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Depression: HELP
Articles by Robert J. DeRubeis
Based on 55 articles published since 2010
(Why 55 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, R. DeRubeis wrote the following 55 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3
1 Guideline Screening, assessment, and care of anxiety and depressive symptoms in adults with cancer: an American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline adaptation. 2014

Andersen, Barbara L / DeRubeis, Robert J / Berman, Barry S / Gruman, Jessie / Champion, Victoria L / Massie, Mary Jane / Holland, Jimmie C / Partridge, Ann H / Bak, Kate / Somerfield, Mark R / Rowland, Julia H / Anonymous2850791. ·Barbara L. Andersen, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH · Robert J. DeRubeis, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA · Barry S. Berman, Broward Health Medical Center, Fort Lauderdale, FL · Jessie Gruman, Center for Advancing Health, Washington, DC · Victoria L. Champion, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN · Mary Jane Massie, Jimmie C. Holland, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute, New York, NY · Ann H. Partridge, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA · Kate Bak and Mark R. Somerfield, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA · Julia H. Rowland, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #24733793.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: A Pan-Canadian Practice Guideline on Screening, Assessment, and Care of Psychosocial Distress (Depression, Anxiety) in Adults With Cancer was identified for adaptation. METHODS: American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for adapting clinical practice guidelines developed by other organizations. The guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor and content applicability. RESULTS: On the basis of content review of the pan-Canadian guideline, the ASCO panel agreed that, in general, the recommendations were clear, thorough, based on the most relevant scientific evidence, and presented options that will be acceptable to patients. However, for some topics addressed in the pan-Canadian guideline, the ASCO panel formulated a set of adapted recommendations based on local context and practice beliefs of the ad hoc panel members. It is recommended that all patients with cancer be evaluated for symptoms of depression and anxiety at periodic times across the trajectory of care. Assessment should be performed using validated, published measures and procedures. Depending on levels of symptoms and supplementary information, differing treatment pathways are recommended. Failure to identify and treat anxiety and depression increases the risk for poor quality of life and potential disease-related morbidity and mortality. This guideline adaptation is part of a larger survivorship guideline series. CONCLUSION: Although clinicians may not be able to prevent some of the chronic or late medical effects of cancer, they have a vital role in mitigating the negative emotional and behavioral sequelae. Recognizing and treating effectively those who manifest symptoms of anxiety or depression will reduce the human cost of cancer.

2 Review [Cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy for major depressive disorder: how do they work, how long, and for whom?] 2019

Lemmens, L H J M / van Bronswijk, S C / Peeters, F / Arntz, A / Roefs, A / Hollon, S D / Derubeis, R J / Huibers, M J H. · ·Tijdschr Psychiatr · Pubmed #31907915.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although the effectiveness of cognitive therapy (ct) and interpersonal psychotherapy (ipt) for depression has been well established, little is known about how, how long and for whom they work.
AIM: To summarize findings from a large rct to the (differential) effects and mechanisms of change of ct/ipt for depression.
METHOD: 182 adult depressed outpatients were randomized to ct (n = 76), ipt (n = 75), or a two-month wait-list-control condition (n = 31). Primary outcome was depression severity (bdi-ii). Other outcomes were quality of life, social and general psychological functioning and various potential process measures. Interventions were compared at the end of treatment, and up to 17 months follow-up.
RESULTS: Overall, ct and ipt were both superior to the wait-list, but did not differ significantly from one another. However, the pathway through which therapeutic change occurred appeared to be different for ct and ipt, and many patients were predicted to have a clinically meaningful advantage in one of the two interventions. We did not find empirical support for the theoretical models of change.
CONCLUSION: (Long-term) outcomes of ct and ipt appear to not differ significantly. The field would benefit from further refinement of research methods to disentangle mechanisms of change, and from advances in the field of personalized medicine.

3 Review Treatment Selection in Depression. 2018

Cohen, Zachary D / DeRubeis, Robert J. ·Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA; email: zachary.d.cohen@gmail.com. ·Annu Rev Clin Psychol · Pubmed #29494258.

ABSTRACT: Mental health researchers and clinicians have long sought answers to the question "What works for whom?" The goal of precision medicine is to provide evidence-based answers to this question. Treatment selection in depression aims to help each individual receive the treatment, among the available options, that is most likely to lead to a positive outcome for them. Although patient variables that are predictive of response to treatment have been identified, this knowledge has not yet translated into real-world treatment recommendations. The Personalized Advantage Index (PAI) and related approaches combine information obtained prior to the initiation of treatment into multivariable prediction models that can generate individualized predictions to help clinicians and patients select the right treatment. With increasing availability of advanced statistical modeling approaches, as well as novel predictive variables and big data, treatment selection models promise to contribute to improved outcomes in depression.

