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Depression: HELP
Articles by Maria Faurholt-Jepsen
Based on 11 articles published since 2010
(Why 11 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, M. Faurholt-Jepsen wrote the following 11 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Correlations Between Objective Behavioral Features Collected From Mobile and Wearable Devices and Depressive Mood Symptoms in Patients With Affective Disorders: Systematic Review. 2018

Rohani, Darius A / Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria / Kessing, Lars Vedel / Bardram, Jakob E. ·Embedded Systems Engineering, Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark. · Copenhagen Center for Health Technology, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark. · Copenhagen Affective Disorder Research Centre, Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·JMIR Mhealth Uhealth · Pubmed #30104184.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Several studies have recently reported on the correlation between objective behavioral features collected via mobile and wearable devices and depressive mood symptoms in patients with affective disorders (unipolar and bipolar disorders). However, individual studies have reported on different and sometimes contradicting results, and no quantitative systematic review of the correlation between objective behavioral features and depressive mood symptoms has been published. OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this systematic review were to (1) provide an overview of the correlations between objective behavioral features and depressive mood symptoms reported in the literature and (2) investigate the strength and statistical significance of these correlations across studies. The answers to these questions could potentially help identify which objective features have shown most promising results across studies. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature, reported according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines. IEEE Xplore, ACM Digital Library, Web of Sciences, PsychINFO, PubMed, DBLP computer science bibliography, HTA, DARE, Scopus, and Science Direct were searched and supplemented by hand examination of reference lists. The search ended on April 27, 2017, and was limited to studies published between 2007 and 2017. RESULTS: A total of 46 studies were eligible for the review. These studies identified and investigated 85 unique objective behavioral features, covering 17 various sensor data inputs. These features were divided into 7 categories. Several features were found to have statistically significant and consistent correlation directionality with mood assessment (eg, the amount of home stay, sleep duration, and vigorous activity), while others showed directionality discrepancies across the studies (eg, amount of text messages [short message service] sent, time spent between locations, and frequency of mobile phone screen activity). CONCLUSIONS: Several studies showed consistent and statistically significant correlations between objective behavioral features collected via mobile and wearable devices and depressive mood symptoms. Hence, continuous and everyday monitoring of behavioral aspects in affective disorders could be a promising supplementary objective measure for estimating depressive mood symptoms. However, the evidence is limited by methodological issues in individual studies and by a lack of standardization of (1) the collected objective features, (2) the mood assessment methodology, and (3) the statistical methods applied. Therefore, consistency in data collection and analysis in future studies is needed, making replication studies as well as meta-analyses possible.

2 Review Heart rate variability in bipolar disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria / Kessing, Lars Vedel / Munkholm, Klaus. ·Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhgaen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK- 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: maria@faurholt-jepsen.dk. · Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhgaen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK- 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Neurosci Biobehav Rev · Pubmed #27986468.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) has been suggested reduced in bipolar disorder (BD) compared with healthy individuals (HC). This meta-analysis investigated: HRV differences in BD compared with HC, major depressive disorder or schizophrenia; HRV differences between affective states; HRV changes from mania/depression to euthymia; and HRV changes following interventions. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis reported according to the PRISMA guidelines was conducted. MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library and Scopus were searched. A total of 15 articles comprising 2534 individuals were included. RESULTS: HRV was reduced in BD compared to HC (g=-1.77, 95% CI: -2.46; -1.09, P<0.001, 10 comparisons, n=1581). More recent publication year, larger study and higher study quality were associated with a smaller difference in HRV. Large between-study heterogeneity, low study quality, and lack of consideration of confounding factors in individual studies were observed. CONCLUSIONS: This first meta-analysis of HRV in BD suggests that HRV is reduced in BD compared to HC. Heterogeneity and methodological issues limit the evidence. Future studies employing strict methodology are warranted.

