Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Depression: HELP
Articles by Neerja Chowdhary
Based on 13 articles published since 2010
(Why 13 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, N. Chowdhary wrote the following 13 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Using consumer perspectives to inform the cultural adaptation of psychological treatments for depression: a mixed methods study from South Asia. 2014

Aggarwal, Neil Krishan / Balaji, Madhumitha / Kumar, Shuba / Mohanraj, Rani / Rahman, Atif / Verdeli, Helena / Araya, Ricardo / Jordans, M J D / Chowdhary, Neerja / Patel, Vikram. ·Columbia University, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 11, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: aggarwa@nyspi.columbia.edu. · Parivartan Trust, Plot no. 20, Vijaya Villa Survey, No. 235A, Sanjay Park, Lane no. 1, Lohgaon Airport Road, Pune 411014, India; Sangath Centre, 841/1 Alto-Porvorim, Sangath, Goa 403521, India. Electronic address: madhs@hotmail.com. · Samarth, No. 100, Warren Road, Mylapore, Chennai 600004, India. Electronic address: shubakumar@samarthngo.org. · Samarth, No. 100, Warren Road, Mylapore, Chennai 600004, India. Electronic address: ranimohanraj@samarthngo.org. · University of Liverpool, Institute of Psychology, Health & Society, Child Mental Health Unit, Alder Hey Children׳s NHS Foundation Trust, Mulberry House, Eaton Road, Liverpool L12 2AP, UK. Electronic address: Atif.Rahman@liverpool.ac.uk. · Department of Counselling and Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University, 525W 120th Street, New York City, NY 10027, USA. Electronic address: VERDELIH@childpsych.columbia.edu. · Academic Unit of Psychiatry, University of Bristol, Oakfield House, Oakfield Grove, Bristol BS8 2BN, UK. Electronic address: R.Araya@bristol.ac.uk. · Health Net TPO, Lizzy Ansinghstraat 163, 1073 RG Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Center for Global Mental Health, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, Box P029, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. Electronic address: mark.jordans@hntpo.org. · Sangath Centre, 841/1 Alto-Porvorim, Sangath, Goa 403521, India. Electronic address: neerjachowdhary@hotmail.com. · Sangath Centre, 841/1 Alto-Porvorim, Sangath, Goa 403521, India; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7H, UK. Electronic address: vikram.patel@lshtm.ac.uk. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #24836093.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Integrating consumer perspectives in developing and adapting psychological treatments (PTs) can enhance their acceptability in diverse cultural contexts. OBJECTIVE: To describe the explanatory models (EMs) of depression in South Asia with the goal of informing the content of culturally appropriate PTs for this region. METHODS: Two methods were used: a systematic review of published literature on the EMs of depression in South Asia; and in-depth interviews with persons with depression and family caregivers in two sites in India. Findings from both were analysed independently and then triangulated. RESULTS: There were 19 studies meeting our inclusion criteria. Interviews were conducted with 27 patients and 10 caregivers. Findings were grouped under four broad categories: illness descriptions, perceived impact, causal beliefs and self-help forms of coping. Depression was characterised predominantly by somatic complaints, stress, low mood, and negative and ruminative thoughts. Patients experienced disturbances in interpersonal relationships occupational functioning, and stigma. Negative life events, particularly relationship difficulties, were perceived as the main cause. Patients mostly engaged in distracting activities, religious practices, and received support from family and friends to cope with the illness. LIMITATIONS: The primary data are entirely from India but the studies from the literature review covering South Asia are consistent with these findings. This study also does not include literature in local languages or explore how consumer perspectives change over time. CONCLUSIONS: EMs can inform cultural adaptations to PTs for depression in South Asia by defining target outcomes, content for psycho-education, and culturally appropriate treatment strategies.

2 Review The content and delivery of psychological interventions for perinatal depression by non-specialist health workers in low and middle income countries: a systematic review. 2014

Chowdhary, Neerja / Sikander, Siham / Atif, Najia / Singh, Neha / Ahmad, Ikhlaq / Fuhr, Daniela C / Rahman, Atif / Patel, Vikram. ·Sangath, 841/1, Alto Porvorim - Goa 403511, India; The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK. · Human Development Research Foundation, Islamabad, Pakistan. · Sangath, 841/1, Alto Porvorim - Goa 403511, India. · The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK. · (d)University of Liverpool, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society Child Mental Health Unit, Alder Hey Children's NHS Trust, Mulberry House, Eaton Road, Liverpool L12 2AP, UK. · Sangath, 841/1, Alto Porvorim - Goa 403511, India; The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK. Electronic address: Vikram.Patel@lshtm.ac.uk. ·Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol · Pubmed #24054170.

ABSTRACT: Psychological interventions delivered by non-specialist health workers are effective for the treatment of perinatal depression in low- and middle-income countries. In this systematic review, we describe the content and delivery of such interventions. Nine studies were identified. The interventions shared a number of key features, such as delivery provided within the context of routine maternal and child health care beginning in the antenatal period and extending postnatally; focus of the intervention beyond the mother to include the child and involving other family members; and attention to social problems and a focus on empowerment of women. All the interventions were adapted for contextual and cultural relevance; for example, in domains of language, metaphors and content. Although the competence and quality of non-specialist health workers delivered interventions was expected to be achieved through structured training and ongoing supervision, empirical evaluations of these were scarce. Scalability of these interventions also remains a challenge and needs further attention.

