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Depression: HELP
Articles by Jack J. M. Dekker
Based on 42 articles published since 2010
(Why 42 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Jack Dekker wrote the following 42 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Review Early interventions in cognitive behavioral therapy for depression: A study contrasting a low-adherent and a highly adherent case. 2019

Don, Frank J / Driessen, Ellen / Molenaar, Pieter J / Spijker, Jan / Dekker, Jack J M. ·Expert Center for Depression. · Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University. · Arkin Academy, Arkin Mental Health. ·Psychotherapy (Chic) · Pubmed #30816762.

ABSTRACT: In cognitive behavioral therapy for depression, the first sessions play a crucial role in determining treatment outcome. In the first sessions, the therapist needs to form an alliance to facilitate application of the techniques; agree with the patient on problem definition, problem solution, and goals; explain the rationale; and create confidence in therapy by producing early symptom relief. This article illustrates the cognitive behavioral therapy treatment process of two depressed clients: one for whom the treatment manual was followed neatly and one for whom the therapist chose not to adhere to the manual strictly. Both had a comparable end result in terms of symptom change and alliance scores. The existing literature shows evidence for starting off with behavioral techniques, supported by assigning and reviewing homework, structuring sessions, and negotiating goals. The cases also illustrate that there are circumstances, such as urgent financial problems, in which the therapists may need to leave the treatment manual early in the therapy process, albeit temporarily. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

2 Review The efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression: A meta-analysis update. 2015

Driessen, Ellen / Hegelmaier, Lisa M / Abbass, Allan A / Barber, Jacques P / Dekker, Jack J M / Van, Henricus L / Jansma, Elise P / Cuijpers, Pim. ·VU University Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: e.driessen@vu.nl. · VU University Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Dalhousie University, Centre for Emotions and Health, Halifax, NS, Canada. · Adelphi University, The Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies, NY, USA. · VU University Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · VU University Amsterdam, University Library, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · VU University Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Clin Psychol Rev · Pubmed #26281018.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) for depression is debated. Recently, a number of large-scale and high-quality studies have been conducted. We examined the efficacy of STPP by updating our 2010 meta-analysis. RESULTS: After a thorough literature search, 54 studies (33 randomized clinical trials) totaling 3946 subjects were included. STPP was significantly more effective than control conditions at post-treatment on depression, general psychopathology and quality of life measures (d=0.49 to 0.69). STPP pre-treatment to post-treatment changes (d=0.57 to 1.18) indicated significant improvements on all outcome measures, which either significantly improved further (d=0.20 to 1.04) or were maintained from post-treatment to follow-up. No significant differences were found between individual STPP and other psychotherapies at post-treatment (d=-0.14) and follow-up (d=-0.06) in analyses that were adequately powered to detect a clinically relevant difference. STPP was significantly more efficacious than other psychotherapies on anxiety measures at both post-treatment (d=0.35) and follow-up (d=0.76). CONCLUSION: We found clear indications that STPP is effective in the treatment of depression in adults. Although more high-quality studies are needed, particularly to assess the efficacy of STPP compared to control conditions at follow-up and to antidepressants, these findings add to the evidence-base of STPP for depression.

3 Review [The efficacy of psychological treatments for depression: a review of recent research findings]. 2014

Driessen, E / Cuijpers, P / Hollon, S D / Van, H L / Dekker, J J M. · ·Tijdschr Psychiatr · Pubmed #25070570.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psychological treatments for depression have been shown to be effective, but there is room for improvement. AIM: To summarise new research findings concerning the efficacy of psychological treatments for depression, as reported in a recent dissertation. METHOD: Four systematic reviews and meta-analyses and one randomised clinical trial are described. RESULTS: As has been shown in the case of patients treated with antidepressants, the efficacy of psychological treatments for depression when compared to strict control conditions, might be greater in patients with more severe depressive symptoms than in patients with milder symptoms. The efficacy of psychological treatments for depression when compared to control conditions is overestimated as a result of systematic publication of positive findings, as has been reported with regard to antidepressant medication too. There is increasing academic support for the efficacy of brief psychodynamic therapy for depression and there are no differences in the efficacy of short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy and cognitive behavioural therapy for depression. Certain patient characteristics were found to be related to the differential efficacy of these two types of psychological treatments, but further validation is needed. A large number of patients with depression who seek help from second-line psychiatric clinics in the Netherlands fail to achieve remission following psychological treatment, irrespective of whether that treatment is combined with antidepressants. CONCLUSION: Improved efficacy of psychological treatments for depression is urgently needed and can be facilitated by means of high quality research.

4 Review Influence of personality on the outcome of treatment in depression: systematic review and meta-analysis. 2014

Newton-Howes, Giles / Tyrer, Peter / Johnson, Tony / Mulder, Roger / Kool, Simone / Dekker, Jack / Schoevers, Robert. · ·J Pers Disord · Pubmed #24256103.

ABSTRACT: There continues to be debate about the influence of personality disorder on the outcome of depressive disorders and is relative interactions with treatment. To determine whether personality disorder, both generically and in terms of individual clusters, leads to a worse outcome in patients with depressive disorders and whether this is influenced by type of treatment, a systematic electronic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO from 1966, 1982, and 1882, respectively, until February 2007 was undertaken. The keyword terms depression, mental illness, and personality disorder were used. All references were reviewed and personal correspondence was undertaken. Only English language papers were considered. Any English language paper studying a depressed adult population was considered for inclusion. Studies needed to clearly define depression and personality disorder using peer-reviewed instruments or International Classification of Disease/Diagnostic Statistical Manual criteria. Outcome assessment at greater than 3 weeks was necessary. Final inclusion papers were agreed on by consensus by at least two reviewers. All data were extracted using predetermined criteria for depression by at least two reviewers in parallel. Disagreement was settled by consensus. Complex data extraction was confirmed within the study group. Data were synthesized using log odds ratios in the Cochrane RevMan 5 program. The finding of comorbid personality disorder and depression was associated with a more than double the odds of a poor outcome for depression compared with those with no personality disorder (OR 2.16, CI 1.83-2.56). This effect was not ameliorated by the treatment modality used for the depressive disorder. This finding led to the conclusion that personality disorder has a negative impact on the outcome of depression. This finding is important in considering prognosis in depressive disorders.