3 Article Differences in mood instability in patients with bipolar disorder type I and II: a smartphone-based study. 2019

Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria / Frost, Mads / Busk, Jonas / Christensen, Ellen Margrethe / Bardram, Jakob E / Vinberg, Maj / Kessing, Lars Vedel. ·Copenhagen Affective Disorder Research Center (CADIC), Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. maria@faurholt-jepsen.dk. · IT University of Copenhagen, Rued Langgaards Vej 7, 2300, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark. · Copenhagen Affective Disorder Research Center (CADIC), Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Int J Bipolar Disord · Pubmed #30706154.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mood instability in bipolar disorder is associated with a risk of relapse. This study investigated differences in mood instability between patients with bipolar disorder type I and type II, which previously has been sparingly investigated. METHODS: Patients with bipolar disorder type I (n = 53) and type II (n = 31) used a daily smartphone-based self-monitoring system for 9 months. Data in the present reflect 15.975 observations of daily collected smartphone-based data on patient-evaluated mood. RESULTS: In models adjusted for age, gender, illness duration and psychopharmacological treatment, patients with bipolar disorder type II experienced more mood instability during depression compared with patients with bipolar disorder type I (B: 0.27, 95% CI 0.007; 0.53, p = 0.044), but lower intensity of manic symptoms. Patients with bipolar disorder type II did not experience lower mean mood or higher intensity of depressive symptoms compared with patients with bipolar disorder type I. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to bipolar disorder type I, patients with bipolar disorder type II had higher mood instability for depression. Clinically it is of importance to identify these inter-episodic symptoms. Future studies investigating the effect of treatment on mood instability measures are warranted. Trial registration NCT02221336.

4 Article The Bipolar Illness Onset study: research protocol for the BIO cohort study. 2017

Kessing, Lars Vedel / Munkholm, Klaus / Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria / Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica / Nielsen, Lars Bo / Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth / Ekstrøm, Claus / Winther, Ole / Pedersen, Bente Klarlund / Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen / McIntyre, Roger S / Kapczinski, Flavio / Gattaz, Wagner F / Bardram, Jakob / Frost, Mads / Mayora, Oscar / Knudsen, Gitte Moos / Phillips, Mary / Vinberg, Maj. ·Department of Psychiatry, Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Biostatistics, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark. · Gene Regulation Bioinformatics at the Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Biology/BRIC, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · The Centre of Inflammation and Metabolism at Department of Infectious Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Psychiatry and Pharmacology, University of Toronto, Brain and Cognition Discovery Foundation, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Department and Institute of Psychiatry, and Laboratory of Neuroscience (LIM27), University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil. · IT University Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Create-Net: Center for Research and Telecommunications Experimentation for Networked Communities, Trento, Italy. · Neurobiology Research Unit and Center for Integrated Molecular Brain Imaging, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #28645967.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Bipolar disorder is an often disabling mental illness with a lifetime prevalence of 1%-2%, a high risk of recurrence of manic and depressive episodes, a lifelong elevated risk of suicide and a substantial heritability. The course of illness is frequently characterised by progressive shortening of interepisode intervals with each recurrence and increasing cognitive dysfunction in a subset of individuals with this condition. Clinically, diagnostic boundaries between bipolar disorder and other psychiatric disorders such as unipolar depression are unclear although pharmacological and psychological treatment strategies differ substantially. Patients with bipolar disorder are often misdiagnosed and the mean delay between onset and diagnosis is 5-10 years. Although the risk of relapse of depression and mania is high it is for most patients impossible to predict and consequently prevent upcoming episodes in an individual tailored way. The identification of objective biomarkers can both inform bipolar disorder diagnosis and provide biological targets for the development of new and personalised treatments. Accurate diagnosis of bipolar disorder in its early stages could help prevent the long-term detrimental effects of the illness.The present Bipolar Illness Onset study aims to identify (1) a composite blood-based biomarker, (2) a composite electronic smartphone-based biomarker and (3) a neurocognitive and neuroimaging-based signature for bipolar disorder. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The study will include 300 patients with newly diagnosed/first-episode bipolar disorder, 200 of their healthy siblings or offspring and 100 healthy individuals without a family history of affective disorder. All participants will be followed longitudinally with repeated blood samples and other biological tissues, self-monitored and automatically generated smartphone data, neuropsychological tests and a subset of the cohort with neuroimaging during a 5 to 10-year study period. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study has been approved by the Local Ethical Committee (H-7-2014-007) and the data agency, Capital Region of Copenhagen (RHP-2015-023), and the findings will be widely disseminated at international conferences and meetings including conferences for the International Society for Bipolar Disorders and the World Federation of Societies for Biological Psychiatry and in scientific peer-reviewed papers. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02888262.