3 Review The methods and outcomes of cultural adaptations of psychological treatments for depressive disorders: a systematic review. 2014

Chowdhary, N / Jotheeswaran, A T / Nadkarni, A / Hollon, S D / King, M / Jordans, M J D / Rahman, A / Verdeli, H / Araya, R / Patel, V. ·Centre for Global Mental Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK, and Sangath, India. · Institute of Psychiatry, King's College, London, UK, Public Health Foundation of India, and Sangath, India. · London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK. · Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Faculty of Brain Sciences, University College London Medical School, UK. · University of Liverpool, UK. · Teachers College, Columbia University and Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, NY, USA. · University of Bristol, UK. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #23866176.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cultural adaptations of evidence-based psychological treatments (PTs) are important to enhance their universal applicability. The aim of this study was to review systematically the literature on adaptations of PTs for depressive disorders for ethnic minorities in Western countries and for any population in non-Western countries to describe the process, extent and nature of the adaptations and the effectiveness of the adapted treatments. METHOD: Controlled trials were identified using database searches, key informants, previous reviews and reference lists. Data on the process and details of the adaptations were analyzed using qualitative methods and meta-analysis was used to assess treatment effectiveness. RESULTS: Twenty studies were included in this review, of which 16 were included in the meta-analysis. The process of adaptation was reported in two-thirds of the studies. Most adaptations were found in the dimensions of language, context and therapist delivering the treatment. The meta-analysis revealed a statistically significant benefit in favor of the adapted treatment [standardized mean difference (SMD) -0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.94 to -0.49]. CONCLUSIONS: Cultural adaptations of PTs follow a systematic procedure and lead primarily to adaptations in the implementation of the treatments rather than their content. Such PTs are effective in the treatment of depressive disorders in populations other than those for whom they were originally developed.

4 Review Early intervention to reduce the global health and economic burden of major depression in older adults. 2012

Reynolds, Charles F / Cuijpers, Pim / Patel, Vikram / Cohen, Alex / Dias, Amit / Chowdhary, Neerja / Okereke, Olivia I / Dew, Mary Amanda / Anderson, Stewart J / Mazumdar, Sati / Lotrich, Frank / Albert, Steven M. ·School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA. Reynoldscf@upmc.edu ·Annu Rev Public Health · Pubmed #22429161.

ABSTRACT: Randomized trials for selective and indicated prevention of depression in both mixed-aged and older adult samples, conducted in high-income countries (HICs), show that rates of incident depression can be reduced by 20-25% over 1-2 years through the use of psychoeducational and psychological interventions designed to increase protective factors. Recurrence of major depression can also be substantially reduced through both psychological and psychopharmacological strategies. Additional research is needed, however, to address the specific issues of depression prevention in older adults in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The growing number of older adults globally, as well as workforce issues and the expense of interventions, makes it important to develop rational, targeted, and cost-effective risk-reduction strategies. In our opinion, one strategy to address these issues entails the use of lay health counselors (LHCs), a form of task shifting already shown to be effective in the treatment of common mental disorders in LMICs. We suggest in this review that the time is right for research into the translation of depression-prevention strategies for use in LMICs.

5 Article Tuberculosis: an opportunity to integrate mental health services in primary care in low-resource settings. 2018

Sweetland, Annika C / Jaramillo, Ernesto / Wainberg, Milton L / Chowdhary, Neerja / Oquendo, Maria A / Medina-Marino, Andrew / Dua, Tarun. ·Department of Psychiatry, Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons/New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: acs2124@cumc.columbia.edu. · Global Tuberculosis Programme, WHO, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Psychiatry, Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons/New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032, USA. · Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Foundation for Professional Development, Pretoria, South Africa. ·Lancet Psychiatry · Pubmed #30241700.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Article Internet-based behavioural activation with lay counsellor support versus online minimal psychoeducation without support for treatment of depression: a randomised controlled trial in Indonesia. 2018