5 Review Bridging the gap for ethnic minority adult outpatients with depression and anxiety disorders by culturally adapted treatments. 2013

van Loon, Annelies / van Schaik, Anneke / Dekker, Jack / Beekman, Aartjan. ·Research Department, GGZ inGeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. a.vanloon@ggzingeest.nl ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #23351566.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Culturally adapted guideline driven depression and anxiety treatments have been developed for ethnic minority patients in Western countries to boost effectiveness for these growing and vulnerable groups. The aims of this study are to systematically review the empirical literature of outcomes associated with culturally adapted guideline driven depression and anxiety interventions, to describe the cultural adaptation and to identify the contribution of the cultural adaptation and approach as such. METHOD: Comprehensive search of the major bibliographical databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Pubmed; Psychinfo) for randomized controlled trials. RESULTS: Nine eligible studies were identified and all were conducted in the USA. The pooled random standardized differences in means of the culturally adapted depression and anxiety treatment on clinical outcome was 1.06 (CI 95% 0.51-1.62, P=0.00). Two studies demonstrated effectiveness of the population specific cultural adaptation per se. All studies incorporated a focus on cultural values and beliefs as a cultural adaptation. LIMITATION: We only identified a small number of USA studies so generalisation of the findings to other western countries can be discussed. CONCLUSION: Culturally adapted guideline driven depression and anxiety treatment was effective for USA minority patients from different cultural backgrounds. There is some evidence for the effectiveness of the population specific cultural adaptation as such.

6 Clinical Trial Linking childhood emotional abuse and depressive symptoms: The role of emotion dysregulation and interpersonal problems. 2019

Christ, Carolien / de Waal, Marleen M / Dekker, Jack J M / van Kuijk, Iris / van Schaik, Digna J F / Kikkert, Martijn J / Goudriaan, Anna E / Beekman, Aartjan T F / Messman-Moore, Terri L. ·Department of Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, GGZ inGeest and Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Institute for Addiction Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #30763360.

ABSTRACT: Childhood abuse is a major public health problem that has been linked to depression in adulthood. Although different types of childhood abuse often co-occur, few studies have examined their unique impact on negative mental health outcomes. Most studies have focused solely on the consequences of childhood physical or sexual abuse; however, it has been suggested that childhood emotional abuse is more strongly related to depression. It remains unclear which underlying psychological processes mediate the effect of childhood emotional abuse on depressive symptoms. In a cross-sectional study in 276 female college students, multiple linear regression analyses were used to determine whether childhood emotional abuse, physical abuse, and sexual abuse were independently associated with depressive symptoms, emotion dysregulation, and interpersonal problems. Subsequently, OLS regression analyses were used to determine whether emotion dysregulation and interpersonal problems mediate the relationship between childhood emotional abuse and depressive symptoms. Of all types of abuse, only emotional abuse was independently associated with depressive symptoms, emotion dysregulation, and interpersonal problems. The effect of childhood emotional abuse on depressive symptoms was mediated by emotion dysregulation and the following domains of interpersonal problems: cold/distant and domineering/controlling. The results of the current study indicate that detection and prevention of childhood emotional abuse deserves attention from Child Protective Services. Finally, interventions that target emotion regulation skills and interpersonal skills may be beneficial in prevention of depression.

7 Article A demonstration of a multi-method variable selection approach for treatment selection: Recommending cognitive-behavioral versus psychodynamic therapy for mild to moderate adult depression. 2020

Cohen, Zachary D / Kim, Thomas T / Van, Henricus L / Dekker, Jack J M / Driessen, Ellen. ·Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health research institute, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Psychother Res · Pubmed #30632922.

ABSTRACT:

8 Article Preventive cognitive therapy versus care as usual in cognitive behavioral therapy responders: A randomized controlled trial. 2019

de Jonge, Margo / Bockting, Claudi L H / Kikkert, Martijn J / van Dijk, Maarten K / van Schaik, Digna J F / Peen, Jaap / Hollon, Steven D / Dekker, Jack J M. ·Department of Research, Arkin. · Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Universitair Medische Centra. · Dimence Mental Health Care Centre. · Department of Research and Innovation, GGZ inGeest. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University. ·J Consult Clin Psychol · Pubmed #31008635.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The optimization of long-term outcomes is an important goal in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Offering subsequent preventive cognitive therapy (PCT) to patients who responded to acute cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) may reduce the risk of relapse/recurrence. METHOD: Therefore, a multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted comparing the addition of eight weekly sessions of PCT to care as usual (CAU) versus CAU alone in patients with a history of depression in remission following treatment with CBT. A total of 214 recurrently depressed patients who remitted following treatment with CBT were randomized to PCT (n = 107) or CAU (n = 107). Primary outcome was time to relapse/recurrence over 15 months and was assessed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I). Secondary outcomes were depressive symptoms measured by the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Report and number and severity of relapses/recurrences measured by the SCID-I. RESULTS: Over the 15-month follow-up, the addition of PCT significantly delayed time to relapse/recurrence relative to CAU alone, hazard ratio = 1.807 (number needed to treat = 8.1), p = .02, 95% CI [1.029, 3.174]. No significant differences were found between the conditions on number or severity of relapses/recurrences and residual symptoms. CONCLUSION: Adding PCT was significantly more effective than CAU alone in delaying time to relapse/recurrence of depression over a period of 15 months among CBT responders. After response on CBT, therapists should consider providing PCT to recurrently depressed patients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

9 Article Economic Evaluation of an Internet-Based Preventive Cognitive Therapy With Minimal Therapist Support for Recurrent Depression: Randomized Controlled Trial. 2018

