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Depression: HELP
Articles by Joshua E. J. Buckman
Based on 3 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, J. E. J. Buckman wrote the following 3 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Attentional Control as a Predictor of Response to Psychological Treatment for Depression and Relapse up to 1 year After Treatment: A Pilot Cohort Study. 2019

Buckman, J E J / Saunders, R / Fearon, P / Leibowitz, J / Pilling, S. ·Research Department of Clinical,Educational and Health Psychology,University College London,Gower Street,London WC1E 6BT. · iCope - Camden and Islington Psychological Therapies Services,Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust,St Pancras Hospital,4 St Pancras Way,London NW1 0PE. ·Behav Cogn Psychother · Pubmed #30352633.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Identifying depressed patients unlikely to reach remission and those likely to relapse after reaching remission is of great importance, but there are few pre-treatment factors that can help clinicians predict prognosis and together these explain relatively little variance in treatment outcomes. Attentional control has shown promise in studies to date, but has not been investigated prospectively in routine clinical settings with depressed patients. AIMS: This study aimed to pilot the use of a brief self-report measure of attentional control in routine care and investigate the associations between attentional control, psychological treatment response and relapse to depression up to 1 year post-treatment. METHOD: Depressed patients were recruited from two primary care psychological treatment (IAPT) services and completed the Attentional Control Scale (ACS) alongside routine symptom measures at every therapy session. Participants were tracked and followed up for 1 year post-treatment. RESULTS: Baseline ACS scores were associated with remission and residual depressive symptoms post-treatment, and relapse within 12 months of ending treatment, all independent of pre-treatment depressive symptom severity, and the latter also independent of residual symptoms. CONCLUSION: A self-report measure of attentional control can potentially be used to predict levels of depressive symptoms post-treatment and can contribute to predicting risk of relapse to depression in IAPT services, without affecting rates of therapy completion/drop-out or data completion of standard IAPT measures. However, this pilot study had a small overall sample size and a very small number of observed relapses, so replication in a larger study is needed before firm conclusions can be made.

2 Article Trajectories of depression and anxiety symptom change during psychological therapy. 2019

Saunders, Rob / Buckman, Joshua E J / Cape, John / Fearon, Pasco / Leibowitz, Judy / Pilling, Stephen. ·Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 7HB, United Kingdom. Electronic address: r.saunders@ucl.ac.uk. · Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 7HB, United Kingdom; iCope - Camden and Islington Psychological Therapies Services, Camden & Islington NHS Foundation Trust, Finsbury Health Centre, Pine Street, London EC1R 0LP, United Kingdom. · Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 7HB, United Kingdom. · iCope - Camden and Islington Psychological Therapies Services, Camden & Islington NHS Foundation Trust, Finsbury Health Centre, Pine Street, London EC1R 0LP, United Kingdom. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #30802698.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Forty-percent of the variance in psychological treatment outcomes is estimated to be explained by symptom change by the third treatment session. However, change may not be uniform across patient groups and symptom domains. This study aimed to identify subgroups of patients with different trajectories of depression and anxiety symptom change during psychological therapy and identify baseline patient characteristics associated with these trajectories. METHODS: 4394 patients attending two psychological treatment services completed sessional, self-report depression and anxiety measures. Trajectories of symptom change were investigated using latent class growth analysis. Multinomial logistic regression was used to explore associations between baseline patient characteristics and trajectory classes. RESULTS: A number of distinct trajectories were identified. Anxiety symptom trajectories could be distinguished by the third treatment session, but for depression symptoms there was a class displaying limited change until session six followed by rapid improvement in symptoms thereafter. Compared to the non-responding trajectories, depression and anxiety trajectories indicating treatment response were associated with lower baseline severity, better social functioning and lower incidence of phobic anxiety, but not with medication prescription status. LIMITATIONS: Data came from two services, so wider generalisability is unknown. Predictors were limited to data routinely collected in the services; unmeasured factors may have improved the prediction of trajectories. CONCLUSIONS: Baseline characteristics and symptom change early in therapy can help identify different trajectories of symptom change. This knowledge could aid clinical decision making and help improve treatment outcomes. By ignoring distinct trajectories, clinicians may incorrectly consider patients as "not-on-track" and unnecessarily change or end therapy that would otherwise benefit patients.

3 Article Risk factors for relapse and recurrence of depression in adults and how they operate: A four-phase systematic review and meta-synthesis. 2018

Buckman, J E J / Underwood, A / Clarke, K / Saunders, R / Hollon, S D / Fearon, P / Pilling, S. ·Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK. Electronic address: joshua.buckman@ucl.ac.uk. · Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. ·Clin Psychol Rev · Pubmed #30075313.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To review and synthesise prognostic indices that predict subsequent risk, prescriptive indices that moderate treatment response, and mechanisms that underlie each with respect to relapse and recurrence of depression in adults. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Childhood maltreatment, post-treatment residual symptoms, and a history of recurrence emerged as strong prognostic indicators of risk and each could be used prescriptively to indicate who benefits most from continued or prophylactic treatment. Targeting prognostic indices or their "down-stream" consequences will be particularly beneficial because each is either a cause or a consequence of the causal mechanisms underlying risk of recurrence. The cognitive and neural mechanisms that underlie the prognostic indices are likely addressed by the effects of treatments that are moderated by the prescriptive factors. For example, psychosocial interventions that target the consequences of childhood maltreatment, extending pharmacotherapy or adapting psychological therapies to deal with residual symptoms, or using cognitive or mindfulness-based therapies for those with prior histories of recurrence. Future research that focuses on understanding causal pathways that link childhood maltreatment, or cognitive diatheses, to dysfunction in the neocortical and limbic pathways that process affective information and facilitate cognitive control, might result in more enduring effects of treatments for depression.