Arjadi, Retha / Nauta, Maaike H / Scholte, Willem F / Hollon, Steven D / Chowdhary, Neerja / Suryani, Angela O / Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M / Bockting, Claudi L H. ·Faculty of Psychology, Atma Jaya Catholic University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia; Department of Clinical Psychology and Experimental Psychopathology, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology and Experimental Psychopathology, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands. · Amsterdam University Medical Centres, Department of Psychiatry, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Equator Foundation, Diemen, Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · 25 Saras Baug, Deonar, Mumbai, India. · Faculty of Psychology, Atma Jaya Catholic University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia. · Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Julius Global Health, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology and Experimental Psychopathology, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands; Amsterdam University Medical Centres, Department of Psychiatry, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Electronic address: c.l.bockting@amc.uva.nl. ·Lancet Psychiatry · Pubmed #30006262.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depression is one of the leading contributors to the global burden of disease. However, treatment availability is often very poor in low-income and middle-income countries. In a randomised clinical trial, we investigated the efficacy of internet-based behavioural activation with lay counsellor support compared with online minimal psychoeducation without support for depression in Indonesia (a middle-income country). METHODS: We did a community-based, two-group, randomised controlled trial in Indonesia. Eligible participants were aged 16 years or older, scored 10 or above on the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9), met the criteria for major depressive disorder or persistent depressive disorder based on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-5, were proficient in Bahasa Indonesia, and could use the internet. Participants were randomly allocated (1:1) by a research assistant using a web-based randomisation program to online behavioural activation with lay support (termed Guided Act and Feel Indonesia [GAF-ID]) or online psychoeducation without further support. Randomisation was done within a random permuted block design and was stratified by sex and depression severity (ie, PHQ-9 10-14 vs ≥15). The primary outcome was self-reported PHQ-9 score at 10 weeks from baseline. Research assistants were masked to group allocation until after the assessment of the primary outcome. Interventions were described to participants during the consent procedure and after randomisation, but no indication was given as to which was the intervention of interest and which was the control. Analysis was by intention to treat. The trial was registered in the Netherlands Trial Register, number NTR5920. It is closed to new particpants, and follow-up has been completed. FINDINGS: Between Sept 6, 2016, and May 1, 2017, 313 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned, 159 to the GAF-ID group and 154 to the online psychoeducation group. At 10 weeks, PHQ-9 scores were significantly lower in the GAF-ID group than in the online psychoeducation group (mean difference -1·26 points [95% CI -2·29 to -0·23]; p=0·017), and participants in the GAF-ID group had a 50% higher chance of remission at 10 weeks (relative risk 1·50 [95% CI 1·19 to 1·88]; p<0·0001). An effect size of 0·24 for the GAF-ID group compared with the control group at 10 weeks was sustained over time (effect size 0·24 at 3 months, and 0·27 at 6 months). No adverse events were reported in either group. INTERPRETATION: To our knowledge, ours is the first adequately powered randomised clinical trial of an internet-based intervention for depression in a low-income or middle-income country. Online behavioural activation with lay counsellor support efficaciously reduced symptoms of depression, and could help to bridge the mental health gap in low-income and middle-income countries. FUNDING: Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education, University of Groningen.

7 Article Probability of major depression diagnostic classification using semi-structured versus fully structured diagnostic interviews. 2018