Klein, Nicola S / Bockting, Claudi Lh / Wijnen, Ben / Kok, Gemma D / van Valen, Evelien / Riper, Heleen / Cuijpers, Pim / Dekker, Jack / van der Heiden, Colin / Burger, Huibert / Smit, Filip. ·Department of Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands. · Top Referent Traumacentrum, GGZ Drenthe, Beilen, Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Public Mental Health, Trimbos Institute, Utrecht, Netherlands. · Care and Public Health Research Institute School for Public Health and Primary Care, Department of Health Services Research, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands. · Ambulante Forensische Psychiatrie Noord, GGZ Drenthe, Emmen, Netherlands. · Department of Geriatrics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands. · Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Amsterdam Public Health, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · GGZ inGeest, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Research Department, Arkin Mental Health Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · PsyQ Mental Health Care Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of General Practice, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands. ·J Med Internet Res · Pubmed #30478021.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is highly recurrent and has a significant disease burden. Although the effectiveness of internet-based interventions has been established for the treatment of acute MDD, little is known about their cost effectiveness, especially in recurrent MDD. OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to evaluate the cost effectiveness and cost utility of an internet-based relapse prevention program (mobile cognitive therapy, M-CT). METHODS: The economic evaluation was performed alongside a single-blind parallel group randomized controlled trial. Participants were recruited via media, general practitioners, and mental health care institutions. In total, 288 remitted individuals with a history of recurrent depression were eligible, of whom 264 were randomly allocated to M-CT with minimal therapist support added to treatment as usual (TAU) or TAU alone. M-CT comprised 8 online lessons, and participants were advised to complete 1 lesson per week. The economic evaluation was performed from a societal perspective with a 24-month time horizon. The health outcomes were number of depression-free days according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, (DSM-IV) criteria assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV axis I disorders by blinded interviewers after 3, 12, and 24 months. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were self-assessed with the three level version of the EuroQol Five Dimensional Questionnaire (EQ-5D-3L). Costs were assessed with the Trimbos and Institute for Medical Technology Assessment Questionnaire on Costs Associated with Psychiatric Illness (TiC-P). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated and cost-effectiveness planes and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves were displayed to assess the probability that M-CT is cost effective compared to TAU. RESULTS: Mean total costs over 24 months were €8298 (US $9415) for M-CT and €7296 (US $8278) for TAU. No statistically significant differences were found between M-CT and TAU regarding depression-free days and QALYs (P=.37 and P=.92, respectively). The incremental costs were €179 (US $203) per depression-free day and €230,816 (US $261,875) per QALY. The cost-effectiveness acceptability curves suggested that for depression-free days, high investments have to be made to reach an acceptable probability that M-CT is cost effective compared to TAU. Regarding QALYs, considerable investments have to be made but the probability that M-CT is cost effective compared to TAU does not rise above 40%. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that adding M-CT to TAU is not effective and cost effective compared to TAU alone. Adherence rates were similar to other studies and therefore do not explain this finding. The participants scarcely booked additional therapist support, resulting in 17.3 minutes of mean total therapist support. More studies are needed to examine the cost effectiveness of internet-based interventions with respect to long-term outcomes and the role and optimal dosage of therapist support. Overall, more research is needed on scalable and cost-effective interventions that can reduce the burden of recurrent MDD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands Trial Register NTR2503; http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=2503 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/73aBn41r3).

10 Article The association between the number of previous episodes and modifiable vulnerability factors in remitted patients with recurrent depression. 2018

de Jonge, Margo / Bockting, Claudi L H / van Oppen, Patricia / Van, Henricus L / Peen, Jaap / Kikkert, Martijn J / Dekker, Jack J M. ·Department of Research, Arkin, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychiatry, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Research, GGZ inGeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #30388131.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Remitted patients with a history of several previous major depressive episodes have a higher risk of relapse/recurrence than patients with fewer previous episodes, and the probability of another episode increases progressively with each successive episode. This study examines the association between the number of previous episodes and modifiable vulnerability factors in remitted patients with recurrent depression. METHODS: Patients with recurrent depression (DSM-IV-diagnosed) who were in remission (N = 214) were recruited between September 2011 and July 2016. The association was examined between the number of previous episodes and the following factors: i.e. interpersonal functioning, daily stress, sense of mastery, coping and dysfunctional beliefs. RESULTS: A history of more previous episodes was associated with higher levels of interpersonal problems (P < .001), daily stress (P = .04) and a lower sense of mastery (P = .05). Interpersonal problems were most strongly associated with more previous episodes in a Generalized Linear Regression model. In the domain of interpersonal problems, the subscales that showed the strongest relationship were domineering/controlling, vindictive/self-centred, socially inhibited and self-sacrificing. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with a history of more depressive episodes reported higher levels of interpersonal problems, daily stress and a lower sense of mastery. Future studies should examine these factors in a longitudinal cohort and look at whether the effect of interventions to prevent relapse can be explained by targeting these psychological factors. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands Trial Register: 2599.

11 Article Optimizing psychotherapy dosage for comorbid depression and personality disorders (PsyDos): a pragmatic randomized factorial trial using schema therapy and short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy. 2018

Kool, Marit / Van, Henricus L / Bartak, Anna / de Maat, Saskia C M / Arntz, Arnoud / van den Eshof, Johanna W / Peen, Jaap / Blankers, Matthijs / Bosmans, Judith E / Dekker, Jack J M. ·Arkin Mental Health Care, Domselaerstraat 128, 1093, MB, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Marit.Kool@arkin.nl. · Arkin Mental Health Care, Domselaerstraat 128, 1093, MB, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Amsterdam UMC, Location AMC, Department of Psychiatry, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Trimbos Institute - Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Earth & Life Sciences, Free University Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·BMC Psychiatry · Pubmed #30086730.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with comorbid depression and personality disorders suffer from a heavy disease burden while tailored treatment options are limited, accounting for a high psychological and economic burden. Little is known about the effect of treatment dosage and type of psychotherapy for this specific co-morbid patient population, in terms of treatment-effect and cost-effectiveness. This study aims to compare treatment outcome of 25 versus 50 individual therapy sessions in a year. We expect the 50-session condition to be more effective in treating depression and maintaining the effect. Secondary objectives will be addressed in order to find therapy-specific and non-specific mechanisms of change. METHODS: In a mono-center pragmatic randomized controlled trial with a 2 × 2 factorial design, 200 patients with a depressive disorder and personality disorder(s) will be included. Patients will be recruited from a Dutch mental health care institute for personality disorders. They will be randomized over therapy dosage (25 vs 50 sessions in a year) and type of therapy (schema therapy vs short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy). The primary clinical outcome measure will be depression severity and remission. Changes in personality functioning and quality of life will be investigated as secondary outcomes. A priori postulated effect moderators and mediators will be collected as well. All patients are assessed at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9-12 months (end of therapy) and at follow up (6 and 12 months after end of treatment). Alongside the trial, an economic evaluation will be conducted. Costs will be collected from a societal perspective. DISCUSSION: This trial will be the first to compare two psychotherapy dosages in patients with both depression and personality disorders. Insight in the effect of treatment dosage for this patient group will contribute to both higher treatment effectiveness and lower costs. In addition, this study will contribute to the limited evidence base on treating patients with both depression and personality disorders. Understanding the processes that account for the therapeutic changes could help to gain insight in what works for whom. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This trial has been registered on July 20th 2016, Netherlands Trial Register, part of the Dutch Cochrane Centre ( NTR5941 ).

