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Depression: HELP
Articles by Svetozar Damjanovic
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Svetozar Damjanovic wrote the following 3 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article PTSD and depressive symptoms are linked to DHEAS via personality. 2018

Savic, Danka / Knezevic, Goran / Matic, Gordana / Damjanovic, Svetozar. ·University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute, Laboratory of Theoretical and Condensed Matter Physics 020/2, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-14, 11001 Belgrade, Serbia. Electronic address: danka.s@sbb.rs. · University of Belgrade, School of Psychology, Cika Ljubina 18-20, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia. Electronic address: gknezevi@f.bg.ac.rs. · University of Belgrade, Institute for Biological Research "Sinisa Stankovic", Bulevar despota Stefana 142, 11060 Belgrade, Serbia. · University of Belgrade, Clinic of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, Doktora Subotica 13, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia. Electronic address: svetadamjanovic@gmail.com. ·Psychoneuroendocrinology · Pubmed #29621722.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Research results on dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate ester (DHEAS) in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are inconsistent. We hypothesized that personality traits could be the confounders of DHEAS levels and disease symptoms, which could in part explain the discrepancy in findings. METHOD: This study was a part of a broader project in which simultaneous psychological and biological investigations were carried out in hospital conditions. 380 male subjects were categorized in four groups: A) current PTSD (n = 132), B) lifetime PTSD (n = 66), C) trauma controls (n = 101), and D) healthy controls (n = 81), matched by age. RESULTS: The level of DHEAS is significantly lower in the current PTSD group than in trauma controls. All groups significantly differ in personality traits Disintegration and Neuroticism (current PTSD group having the highest scores). DHEAS is related to both PTSD and depressive symptoms; however, Structural Equation Model (SEM) shows that the relations are indirect, realized via their confounder - personality trait Disintegration. CONCLUSIONS: According to our project results, DHEAS is the second putative biomarker for trauma-related disorders that fails to fulfil this expectation. It appears to be more directly related to personality than to the disease symptoms (the first one being basal cortisol). Our data promote personality as a biologically based construct with seemingly important role in understanding the mental health status.

2 Article Posttraumatic and depressive symptoms in β-endorphin dynamics. 2015

Savic, Danka / Knezevic, Goran / Matic, Gordana / Damjanovic, Svetozar / Spiric, Zeljko. ·University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute, Belgrade, Serbia. Electronic address: danka.s@sbb.rs. · University of Belgrade, School of Psychology, Belgrade, Serbia. · University of Belgrade, Institute for Biological Research "Sinisa Stankovic", Belgrade, Serbia. · Institute of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Disease, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Clinic for Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine of the Military Medical Academy, University of Defense, Belgrade, Serbia. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #25917294.

ABSTRACT: A disturbed beta-endorphin system can be a part of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression allostasis. Study subjects (N=392) included those with PTSD and/or (stress-induced) depression, and healthy controls with and without traumas. The aim of the study was to examine the network of relations centered around plasma beta-endorphin. The network included anxiety (as a personality trait), traumatic events, pain, aggressiveness, depressive symptoms, and three clusters of PTSD symptoms: intrusions, avoidance, and hyperarousal. Beta-endorphin was represented by individual mean from 13 time points (BEmean), reflecting the total amount of the peripherally secreted hormone, and the coefficient of variation (BEvar), calculated as the ratio of standard deviation to the mean, reflecting the hormone׳s dynamics. BEvar correlated with all other variables, BEmean had no correlations. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine all interrelations (including their directions) of BEvar and the state/trait variables in the context of their entirety. The model revealed that hyperarousal and anxiety were the only direct agents of peripheral beta-endorphin fluctuations, mediating the effects of other variables. Traumatic events and intrusions act on BEvar via hyperarousal, while depressive symptoms, avoidance, and pain act via anxiety. Hyperarousal should be emphasized as the main agent not only because its effect on BEvar is larger than that of anxiety, but also because it increases anxiety itself (via avoidance and pain). All influences on BEvar are positive and they indicate long-term (sensitizing) effects (as opposed to direct stimulation, for example, by acute pain, anger, etc.). Relations apart from beta-endorphin are also discussed.

3 Article Is there a biological difference between trauma-related depression and PTSD? DST says 'NO'. 2012

Savic, Danka / Knezevic, Goran / Damjanovic, Svetozar / Spiric, Zeljko / Matic, Gordana. ·Vinca Institute, Belgrade, Serbia. danka.s@sbb.rs ·Psychoneuroendocrinology · Pubmed #22398269.

ABSTRACT: The use of the low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (DST) as a potentially discriminative marker between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression is still under discussion. In order to compare the influence of these psychopathologies on the DST results, we examined suppression in war-traumatized subjects with one or both of these disorders, as well as in healthy controls. Based on our previous findings, we hypothesized that subjects with any disorder would exhibit higher dexamethasone suppression than healthy controls due to traumatic experiences. This study was a part of a broader project in which simultaneous psychological and biological investigations were carried out in hospital conditions on 399 male participants: 57 with PTSD, 28 with depression, 76 with PTSD+depression, and 238 healthy controls. Cortisol was measured in blood samples taken at 0900 h before and after administering 0.5mg of dexamethasone (at 2300 h). Group means ± standard deviation of cortisol suppression were: 79.4±18.5 in the PTSD group, 80.8±11.6 in the depression group, 77.5±24.6 in the group with PTSD+depression, and 66.8±34.6 in healthy controls. The first three groups suppressed significantly more than the fourth. When the number of traumas was introduced as a covariate, the differences disappeared. The hypothesis was confirmed: in respect to DST, the examined trauma-related psychopathologies showed the same pattern: hypersuppression, due to multiple traumatic experiences.