Levis, Brooke / Benedetti, Andrea / Riehm, Kira E / Saadat, Nazanin / Levis, Alexander W / Azar, Marleine / Rice, Danielle B / Chiovitti, Matthew J / Sanchez, Tatiana A / Cuijpers, Pim / Gilbody, Simon / Ioannidis, John P A / Kloda, Lorie A / McMillan, Dean / Patten, Scott B / Shrier, Ian / Steele, Russell J / Ziegelstein, Roy C / Akena, Dickens H / Arroll, Bruce / Ayalon, Liat / Baradaran, Hamid R / Baron, Murray / Beraldi, Anna / Bombardier, Charles H / Butterworth, Peter / Carter, Gregory / Chagas, Marcos H / Chan, Juliana C N / Cholera, Rushina / Chowdhary, Neerja / Clover, Kerrie / Conwell, Yeates / de Man-van Ginkel, Janneke M / Delgadillo, Jaime / Fann, Jesse R / Fischer, Felix H / Fischler, Benjamin / Fung, Daniel / Gelaye, Bizu / Goodyear-Smith, Felicity / Greeno, Catherine G / Hall, Brian J / Hambridge, John / Harrison, Patricia A / Hegerl, Ulrich / Hides, Leanne / Hobfoll, Stevan E / Hudson, Marie / Hyphantis, Thomas / Inagaki, Masatoshi / Ismail, Khalida / Jetté, Nathalie / Khamseh, Mohammad E / Kiely, Kim M / Lamers, Femke / Liu, Shen-Ing / Lotrakul, Manote / Loureiro, Sonia R / Löwe, Bernd / Marsh, Laura / McGuire, Anthony / Mohd Sidik, Sherina / Munhoz, Tiago N / Muramatsu, Kumiko / Osório, Flávia L / Patel, Vikram / Pence, Brian W / Persoons, Philippe / Picardi, Angelo / Rooney, Alasdair G / Santos, Iná S / Shaaban, Juwita / Sidebottom, Abbey / Simning, Adam / Stafford, Lesley / Sung, Sharon / Tan, Pei Lin Lynnette / Turner, Alyna / van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M / van Weert, Henk C / Vöhringer, Paul A / White, Jennifer / Whooley, Mary A / Winkley, Kirsty / Yamada, Mitsuhiko / Zhang, Yuying / Thombs, Brett D. ·Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,Jewish General Hospital,Montréal,Québec,CanadaandDepartment of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health,McGill University,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health,McGill University,Montréal,Québec,Canada;Department of Medicine,McGill University,Montréal,Québec,CanadaandRespiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit,McGill University Health Centre,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,Jewish General Hospital,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,Jewish General Hospital,Montréal,Québec,CanadaandDepartment of Psychology,McGill University,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology,EMGO Institute, VU University,Amsterdam,the Netherlands. · Hull York Medical School and the Department of Health Sciences,University of York,York,UK. · Department of Medicine,Department of Health Research and Policy,Department of Biomedical Data Science,Department of Statistics,Stanford University,Stanford,California,USA. · Library,Concordia University,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences,University of Calgary,Calgary,Alberta,Canada and Hotchkiss Brain Institute and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary,Calgary,Alberta,Canada. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,Jewish General Hospital,Montréal,Québec,CanadaandDepartment of Mathematics and Statistics,McGill University,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Department of Medicine,Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine,Baltimore,Maryland,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,Makerere University College of Health Sciences,Kampala,Uganda. · Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care,University of Auckland,New Zealand. · Louis and Gabi Weisfeld School of Social Work,Bar Ilan University,Ramat Gan,Israel. · Endocrine Research Center,Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Iran University of Medical Sciences,Tehran,Iran. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,Jewish General Hospital,Montréal,Québec,CanadaandDepartment of Medicine,McGill University,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Kbo-Lech-Mangfall-Klinik Garmisch-Partenkirchen,Klinik für Psychiatrie,Psychotherapie & Psychosomatik,Lehrkrankenhaus der Technischen Universität München,Munich,Germany. · Department of Rehabilitation Medicine,University of Washington,Seattle,Washington,USA. · Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing,Research School of Population Health,The Australian National University,Canberra,Australia;Centre for Mental Health,Melbourne School of Population and Global Health,University of Melbourne,Melbourne,AustraliaandMelbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, University of Melbourne,Melbourne,Australia. · Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health,University of Newcastle,New South Wales,Australia. · Department of Neurosciences and Behavior,Ribeirão Preto Medical School,University of São Paulo,Ribeirão Preto,Brazil. · Department of Medicine and Therapeutics,Prince of Wales Hospital,The Chinese University of Hong Kong,Hong Kong Special Administrative Region,China;Asia Diabetes Foundation,Prince of Wales Hospital,Hong Kong Special Administrative Region,China and Hong Kong Institute of Diabetes and Obesity,Hong Kong Special Administrative Region,China. · Department of Pediatrics,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine,Chapel Hill,North Carolina,USA. · Clinical Psychiatrist, Mumbai,India. · Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health,University of Newcastle,New South Wales,AustraliaandPsycho-Oncology Service,Calvary Mater Newcastle,New South Wales,Australia. · Department of Psychiatry,University of Rochester Medical Center,New York,USA. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care,University Medical Center Utrecht,Utrecht,the Netherlands. · Clinical Psychology Unit,Department of Psychology,University of Sheffield,Sheffield,UK. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,University of Washington,Seattle,Washington,USA. · Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics,Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin,GermanyandDepartment of Psychosomatic Medicine,Center for Internal Medicine and Dermatology,Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin,Germany. · Private Practice,Brussels,Belgium. · Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry,Institute of Mental Health,Singapore;Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine,National University of Singapore,Singapore;Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine,Nanyang Technological University,SingaporeandOffice of Clinical Sciences,Duke-NUS Medical School,Singapore. · Department of Epidemiology,Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health,Boston,Massachusetts,USA. · School of Social Work,University of Pittsburgh,Pittsburgh,Pennsylvania,USA. · Global and Community Mental Health Research Group,Department of Psychology,Faculty of Social Sciences,University of Macau,Macau Special Administrative Region,ChinaandDepartment of Health, Behavior, and Society,Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,Baltimore,Maryland,USA. · Liaison Psychiatry Department,John Hunter Hospital,Newcastle,Australia. · City of Minneapolis Health Department,Minneapolis,Minnesota,USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,University Hospital Leipzig,Leipzig,Germany. · Centre for Children's Health Research,Institute of Health & Biomedical Innovation,School of Psychology,University of Queensland,Brisbane,Queensland,Australia. · Department of Behavioral Sciences,Rush University Medical Center,Chicago,Illinois,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,University of Ioannina,Ioannina,Greece. · Department of Neuropsychiatry,Okayama University Hospital,Okayama,Japan. · Department of Psychological Medicine,Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neurosciences,King's College London Weston Education Centre,London,UK. · Department of Community Health Sciences,University of Calgary,Calgary,Alberta,Canada;Hotchkiss Brain Institute and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary,Calgary,Alberta,CanadaandDepartment of Clinical Neurosciences,University of Calgary,Calgary,Alberta,Canada. · Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing,Research School of Population Health,The Australian National University,Canberra,Australia. · Department