12 Article Prevalence and predictors of violent victimization in remitted patients with recurrent depression. 2018

Christ, C / de Jonge, M / Bockting, C L H / Kikkert, M J / van Schaik, D J F / Beekman, A T F / Dekker, J J M. ·Department of Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Klaprozenweg 111, Amsterdam 1033 NN, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center/GGZ inGeest, The Netherlands; Amsterdam Public Health research institute, VUmc, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: carolien.christ@arkin.nl. · Department of Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Klaprozenweg 111, Amsterdam 1033 NN, The Netherlands. · Academic Medical Center, Department Psychiatry, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center/GGZ inGeest, The Netherlands; Amsterdam Public Health research institute, VUmc, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Klaprozenweg 111, Amsterdam 1033 NN, The Netherlands; Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #29909304.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depressed patients are at increased risk to fall victim to a violent crime compared to the general population. It remains unknown whether their increased risk persists after remission. This study compared victimization rates of remitted patients with both a random general population sample and a group of currently depressed patients. Furthermore, this study aimed to identify predictors of future violent victimization. METHODS: In this longitudinal study conducted in the Netherlands, 12-month prevalence rates of sexual assaults, physical assaults, and threats were assessed with the Safety Monitor in 140 currently remitted patients with recurrent depression, and compared to those of a weighted general population sample (N = 9.175) and a weighted sample of currently depressed outpatients (N = 102) using Chi-square tests. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify baseline predictors of future victimization. RESULTS: The prevalence of violent victimization did not differ between remitted patients and the general population (12.1 vs. 11.7%). Remitted patients were significantly less likely to have been victimized over the past 12 months than currently depressed patients (12.1 vs. 35.5%). In remitted patients, living alone and low sense of mastery at baseline predicted future violent victimization. However, when combined in a multiple model, only living alone was independently associated with violent victimization (χ LIMITATIONS: Our comparison of victimization rates across samples was cross-sectional. CONCLUSIONS: Since the increased risk of victimization appears to be specific for the acute depressive state, preventive interventions should target victimization in currently depressed patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): 2599.

13 Article Comparative Effect of Collaborative Care, Pain Medication, and Duloxetine in the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder and Comorbid (Sub)Chronic Pain: Results of an Exploratory Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial (CC:PAINDIP). 2018

de Heer, Eric W / Dekker, Jack / Beekman, Aartjan T F / van Marwijk, Harm W J / Holwerda, Tjalling J / Bet, Pierre M / Roth, Joost / Timmerman, Lotte / van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M. ·GGz Breburg, Clinical Centre of Excellence for Body, Mind and Health, Tilburg, Netherlands. · Tranzo Department, Tilburg School of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Tilburg University, Tilburg, Netherlands. · Faculty of Behavioral and Movement Sciences, VU University, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Arkin, Mental Health Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · GGz inGeest, Mental Health Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research (EMGO+), Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of General Practice, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Division of Population Health, Health Services Research and Primary Care, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. · Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacy, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ·Front Psychiatry · Pubmed #29674981.

ABSTRACT: Objective: Evidence exists for the efficacy of collaborative care (CC) for major depressive disorder (MDD), for the efficacy of the consequent use of pain medication against pain, and for the efficacy of duloxetine against both MDD and neuropathic pain. Their relative effectiveness in comorbid MDD and pain has never been established so far. This study explores the effectiveness of CC with pain medication and duloxetine, and CC with pain medication and placebo, compared with duloxetine alone, on depressive and pain symptoms. This study was prematurely terminated because of massive reorganizations and reimbursement changes in mental health care in the Netherlands during the study period and is therefore of exploratory nature. Methods: Three-armed, randomized, multicenter, placebo-controlled trial at three specialized mental health outpatient clinics with patients who screened positive for MDD. Interventions lasted 12 weeks. Pain medication was administered according to an algorithm that avoids opiate prescription as much as possible, where paracetamol, COX inhibitors, and pregabalin are offered as steps before opiates are considered. Patients who did not show up for three or more sessions were registered as non-compliant. Explorative, intention-to-treat and per protocol, multilevel regression analyses were performed. The trial is listed in the trial registration (http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=1089; NTR number: NTR1089). Results: Sixty patients completed the study. Patients in all treatment groups reported significantly less depressive and pain symptoms after 12 weeks. CC with placebo condition showed the fastest decrease in depressive symptoms compared with the duloxetine alone group ( Conclusion: In MDD and pain, patient's compliance and placebo effects are more important in attaining effect than choice of one of the treatments. Active pain management with COX inhibitors and pregabalin as alternatives to tramadol or other opiates might provide an attractive alternative to the current WHO pain ladder as it avoids opiate prescription as much as possible. The generalizability is limited due to the small sample size. Larger studies are needed.

14 Article Effectiveness of preventive cognitive therapy while tapering antidepressants versus maintenance antidepressant treatment versus their combination in prevention of depressive relapse or recurrence (DRD study): a three-group, multicentre, randomised controlled trial. 2018