5 Article Increased blood BDNF in healthy individuals with a family history of depression. 2017

Knorr, Ulla / Søndergaard, Mia H Greisen / Koefoed, Pernille / Jørgensen, Anders / Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria / Vinberg, Maj / Kessing, Lars Vedel. ·Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: ulla.knorr@regionh.dk. · Laboratory of Neuropsychiatry, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Denmark. · Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark; Laboratory of Neuropsychiatry, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Denmark. · Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Psychiatry Res · Pubmed #28645077.

ABSTRACT: The brain-derive neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may play an important role in the course of depression. We aimed to study the associations between peripheral whole blood BDNF levels in healthy individuals with and without a family history of depression. BDNF levels were significantly increased in healthy individuals with (n = 76), compared with healthy individuals without (n = 39) a family history of depression and persisted after adjustment for age and gender differences. Higher BDNF levels were associated with increasing age and seasonality. A family history of depression may contribute to an elevation of peripheral BDNF levels in healthy individuals.

6 Article Voice analysis as an objective state marker in bipolar disorder. 2016

Faurholt-Jepsen, M / Busk, J / Frost, M / Vinberg, M / Christensen, E M / Winther, O / Bardram, J E / Kessing, L V. ·Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · DTU Compute, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Lyngby, Denmark. · The Pervasive Interaction Laboratory, IT University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Transl Psychiatry · Pubmed #27434490.

ABSTRACT: Changes in speech have been suggested as sensitive and valid measures of depression and mania in bipolar disorder. The present study aimed at investigating (1) voice features collected during phone calls as objective markers of affective states in bipolar disorder and (2) if combining voice features with automatically generated objective smartphone data on behavioral activities (for example, number of text messages and phone calls per day) and electronic self-monitored data (mood) on illness activity would increase the accuracy as a marker of affective states. Using smartphones, voice features, automatically generated objective smartphone data on behavioral activities and electronic self-monitored data were collected from 28 outpatients with bipolar disorder in naturalistic settings on a daily basis during a period of 12 weeks. Depressive and manic symptoms were assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17-item and the Young Mania Rating Scale, respectively, by a researcher blinded to smartphone data. Data were analyzed using random forest algorithms. Affective states were classified using voice features extracted during everyday life phone calls. Voice features were found to be more accurate, sensitive and specific in the classification of manic or mixed states with an area under the curve (AUC)=0.89 compared with an AUC=0.78 for the classification of depressive states. Combining voice features with automatically generated objective smartphone data on behavioral activities and electronic self-monitored data increased the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of classification of affective states slightly. Voice features collected in naturalistic settings using smartphones may be used as objective state markers in patients with bipolar disorder.

7 Article Mood instability in bipolar disorder type I versus type II-continuous daily electronic self-monitoring of illness activity using smartphones. 2015

Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria / Ritz, Christian / Frost, Mads / Mikkelsen, Rie Lambæk / Margrethe Christensen, Ellen / Bardram, Jakob / Vinberg, Maj / Kessing, Lars Vedel. ·Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: maria@faurholt-jepsen.dk. · Department of Basic Sciences and Environment, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. · The Pervasive Interaction Laboratory (PIT Lab), IT University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #26277270.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A substantial proportion of patients with bipolar disorder remain symptomatic during inter-episode periods, and mood instability is associated with high risk of relapse and hospitalization. Few studies have investigated long-term daily illness activity and none has compared bipolar type I and II using daily data. The objectives were to investigate differences in daily illness activity between bipolar disorder type I and II. METHODS: A smartphone-based system for self-monitoring was developed. A total of 33 patients treated in a mood clinic used the system for daily self-monitoring during a median period of 310 days [IQR 189; 437]. Data presented summarize over 8500 observations. RESULTS: Patients with bipolar disorder type II (n=20), compared to patients with bipolar disorder type I (n=13), experienced a significant lower mean level of mood on a scale from -3; +3 (-0.54 (95% CI: -0.74; -0.35) versus -0.19 (95% CI: -0.35; -0.02), p=0.02), less time euthymic (51.0% (95% CI: 36.4; 65.7) versus 74.5% (95% CI: 62.4; 86.7), p=0.03) and a higher proportion of time with depressive symptoms (45.1% (95% CI: 30.6; 59.5) versus 18.8% (95% CI: 6.9; 30.7), p=0.01). The proportion of time spent with (hypo)manic symptoms did not differ (2.7% (95% CI: 0.1; 5.5) versus 5.5% (95% CI: 3.1; 7.8), p=0.17). LIMITATIONS: Patients received different types, doses and combinations of psychopharmacological treatment. CONCLUSION: Euthymia was obtained for a substantial proportion of time in patients with bipolar disorder type I, but despite on-going treatment only for half of the time for patients with bipolar disorder type II. This emphasizes the need for improving treatment strategies for bipolar disorder type II.

8 Article Daily electronic self-monitoring in bipolar disorder using smartphones - the MONARCA I trial: a randomized, placebo-controlled, single-blind, parallel group trial. 2015

Faurholt-Jepsen, M / Frost, M / Ritz, C / Christensen, E M / Jacoby, A S / Mikkelsen, R L / Knorr, U / Bardram, J E / Vinberg, M / Kessing, L V. ·The Copenhagen Clinic for Affective Disorder,Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen,Rigshospitalet,Copenhagen,Denmark. · The Pervasive Interaction Laboratory (PIT Lab),IT University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark. · Department of Basic Sciences and Environment,Faculty of Life Sciences,University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #26220802.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The number of studies on electronic self-monitoring in affective disorder and other psychiatric disorders is increasing and indicates high patient acceptance and adherence. Nevertheless, the effect of electronic self-monitoring in patients with bipolar disorder has never been investigated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). The objective of this trial was to investigate in a RCT whether the use of daily electronic self-monitoring using smartphones reduces depressive and manic symptoms in patients with bipolar disorder. METHOD: A total of 78 patients with bipolar disorder according to ICD-10 criteria, aged 18-60 years, and with 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) scores ≤17 were randomized to the use of a smartphone for daily self-monitoring including a clinical feedback loop (the intervention group) or to the use of a smartphone for normal communicative purposes (the control group) for 6 months. The primary outcomes were differences in depressive and manic symptoms measured using HAMD-17 and YMRS, respectively, between the intervention and control groups. RESULTS: Intention-to-treat analyses using linear mixed models showed no significant effects of daily self-monitoring using smartphones on depressive as well as manic symptoms. There was a tendency towards more sustained depressive symptoms in the intervention group (B = 2.02, 95% confidence interval -0.13 to 4.17, p = 0.066). Sub-group analysis among patients without mixed symptoms and patients with presence of depressive and manic symptoms showed significantly more depressive symptoms and fewer manic symptoms during the trial period in the intervention group. CONCLUSIONS: These results highlight that electronic self-monitoring, although intuitive and appealing, needs critical consideration and further clarification before it is implemented as a clinical tool.