of Psychiatry,Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center,Amsterdam,the Netherlands. · Office of Clinical Sciences,Duke-NUS Medical School,Singapore;Department of Psychiatry,Mackay Memorial Hospital,Taipei,Taiwan;Department of Medical Research,Mackay Memorial Hospital,Taipei,TaiwanandDepartment of Medicine,Mackay Medical College,Taipei,Taiwan. · Department of Psychiatry,Faculty of Medicine,Ramathibodi Hospital,Mahidol University,Bangkok,Thailand. · Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy,University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf,Hamburg,GermanyandSchön Klinik Hamburg Eilbek,Hamburg,Germany. · Baylor College of Medicine,HoustonandMichael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center,Houston,Texas,USA. · Department of Nursing,St. Joseph's College,Standish,Maine,USA. · Cancer Resource & Education Centre, and Department of Psychiatry,Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences,Universiti Putra Malaysia,Serdang,Selangor,Malaysia. · Post-graduate Program in Epidemiology,Federal University of Pelotas,Pelotas,RS,Brazil. · Department of Clinical Psychology,Graduate School of Niigata Seiryo University,Niigata,Japan. · Department of Neurosciences and Behavior,Ribeirão Preto Medical School,University of São Paulo,Ribeirão Preto,Brazil and National Institute of Science and Technology,Translational Medicine,Ribeirão Preto,Brazil. · Department of Global Health and Social Medicine,Harvard Medical School,Boston,Massachusetts,USA;London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine,London,UKandCentre for Chronic Conditions and Injuries,Public Health Foundation of India,New Delhi,India. · Department of Epidemiology,Gillings School of Global Public Health,The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Chapel Hill,North Carolina,USA. · Department of Adult Psychiatry,University Hospitals Leuven,Leuven,BelgiumandDepartment of Neurosciences,Katholieke Universiteit Leuven,Leuven,Belgium. · Centre for Behavioural Sciences and Mental Health,Italian National Institute of Health,Rome,Italy. · Division of Psychiatry,Royal Edinburgh Hospital,University of Edinburg,Edinburgh,Scotland,UK. · Department of Family Medicine,School of Medical Sciences,Universiti Sains Malaysia,Kelantan,Malaysia. · Allina Health,Minneapolis,Minnesota,USA. · Centre for Women's Mental Health,Royal Women's Hospital,Parkville,AustraliaandMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences,University of Melbourne,Australia. · Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry,Institute of Mental Health,SingaporeandOffice of Clinical Sciences,Duke-NUS Medical School,Singapore. · Department of Psychological Medicine,Tan Tock Seng Hospital,Singapore. · School of Medicine and Public Health,University of Newcastle,New South Wales,Newcastle,AustraliaandIMPACT Strategic Research Centre,School of Medicine,Deakin University,Geelong,Victoria,Australia. · Clinical Center of Excellence for Body, Mind and Health,GGz Breburg,Tilburg,the Netherlands and Tilburg University,Faculty of Social Sciences,Tranzo Department,Tilburg,the Netherlands. · Department of General Practice,Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam,University of Amsterdam,Amsterdam,the Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health,Clinical Hospital,Universidad de Chile,Santiago,Chile;Millennium Institute for Depression and Personality Research (MIDAP),Ministry of Economy,Macul,Santiago,ChileandMood Disorders Program,Tufts Medical Center,Tufts University,Boston,USA. · Monash University,Melbourne,Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics,University of California San Francisco,San Francisco,California,USA;Department of Medicine,Veterans Affairs Medical Center,San Francisco,California,USAandDepartment of Medicine,University of California San Francisco,San Francisco,California,USA. · Department of Neuropsychopharmacology,National Institute of Mental Health,National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry,Ogawa-Higashi,Kodaira,Tokyo,Japan. · Department of Medicine and Therapeutics,Prince of Wales Hospital,The Chinese University of Hong Kong,Hong Kong Special Administrative Region,ChinaandAsia Diabetes Foundation,Prince of Wales Hospital,Hong Kong Special Administrative Region,China. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,Jewish General Hospital,Montréal,Québec,CanadaandDepartment of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health,Department of Medicine,Department of Psychology,Department of Psychiatry, andDepartment of Educational and Counselling Psychology,McGill University,Montréal, Québec,Canada. ·Br J Psychiatry · Pubmed #29717691.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Different diagnostic interviews are used as reference standards for major depression classification in research. Semi-structured interviews involve clinical judgement, whereas fully structured interviews are completely scripted. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), a brief fully structured interview, is also sometimes used. It is not known whether interview method is associated with probability of major depression classification.AimsTo evaluate the association between interview method and odds of major depression classification, controlling for depressive symptom scores and participant characteristics. METHOD: Data collected for an individual participant data meta-analysis of Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) diagnostic accuracy were analysed and binomial generalised linear mixed models were fit. RESULTS: A total of 17 158 participants (2287 with major depression) from 57 primary studies were analysed. Among fully structured interviews, odds of major depression were higher for the MINI compared with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) (odds ratio (OR) = 2.10; 95% CI = 1.15-3.87). Compared with semi-structured interviews, fully structured interviews (MINI excluded) were non-significantly more likely to classify participants with low-level depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 scores ≤6) as having major depression (OR = 3.13; 95% CI = 0.98-10.00), similarly likely for moderate-level symptoms (PHQ-9 scores 7-15) (OR = 0.96; 95% CI = 0.56-1.66) and significantly less likely for high-level symptoms (PHQ-9 scores ≥16) (OR = 0.50; 95% CI = 0.26-0.97). CONCLUSIONS: The MINI may identify more people as depressed than the CIDI, and semi-structured and fully structured interviews may not be interchangeable methods, but these results should be replicated.Declaration of interestDrs Jetté and Patten declare that they received a grant, outside the submitted work, from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, which was jointly funded by the Institute and Pfizer. Pfizer was the original sponsor of the development of the PHQ-9, which is now in the public domain. Dr Chan is a steering committee member or consultant of Astra Zeneca, Bayer, Lilly, MSD and Pfizer. She has received sponsorships and honorarium for giving lectures and providing consultancy and her affiliated institution has received research grants from these companies. Dr Hegerl declares that within the past 3 years, he was an advisory board member for Lundbeck, Servier and Otsuka Pharma; a consultant for Bayer Pharma; and a speaker for Medice Arzneimittel, Novartis, and Roche Pharma, all outside the submitted work. Dr Inagaki declares that he has received grants from Novartis Pharma, lecture fees from Pfizer, Mochida, Shionogi, Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma, Daiichi-Sankyo, Meiji Seika and Takeda, and royalties from Nippon Hyoron Sha, Nanzando, Seiwa Shoten, Igaku-shoin and Technomics, all outside of the submitted work. Dr Yamada reports personal fees from Meiji Seika Pharma Co., Ltd., MSD K.K., Asahi Kasei Pharma Corporation, Seishin Shobo, Seiwa Shoten Co., Ltd., Igaku-shoin Ltd., Chugai Igakusha and Sentan Igakusha, all outside the submitted work. All other authors declare no competing interests. No funder had any role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis and interpretation of the data; preparation, review or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