Bockting, Claudi L H / Klein, Nicola S / Elgersma, Hermien J / van Rijsbergen, Gerard D / Slofstra, Christien / Ormel, Johan / Buskens, Erik / Dekker, Jack / de Jong, Peter J / Nolen, Willem A / Schene, Aart H / Hollon, Steven D / Burger, Huibert. ·Academic Medical Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Department of Clinical Psychology and Experimental Psychopathology, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands. Electronic address: c.l.bockting@amc.uva.nl. · Department of Clinical Psychology and Experimental Psychopathology, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands. · Department of Early Detection and Intervention in Psychosis, GGZ Drenthe, Assen, Netherlands. · Lentis Psychiatric Institute, Lentis Research, Groningen, Netherlands. · University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Psychiatry, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands. · Health Technology Assessment, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands. · Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Arkin Institute for Mental Health, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Centre, and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of General Practice, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands. ·Lancet Psychiatry · Pubmed #29625762.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Keeping individuals on antidepressants after remission or recovery of major depressive disorder is a common strategy to prevent relapse or recurrence. Preventive cognitive therapy (PCT) has been proposed as an alternative to maintenance antidepressant treatment, but whether its addition would allow tapering of antidepressants or enhance the efficacy of maintenance antidepressant treatment is unclear. We aimed to compare the effectiveness of antidepressants alone, with PCT while tapering off antidepressants, or PCT added to antidepressants in the prevention of relapse and recurrence. METHODS: In this single-blind, multicentre, parallel, three-group, randomised controlled trial, individuals recruited by general practitioners, pharmacists, secondary mental health care, or media were randomly assigned (10:10:8) to PCT and antidepressants, antidepressants alone, or PCT with tapering of antidepressants, using computer-generated randomised allocation stratified for number of previous depressive episodes and type of care. Eligible participants had previously experienced at least two depressive episodes and were in remission or recovery on antidepressants, which they had been receiving for at least the past 6 months. Exclusion criteria were current mania or hypomania, a history of bipolar disorder, any history of psychosis, current alcohol or drug abuse, an anxiety disorder that requires treatment, psychological treatment more than twice a month, and a diagnosis of organic brain damage. The primary outcome was time-related proportion of individuals with depressive relapse or recurrence in the intention-to-treat population, assessed four times in 24 months. Assessors were masked to treatment allocation, whereas physicians and participants could not be masked. This trial is registered with the Netherlands Trial Register, number NTR1907. FINDINGS: Between July 14, 2009, and April 30, 2015, 2486 participants were assessed for eligibility and 289 were randomly assigned to PCT and antidepressant (n=104), antidepressant alone (n=100), or PCT with tapering of antidepressant (n=85). The overall log-rank test was significant (p=0·014). Antidepressants alone were not superior to PCT while tapering off antidepressants in terms of the risk of relapse or recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] 0·86, 95% CI 0·56-1·32; p=0·502). Adding PCT to antidepressant treatment resulted in a 41% relative risk reduction compared with antidepressants alone (0·59, 0·38-0·94; p=0·026). There were two suicide attempts (one in the antidepressants alone group and one in the PCT with tapering of antidepressants group) and one death (in the PCT and antidepressants group) not related to the interventions during the 24 months' follow-up. INTERPRETATION: Maintenance antidepressant treatment is not superior to PCT after recovery, whereas adding PCT to antidepressant treatment after recovery is superior to antidepressants alone. PCT should be offered to recurrently depressed individuals on antidepressants and to individuals who wish to stop antidepressants after recovery. FUNDING: The Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development.

15 Article Which patients benefit specifically from short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) for depression? Study protocol of a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data. 2018

Driessen, Ellen / Abbass, Allan A / Barber, Jacques P / Connolly Gibbons, Mary Beth / Dekker, Jack J M / Fokkema, Marjolein / Fonagy, Peter / Hollon, Steven D / Jansma, Elise P / de Maat, Saskia C M / Town, Joel M / Twisk, Jos W R / Van, Henricus L / Weitz, Erica / Cuijpers, Pim. ·Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health research institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Centre for Emotions & Health, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Gordon F. Derner School of Psychology, Adelphi University, Garden City, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Methodology and Statistics, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands. · Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · University Library, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Dutch Psychoanalytic Institute, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #29463590.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) is an empirically supported treatment that is often used to treat depression. However, it is largely unclear if certain subgroups of depressed patients can benefit specifically from this treatment method. We describe the protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data (IPD) aimed at identifying predictors and moderators of STPP for depression efficacy. METHOD AND ANALYSIS: We will conduct a systematic literature search in multiple bibliographic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase.com, Web of Science and Cochrane's Central Register of Controlled Trials), 'grey literature' databases (GLIN and UMI ProQuest) and a prospective trial register (http://www.controlled-trials.com). We will include studies reporting (a) outcomes on standardised measures of (b) depressed (c) adult patients (d) receiving STPP. We will next invite the authors of these studies to share the participant-level data of their trials and combine these data to conduct IPD meta-analyses. The primary outcome for this study is post-treatment efficacy as assessed by a continuous depression measure. Potential predictors and moderators include all sociodemographic variables, clinical variables and psychological patient characteristics that are measured before the start of treatment and are assessed consistently across studies. One-stage IPD meta-analyses will be conducted using mixed-effects models. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Institutional review board approval is not required for this study. We intend to submit reports of the outcomes of this study for publication to international peer-reviewed journals in the fields of psychiatry or clinical psychology. We also intend to present the outcomes at international scientific conferences aimed at psychotherapy researchers and clinicians. The findings of this study can have important clinical implications, as they can inform expectations of STPP efficacy for individual patients, and help to make an informed choice concerning the best treatment option for a given patient. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42017056029.

16 Article Prevention of violent revictimization in depressed patients with an add-on internet-based emotion regulation training (iERT): study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial. 2018

