measures correlated to the clinical response. CONCLUSION: Our findings show that ECT causes a remodeling of brain structures involved in affective regulation, but due to their lack of correlation with the antidepressant effect, this remodeling does not appear to be directly underlying the antidepressant action of ECT.

7 Article Clinical and psychometric validation of the psychotic depression assessment scale. 2015

Østergaard, Søren D / Pedersen, Christina H / Uggerby, Peter / Munk-Jørgensen, Povl / Rothschild, Anthony J / Larsen, Jens Ivar / Gøtzsche, Camilla / Søndergaard, Mia G / Bille, Anna Gry / Bolwig, Tom G / Larsen, Jens Knud / Bech, Per. ·Research Department P, Aarhus University Hospital - Risskov, Risskov, Denmark; Unit for Psychiatric Research, Aalborg Psychiatric Hospital, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. Electronic address: soeoes@rm.dk. · Unit for Psychiatric Research, Aalborg Psychiatric Hospital, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department M, Aarhus University Hospital - Risskov, Risskov, Denmark. · University of Massachusetts Medical School and University of Massachusetts Memorial Health Care, Worcester, MA, USA. · Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Laboratory of Neuropsychiatry, Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Psychiatric Research Unit, Psychiatric Center North Zealand, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #25462426.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent studies have indicated that the 11-item Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS), consisting of the 6-item melancholia subscale (HAM-D6) of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and 5 psychosis items from the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), is a valid measure for the severity of psychotic depression. The aim of this study was to subject the PDAS, and its depression (HAM-D6) and psychosis (BPRS5) subscales to further validation. METHODS: Patients diagnosed with psychotic depression at Danish psychiatric hospitals participated in semi-structured interviews. Video recordings of these interviews were assessed by two experienced psychiatrists (global severity rating of psychotic depression, depressive symptoms and psychotic symptoms) and by two young physicians (rating on 27 symptom items, including the 11 PDAS items). The clinical validity and responsiveness of the PDAS and its subscales was investigated by Spearman correlation analysis of the global severity ratings and the PDAS, HAM-D6, and BPRS5 total scores. The unidimensionality of the scales was tested by item response theory analysis (Mokken). RESULTS: Ratings from 39 participants with unipolar psychotic depression and nine participants with bipolar psychotic depression were included in the analysis. The Spearman correlation analysis indicated that the PDAS, HAM-D6 and BPRS5 were clinically valid (correlation coefficients from 0.78 to 0.85, p<0.001) and responsive (correlation coefficients from 0.72 to 0.86, p<0.001) measures of psychotic depression. According to the Mokken analysis, all three scales were unidimensional. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical validity, responsiveness and unidimensionality of the PDAS and its subscales were confirmed in an independent sample of patients with psychotic depression.

8 Article Systemic oxidatively generated DNA/RNA damage in clinical depression: associations to symptom severity and response to electroconvulsive therapy. 2013

Jorgensen, Anders / Krogh, Jesper / Miskowiak, Kamilla / Bolwig, Tom G / Kessing, Lars V / Fink-Jensen, Anders / Nordentoft, Merete / Henriksen, Trine / Weimann, Allan / Poulsen, Henrik E / Jorgensen, Martin B. ·Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. anders.01.joergensen@regionh.dk ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #23497793.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depression has been associated with increased oxidative stress and hypothesized to accelerate aging. Nucleic acid damage from oxidation is a critical part of the aging process, and a suggested early event in age-related somatic morbidities that are also prevalent in depression, such as dementia and type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that increased severity of depression is associated with increased systemic oxidatively generated DNA and RNA damage, and that this increase is attenuated by an effective antidepressant treatment. METHODS: The urinary excretion of markers of systemic oxidatively generated DNA and RNA damage, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo), respectively, were determined in healthy controls (N=28), moderately depressed, non-medicated patients (N=26) and severely depressed patients eligible for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) (N=29). In the severely depressed patient group, samples were also obtained 1 week after the completion of ECT. RESULTS: Systemic RNA damage from oxidation, as measured by 8-oxoGuo excretion, was higher with increasing severity of depression (controlsSevere depression is associated with increased systemic oxidatively generated RNA damage, which may be an additional factor underlying the somatic morbidity and neurodegenerative features associated with depression. Due to the lack of normalization by clinically effective ECT, the phenomenon does not appear to be causally linked to the depressive state per se.