8 Article Cultural Adaptation of Minimally Guided Interventions for Common Mental Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 2016

Harper Shehadeh, Melissa / Heim, Eva / Chowdhary, Neerja / Maercker, Andreas / Albanese, Emiliano. ·Institute of Global Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. Melissa.Harper@etu.unige.ch. ·JMIR Ment Health · Pubmed #27670598.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cultural adaptation of mental health care interventions is key, particularly when there is little or no therapist interaction. There is little published information on the methods of adaptation of bibliotherapy and e-mental health interventions. OBJECTIVE: To systematically search for evidence of the effectiveness of minimally guided interventions for the treatment of common mental disorders among culturally diverse people with common mental disorders; to analyze the extent and effects of cultural adaptation of minimally guided interventions for the treatment of common mental disorders. METHODS: We searched Embase, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO for randomized controlled trials that tested the efficacy of minimally guided or self-help interventions for depression or anxiety among culturally diverse populations. We calculated pooled standardized mean differences using a random-effects model. In addition, we administered a questionnaire to the authors of primary studies to assess the cultural adaptation methods used in the included primary studies. We entered this information into a meta-regression to investigate effects of the extent of adaptation on intervention efficacy. RESULTS: We included eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) out of the 4911 potentially eligible records identified by the search: four on e-mental health and four on bibliotherapy. The extent of cultural adaptation varied across the studies, with language translation and use of metaphors being the most frequently applied elements of adaptation. The pooled standardized mean difference for primary outcome measures of depression and anxiety was -0.81 (95% CI -0.10 to -0.62). Higher cultural adaptation scores were significantly associated with greater effect sizes (P=.04). CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the results of previous systematic reviews on the cultural adaptation of face-to-face interventions: the extent of cultural adaptation has an effect on intervention efficacy. More research is warranted to explore how cultural adaptation may contribute to improve the acceptability and effectiveness of minimally guided psychological interventions for common mental disorders.

9 Article Guided Act and Feel Indonesia (GAF-ID) - Internet-based behavioral activation intervention for depression in Indonesia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. 2016

Arjadi, Retha / Nauta, Maaike H / Scholte, Willem F / Hollon, Steven D / Chowdhary, Neerja / Suryani, Angela O / Bockting, Claudi L H. ·Department of Clinical Psychology and Experimental Psychopathology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Faculty of Psychology, Atma Jaya Catholic University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia. · Academic Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Equator Foundation, Diemen, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · International Medical Corps, Washington DC, USA. · Department of Clinical Psychology and Experimental Psychopathology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. c.l.h.bockting@uu.nl. · Department of Clinical Psychology, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS, Utrecht, The Netherlands. c.l.h.bockting@uu.nl. ·Trials · Pubmed #27639557.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depression is a leading cause of disease burden across the world. However, in low-middle income countries (LMICs), access to mental health services is severely limited because of the insufficient number of mental health professionals available. The WHO initiated the Mental Health Gap Action Program (mhGAP) aiming to provide a coherent strategy for closing the gap between what is urgently needed and what is available in LMICs. Internet-based treatment is a promising strategy that can be made available to a large number of people now that Internet access is increasing rapidly throughout the world. The present study will investigate whether such an Internet-based treatment for depression is effective in Indonesia. METHODS: An Internet-based behavioral activation treatment, with support by lay counselors who will provide online feedback on the assignments and supportive phone contact to encourage participants to work in the program (Guided Act and Feel Indonesia/GAF-ID), is compared to an online-delivered minimal psychoeducation without any support (psychoeducation/PE). Initial assessment for inclusion is based on a Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) score of at least 10 and meeting criteria for major depressive disorder or persistent depressive disorder as assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-5 (SCID-5). Participants with depression (N = 312) will be recruited and randomly assigned to GAF-ID or PE. Overall assessments will be done at baseline, post intervention (10 weeks from baseline) and follow-ups (3 months and 6 months from baseline). The primary outcome is the reduction of depression symptoms as measured by the PHQ-9 after 10 weeks from baseline. DISCUSSION: To our knowledge, this is the first study in Indonesia that examines the effectiveness of an Internet-based intervention for depression in a randomized controlled trial. The hope is that it can serve as a starting point for bridging the mental health gap in Indonesia and other LMICs. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Nederlands Trial Register ( www.trialregister.nl ): NTR5920 , registered on 1 July 2016.