9 Article Electronic monitoring of psychomotor activity as a supplementary objective measure of depression severity. 2015

Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria / Brage, Søren / Vinberg, Maj / Jensen, Hans Mørch / Christensen, Ellen Margrethe / Knorr, Ulla / Kessing, Lars Vedel. ·The Clinic for Affective Disorders, Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen , Denmark. ·Nord J Psychiatry · Pubmed #25131795.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Rating scales used to assess the severity of depression e.g. the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17-item (HDRS-17) partly rely on the patient's subjective experience and reporting. Such subjective measures tend to have low reliability and adding objective measures to complement the assessment of depression severity would be a major step forward. AIMS: To investigate correlations between electronic monitoring of psychomotor activity and severity of depression according to HDRS-17. METHODS: A total of 36 patients with unipolar disorder (n = 18) or bipolar disorder (n = 18) and 31 healthy control persons aged 18-60 years were included. Psychomotor activity was measured using a combined heart rate and movement sensor device (Actiheart) for 3 consecutive days, 24 h a day. RESULTS: We found that sleeping heart rate (beats/min) correlated with HDRS-17 in both patients with unipolar disorder and bipolar disorder (unadjusted model: B = 0.46, 95% CI 0.037-0.89, P = 0.034). In contrast, correlations between activity energy expenditure (kJ/kg/day), cardio-respiratory fitness (mlO2/min/kg) and HDRS-17 were non-significant. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that measuring sleeping heart rate in non-experimental daily life could be an objective supplementary method to measure the severity of depression and perhaps indicate presence of insomnia.

10 Article Smartphone data as objective measures of bipolar disorder symptoms. 2014

Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria / Frost, Mads / Vinberg, Maj / Christensen, Ellen Margrethe / Bardram, Jakob E / Kessing, Lars Vedel. ·The Clinic for Affective Disorder, Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: maria@faurholt-jepsen.dk. · The Pervasive Interaction Laboratory (PIT Lab.), IT University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · The Clinic for Affective Disorder, Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Psychiatry Res · Pubmed #24679993.

ABSTRACT: The daily electronic self-monitoring Smartphone software "MONARCA" was used by 17 patients with bipolar disorder for 3 consecutive months. Patients were rated fortnightly using Hamilton Depression rating Scale 17 items (HDRS-17) and Young Mania rating Scale (YMRS) (102 ratings) with blinding for Smartphone data. Objective Smartphone measures such as physical and social activity correlated with clinically rated depressive symptoms. Self-monitored depressive symptoms correlated significantly with HDRS-17 items score.

11 Article Differences in psychomotor activity in patients suffering from unipolar and bipolar affective disorder in the remitted or mild/moderate depressive state. 2012

Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria / Brage, Søren / Vinberg, Maj / Christensen, Ellen Margrethe / Knorr, Ulla / Jensen, Hans Mørch / Kessing, Lars Vedel. ·The Copenhagen Affective Disorder Clinic, Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #22391514.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Abnormalities in psychomotor activity are a central and essential feature of affective disorder. Studies measuring differences in psychomotor activity between unipolar and bipolar disorder show divergent results and none have used a combined heart rate and movement monitor for measuring activity during free-living conditions. OBJECTIVE: To compare objectively measured psychomotor activity in patients with unipolar and bipolar disorder in a remitted or mild/moderate depressive state. Further, both groups were compared to a healthy control group. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of outpatients suffering from unipolar (n=20) and bipolar (n=18) disorder and healthy controls (n=31), aged 18-60 years. For three consecutive days a combined acceleration (m/s(2)) and heart rate (beats per minute) monitoring was used in conjunction with a step test to estimate activity energy expenditure (J/min/kg) as measures of psychomotor activity and physical fitness. RESULTS: Overall score on Hamilton-17 items ranged between 0 and 22. Patients had higher sleeping heart rate (p<0.001), lower fitness (p=0.02), lower acceleration (p=0.004), and lower activity energy expenditure (p=0.004) compared to controls. Comparing unipolar and bipolar patients and adjusting for differences in Hamilton-17 revealed lower acceleration (p=0.01) and activity energy expenditure in bipolar patients (p=0.02); the difference was most prominent in the morning. CONCLUSIONS: Electronic monitoring of psychomotor activity may be a promising additional tool in the distinction between unipolar and bipolar affective disorder when patients present in a remitted or depressive state.