4 Review Initial severity of depression and efficacy of cognitive-behavioural therapy: individual-participant data meta-analysis of pill-placebo-controlled trials. 2017

Furukawa, Toshi A / Weitz, Erica S / Tanaka, Shiro / Hollon, Steven D / Hofmann, Stefan G / Andersson, Gerhard / Twisk, Jos / DeRubeis, Robert J / Dimidjian, Sona / Hegerl, Ulrich / Mergl, Roland / Jarrett, Robin B / Vittengl, Jeffrey R / Watanabe, Norio / Cuijpers, Pim. ·Toshi A. Furukawa, MD, PhD, Departments of Health Promotion and Human Behavior and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Erica S. Weitz, MA, Department of Clinical Psychology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Shiro Tanaka, PhD, Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Steven D. Hollon, PhD, Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD, Department of Psychological and Brain Science, Boston University, Massachusetts, USA; Gerhard Andersson, PhD, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden and Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stokholm, Sweden; Jos Twisk, PhD, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Robert J. DeRubeis, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Sona Dimidjian, PhD, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, USA; Ulrich Hegerl, MD, PhD, Roland Mergl, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Robin B. Jarrett, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA; Jeffrey R. Vittengl, PhD, Department of Psychology, Truman State University, Kirksville, Missouri, USA; Norio Watanabe, MD, PhD, Departments of Health Promotion and Human Behavior and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Pim Cuijpers, PhD, Department of Clinical Psychology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands furukawa@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp. · Toshi A. Furukawa, MD, PhD, Departments of Health Promotion and Human Behavior and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Erica S. Weitz, MA, Department of Clinical Psychology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Shiro Tanaka, PhD, Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Steven D. Hollon, PhD, Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD, Department of Psychological and Brain Science, Boston University, Massachusetts, USA; Gerhard Andersson, PhD, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden and Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stokholm, Sweden; Jos Twisk, PhD, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Robert J. DeRubeis, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Sona Dimidjian, PhD, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, USA; Ulrich Hegerl, MD, PhD, Roland Mergl, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Robin B. Jarrett, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA; Jeffrey R. Vittengl, PhD, Department of Psychology, Truman State University, Kirksville, Missouri, USA; Norio Watanabe, MD, PhD, Departments of Health Promotion and Human Behavior and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Pim Cuijpers, PhD, Department of Clinical Psychology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Br J Psychiatry · Pubmed #28104735.

ABSTRACT:

5 Review Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Nature and Relation to Non-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. 2016

Lorenzo-Luaces, Lorenzo / Keefe, John R / DeRubeis, Robert J. ·University of Pennsylvania. Electronic address: lorenzl@sas.upenn.edu. · University of Pennsylvania. ·Behav Ther · Pubmed #27993333.

ABSTRACT: Since the introduction of Beck's cognitive theory of emotional disorders, and their treatment with psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral approaches have become the most extensively researched psychological treatment for a wide variety of disorders. Despite this, the relative contribution of cognitive to behavioral approaches to treatment are poorly understood and the mechanistic role of cognitive change in therapy is widely debated. We critically review this literature, focusing on the mechanistic role of cognitive change across cognitive and behavioral therapies for depressive and anxiety disorders.

6 Review It's complicated: The relation between cognitive change procedures, cognitive change, and symptom change in cognitive therapy for depression. 2015

Lorenzo-Luaces, Lorenzo / German, Ramaris E / DeRubeis, Robert J. ·Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, United States. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, United States. Electronic address: derubeis@psych.upenn.edu. ·Clin Psychol Rev · Pubmed #25595660.

ABSTRACT: Many attempts have been made to discover and characterize the mechanisms of change in psychotherapies for depression, yet no clear, evidence-based account of the relationship between therapeutic procedures, psychological mechanisms, and symptom improvement has emerged. Negatively-biased thinking plays an important role in the phenomenology of depression, and most theorists acknowledge that cognitive changes occur during successful treatments. However, the causal role of cognitive change procedures in promoting cognitive change and alleviating depressive symptoms has been questioned. We describe the methodological and inferential limitations of the relevant empirical investigations and provide recommendations for addressing them. We then develop a framework within which the possible links between cognitive procedures, cognitive change, and symptom change can be considered. We conclude that cognitive procedures are effective in alleviating symptoms of depression and that cognitive change, regardless of how it is achieved, contributes to symptom change, a pattern of findings that lends support to the cognitive theory of depression.

7 Review Processes of change in CBT of adolescent depression: review and recommendations. 2012

Webb, Christian A / Auerbach, Randy P / Derubeis, Robert J. ·Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 3815 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-1696, USA. webb@sas.upenn.edu ·J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol · Pubmed #22867130.

ABSTRACT: A growing body of research supports the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for adolescent depression. The mechanisms through which CBT exerts its beneficial effects on adolescent patients suffering from depression, however, remain unclear. The current article reviews the CBT for adolescent depression process literature. Our review focuses on several process variables: the therapeutic alliance, patient cognitive change, and therapist adherence to, and competence in, the theory-specified techniques of therapy. Given that the vast majority of CBT process research has been conducted in the context of adult psychotherapy, we also review relevant adult research as a framework for understanding adolescent process research and to inform future investigations. Methodological issues are addressed and recommendations for future process research are raised.

8 Article Outcomes, skill acquisition, and the alliance: Similarities and differences between clinical trial and student therapists. 2020

Goldstein, Lizabeth A / Adler Mandel, Abby D / DeRubeis, Robert J / Strunk, Daniel R. ·The Ohio State University, Department of Psychology, 1835 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA; San Francisco VA Healthcare System, 4150 Clement St., 116P, San Francisco, CA, 94121, USA; University of California, San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave., San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA. Electronic address: Lizabeth.Goldstein2@va.gov. · The Ohio State University, Department of Psychology, 1835 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA; The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Ave., N.E. Washington, DC, 20064, USA. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 19104, PA, USA. · The Ohio State University, Department of Psychology, 1835 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA. ·Behav Res Ther · Pubmed #32276239.