10 Article "When Grief Breaks Your Heart": A Case Study of Interpersonal Psychotherapy Delivered in a Primary Care Setting. 2016

Gomes, Maria Fatima / Chowdhary, Neerja / Vousoura, Eleni / Verdeli, Helen. ·M.E.S. College of Arts and Commerce, Goa, India. fatimadcosta@rediffmail.com. · Consultant Psychiatrist, Mumbai, India. · Athens University Medical School. · Teachers College, Columbia University. ·J Clin Psychol · Pubmed #27479156.

ABSTRACT: Depression and anxiety, the so-called common mental disorders (CMDs), are highly prevalent and disabling, yet remain largely untreated. This treatment gap is particularly true in low- and middle-income settings, where there is significant scarcity of resources (including human resources) and treatment accessibility is complicated by stigma surrounding mental illness. To address these challenges, the MANAS trial, one of the largest to date randomized, controlled trials, aimed to test the effectiveness of a stepped care intervention led by lay health counselors in primary care settings in Goa, India. Six- and 12-month follow-up outcomes suggest that MANAS was a safe, feasible, effective, and cost-effective intervention for CMDs in that context. This article demonstrates the use of culturally adapted IPT as an intervention to treat CMDs in a 54-year-old Indian primary care patient struggling with depression and heart-related problems after his wife's death. A case formulation is presented based on core IPT principles, followed by detailed delineation of treatment from beginning through termination.

11 Article The Healthy Activity Program lay counsellor delivered treatment for severe depression in India: systematic development and randomised evaluation. 2016

Chowdhary, Neerja / Anand, Arpita / Dimidjian, Sona / Shinde, Sachin / Weobong, Benedict / Balaji, Madhumitha / Hollon, Steven D / Rahman, Atif / Wilson, G Terence / Verdeli, Helena / Araya, Ricardo / King, Michael / Jordans, Mark J D / Fairburn, Christopher / Kirkwood, Betty / Patel, Vikram. ·Neerja Chowdhary, MD, Sangath, Goa, India and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Arpita Anand, MSc, MA, Sangath, Goa, India; Sona Dimidjian, PhD, University of Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA; Sachin Shinde, MPA, Sangath, Goa, India; Benedict Weobong, PhD, Sangath, Goa, India and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Madhumitha Balaji, MSc, Sangath, Goa, India; Steve D. Hollon, PhD, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Atif Rahman, PhD, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; G. Terence Wilson, PhD, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA; Helena Verdeli, PhD, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, USA; Ricardo Araya, PhD, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Michael King, PhD, University College, London, UK; Mark J. D. Jordans, PhD, King's College, London, UK; Christopher Fairburn, PhD, Oxford University, Oxford, UK; Betty Kirkwood, PhD, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Vikram Patel, FMedSi, Sangath, Goa, Centre for Chronic Conditions and Injuries, Public Health Foundation of India, New Delhi, India and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK. · Neerja Chowdhary, MD, Sangath, Goa, India and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Arpita Anand, MSc, MA, Sangath, Goa, India; Sona Dimidjian, PhD, University of Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA; Sachin Shinde, MPA, Sangath, Goa, India; Benedict Weobong, PhD, Sangath, Goa, India and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Madhumitha Balaji, MSc, Sangath, Goa, India; Steve D. Hollon, PhD, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Atif Rahman, PhD, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; G. Terence Wilson, PhD, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA; Helena Verdeli, PhD, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, USA; Ricardo Araya, PhD, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Michael King, PhD, University College, London, UK; Mark J. D. Jordans, PhD, King's College, London, UK; Christopher Fairburn, PhD, Oxford University, Oxford, UK; Betty Kirkwood, PhD, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Vikram Patel, FMedSi, Sangath, Goa, Centre for Chronic Conditions and Injuries, Public Health Foundation of India, New Delhi, India and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK vikram.patel@lshtm.ac.uk. ·Br J Psychiatry · Pubmed #26494875.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reducing the global treatment gap for mental disorders requires treatments that are economical, effective and culturally appropriate. AIMS: To describe a systematic approach to the development of a brief psychological treatment for patients with severe depression delivered by lay counsellors in primary healthcare. METHOD: The treatment was developed in three stages using a variety of methods: (a) identifying potential strategies; (b) developing a theoretical framework; and (c) evaluating the acceptability, feasibility and effectiveness of the psychological treatment. RESULTS: The Healthy Activity Program (HAP) is delivered over 6-8 sessions and consists of behavioral activation as the core psychological framework with added emphasis on strategies such as problem-solving and activation of social networks. Key elements to improve acceptability and feasibility are also included. In an intention-to-treat analysis of a pilot randomised controlled trial (55 participants), the prevalence of depression (Beck Depression Inventory II ⩾19) after 2 months was lower in the HAP than the control arm (adjusted risk ratio = 0.55, 95% CI 0.32-0.94,P= 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Our systematic approach to the development of psychological treatments could be extended to other mental disorders. HAP is an acceptable and effective brief psychological treatment for severe depression delivered by lay counsellors in primary care.