Christ, Carolien / de Waal, Marleen M / van Schaik, Digna J F / Kikkert, Martijn J / Blankers, Matthijs / Bockting, Claudi L H / Beekman, Aartjan T F / Dekker, Jack J M. ·Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center/ GGZ inGeest, P.O. Box 7057, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. c.christ@ggzingeest.nl. · Department of Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Klaprozenweg 111, 1033 NN, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. c.christ@ggzingeest.nl. · Amsterdam Public Health research institute, VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. c.christ@ggzingeest.nl. · Department of Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Klaprozenweg 111, 1033 NN, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Academic Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Institute for Addiction Research, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center/ GGZ inGeest, P.O. Box 7057, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Amsterdam Public Health research institute, VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Trimbos Institute - Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction, Da Costakade 45, 3521 VS, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, University Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 1, BT 1081, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·BMC Psychiatry · Pubmed #29394919.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psychiatric patients are at high risk of becoming victim of a violent crime compared to the general population. Although most research has focused on patients with severe mental illness, depressed patients have been demonstrated to be prone to victimization as well. Victimization is associated with more severe symptomatology, decreased quality of life, and high risk of revictimization. Hence, there is a strong need for interventions that focus on preventing violent revictimization. Since emotion dysregulation is associated with both victimization and depression, we developed an internet-based Emotion Regulation Training (iERT) to reduce revictimization in depressed patients. This study aims to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of iERT added to Treatment As Usual (TAU) in reducing incidents of violent revictimization among depressed patients with a recent history of victimization. Furthermore, this study aims to examine secondary clinical outcomes, and moderators and mediators that may be associated with treatment outcomes. METHODS: In a multicenter randomized controlled trial with parallel group design, patients with a major depressive disorder and a history of violent victimization over the past three years (N = 200) will be allocated to either TAU + iERT (N = 100) or TAU only (N = 100), based on computer-generated stratified block randomization. Assessments will take place at baseline, 8 weeks, 14 weeks, and 6 months after start of treatment, and 12, 24, and 36 months after baseline. The primary outcome measure is the total number of violent victimization incidents at 12 months after baseline, measured with the Safety Monitor: an adequate self-report questionnaire that assesses victimization over the preceding 12 months. Secondary outcome measures and mediators include emotion dysregulation and depressive symptomatology. An economic evaluation with the societal perspective will be performed alongside the trial. DISCUSSION: This study is the first to examine the effectiveness of an intervention aimed at reducing violent revictimization in depressed patients. If effective, iERT can be implemented in mental health care, and contribute to the well-being of depressed patients. Furthermore, the results will provide insight into underlying mechanisms of revictimization. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study is registered at the Netherlands Trial Register ( NTR5822 ). Date of registration: 4 April 2016.

17 Article Loneliness and cardiovascular disease and the role of late-life depression. 2018

Hegeman, Annette / Schutter, Natasja / Comijs, Hannie / Holwerda, Tjalling / Dekker, Jack / Stek, Max / van der Mast, Roos. ·Department of Psychiatry, St. Antonius Ziekenhuis, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, EMGO Institute of Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry PuntP, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam. · Department of Psychology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, CAPRI, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium. ·Int J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #28418079.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Loneliness and depression have a strong reciprocal influence, and both predict adverse health outcomes at old age. Therefore, this study examines whether loneliness is associated with the presence of cardiovascular diseases taking into account the role of late-life depression. METHODS: Cross-sectional data of 477 older adults in the Netherlands Study of Depressed Older Persons were used. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the relation between loneliness and cardiovascular disease. Depression was added to the regression model to examine whether depression is an explanatory factor in the association between loneliness and cardiovascular disease. Interaction terms between loneliness and depression and between loneliness and sex were introduced in the regression model to investigate whether depressed and non-depressed participants, and men and women differed in their association between loneliness and cardiovascular disease. RESULTS: Of the overall group, 61% were lonely, 28% had a history of cardiovascular disease and 74% were depressed. Loneliness and cardiovascular disease were not associated in the overall group after adjustment for confounders (continuous: odds ratio [OR] = 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.98-1.10), p = 0.25; dichotomous: OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 0.80-2.03, p = 0.32). For women, there was an association between loneliness and cardiovascular diseases (continuous: OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.06-1.21, p < 0.001; dichotomous: OR = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.50-4.65, p = 0.001), but this association was not present in men (OR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.88-1.05, p = 0.38). This association remained significant after adjustment for confounders, but it lost significance after adding depression to the model. CONCLUSION: For women only, there was an association between loneliness and cardiovascular disease. However, this association was explained by depression, indicating that loneliness in its own right seems not related with cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

18 Article Moderation of the Alliance-Outcome Association by Prior Depressive Episodes: Differential Effects in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Short-Term Psychodynamic Supportive Psychotherapy. 2017

Lorenzo-Luaces, Lorenzo / Driessen, Ellen / DeRubeis, Robert J / Van, Henricus L / Keefe, John R / Hendriksen, Mariëlle / Dekker, Jack. ·University of Pennsylvania, Brown University. Electronic address: lorenzl@sas.upenn.edu. · VU University Amsterdam. · University of Pennsylvania. · Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam. · VU University Amsterdam, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam. ·Behav Ther · Pubmed #28711109.

ABSTRACT: Prior studies have suggested that the association between the alliance and depression improvement varies as a function of prior history of depression. We sought to replicate these findings and extend them to short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy (SPSP) in a sample of patients who were randomized to one of these treatments and were administered the Helping Alliance Questionnaire (N=282) at Week 5 of treatment. Overall, the alliance was a predictor of symptom change (d=0.33). In SPSP, the alliance was a modest but robust predictor of change, irrespective of prior episodes (d=0.25-0.33). By contrast, in CBT, the effects of the alliance on symptom change were large for patients with 0 prior episodes (d=0.86), moderate for those with 1 prior episode (d=0.49), and small for those with 2+ prior episodes (d=0.12). These findings suggest a complex interaction between patient features and common vs. specific therapy processes. In CBT, the alliance relates to change for patients with less recurrent depression whereas other CBT-specific processes may account for change for patients with more recurrent depression.

19 Article Cognitive-behavioral versus psychodynamic therapy for major depression: Secondary outcomes of a randomized clinical trial. 2017

Driessen, Ellen / Van, Henricus L / Peen, Jaap / Don, Frank J / Twisk, Jos W R / Cuijpers, Pim / Dekker, Jack J M. ·Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Section Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Behavioral and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. · Arkin Mental Health Care. · Department of Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. ·J Consult Clin Psychol · Pubmed #28627912.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: In a randomized clinical trial, we compared the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapy for adult outpatient depression on measures of psychopathology, interpersonal functioning, pain, and quality of life. METHOD: There were 341 Dutch adults (70.1% female, mean age = 38.9, SD = 10.3) meeting RESULTS: Across treatment conditions, 45-60% of the patients who completed posttreatment assessment showed clinically meaningful change for most outcome measures. We found no significant differences between the treatment conditions on any of the outcome measures at both posttreatment and follow-up. Noninferiority of psychodynamic therapy to CBT was shown for posttreatment and follow-up anxiety measures as well as for posttreatment pain and quality of life measures, but could not be consistently demonstrated for the other outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study that shows that psychodynamic therapy can be at least as efficacious as CBT for depression on important aspects of patient functioning other than depressive symptom reduction. These findings extend the evidence-base of psychodynamic therapy for depression, but replication is needed by means of rigorously designed noninferiority trials. (PsycINFO Database Record

