Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Depression: HELP
Articles by Steven D. Hollon
Based on 92 articles published since 2008
||||

Between 2008 and 2019, S. D. Hollon wrote the following 92 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4
1 Editorial Reviewing psychological treatments for adult depression. 2013

Hollon, Steven D / Cuijpers, Pim. · ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #23870718.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Review Recent Developments in the Treatment of Depression. 2019

Hollon, Steven D / Cohen, Zachary D / Singla, Daisy R / Andrews, Paul W. ·Vanderbilt University. Electronic address: steven.d.hollon@vanderbilt.edu. · University of Pennsylvania. · University of Toronto, Sinai Health System. · McMaster University. ·Behav Ther · Pubmed #30824244.

ABSTRACT: The cognitive and behavioral interventions can be as efficacious as antidepressant medications and more enduring, but some patients will be more likely to respond to one than the other. Recent work has focused on developing sophisticated selection algorithms using machine-learning approaches that answer the question, "What works best for whom?" Moreover, the vast majority of people suffering from depression reside in low- and middle-income countries where access to either psychotherapy or medications is virtually nonexistent. Great strides have been made in training nonspecialist providers (known as task sharing) to overcome this gap. Finally, recent work growing out of evolutionary psychology suggests that antidepressant medications may suppress symptoms at the expense of prolonging the underlying episode so as to increase the risk of relapse whenever someone tries to stop. We address each of these developments and their cumulative implications.

3 Review The Mortality and Myocardial Effects of Antidepressants Are Moderated by Preexisting Cardiovascular Disease: A Meta-Analysis. 2017

Maslej, Marta M / Bolker, Benjamin M / Russell, Marley J / Eaton, Keifer / Durisko, Zachary / Hollon, Steven D / Swanson, G Marie / Thomson, J Anderson / Mulsant, Benoit H / Andrews, Paul W. ·Department of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. ·Psychother Psychosom · Pubmed #28903117.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Antidepressants (ADs) are commonly prescribed medications, but their long-term health effects are debated. ADs disrupt multiple adaptive processes regulated by evolutionarily ancient biochemicals, potentially increasing mortality. However, many ADs also have anticlotting properties that can be efficacious in treating cardiovascular disease. We conducted a meta-analysis assessing the effects of ADs on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events in general-population and cardiovascular-patient samples. METHODS: Two reviewers independently assessed articles from PubMed, EMBASE, and Google Scholar for AD-related mortality controlling for depression and other comorbidities. From these articles, we extracted information about cardiovascular events, cardiovascular risk status, and AD class. We conducted mixed-effect meta-analyses testing sample type and AD class as moderators of all-cause mortality and new cardiovascular events. RESULTS: Seventeen studies met our search criteria. Sample type consistently moderated health risks. In general-population samples, AD use increased the risks of mortality (HR = 1.33, 95% CI: 1.14-1.55) and new cardiovascular events (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.08-1.21). In cardiovascular patients, AD use did not significantly affect risks. AD class also moderated mortality, but the serotonin reuptake inhibitors were not significantly different from tricyclic ADs (TCAs) (HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 0.93-1.31, p = 0.27). Only "other ADs" were differentiable from TCAs (HR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.08-1.69). Mortality risk estimates increased when we analyzed the subset of studies controlling for premedication depression, suggesting the absence of confounding by indication. CONCLUSIONS: The results support the hypothesis that ADs are harmful in the general population but less harmful in cardiovascular patients.

4 Review Initial severity of depression and efficacy of cognitive-behavioural therapy: individual-participant data meta-analysis of pill-placebo-controlled trials. 2017