ABSTRACT: Considerable evidence from clinical trials supports the efficacy of cognitive therapy (CT) of depression. Less is known about outcomes when provided in other contexts, such as when provided by student therapists. We conducted a non-randomized comparison of student therapists vs. clinical trial therapists on change in depressive symptoms, dropout, change in CT skills, and therapeutic alliance among 100 clients with moderate to severe depression. Treatment manual and duration were the same. Clients treated by student therapists had largely comparable outcomes on depressive symptom change, therapeutic alliance, and CT skills. Results supported non-inferiority of student therapists on change in depressive symptoms, but non-inferiority was not supported when using an interviewer evaluated measure of depression. Evidence of non-inferiority was also obtained for client CT skills and therapeutic alliance. In fact, conventional superiority analyses indicated student therapists outperformed clinical trial therapists on alliance and CT skills. The rate of dropout among student therapists (30%) was numerically higher than among clinical trial therapists (17%) and our results did not support non-inferiority on dropout. CT provided by student therapists can achieve outcomes similar to those in a clinical trial, but more research about dropout is needed.

9 Article Interpersonal Psychotherapy Versus Cognitive Therapy for Depression: How They Work, How Long, and for Whom-Key Findings From an RCT. 2020

Lemmens, Lotte H J M / van Bronswijk, Suzanne C / Peeters, Frenk P M L / Arntz, Arnoud / Roefs, Anne / Hollon, Steven D / DeRubeis, Robert J / Huibers, Marcus J H. ·Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands (Lemmens, van Bronswijk, Peeters, Roefs) · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Arntz) · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (Hollon) · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (DeRubeis, Huibers) · Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam (DeRubeis, Huibers). ·Am J Psychother · Pubmed #32122161.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Although the effectiveness of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive therapy (CT) for major depression has been established, little is known about how and for whom they work and how they compare in the long term. The latter is especially relevant for IPT because research on its long-term effects has been limited. This overview paper summarizes findings from a Dutch randomized controlled trial on the effects and mechanisms of change of IPT versus CT for major depression. METHODS: Adult outpatients with depression (N=182) were randomly assigned to CT (N=76), IPT (N=75), or a 2-month waitlist control group followed by patient's treatment of choice (N=31). The primary outcome was depression severity. Other outcomes were quality of life, social and general psychological functioning, and scores on various mechanism measures. Interventions were compared at the end of treatment and up to 17 months follow-up. RESULTS: On average, IPT and CT were both superior to waitlist, and their outcomes did not differ significantly from one another. However, the pathway through which change occurred appeared to differ. For a majority of participants, one of the interventions was predicted to be more beneficial than the other. No support for the theoretical models of change was found. CONCLUSIONS: Outcomes of IPT and CT did not appear to differ significantly. IPT may have an enduring effect not different from that of CT. The field would benefit from further refinement of study methods to disentangle mechanisms of change and from advances in the field of personalized medicine (i.e., person-specific analyses and treatment selection methods).

10 Article Distress and anhedonia as predictors of depression treatment outcome: A secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial. 2020

Khazanov, Gabriela K / Xu, Colin / Dunn, Barnaby D / Cohen, Zachary D / DeRubeis, Robert J / Hollon, Steven D. ·Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 425 S. University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. Electronic address: kattang@sas.upenn.edu. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 425 S. University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. Electronic address: colinxu@sas.upenn.edu. · Mood Disorders Centre, University of Exeter. Sir Henry Wellcome Building for Mood Disorders Research, University of Exeter, Perry Road, EX4 4QG, UK. Electronic address: B.D.Dunn@exeter.ac.uk. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 425 S. University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. Electronic address: zcohen@sas.upenn.edu. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 425 S. University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. Electronic address: derubeis@psych.upenn.edu. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University. 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN, 37240, USA. Electronic address: steven.d.hollon@vanderbilt.edu. ·Behav Res Ther · Pubmed #31896529.

ABSTRACT: Two core features of depression include depressed mood (heightened distress) and anhedonia (reduced pleasure). Despite their centrality to depression, studies have not examined their contribution to treatment outcomes in a randomized clinical trial providing mainstream treatments like antidepressant medications (ADM) and cognitive therapy (CT). We used baseline distress and anhedonia derived from a factor analysis of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire to predict remission and recovery in 433 individuals with recurrent/chronic major depressive disorder. Patients were provided with only ADM or both ADM and CT. Overall, higher baseline distress and anhedonia predicted longer times to remission within one year and recovery within three years. When controlling for treatment condition, distress improved prediction of outcomes over and above anhedonia, while anhedonia did not improve prediction of outcomes over and above distress. Interactions with treatment condition demonstrated that individuals with higher distress and anhedonia benefited from receiving CT in addition to ADM, whereas there was no added benefit of CT for individuals with lower distress and anhedonia. Assessing distress and anhedonia prior to treatment may help select patients who will benefit most from CT in addition to ADM. For the treatments and outcome measures tested, utilizing distress to guide treatment planning may yield the greatest benefit. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00057577.