12 Article Improving the scalability of psychological treatments in developing countries: an evaluation of peer-led therapy quality assessment in Goa, India. 2014

Singla, Daisy R / Weobong, Benedict / Nadkarni, Abhijit / Chowdhary, Neerja / Shinde, Sachin / Anand, Arpita / Fairburn, Christopher G / Dimijdan, Sona / Velleman, Richard / Weiss, Helen / Patel, Vikram. ·1205 Ave Docteur Penfield, Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 1B1, Canada. · Sangath, H No 451 (168), Survey No 50/31, Succour, Porvorim, Bardez, Goa 403501, India; Centre for Global Mental Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E7HT, United Kingdom. · Sangath, H No 451 (168), Survey No 50/31, Succour, Porvorim, Bardez, Goa 403501, India. · Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, OX3 7JX, United Kingdom. · University of Colorado, Boulder, 345 UCB Muenzinger, Boulder, CO 80309-0345, USA. · Sangath, H No 451 (168), Survey No 50/31, Succour, Porvorim, Bardez, Goa 403501, India; Department of Psychology, 2 South, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY, United Kingdom. · Centre for Global Mental Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E7HT, United Kingdom. · Sangath, H No 451 (168), Survey No 50/31, Succour, Porvorim, Bardez, Goa 403501, India; Centre for Global Mental Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E7HT, United Kingdom; Centre for Chronic Conditions and Injuries, Public Health Foundation of India, New Delhi, India. Electronic address: vikram.patel@lshtm.ac.uk. ·Behav Res Ther · Pubmed #25064211.

ABSTRACT: Psychological treatments delivered by lay therapists, with little or no previous mental health training, have been shown to be effective in treating a range of mental health problems. In low resource settings, the dearth of available experts to assess therapy quality potentially leads to a bottleneck in scaling up lay therapist delivered psychological treatments. Peer-led supervision and the assessment of therapy quality may be one solution to address this barrier. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) to assess lay therapist quality ratings compared to expert supervisors in a multisite study where lay therapists delivered two locally developed, psychological treatments for harmful and dependent drinking and severe depression; 2) assess the acceptability and feasibility of peer-led supervision compared to expert-led supervision. We developed two scales, one for each treatment, to compare lay therapist and expert ratings on audio-taped treatment sessions (n = 189). Our findings confirmed our primary hypothesis of increased levels of agreement between peer and expert ratings over three consecutive time periods as demonstrated by a decrease in the differences in mean therapy quality rating scores. This study highlights that lay therapists can be trained to effectively assess each other's therapy sessions as well as experts, and that peer-led supervision is acceptable for lay therapists, thus, enhancing the scalability of psychological treatments in low-resource settings.

13 Article Lay health worker led intervention for depressive and anxiety disorders in India: impact on clinical and disability outcomes over 12 months. 2011

Patel, Vikram / Weiss, Helen A / Chowdhary, Neerja / Naik, Smita / Pednekar, Sulochana / Chatterjee, Sudipto / Bhat, Bhargav / Araya, Ricardo / King, Michael / Simon, Gregory / Verdeli, Helena / Kirkwood, Betty R. ·Department of Nutrition and Public Health Intervention Research, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK and Sangath, Goa, India. Vikram.patel@lshtm.ac.uk ·Br J Psychiatry · Pubmed #22130747.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depressive and anxiety disorders (common mental disorders) are the most common psychiatric condition encountered in primary healthcare. AIMS: To test the effectiveness of an intervention led by lay health counsellors in primary care settings (the MANAS intervention) to improve the outcomes of people with common mental disorders. METHOD: Twenty-four primary care facilities (12 public, 12 private) in Goa (India) were randomised to provide either collaborative stepped care or enhanced usual care to adults who screened positive for common mental disorders. Participants were assessed at 2, 6 and 12 months for presence of ICD-10 common mental disorders, the severity of symptoms of depression and anxiety, suicidal behaviour and disability levels. All analyses were intention to treat and carried out separately for private and public facilities and adjusted for the design. The trial has been registered with clinical trials.gov (NCT00446407). RESULTS: A total of 2796 participants were recruited. In public facilities, the intervention was consistently associated with strong beneficial effects over the 12 months on all outcomes. There was a 30% decrease in the prevalence of common mental disorders among those with baseline ICD-10 diagnoses (risk ratio (RR) = 0.70, 95% CI 0.53-0.92); and a similar effect among the subgroup of participants with depression (RR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.59-0.98). Suicide attempts/plans showed a 36% reduction over 12 months (RR=0.64, 95% CI0.42–0.98) among baseline ICD-10 cases. Strong effects were observed on days out of work and psychological morbidity, and modest effects on overall disability [corrected]. In contrast, there was little evidence of impact of the intervention on any outcome among participants attending private facilities. CONCLUSIONS: Trained lay counsellors working within a collaborative-care model can reduce prevalence of common mental disorders, suicidal behaviour, psychological morbidity and disability days among those attending public primary care facilities.