Furukawa, Toshi A / Weitz, Erica S / Tanaka, Shiro / Hollon, Steven D / Hofmann, Stefan G / Andersson, Gerhard / Twisk, Jos / DeRubeis, Robert J / Dimidjian, Sona / Hegerl, Ulrich / Mergl, Roland / Jarrett, Robin B / Vittengl, Jeffrey R / Watanabe, Norio / Cuijpers, Pim. ·Toshi A. Furukawa, MD, PhD, Departments of Health Promotion and Human Behavior and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Erica S. Weitz, MA, Department of Clinical Psychology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Shiro Tanaka, PhD, Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Steven D. Hollon, PhD, Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD, Department of Psychological and Brain Science, Boston University, Massachusetts, USA; Gerhard Andersson, PhD, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden and Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stokholm, Sweden; Jos Twisk, PhD, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Robert J. DeRubeis, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Sona Dimidjian, PhD, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, USA; Ulrich Hegerl, MD, PhD, Roland Mergl, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Robin B. Jarrett, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA; Jeffrey R. Vittengl, PhD, Department of Psychology, Truman State University, Kirksville, Missouri, USA; Norio Watanabe, MD, PhD, Departments of Health Promotion and Human Behavior and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Pim Cuijpers, PhD, Department of Clinical Psychology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands furukawa@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp. · Toshi A. Furukawa, MD, PhD, Departments of Health Promotion and Human Behavior and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Erica S. Weitz, MA, Department of Clinical Psychology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Shiro Tanaka, PhD, Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Steven D. Hollon, PhD, Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD, Department of Psychological and Brain Science, Boston University, Massachusetts, USA; Gerhard Andersson, PhD, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden and Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stokholm, Sweden; Jos Twisk, PhD, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Robert J. DeRubeis, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Sona Dimidjian, PhD, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, USA; Ulrich Hegerl, MD, PhD, Roland Mergl, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Robin B. Jarrett, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA; Jeffrey R. Vittengl, PhD, Department of Psychology, Truman State University, Kirksville, Missouri, USA; Norio Watanabe, MD, PhD, Departments of Health Promotion and Human Behavior and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Pim Cuijpers, PhD, Department of Clinical Psychology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Br J Psychiatry · Pubmed #28104735.

ABSTRACT:

5 Review Does Publication Bias Inflate the Apparent Efficacy of Psychological Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of US National Institutes of Health-Funded Trials. 2015

Driessen, Ellen / Hollon, Steven D / Bockting, Claudi L H / Cuijpers, Pim / Turner, Erick H. ·Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America. · Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands; Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Behavioral Health and Neurosciences Division, VA Portland Health Care System, Portland, Oregon, United States of America; Departments of Psychiatry and Pharmacology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #26422604.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The efficacy of antidepressant medication has been shown empirically to be overestimated due to publication bias, but this has only been inferred statistically with regard to psychological treatment for depression. We assessed directly the extent of study publication bias in trials examining the efficacy of psychological treatment for depression. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We identified US National Institutes of Health grants awarded to fund randomized clinical trials comparing psychological treatment to control conditions or other treatments in patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder for the period 1972-2008, and we determined whether those grants led to publications. For studies that were not published, data were requested from investigators and included in the meta-analyses. Thirteen (23.6%) of the 55 funded grants that began trials did not result in publications, and two others never started. Among comparisons to control conditions, adding unpublished studies (Hedges' g = 0.20; CI95% -0.11~0.51; k = 6) to published studies (g = 0.52; 0.37~0.68; k = 20) reduced the psychotherapy effect size point estimate (g = 0.39; 0.08~0.70) by 25%. Moreover, these findings may overestimate the "true" effect of psychological treatment for depression as outcome reporting bias could not be examined quantitatively. CONCLUSION: The efficacy of psychological interventions for depression has been overestimated in the published literature, just as it has been for pharmacotherapy. Both are efficacious but not to the extent that the published literature would suggest. Funding agencies and journals should archive both original protocols and raw data from treatment trials to allow the detection and correction of outcome reporting bias. Clinicians, guidelines developers, and decision makers should be aware that the published literature overestimates the effects of the predominant treatments for depression.

6 Review The effects of cognitive behavior therapy for adult depression on dysfunctional thinking: A meta-analysis. 2015

Cristea, Ioana A / Huibers, Marcus J H / David, Daniel / Hollon, Steven D / Andersson, Gerhard / Cuijpers, Pim. ·Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania; Clinical Psychology Branch, Department of Surgical, Medical, Molecular and Critical Pathology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. Electronic address: ioana.cristea@ubbcluj.ro. · Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, USA. · Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. ·Clin Psychol Rev · Pubmed #26319193.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: It is not clear whether cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) works through changing dysfunctional thinking. Although several primary studies have examined the effects of CBT on dysfunctional thinking, no meta-analysis has yet been conducted. METHOD: We searched for randomized trials comparing CBT for adult depression with control groups or with other therapies and reporting outcomes on dysfunctional thinking. We calculated effect sizes for CBT versus control groups, and separately for CBT versus other psychotherapies and respectively, pharmacotherapy. RESULTS: 26 studies totalizing 2002 patients met inclusion criteria. The quality of the studies was less than optimal. We found a moderate effect of CBT compared to control groups on dysfunctional thinking at post-test (g=0.50; 95% CI: 0.38-0.62), with no differences between the measures used. This result was maintained at follow-up (g=0.46; 95% CI: 0.15-0.78). There was a strong association between the effects on dysfunctional thinking and those on depression. We found no significant differences between CBT and other psychotherapies (g=0.17; p=0.31), except when restrict in outcomes to the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale (g=0.29). There also was no difference between CBT and pharmacotherapy (g=0.04), though this result was based on only 4 studies. DISCUSSION: While CBT had a robust and stable effect on dysfunctional thoughts, this was not significantly different from what other psychotherapies or pharmacotherapy achieved. This result can be interpreted as confirming the primacy of cognitive change in symptom change, irrespective of how it is attained, as well as supporting the idea that dysfunctional thoughts are simply another symptom that changes subsequent to treatment.