11 Article What factors indicate prognosis for adults with depression in primary care? A protocol for meta-analyses of individual patient data using the Dep-GP database. 2019

Buckman, Joshua E J / Saunders, Rob / Cohen, Zachary D / Clarke, Katherine / Ambler, Gareth / DeRubeis, Robert J / Gilbody, Simon / Hollon, Steven D / Kendrick, Tony / Watkins, Edward / White, Ian R / Lewis, Glyn / Pilling, Stephen. ·Centre for Outcomes Research and Effectiveness (CORE), Research Department of Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology, University College London, London, WC1E 7HB, UK. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA. · Statistical Science, University College London, London, WC1E 7HB, UK. · School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104-60185, USA. · Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, UK. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 407817, USA. · Primary Care & Population Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO16 5ST, UK. · Department of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK. · Institute of Clinical Trials and Methodology, MRC Clinical Trials Unit, University College London, London, WC1V 6LJ, UK. · Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, W1T 7NF, UK. ·Wellcome Open Res · Pubmed #31815189.

ABSTRACT:

12 Article Precision medicine for long-term depression outcomes using the Personalized Advantage Index approach: cognitive therapy or interpersonal psychotherapy? 2019

van Bronswijk, Suzanne C / DeRubeis, Robert J / Lemmens, Lotte H J M / Peeters, Frenk P M L / Keefe, John R / Cohen, Zachary D / Huibers, Marcus J H. ·Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA. · Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #31753043.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psychotherapies for depression are equally effective on average, but individual responses vary widely. Outcomes can be improved by optimizing treatment selection using multivariate prediction models. A promising approach is the Personalized Advantage Index (PAI) that predicts the optimal treatment for a given individual and the magnitude of the advantage. The current study aimed to extend the PAI to long-term depression outcomes after acute-phase psychotherapy. METHODS: Data come from a randomized trial comparing cognitive therapy (CT, n = 76) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT, n = 75) for major depressive disorder (MDD). Primary outcome was depression severity, as assessed by the BDI-II, during 17-month follow-up. First, predictors and moderators were selected from 38 pre-treatment variables using a two-step machine learning approach. Second, predictors and moderators were combined into a final model, from which PAI predictions were computed with cross-validation. Long-term PAI predictions were then compared to actual follow-up outcomes and post-treatment PAI predictions. RESULTS: One predictor (parental alcohol abuse) and two moderators (recent life events; childhood maltreatment) were identified. Individuals assigned to their PAI-indicated treatment had lower follow-up depression severity compared to those assigned to their PAI-non-indicated treatment. This difference was significant in two subsets of the overall sample: those whose PAI score was in the upper 60%, and those whose PAI indicated CT, irrespective of magnitude. Long-term predictions did not overlap substantially with predictions for acute benefit. CONCLUSIONS: If replicated, long-term PAI predictions could enhance precision medicine by selecting the optimal treatment for a given depressed individual over the long term.

13 Article Predicting optimal interventions for clinical depression: Moderators of outcomes in a positive psychological intervention vs. cognitive-behavioral therapy. 2019

Lopez-Gomez, Irene / Lorenzo-Luaces, Lorenzo / Chaves, Covadonga / Hervas, Gonzalo / DeRubeis, Robert J / Vazquez, Carmelo. ·School of Health Sciences, Rey Juan Carlos University, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: irene.lopez.gomez@urjc.es. · Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, College of Arts & Sciences, Indiana University Bloomington, United States of America. Electronic address: lolorenz@indiana.edu. · Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Francisco de Vitoria University, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: cchavesv@psi.ucm.es. · Department of Clinical Psychology, School of Psychology, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: ghervas@psi.ucm.es. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States of America. Electronic address: derubeis@psych.upenn.edu. · Department of Clinical Psychology, School of Psychology, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: cvazquez@psi.ucm.es. ·Gen Hosp Psychiatry · Pubmed #31395363.

ABSTRACT: Identifying differences in the clinical response to specific interventions is an important challenge in the field of Clinical Psychology. This is especially true in the treatment of depression where many treatments appear to have comparable outcomes. In a controlled trial, we compared a positive psychology group intervention, the Integrative Positive Psychological Intervention for Depression (IPPI-D; n = 62) to a cognitive-behavioral therapy group intervention (CBT; n = 66) for depression. No statistically or clinically-significant differences between the treatments were found, but a slight advantage was observed, on average, for IPPI-D. The aim of the present study was to identify and combine moderators of the differential efficacy of these two psychological interventions for clinical depression. For this purpose, a secondary analysis using the Personalized Advantage Index (PAI) was performed to identify the intervention predicted to produce the better outcome for each patient. Six of the 21 potential moderators were found to predict differential efficacy between the treatments. IPPI-D was predicted to be the optimal treatment for 73% of the sample. Baseline features that characterized these individuals were: mental and physical comorbidity, prior antidepressant medication, higher levels of negative thoughts, and higher personal growth. The 27% who were predicted to achieve better outcomes in CBT than in IPPI-D tended to have these baseline features: no comorbidities, no prior antidepressant medication, lower levels of negative thoughts, and lower personal growth.

14 Article The symptom-specific efficacy of antidepressant medication vs. cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of depression: results from an individual patient data meta-analysis. 2019

Boschloo, Lynn / Bekhuis, Ella / Weitz, Erica S / Reijnders, Mirjam / DeRubeis, Robert J / Dimidjian, Sona / Dunner, David L / Dunlop, Boadie W / Hegerl, Ulrich / Hollon, Steven D / Jarrett, Robin B / Kennedy, Sidney H / Miranda, Jeanne / Mohr, David C / Simons, Anne D / Parker, Gordon / Petrak, Frank / Herpertz, Stephan / Quilty, Lena C / John Rush, A / Segal, Zindel V / Vittengl, Jeffrey R / Schoevers, Robert A / Cuijpers, Pim. ·Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry and Interdisciplinary Center Psychopathology and Emotion Regulation (ICPE), University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA. · Center for Anxiety and Depression, Mercer Island, Washington, WA, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Health Services Research Center, Neuropsychiatric Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, USA. · School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, LWL-University Clinic Bochum, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany. · Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore. · Department of Psychiatry, Duke Medical School, Durham, NC, USA. · Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Permian Basin, TX, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Psychology, Truman State University, Kirksville, MO, USA. ·World Psychiatry · Pubmed #31059603.