20 Article Loneliness in older adults is associated with diminished cortisol output. 2017

Schutter, N / Holwerda, T J / Stek, M L / Dekker, J J M / Rhebergen, D / Comijs, H C. ·Arkin Mental Health Care, Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Nieuwe Kerkstraat 156, 1018 VM Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: natasja.schutter@mentrum.nl. · Arkin Mental Health Care, Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Nieuwe Kerkstraat 156, 1018 VM Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · GGZ InGeest, Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Clinical Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·J Psychosom Res · Pubmed #28314545.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Loneliness in older adults has been associated with increased mortality and health problems. One of the assumed underlying mechanisms is dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPA-axis). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether loneliness in older adults is associated with HPA-axis dysregulation and whether this association differs between depressed and non-depressed persons. METHODS: Cross-sectional data of 426 lonely and non-lonely older adults in the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons (NESDO) were used. Linear regression analyses and multinominal logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between loneliness and morning cortisol, cortisol awakening response, diurnal slope and dexamethasone suppression ratio. In all analyses, confounders were introduced. In order to examine whether the association between loneliness and cortisol measures is different in depressed versus non-depressed persons, an interaction term for loneliness x depression diagnosis was tested. RESULTS: Cortisol output in the first hour after awakening and dexamethasone suppression ratio was lower in lonely participants. There were no significant interactions between loneliness and depression diagnosis in the association with the cortisol measures. CONCLUSION: This study is the first to investigate the association between the HPA-axis and loneliness in a large group of older adults aged 60-93years. We found lower cortisol output in the first hour after awakening and lower dexamethasone suppression ratio in lonely older depressed and non-depressed adults. Whether diminished cortisol output is the underlying mechanism that leads to health problems in lonely older adults is an interesting object for further study.

21 Article The role of affect in predicting depressive symptomatology in remitted recurrently depressed patients. 2017

de Jonge, M / Dekker, J J M / Kikkert, M J / Peen, J / van Rijsbergen, G D / Bockting, C L H. ·Department of Research Arkin, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: margo.de.jonge@arkin.nl. · Department of Research Arkin, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Clinical Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Research Arkin, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #28013124.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder is an emotional disorder. It is important to improve our understanding of the role of affect in relapse/recurrence of depression. Therefore, this study examines whether affect plays a role in prospectively predicting depressive symptomatology and if there are indications for emotional scarring as a consequence of undergoing depressive episodes. METHODS: In 107 patients remitted from recurrent depression affect was examined in predicting depressive symptomatology as measured with the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology - Self Report. Affect was measured with the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and with a one item Visual Analogue Mood Scale. Indication of emotional scarring was examined by comparing number of previous depressive episodes to levels of affect. RESULTS: Less positive affect as assessed after remission predicted increased depressive symptomatology six months later, even after we controlled for baseline symptomatology. Negative affect also predicted depressive symptomatology six months later, but not after controlling for baseline depressive symptomatology. No relationship was found between affect and number of previous episodes. LIMITATIONS: All participants in this study had two or more previous depressive episodes and received CBT during the acute phase of their depression. The instruments that measured mood and affect were administered within 4 weeks of each other. CONCLUSIONS: Positive affect and negative affect as assessed after remission in recurrent depression can predict depressive symptomatology. Especially positive affect seems to play an independent role in predicting depressive symptomatology. Directly targeting positive affect in relapse prevention during remission might be a way to enhance treatment effects.

22 Article The role of avoidant and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder traits in matching patients with major depression to cognitive behavioral and psychodynamic therapy: A replication study. 2016

Kikkert, Martijn J / Driessen, Ellen / Peen, Jaap / Barber, Jacques P / Bockting, Claudi / Schalkwijk, Frans / Dekker, Jeff / Dekker, Jack J M. ·Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; VU University Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies, Adelphi University, Garden City, NY, USA. · Universiteit Utrecht, Department of Clinical & Health Psychology, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · VU University Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #27598693.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Barber and Muenz (1996) reported that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) was more effective than interpersonal therapy (IPT) for depressed patients with elevated levels of avoidant personality disorder, while IPT was more effective than CBT in patients with elevated levels of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. These findings may have important clinical implications, but have not yet been replicated. METHODS: We conducted a study using data from a randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of CBT and short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy in the outpatient treatment of depression. RESULTS: We found no evidence indicating that avoidant patients may benefit more from CBT compared to short-term psychodynamic supportive therapy (SPSP). CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that treatment effect does not depend on the level of avoidance, or obsessive-compulsiveness personality disorders further examine the influence of personality disorders on the effectiveness of CBT or psychodynamic therapy in the treatment of depression.

23 Article Efficacy of an internet-based self-help intervention to reduce co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression symptoms in adults: study protocol of a three-arm randomised controlled trial. 2016

Schaub, Michael P / Blankers, Matthijs / Lehr, Dirk / Boss, Leif / Riper, Heleen / Dekker, Jack / Goudriaan, Anna E / Maier, Larissa J / Haug, Severin / Amann, Manuel / Dey, Michelle / Wenger, Andreas / Ebert, David D. ·Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Health Psychology and Applied Biological Psychology, Leuphana University Lueneburg, Lueneburg, Germany. · Division of Health Training Online, Innovation Incubator, Leuphana University Lueneburg, Lueneburg, Germany. · Department of Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Department of Clinical Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #27225652.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: In the general population, alcohol use disorder and depression more often occur together than any other combination of a mental illness with a substance use disorder. It is important to have a cost-effective intervention that is able to reach at-risk individuals in the early stages of developing alcohol use disorders and depression disorders. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This paper presents the protocol for a 3-arm multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the combined internet-based self-help intervention Take Care of You (TCOY) to reduce alcohol misuse and depression symptoms in comparison with a waiting list control group and a comparable intervention focusing on problematic alcohol use only. The active interventions consist of modules designed to reduce alcohol use, based on the principles of motivational interviewing and methods of cognitive behavioural therapy, together with additional modules in the combined study arm to reduce symptoms of depression. Data will be collected at baseline, as well as at 3 and 6 months postrandomisation. The primary outcome is the quantity of alcohol used in the past 7 days. A number of secondary outcome measures will be studied. These include the Centre of Epidemiologic Studies of Depression Scale (CES-D) and a combined measure with the criteria of values below the cut-off for severe alcohol use disorder and for CES-D. Data analysis will follow the intention-to-treat principle using (generalised) linear mixed models. In order to investigate the interventions' cost-utility and cost-effectiveness, a full economic evaluation will be performed. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This RCT will be executed in compliance with the Helsinki Declaration and has been approved by 2 local Ethics Committees. Results will be reported at conferences and in peer-reviewed publications. Participant-friendly summaries of trial findings will be published on the TCOY websites. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN10323951.