7 Review A lifetime approach to major depressive disorder: The contributions of psychological interventions in preventing relapse and recurrence. 2015

Bockting, Claudi L / Hollon, Steven D / Jarrett, Robin B / Kuyken, Willem / Dobson, Keith. ·Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands; Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: c.l.h.bockting@uu.nl. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD, UK. · Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ·Clin Psychol Rev · Pubmed #25754289.

ABSTRACT: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is highly disabling and typically runs a recurrent course. Knowledge about prevention of relapse and recurrence is crucial to the long-term welfare of people who suffer from this disorder. This article provides an overview of the current evidence for the prevention of relapse and recurrence using psychological interventions. We first describe a conceptual framework to preventive interventions based on: acute treatment; continuation treatment, or; prevention strategies for patients in remission. In brief, cognitive-behavioral interventions, delivered during the acute phase, appear to have an enduring effect that protects patients against relapse and perhaps others from recurrence following treatment termination. Similarly, continuation treatment with either cognitive therapy or perhaps interpersonal psychotherapy appears to reduce risk for relapse and maintenance treatment appears to reduce risk for recurrence. Preventive relapse strategies like preventive cognitive therapy or mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) applied to patients in remission protects against subsequent relapse and perhaps recurrence. There is some preliminary evidence of specific mediation via changing the content or the process of cognition. Continuation CT and preventive interventions started after remission (CBT, MBCT) seem to have the largest differential effects for individuals that need them the most. Those who have the greatest risk for relapse and recurrence including patients with unstable remission, more previous episodes, potentially childhood trauma, early age of onset. These prescriptive indications, if confirmed in future research, may point the way to personalizing prevention strategies. Doing so, may maximize the efficiency with which they are applied and have the potential to target the mechanisms that appear to underlie these effects. This may help make this prevention strategies more efficacious.

8 Review Effectiveness of psychological interventions in preventing recurrence of depressive disorder: meta-analysis and meta-regression. 2015

Biesheuvel-Leliefeld, Karolien E M / Kok, Gemma D / Bockting, Claudi L H / Cuijpers, Pim / Hollon, Steven D / van Marwijk, Harm W J / Smit, Filip. ·Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: k.leliefeld@vumc.nl. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Psychology, Groningen University, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University and VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University and VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Leuphana University, Lüneburg, Germany. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Psychology, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University and VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Public Mental Health, Trimbos Institute (Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction), Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #25553400.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Major depression is probably best seen as a chronically recurrent disorder, with patients experiencing another depressive episode after remission. Therefore, attention to reduce the risk of relapse or recurrence after remission is warranted. The aim of this review is to meta-analytically examine the effectiveness of psychological interventions to reduce relapse or recurrence rates of depressive disorder. METHODS: We systematically reviewed the pertinent trial literature until May 2014. The random-effects model was used to compute the pooled relative risk of relapse or recurrence (RR). A distinction was made between two comparator conditions: (1) treatment-as-usual and (2) the use of antidepressants. Other sources of heterogeneity in the data were explored using meta-regression. RESULTS: Twenty-five randomised trials met inclusion criteria. Preventive psychological interventions were significantly better than treatment-as-usual in reducing the risk of relapse or recurrence (RR=0.64, 95% CI=0.53-0.76, z=4.89, p<0.001, NNT=5) and also more successful than antidepressants (RR=0.83, 95% CI=0.70-0.97, z=2.40, p=0.017, NNT=13). Meta-regression showed homogeneity in effect size across a range of study, population and intervention characteristics, but the preventive effect of psychological intervention was usually better when the prevention was preceded by treatment in the acute phase (b=-1.94, SEb=0.68, z=-2.84, p=0.005). LIMITATIONS: Differences between the primary studies in methodological design, composition of the patient groups and type of intervention may have caused heterogeneity in the data, but could not be evaluated in a meta-regression owing to poor reporting. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that there is supporting evidence that preventive psychological interventions reduce the risk of relapse or recurrence in major depression.