ABSTRACT: A recent individual patient data meta-analysis showed that antidepressant medication is slightly more efficacious than cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing overall depression severity in patients with a DSM-defined depressive disorder. We used an update of that dataset, based on seventeen randomized clinical trials, to examine the comparative efficacy of antidepressant medication vs. CBT in more detail by focusing on individual depressive symptoms as assessed with the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Five symptoms (i.e., "depressed mood" , "feelings of guilt" , "suicidal thoughts" , "psychic anxiety" and "general somatic symptoms") showed larger improvements in the medication compared to the CBT condition (effect sizes ranging from .13 to .16), whereas no differences were found for the twelve other symptoms. In addition, network estimation techniques revealed that all effects, except that on "depressed mood" , were direct and could not be explained by any of the other direct or indirect treatment effects. Exploratory analyses showed that information about the symptom-specific efficacy could help in identifying those patients who, based on their pre-treatment symptomatology, are likely to benefit more from antidepressant medication than from CBT (effect size of .30) versus those for whom both treatments are likely to be equally efficacious. Overall, our symptom-oriented approach results in a more thorough evaluation of the efficacy of antidepressant medication over CBT and shows potential in "precision psychiatry" .

15 Article Translating the BDI and BDI-II into the HAMD and vice versa with equipercentile linking. 2019

Furukawa, Toshi A / Reijnders, Mirjam / Kishimoto, Sanae / Sakata, Masatsugu / DeRubeis, Robert J / Dimidjian, Sona / Dozois, David J A / Hegerl, Ulrich / Hollon, Steven D / Jarrett, Robin B / Lespérance, François / Segal, Zindel V / Mohr, David C / Simons, Anne D / Quilty, Lena C / Reynolds, Charles F / Gentili, Claudio / Leucht, Stefan / Engel, Rolf R / Cuijpers, Pim. ·Departments of Health Promotion and Human Behavior and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan. · Department of Clinical, Neuro-, and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, Westminster Hall, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Addiction, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Psychology, University of Toronto - Scarborough, Toronto, Canada. · Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA. · Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, USA. · Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Technische Universität München, Kkinikum rechts der Isar, Germany. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximillians Universität München, Germany. ·Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci · Pubmed #30867082.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) are the most frequently used observer-rated and self-report scales of depression, respectively. It is important to know what a given total score or a change score from baseline on one scale means in relation to the other scale. METHODS: We obtained individual participant data from the randomised controlled trials of psychological and pharmacological treatments for major depressive disorders. We then identified corresponding scores of the HAMD and the BDI (369 patients from seven trials) or the BDI-II (683 patients from another seven trials) using the equipercentile linking method. RESULTS: The HAMD total scores of 10, 20 and 30 corresponded approximately with the BDI scores of 10, 27 and 42 or with the BDI-II scores of 13, 32 and 50. The HAMD change scores of -20 and -10 with the BDI of -29 and -15 and with the BDI-II of -35 and -16. CONCLUSIONS: The results can help clinicians interpret the HAMD or BDI scores of their patients in a more versatile manner and also help clinicians and researchers evaluate such scores reported in the literature or the database, when scores on only one of these scales are provided. We present a conversion table for future research.

16 Article A prognostic index for long-term outcome after successful acute phase cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy for major depressive disorder. 2019

van Bronswijk, Suzanne C / Lemmens, Lotte H J M / Keefe, John R / Huibers, Marcus J H / DeRubeis, Robert J / Peeters, Frenk P M L. ·Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands. · School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States. · Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, United States. · Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·Depress Anxiety · Pubmed #30516871.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) has a highly recurrent nature. After successful treatment, it is important to identify individuals who are at risk of an unfavorable long-term course. Despite extensive research, there is no consensus yet on the clinically relevant predictors of long-term outcome in MDD, and no prediction models are implemented in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to create a prognostic index (PI) to estimate long-term depression severity after successful and high quality acute treatment for MDD. METHODS: Data come from responders to cognitive therapy (CT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in a randomized clinical trial (n = 85; CT = 45, IPT = 40). Primary outcome was depression severity, assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory II, measured throughout a 17-month follow-up phase. We examined 29 variables as potential predictors, using a model-based recursive partitioning method and bootstrap resampling in conjunction with backwards elimination. The selected predictors were combined into a PI. Individual PI scores were estimated using a cross-validation approach. RESULTS: A total of three post-treatment predictors were identified: depression severity, hopelessness, and self-esteem. Cross-validated PI scores evidenced a strong correlation (r = 0.60) with follow-up depression severity. CONCLUSION: Long-term predictions of MDD are multifactorial, involving a combination of variables that each has a small prognostic effect. If replicated and validated, the PI can be implemented to predict follow-up depression severity for each individual after acute treatment response, and to personalize long-term treatment strategies.