24 Article Impact of loneliness and depression on mortality: results from the Longitudinal Ageing Study Amsterdam. 2016

Holwerda, Tjalling J / van Tilburg, Theo G / Deeg, Dorly J H / Schutter, Natasja / Van, Rien / Dekker, Jack / Stek, Max L / Beekman, Aartjan T F / Schoevers, Robert A. ·Tjalling J. Holwerda, MD, Department of Psychiatry, ARKIN Institute of Mental Health Care and EMGO Institute, VU University Medical Centre Amsterdam (VUMC), Longitudinal Ageing Study Amsterdam (LASA), Amsterdam; Theo G. van Tilburg, PhD, EMGO Institute, VU University Medical Centre Amsterdam (VUMC), Longitudinal Ageing Study Amsterdam (LASA) and Department of Sociology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam; Dorly J. H. Deeg, PhD, EMGO Institute, VU University Medical Centre Amsterdam (VUMC), Longitudinal Ageing Study Amsterdam (LASA), Amsterdam; Natasja Schutter, MD, Rien Van, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, ARKIN Institute of Mental Health Care, Amsterdam; Jack Dekker, PhD, Department of Psychology & Department of Research, ARKIN Institute of Mental Health Care, Amsterdam; Max L. Stek, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry GGZ INGEEST, Amsterdam; Aartjan T. F. Beekman, MD, PhD, EMGO Institute, VU University Medical Centre Amsterdam (VUMC), Longitudinal Ageing Study Amsterdam (LASA), Amsterdam and Department of Psychiatry GGZ INGEEST, Amsterdam; Robert A. Schoevers, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Groningen and Interdisciplinary Center for Psychopathology and Emotion Regulation (ICPE), Groningen, The Netherlands tj.holwerda@vumc.nl. · Tjalling J. Holwerda, MD, Department of Psychiatry, ARKIN Institute of Mental Health Care and EMGO Institute, VU University Medical Centre Amsterdam (VUMC), Longitudinal Ageing Study Amsterdam (LASA), Amsterdam; Theo G. van Tilburg, PhD, EMGO Institute, VU University Medical Centre Amsterdam (VUMC), Longitudinal Ageing Study Amsterdam (LASA) and Department of Sociology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam; Dorly J. H. Deeg, PhD, EMGO Institute, VU University Medical Centre Amsterdam (VUMC), Longitudinal Ageing Study Amsterdam (LASA), Amsterdam; Natasja Schutter, MD, Rien Van, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, ARKIN Institute of Mental Health Care, Amsterdam; Jack Dekker, PhD, Department of Psychology & Department of Research, ARKIN Institute of Mental Health Care, Amsterdam; Max L. Stek, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry GGZ INGEEST, Amsterdam; Aartjan T. F. Beekman, MD, PhD, EMGO Institute, VU University Medical Centre Amsterdam (VUMC), Longitudinal Ageing Study Amsterdam (LASA), Amsterdam and Department of Psychiatry GGZ INGEEST, Amsterdam; Robert A. Schoevers, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Groningen and Interdisciplinary Center for Psychopathology and Emotion Regulation (ICPE), Groningen, The Netherlands. ·Br J Psychiatry · Pubmed #27103680.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Loneliness is highly prevalent among older people, has serious health consequences and is an important predictor of mortality. Loneliness and depression may unfavourably interact with each other over time but data on this topic are scarce. AIMS: To determine whether loneliness is associated with excess mortality after 19 years of follow-up and whether the joint effect with depression confers further excess mortality. METHOD: Different aspects of loneliness were measured with the De Jong Gierveld scale and depression with the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale in a cohort of 2878 people aged 55-85 with 19 years of follow-up. Excess mortality hypotheses were tested with Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard analyses controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: At follow-up loneliness and depression were associated with excess mortality in older men and women in bivariate analysis but not in multivariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, severe depression was associated with excess mortality in men who were lonely but not in women. CONCLUSIONS: Loneliness and depression are important predictors of early death in older adults. Severe depression has a strong association with excess mortality in older men who were lonely, indicating a lethal combination in this group.

25 Article Differential efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy and psychodynamic therapy for major depression: a study of prescriptive factors. 2016

Driessen, E / Smits, N / Dekker, J J M / Peen, J / Don, F J / Kool, S / Westra, D / Hendriksen, M / Cuijpers, P / Van, H L. ·Department of Clinical Psychology,VU University Amsterdam,Amsterdam,The Netherlands. · Arkin Mental Health Care,Amsterdam,The Netherlands. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #26750445.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Minimal efficacy differences have been found between cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapies for depression, but little is known about patient characteristics that might moderate differential treatment effects. We aimed to generate hypotheses regarding such potential prescriptive factors. METHOD: We conducted post-hoc model-based recursive partitioning analyses alongside a randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of CBT and short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy (SPSP). Severely depressed patients received additional antidepressant medication. We included 233 adults seeking treatment for a major depressive episode in psychiatric outpatient clinics, who completed post-treatment assessment. Post-treatment mean Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores constituted the main outcome measure. RESULTS: While treatment differences (CBT v. SPSP) were minimal in the total sample of patients (d = 0.04), model-based recursive partitioning indicated differential treatment efficacy in certain subgroups of patients. SPSP was found more efficacious among moderately depressed patients receiving psychotherapy only who showed low baseline co-morbid anxiety levels (d = -0.40) and among severely depressed patients receiving psychotherapy and antidepressant medication who reported a duration of the depressive episode of ⩾1 year (d = -0.31), while CBT was found more efficacious for such patients reporting a duration <1 year (d = 0.83). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are observational and need validation before they can be used to guide treatment selection, but suggest that knowledge of prescriptive factors can help improve the efficacy of psychotherapy for depression. Depressive episode duration and co-morbid anxiety level should be included as stratification variables in future randomized clinical trials comparing CBT and psychodynamic therapy.

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