9 Review [The efficacy of psychological treatments for depression: a review of recent research findings]. 2014

Driessen, E / Cuijpers, P / Hollon, S D / Van, H L / Dekker, J J M. · ·Tijdschr Psychiatr · Pubmed #25070570.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psychological treatments for depression have been shown to be effective, but there is room for improvement. AIM: To summarise new research findings concerning the efficacy of psychological treatments for depression, as reported in a recent dissertation. METHOD: Four systematic reviews and meta-analyses and one randomised clinical trial are described. RESULTS: As has been shown in the case of patients treated with antidepressants, the efficacy of psychological treatments for depression when compared to strict control conditions, might be greater in patients with more severe depressive symptoms than in patients with milder symptoms. The efficacy of psychological treatments for depression when compared to control conditions is overestimated as a result of systematic publication of positive findings, as has been reported with regard to antidepressant medication too. There is increasing academic support for the efficacy of brief psychodynamic therapy for depression and there are no differences in the efficacy of short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy and cognitive behavioural therapy for depression. Certain patient characteristics were found to be related to the differential efficacy of these two types of psychological treatments, but further validation is needed. A large number of patients with depression who seek help from second-line psychiatric clinics in the Netherlands fail to achieve remission following psychological treatment, irrespective of whether that treatment is combined with antidepressants. CONCLUSION: Improved efficacy of psychological treatments for depression is urgently needed and can be facilitated by means of high quality research.

10 Review The effects of psychotherapies for major depression in adults on remission, recovery and improvement: a meta-analysis. 2014

Cuijpers, Pim / Karyotaki, Eirini / Weitz, Erica / Andersson, Gerhard / Hollon, Steven D / van Straten, Annemieke. ·Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Leuphana University, Lüneburg, Germany. Electronic address: p.cuijpers@vu.nl. · Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #24679399.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Standardised effect sizes have been criticized because they are difficult to interpret and offer little clinical information. This meta-analyses examine the extent of actual improvement, the absolute numbers of patients no longer meeting criteria for major depression, and absolute rates of response and remission. METHODS: We conducted a meta-analysis of 92 studies with 181 conditions (134 psychotherapy and 47 control conditions) with 6937 patients meeting criteria for major depressive disorder. Within these conditions, we calculated the absolute number of patients no longer meeting criteria for major depression, rates of response and remission, and the absolute reduction on the BDI, BDI-II, and HAM-D. RESULTS: After treatment, 62% of patients no longer met criteria for MDD in the psychotherapy conditions. However, 43% of participants in the control conditions and 48% of people in the care-as-usual conditions no longer met criteria for MDD, suggesting that the additional value of psychotherapy compared to care-as-usual would be 14%. For response and remission, comparable results were found, with less than half of the patients meeting criteria for response and remission after psychotherapy. Additionally, a considerable proportion of response and remission was also found in control conditions. In the psychotherapy conditions, scores on the BDI were reduced by 13.42 points, 15.12 points on the BDI-II, and 10.28 points on the HAM-D. In the control conditions, these reductions were 4.56, 4.68, and 5.29. DISCUSSION: Psychotherapy contributes to improvement in depressed patients, but improvement in control conditions is also considerable.

11 Review The methods and outcomes of cultural adaptations of psychological treatments for depressive disorders: a systematic review. 2014

Chowdhary, N / Jotheeswaran, A T / Nadkarni, A / Hollon, S D / King, M / Jordans, M J D / Rahman, A / Verdeli, H / Araya, R / Patel, V. ·Centre for Global Mental Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK, and Sangath, India. · Institute of Psychiatry, King's College, London, UK, Public Health Foundation of India, and Sangath, India. · London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK. · Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Faculty of Brain Sciences, University College London Medical School, UK. · University of Liverpool, UK. · Teachers College, Columbia University and Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, NY, USA. · University of Bristol, UK. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #23866176.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cultural adaptations of evidence-based psychological treatments (PTs) are important to enhance their universal applicability. The aim of this study was to review systematically the literature on adaptations of PTs for depressive disorders for ethnic minorities in Western countries and for any population in non-Western countries to describe the process, extent and nature of the adaptations and the effectiveness of the adapted treatments. METHOD: Controlled trials were identified using database searches, key informants, previous reviews and reference lists. Data on the process and details of the adaptations were analyzed using qualitative methods and meta-analysis was used to assess treatment effectiveness. RESULTS: Twenty studies were included in this review, of which 16 were included in the meta-analysis. The process of adaptation was reported in two-thirds of the studies. Most adaptations were found in the dimensions of language, context and therapist delivering the treatment. The meta-analysis revealed a statistically significant benefit in favor of the adapted treatment [standardized mean difference (SMD) -0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.94 to -0.49]. CONCLUSIONS: Cultural adaptations of PTs follow a systematic procedure and lead primarily to adaptations in the implementation of the treatments rather than their content. Such PTs are effective in the treatment of depressive disorders in populations other than those for whom they were originally developed.