17 Article Dysfunctional attitudes or extreme response style as predictors of depressive relapse and recurrence after mobile cognitive therapy for recurrent depression. 2019

Brouwer, Marlies E / Williams, Alishia D / Forand, Nicholas R / DeRubeis, Robert J / Bockting, Claudi L H. ·Department of Clinical Psychology, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, Utrecht 3584 CS, The Netherlands; Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Psychiatry, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, Utrecht 3584 CS, The Netherlands. · Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Zucker Hillside Hospital, 75-59 263rd Street, Glen Oaks, NY 110042, USA. · University of Pennsylvania, Department of Psychology, Stephen A. Levin Building, 425 S. University Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6018, United States. · Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Psychiatry, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Groningen, Grote Kruisstraat 2-1, Groningen 9712 TS, The Netherlands. Electronic address: c.l.bockting@amc.uva.nl. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #30223139.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: According to previous research, dysfunctional attitudes and/or scoring extreme on the end-point anchors of questionnaires of dysfunctional thinking predict depressive relapse/recurrence. Evidence that these two methods represent a risk for depressive relapse/recurrence is however mixed, due to differential or poorly defined concepts. The current study aimed to test the two methods. METHODS: Remitted recurrently depressed patients with low residual depressive symptoms (N = 264) were recruited as part of a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of mobile Cognitive Therapy for recurrent depression versus treatment as usual. In the current secondary analysis, Cox regression models were conducted to test dysfunctional attitudes and extreme responding variables (assessed on the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale [DAS]) as predictors of depressive relapse/recurrence within two years after randomization. RESULTS: Data from 255 participants were analyzed. Results showed that DAS total scores at baseline significantly predicted depressive relapse/recurrence (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 1.01, p = .042). An index that reflects endorsement of habitual relative to functional responses was a significant predictor of depressive relapse/recurrence (HR = 2.11, p = .029). LIMITATIONS: The current study employed a single measure to identify extreme responses and dysfunctional attitudes. Secondly, various statistical analyses were performed without correcting for multiple testing, which in turn increased the likelihood to finding significant results. CONCLUSIONS: Current study confirmed both methods: People who scored higher on the DAS or had relatively more habitual than functional responses on the extreme positive ends of the DAS had a decreased time to depressive relapse/recurrence.

18 Article Personalized prediction of antidepressant v. placebo response: evidence from the EMBARC study. 2019

Webb, Christian A / Trivedi, Madhukar H / Cohen, Zachary D / Dillon, Daniel G / Fournier, Jay C / Goer, Franziska / Fava, Maurizio / McGrath, Patrick J / Weissman, Myrna / Parsey, Ramin / Adams, Phil / Trombello, Joseph M / Cooper, Crystal / Deldin, Patricia / Oquendo, Maria A / McInnis, Melvin G / Huys, Quentin / Bruder, Gerard / Kurian, Benji T / Jha, Manish / DeRubeis, Robert J / Pizzagalli, Diego A. ·Harvard Medical School - McLean Hospital,Boston, MA,USA. · University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center,Dallas, TX,USA. · University of Pennsylvania,Philadelphia, PA,USA. · University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine,Pittsburgh, PA,USA. · Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital,Boston, MA,USA. · New York State Psychiatric Institute & Department of Psychiatry,College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University,New York, NY,USA. · Stony Brook University,Stony Brook, NY,USA. · University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI,USA. · University of Zurich,Zurich,Switzerland. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #29962359.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a highly heterogeneous condition in terms of symptom presentation and, likely, underlying pathophysiology. Accordingly, it is possible that only certain individuals with MDD are well-suited to antidepressants. A potentially fruitful approach to parsing this heterogeneity is to focus on promising endophenotypes of depression, such as neuroticism, anhedonia, and cognitive control deficits. METHODS: Within an 8-week multisite trial of sertraline v. placebo for depressed adults (n = 216), we examined whether the combination of machine learning with a Personalized Advantage Index (PAI) can generate individualized treatment recommendations on the basis of endophenotype profiles coupled with clinical and demographic characteristics. RESULTS: Five pre-treatment variables moderated treatment response. Higher depression severity and neuroticism, older age, less impairment in cognitive control, and being employed were each associated with better outcomes to sertraline than placebo. Across 1000 iterations of a 10-fold cross-validation, the PAI model predicted that 31% of the sample would exhibit a clinically meaningful advantage [post-treatment Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) difference ⩾3] with sertraline relative to placebo. Although there were no overall outcome differences between treatment groups (d = 0.15), those identified as optimally suited to sertraline at pre-treatment had better week 8 HRSD scores if randomized to sertraline (10.7) than placebo (14.7) (d = 0.58). CONCLUSIONS: A subset of MDD patients optimally suited to sertraline can be identified on the basis of pre-treatment characteristics. This model must be tested prospectively before it can be used to inform treatment selection. However, findings demonstrate the potential to improve individual outcomes through algorithm-guided treatment recommendations.

19 Article Combined Treatment for Obesity and Depression: A Pilot Study. 2018

Faulconbridge, Lucy F / Driscoll, Colleen F B / Hopkins, Christina M / Bailer Benforado, Brooke / Bishop-Gilyard, Chanelle / Carvajal, Raymond / Berkowitz, Robert I / DeRubeis, Robert / Wadden, Thomas A. ·Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. ·Obesity (Silver Spring) · Pubmed #29932516.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Obesity and depression frequently co-occur, and each increases risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study tested whether a combined treatment, targeting obesity and depression simultaneously, would yield greater improvements in weight, mood, and CVD risk factors than treatments that targeted each disease individually. METHODS: Seventy-six participants with obesity and major depression were randomly assigned to (1) behavioral weight control (BWC), (2) cognitive behavioral therapy for depression (CBT-D), or (3) BWC combined with CBT-D. Participants were provided 18 group treatment sessions over 20 weeks. Mood, weight, and CVD risk were assessed at baseline and weeks 8 and 20, with a follow-up visit at week 46. RESULTS: At week 20, participants in combined treatment lost significantly (P < 0.02) more weight (5.2% ± 1.2%) than those assigned to CBT-D (0.8% ± 1.3%) and comparable amounts as those in BWC (3.5% ± 1.3%). Depression scores decreased significantly from baseline levels in each group, with no significant differences between groups. All three groups showed significant improvements in 10-year CVD risk, with no significant differences between groups. Groups did not differ significantly on any of these measures at week 46. CONCLUSIONS: BWC yielded short-term improvements in weight, mood, and CVD risk, comparable to a combined treatment that incorporated CBT-D. Results require replication with a larger sample size.

20 Article Cross-sectional networks of depressive symptoms before and after antidepressant medication treatment. 2018

Bos, Fionneke M / Fried, Eiko I / Hollon, Steven D / Bringmann, Laura F / Dimidjian, Sona / DeRubeis, Robert J / Bockting, Claudi L H. ·Department of Psychiatry, Rob Giel Research Center, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, PO Box 30.001, 9700 RB, Groningen, The Netherlands. f.m.bos01@umcg.nl. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. f.m.bos01@umcg.nl. · Department Quantitative Psychology and Individual Differences, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol · Pubmed #29627898.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Recent reviews have questioned the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) above placebo response, and their working mechanisms remain unclear. New approaches to understanding the effects of SSRIs are necessary to enhance their efficacy. The aim of this study was to explore the possibilities of using cross-sectional network analysis to increase our understanding of symptom connectivity before and after SSRI treatment. METHODS: In two randomized controlled trials (total N = 178), we estimated Gaussian graphical models among 20 symptoms of the Beck Depression Inventory-II before and after 8 weeks of treatment with the SSRI paroxetine. Networks were compared on connectivity, community structure, predictability (proportion explained variance), and strength centrality (i.e., connectedness to other symptoms in the network). RESULTS: Symptom severity for all individual BDI-II symptoms significantly decreased over 8 weeks of SSRI treatment, whereas interconnectivity and predictability of the symptoms significantly increased. At baseline, three communities were detected; five communities were detected at week 8. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest the effects of SSRIs can be studied using the network approach. The increased connectivity, predictability, and communities at week 8 may be explained by the decrease in depressive symptoms rather than specific effects of SSRIs. Future studies with larger samples and placebo controls are needed to offer insight into the effects of SSRIs. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trials described in this manuscript were funded by the NIMH. Pennsylvania/Vanderbilt study: 5 R10 MH55877 ( https://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=6186633&icde=28344168&ddparam=&ddvalue=&ddsub=&cr=1&csb=default&cs=ASC&MMOpt= ). Washington study: R01 MH55502 ( https://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=2034618&icde=28344217&ddparam=&ddvalue=&ddsub=&cr=5&csb=default&cs=ASC ).

21 Article Residual anxiety may be associated with depressive relapse during continuation therapy of bipolar II depression. 2018

Lorenzo-Luaces, Lorenzo / Amsterdam, Jay D / DeRubeis, Robert J. ·Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University - Bloomington, Bloomington, IN, United States. Electronic address: lolorenz@indiana.edu. · Depression Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, United States. · Depression Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, United States; Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #29149756.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Anxiety symptoms are common in bipolar disorder. We explored the effect of anxiety on the outcome of acute and continuation pharmacotherapy of bipolar II depression. METHODS: Data were derived from a randomized double-blind 12-week acute (N = 129) and 6-month continuation (N = 55) comparison of venlafaxine versus lithium monotherapy in bipolar II depression in adults. We distinguished between the items of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) that capture depression vs. anxiety (i.e., psychomotor agitation, psychic anxiety, somatic anxiety, hypochondriasis, and obsessive-compulsive concerns) and examined the effect of treatment on depression and anxiety. Additionally, we explored whether baseline anxiety or depression predicted changes over time in depression and anxiety ratings or moderated treatment outcomes. We also explored whether residual depressive and anxious symptoms predicted relapse during continuation therapy. RESULTS: Venlafaxine was superior to lithium in reducing both depression and anxiety, though its effects on anxiety were more modest than those on depression. Baseline anxiety predicted change over time in anxiety, but not depression. By contrast, baseline depression did not predict change over time in depression or anxiety. Residual anxiety, specifically uncontrollable worry, was a stronger predictor of relapse than residual depression. CONCLUSION: Successful treatment of symptoms of anxiety in bipolar depression may protect against depressive relapse.