12 Review Double trouble: does co-morbid chronic somatic illness increase risk for recurrence in depression? A systematic review. 2013

Kok, Gemma D / Bockting, Claudi L H / Burger, Huibert / Hannig, Wiebke / Pijnenborg, Gerdina H M / Cuijpers, Pim / Hollon, Steven D. ·Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #23472087.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review, and if possible a meta-analysis, to establish whether depressed patients with co-morbid chronic somatic illnesses are a high risk "double trouble" group for depressive recurrence. METHOD: The databases PubMed, EMbase and PsycINFO were systematically searched until the 4(th) of December 2012 by using MeSH and free text terms. Additionally, reference lists of retrieved publications and treatment guidelines were reviewed, and experts were consulted. Inclusion criteria were: depression had to be measured at least twice during the study with qualified instruments and the chronic somatic illness had to be assessed by self-report or by a medical professional. Information on depressive recurrence was extracted and additionally risk ratios of recurrence were calculated. RESULTS: The search generated four articles that fulfilled our inclusion criteria. These studies showed no differences in recurrence over one- two- three- and 6.5 years of follow-up for a total of 2010 depressed patients of which 694 patients with a co-morbid chronic somatic illness versus 1316 patients without (Study 1: RR = 0.49, 95% CI, 0.17-1.41 at one year follow-up and RR = 1.37, 95% CI, 0.78-2.41 at two year follow-up; Study 2: RR = 0.94, 95% CI, 0.65-1.36 at two year follow-up; Study 3: RR = 1.15, 95% CI, 0.40-3.27 at one year follow-up; RR = 1.07, 95% CI, 0.48-2.42 at two year follow-up and RR = 0.99, 95% CI,0.55-1.77 at 6.5 years follow-up; Study 4: RR = 1.16, 95% CI, 0.86-1.57 at three year follow-up). CONCLUSION: We found no association between a heightened risk for depressive recurrence and co-morbid chronic somatic illnesses. There is a need for more longitudinal studies to justify the current specific treatment advice such as long-term pharmacological maintenance treatment for this presumed "double trouble" group.

13 Review Cognitive and behavior therapy in the treatment and prevention of depression. 2011

Hollon, Steven D. ·Vanderbilt University, Tennessee. steven.d.hollon@Vanderbilt.Edu ·Depress Anxiety · Pubmed #21456036.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Review Efficacy of cognitive-behavioural therapy and other psychological treatments for adult depression: meta-analytic study of publication bias. 2010

Cuijpers, Pim / Smit, Filip / Bohlmeijer, Ernst / Hollon, Steven D / Andersson, Gerhard. ·Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 1, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. p.cuijpers@psy.vu.nl ·Br J Psychiatry · Pubmed #20194536.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: It is not clear whether the effects of cognitive-behavioural therapy and other psychotherapies have been overestimated because of publication bias. AIMS: To examine indicators of publication bias in randomised controlled trials of psychotherapy for adult depression. METHOD: We examined effect sizes of 117 trials with 175 comparisons between psychotherapy and control conditions. As indicators of publication bias we examined funnel plots, calculated adjusted effect sizes after publication had been taken into account using Duval & Tweedie's procedure, and tested the symmetry of the funnel plots using the Begg & Mazumdar rank correlation test and Egger's test. RESULTS: The mean effect size was 0.67, which was reduced after adjustment for publication bias to 0.42 (51 imputed studies). Both Begg & Mazumbar's test and Egger's test were highly significant (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The effects of psychotherapy for adult depression seem to be overestimated considerably because of publication bias.

15 Review Antidepressant drug effects and depression severity: a patient-level meta-analysis. 2010

Fournier, Jay C / DeRubeis, Robert J / Hollon, Steven D / Dimidjian, Sona / Amsterdam, Jay D / Shelton, Richard C / Fawcett, Jan. ·Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 3720 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. jcf@sas.upenn.edu ·JAMA · Pubmed #20051569.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Antidepressant medications represent the best established treatment for major depressive disorder, but there is little evidence that they have a specific pharmacological effect relative to pill placebo for patients with less severe depression. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the relative benefit of medication vs placebo across a wide range of initial symptom severity in patients diagnosed with depression. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched from January 1980 through March 2009, along with references from meta-analyses and reviews. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized placebo-controlled trials of antidepressants approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the treatment of major or minor depressive disorder were selected. Studies were included if their authors provided the requisite original data, they comprised adult outpatients, they included a medication vs placebo comparison for at least 6 weeks, they did not exclude patients on the basis of a placebo washout period, and they used the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Data from 6 studies (718 patients) were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Individual patient-level data were obtained from study authors. RESULTS: Medication vs placebo differences varied substantially as a function of baseline severity. Among patients with HDRS scores below 23, Cohen d effect sizes for the difference between medication and placebo were estimated to be less than 0.20 (a standard definition of a small effect). Estimates of the magnitude of the superiority of medication over placebo increased with increases in baseline depression severity and crossed the threshold defined by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence for a clinically significant difference at a baseline HDRS score of 25. CONCLUSIONS: The magnitude of benefit of antidepressant medication compared with placebo increases with severity of depression symptoms and may be minimal or nonexistent, on average, in patients with mild or moderate symptoms. For patients with very severe depression, the benefit of medications over placebo is substantial.

16 Review Mediating the effects of cognitive therapy for depression. 2009

Hollon, Steven D / DeRubeis, Robert J. ·Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37240, USA. steven.d.hollon@vanderbilt.edu ·Cogn Behav Ther · Pubmed #19675962.

ABSTRACT: Cognitive theory holds that inaccurate beliefs and maladaptive information processing play a role in the cause and maintenance of depression, and a cognitive theory of change posits that correcting those errors in thinking will ameliorate existing distress and reduce subsequent risk. Cognitive therapy has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of depression and prevention of subsequent relapse, but evidence for mediation has been difficult to detect. The authors review efforts to test for mediation in cognitive therapy and describe the epistemological issues that complicate the process. Cognitive mediation of acute response likely will be hard to detect, whereas there already is good evidence that cognitive processes play a role in the mediation of enduring effects.

17 Review Cognitive therapy versus medication for depression: treatment outcomes and neural mechanisms. 2008

DeRubeis, Robert J / Siegle, Greg J / Hollon, Steven D. ·University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. derubeis@psych.upenn.edu ·Nat Rev Neurosci · Pubmed #18784657.

ABSTRACT: Depression is one of the most prevalent and debilitating of the psychiatric disorders. Studies have shown that cognitive therapy is as efficacious as antidepressant medication at treating depression, and it seems to reduce the risk of relapse even after its discontinuation. Cognitive therapy and antidepressant medication probably engage some similar neural mechanisms, as well as mechanisms that are distinctive to each. A precise specification of these mechanisms might one day be used to guide treatment selection and improve outcomes.

18 Clinical Trial Sudden gains in routine care cognitive behavioral therapy for depression: A replication with extensions. 2017

Wucherpfennig, Felix / Rubel, Julian A / Hollon, Steven D / Lutz, Wolfgang. ·Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, University of Trier, D-54296 Trier, Germany. Electronic address: wucherpfennig@uni-trier.de. · Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, University of Trier, D-54296 Trier, Germany. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, TN 37240 Nashville, United States. ·Behav Res Ther · Pubmed #27846418.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Over the last decade, a substantial amount of findings have been reported on the association between sudden gains (large symptom improvements in a between-session interval) and treatment outcome. Accurate replications of previous findings are needed to tackle inconsistencies and to shed light on the clinical implications of sudden gains. This study investigates whether similar effects of sudden gains can be expected under routine care conditions, when the patients are comparable to those examined in the original study by Tang and DeRubeis (1999). METHOD: Using propensity score matching (PSM), 462 patients treated with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) under routine conditions were matched stepwise to patients of the original study on sudden gains, a randomized controlled CBT trial (RCT). RESULTS: After the application of PSM, the effects of sudden gains on treatment outcome were similar to those found by Tang and DeRubeis (1999). The closer the match between the RCT and the naturalistic sample, the more similar the association between sudden gains and treatment outcome. CONCLUSION: Sudden gains seem to have a significant impact on recovery rates, even in treatments under routine care. Results suggest that one important aspect of replication success is to control for confounding baseline covariates.

19 Clinical Trial The clinical effectiveness of evidence-based interventions for depression: a pragmatic trial in routine practice. 2013

Peeters, Frenk / Huibers, Marcus / Roelofs, Jeffrey / van Breukelen, Gerard / Hollon, Steven D / Markowitz, John C / van Os, Jim / Arntz, Arnoud. ·Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. f.peeters@maastrichtuniversity.nl ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #22985486.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Controversy persists about how effectively empirically-supported treatments for major depression work in actual clinical practice as well as how patients choose among them. We examined the acute phase effectiveness of cognitive therapy (CT), interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), and combined psychotherapy-pharmacotherapy (PHT) in a naturalistic setting, allowing patients their choice of treatment. METHODS: The study compared CT (n=63), IPT (n=56), CT-PHT (n=34), and IPT-PHT (n=21) for 174 subjects with major depression in a secondary care mood disorders clinic. Patient preference, rather than randomization, determined treatment selection. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI) was the primary outcome variable. Exclusion criteria were minimal. RESULTS: All treatments were associated with a reduction in depressive symptoms, with a 35% remission rate by week 26. Overall improvement was well within ranges reported in efficacy trials. On average, treatment effects of the different interventions straddled the same range, but moderation analyses revealed that BDI scores dropped faster in the first 16 weeks in patients who received CT alone than patients who received CT and pharmacotherapy, a pattern not found in patients who received IPT (with or without pharmacotherapy). LIMITATIONS: Limitations consist of a modest sample size, choice of treatment was made by participants which may have been influenced by many sources, and the absence of a non-active control group. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the effectiveness of empirically-supported antidepressant treatments selected by patients in routine settings, and provides an indication that speed of therapeutic response may vary amongst treatments.