22 Article Exploring mechanisms of change in schema therapy for chronic depression. 2018

Renner, Fritz / DeRubeis, Robert / Arntz, Arnoud / Peeters, Frenk / Lobbestael, Jill / Huibers, Marcus J H. ·MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. Electronic address: Fritz.Renner@mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, University Hospital Maastricht, The Netherlands; School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States; Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry · Pubmed #29035800.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The underlying mechanisms of symptom change in schema therapy (ST) for chronic major depressive disorder (cMDD) have not been studied. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of two potentially important mechanisms of symptom change, maladaptive schemas (proxied by negative idiosyncratic core-beliefs) and the therapeutic alliance. METHODS: We drew data from a single-case series of ST for cMDD. Patients with cMDD (N = 20) received on average 78 repeated weekly assessments over a course of up to 65 individual sessions of ST. Focusing on repeated assessments within-individuals, we used mixed regression to test whether change in core-beliefs and therapeutic alliance preceded, followed, or occurred concurrently with change in depressive symptoms. RESULTS: Changes in core-beliefs did not precede but were concurrently related to changes in symptoms. Repeated goal and task agreement ratings (specific aspects of alliance) of the same session, completed on separate days, were at least in part associated with concurrent changes in symptoms. LIMITATIONS: By design this study had a small sample-size and no control group. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to what would be expected based on theory, our findings suggest that change in core-beliefs does not precede change in symptoms. Instead, change in these variables occurs concurrently. Moreover, alliance ratings seem to be at least in part colored by changes in current mood state.

23 Article Moderation of the Alliance-Outcome Association by Prior Depressive Episodes: Differential Effects in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Short-Term Psychodynamic Supportive Psychotherapy. 2017

Lorenzo-Luaces, Lorenzo / Driessen, Ellen / DeRubeis, Robert J / Van, Henricus L / Keefe, John R / Hendriksen, Mariëlle / Dekker, Jack. ·University of Pennsylvania, Brown University. Electronic address: lorenzl@sas.upenn.edu. · VU University Amsterdam. · University of Pennsylvania. · Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam. · VU University Amsterdam, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam. ·Behav Ther · Pubmed #28711109.

ABSTRACT: Prior studies have suggested that the association between the alliance and depression improvement varies as a function of prior history of depression. We sought to replicate these findings and extend them to short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy (SPSP) in a sample of patients who were randomized to one of these treatments and were administered the Helping Alliance Questionnaire (N=282) at Week 5 of treatment. Overall, the alliance was a predictor of symptom change (d=0.33). In SPSP, the alliance was a modest but robust predictor of change, irrespective of prior episodes (d=0.25-0.33). By contrast, in CBT, the effects of the alliance on symptom change were large for patients with 0 prior episodes (d=0.86), moderate for those with 1 prior episode (d=0.49), and small for those with 2+ prior episodes (d=0.12). These findings suggest a complex interaction between patient features and common vs. specific therapy processes. In CBT, the alliance relates to change for patients with less recurrent depression whereas other CBT-specific processes may account for change for patients with more recurrent depression.

24 Article Exploring mechanisms of change in cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy for adult depression. 2017

Lemmens, Lotte H J M / Galindo-Garre, Francisca / Arntz, Arnoud / Peeters, Frenk / Hollon, Steven D / DeRubeis, Robert J / Huibers, Marcus J H. ·Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: Lotte.Lemmens@Maastrichtuniversity.nl. · EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands; Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, PO Box 19268, 1000 GG Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, 306 Wilson Hall, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 3720 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6241, USA. · Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands; Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 1, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Behav Res Ther · Pubmed #28544896.

ABSTRACT: The present study explored the temporal relationships between change in five candidate causal mechanisms and change in depressive symptoms in a randomized comparison of individual Cognitive Therapy (CT) and Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) for adult depression. Furthermore, hypotheses concerning the mediation of change in these treatments were tested. Patients were 151 depressed adult outpatients treated with either CT (n = 76) or IPT (n = 75). Depression severity was assessed with the BDI-II. Candidate mediators included both therapy-specific as well as common factors. Measures were taken multiple times over the course of treatment (baseline, mid-, and post-treatment). Pearson's correlations and Latent-Difference-Score models were used to examine the direct and indirect relationships between (change in) the candidate mediators and (subsequent) (change in) depression. Patients showed improvement on all measures. No differential effects in pre- to post-treatment changes were observed between the two conditions. However, change in interpersonal functioning occurred more rapidly in IPT. Only little empirical support for the respective theoretical models of change in CT and IPT was found. Future studies should pay special attention to the timing of assessments and within-patient variance.

25 Article Psychometric Properties of the Reconstructed Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Scales. 2017

Porter, Eliora / Chambless, Dianne L / McCarthy, Kevin S / DeRubeis, Robert J / Sharpless, Brian A / Barrett, Marna S / Milrod, Barbara / Hollon, Steven D / Barber, Jacques P. ·*Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania; †Department of Psychology, Chestnut Hill College, Philadelphia, PA; ‡American School of Professional Psychology, Argosy University, Arlington, VA; §Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; ∥Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY; ¶Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; and #Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies, Adelphi University, Garden City, NY. ·J Nerv Ment Dis · Pubmed #28225509.

ABSTRACT: Although widely used, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) discriminate poorly between depression and anxiety. To address this problem, Riskind, Beck, Brown, and Steer (J Nerv Ment Dis. 175:474-479, 1987) created the Reconstructed Hamilton Scales by reconfiguring HRSD and HARS items into modified scales. To further analyze the reconstructed scales, we examined their factor structure and criterion-related validity in a sample of patients with major depressive disorder and no comorbid anxiety disorders (n = 215) or with panic disorder and no comorbid mood disorders (n = 149). Factor analysis results were largely consistent with those of Riskind et al. The correlation between the new reconstructed scales was small. Compared with the original scales, the new reconstructed scales correlated more strongly with diagnosis in the expected direction. The findings recommend the use of the reconstructed HRSD over the original HRSD but highlight problems with the criterion-related validity of the original and reconstructed HARS.

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