20 Clinical Trial Is prior course of illness relevant to acute or longer-term outcomes in depressed out-patients? A STAR*D report. 2012

Rush, A J / Wisniewski, S R / Zisook, S / Fava, M / Sung, S C / Haley, C L / Chan, H N / Gilmer, W S / Warden, D / Nierenberg, A A / Balasubramani, G K / Gaynes, B N / Trivedi, M H / Hollon, S D. ·Office of Clinical Sciences, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, Singapore. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #22008447.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is commonly chronic and/or recurrent. We aimed to determine whether a chronic and/or recurrent course of MDD is associated with acute and longer-term MDD treatment outcomes. METHOD: This cohort study recruited out-patients aged 18-75 years with non-psychotic MDD from 18 primary and 23 psychiatric care clinics across the USA. Participants were grouped as: chronic (index episode >2 years) and recurrent (n = 398); chronic non-recurrent (n=257); non-chronic recurrent (n=1614); and non-chronic non-recurrent (n = 387). Acute treatment was up to 14 weeks of citalopram (≤ 60 mg/day) with up to 12 months of follow-up treatment. The primary outcomes for this report were remission [16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology - Self-Rated (QIDS-SR(16)) ≤ 5] or response (≥ 50% reduction from baseline in QIDS-SR(16)) and time to first relapse [first QIDS-SR16 by Interactive Voice Response (IVR) ≥ 11]. RESULTS: Most participants (85%) had a chronic and/or recurrent course; 15% had both. Chronic index episode was associated with greater sociodemographic disadvantage. Recurrent course was associated with earlier age of onset and greater family histories of depression and substance abuse. Remission rates were lowest and slowest for those with chronic index episodes. For participants in remission entering follow-up, relapse was most likely for the chronic and recurrent group, and least likely for the non-chronic, non-recurrent group. For participants not in remission when entering follow-up, prior course was unrelated to relapse. CONCLUSIONS: Recurrent MDD is the norm for out-patients, of whom 15% also have a chronic index episode. Chronic and recurrent course of MDD may be useful in predicting acute and long-term MDD treatment outcomes.

21 Article Component studies of psychological treatments of adult depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2019

Cuijpers, Pim / Cristea, Ioana A / Karyotaki, Eirini / Reijnders, Mirjam / Hollon, Steven D. ·a Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology , VU University Amsterdam , Amsterdam , Netherlands. · b Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute , Amsterdam , Netherlands. · c Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy , Babes-Bolyai University , Cluj-Napoca , Romania. · d Department of Psychology , Vanderbilt University , Nashville , TN , USA. ·Psychother Res · Pubmed #29115185.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: A recent report from the US Institute of Medicine indicated that identifying core elements of psychosocial interventions is a key step in successfully bringing evidence-based psychosocial interventions into clinical practice. Component studies have the best design to examine these core elements. Earlier reviews resulted in heterogeneous sets of studies and probably missed many studies. METHODS: We conducted a comprehensive search of component studies on psychotherapies for adult depression and included 16 studies with 22 comparisons. RESULTS: Fifteen components were examined of which four were examined in more than one comparison. The pooled difference between the full treatments and treatments with one component removed was g = 0.21 (95% CI: 0.03∼0.39). One study had sufficient statistical power to detect a small effect size and found that adding emotion regulation skills increased the effects of CBT. None of the other studies had enough power to detect an effect size smaller than g = 0.55. Only one study had low risk of bias. CONCLUSIONS: The currently available component studies do not have the statistical power nor the quality to draw any meaningful conclusion about key ingredients of psychotherapies for adult depression.

22 Article Risk factors for relapse and recurrence of depression in adults and how they operate: A four-phase systematic review and meta-synthesis. 2018

Buckman, J E J / Underwood, A / Clarke, K / Saunders, R / Hollon, S D / Fearon, P / Pilling, S. ·Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK. Electronic address: joshua.buckman@ucl.ac.uk. · Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. ·Clin Psychol Rev · Pubmed #30075313.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To review and synthesise prognostic indices that predict subsequent risk, prescriptive indices that moderate treatment response, and mechanisms that underlie each with respect to relapse and recurrence of depression in adults. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Childhood maltreatment, post-treatment residual symptoms, and a history of recurrence emerged as strong prognostic indicators of risk and each could be used prescriptively to indicate who benefits most from continued or prophylactic treatment. Targeting prognostic indices or their "down-stream" consequences will be particularly beneficial because each is either a cause or a consequence of the causal mechanisms underlying risk of recurrence. The cognitive and neural mechanisms that underlie the prognostic indices are likely addressed by the effects of treatments that are moderated by the prescriptive factors. For example, psychosocial interventions that target the consequences of childhood maltreatment, extending pharmacotherapy or adapting psychological therapies to deal with residual symptoms, or using cognitive or mindfulness-based therapies for those with prior histories of recurrence. Future research that focuses on understanding causal pathways that link childhood maltreatment, or cognitive diatheses, to dysfunction in the neocortical and limbic pathways that process affective information and facilitate cognitive control, might result in more enduring effects of treatments for depression.

23 Article Cross-sectional networks of depressive symptoms before and after antidepressant medication treatment. 2018

Bos, Fionneke M / Fried, Eiko I / Hollon, Steven D / Bringmann, Laura F / Dimidjian, Sona / DeRubeis, Robert J / Bockting, Claudi L H. ·Department of Psychiatry, Rob Giel Research Center, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, PO Box 30.001, 9700 RB, Groningen, The Netherlands. f.m.bos01@umcg.nl. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. f.m.bos01@umcg.nl. · Department Quantitative Psychology and Individual Differences, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol · Pubmed #29627898.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Recent reviews have questioned the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) above placebo response, and their working mechanisms remain unclear. New approaches to understanding the effects of SSRIs are necessary to enhance their efficacy. The aim of this study was to explore the possibilities of using cross-sectional network analysis to increase our understanding of symptom connectivity before and after SSRI treatment. METHODS: In two randomized controlled trials (total N = 178), we estimated Gaussian graphical models among 20 symptoms of the Beck Depression Inventory-II before and after 8 weeks of treatment with the SSRI paroxetine. Networks were compared on connectivity, community structure, predictability (proportion explained variance), and strength centrality (i.e., connectedness to other symptoms in the network). RESULTS: Symptom severity for all individual BDI-II symptoms significantly decreased over 8 weeks of SSRI treatment, whereas interconnectivity and predictability of the symptoms significantly increased. At baseline, three communities were detected; five communities were detected at week 8. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest the effects of SSRIs can be studied using the network approach. The increased connectivity, predictability, and communities at week 8 may be explained by the decrease in depressive symptoms rather than specific effects of SSRIs. Future studies with larger samples and placebo controls are needed to offer insight into the effects of SSRIs. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trials described in this manuscript were funded by the NIMH. Pennsylvania/Vanderbilt study: 5 R10 MH55877 ( https://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=6186633&icde=28344168&ddparam=&ddvalue=&ddsub=&cr=1&csb=default&cs=ASC&MMOpt= ). Washington study: R01 MH55502 ( https://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=2034618&icde=28344217&ddparam=&ddvalue=&ddsub=&cr=5&csb=default&cs=ASC ).

24 Article Which patients benefit specifically from short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) for depression? Study protocol of a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data. 2018

Driessen, Ellen / Abbass, Allan A / Barber, Jacques P / Connolly Gibbons, Mary Beth / Dekker, Jack J M / Fokkema, Marjolein / Fonagy, Peter / Hollon, Steven D / Jansma, Elise P / de Maat, Saskia C M / Town, Joel M / Twisk, Jos W R / Van, Henricus L / Weitz, Erica / Cuijpers, Pim. ·Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health research institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Centre for Emotions & Health, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Gordon F. Derner School of Psychology, Adelphi University, Garden City, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Research, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Methodology and Statistics, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands. · Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · University Library, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Dutch Psychoanalytic Institute, Arkin Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #29463590.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) is an empirically supported treatment that is often used to treat depression. However, it is largely unclear if certain subgroups of depressed patients can benefit specifically from this treatment method. We describe the protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data (IPD) aimed at identifying predictors and moderators of STPP for depression efficacy. METHOD AND ANALYSIS: We will conduct a systematic literature search in multiple bibliographic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase.com, Web of Science and Cochrane's Central Register of Controlled Trials), 'grey literature' databases (GLIN and UMI ProQuest) and a prospective trial register (http://www.controlled-trials.com). We will include studies reporting (a) outcomes on standardised measures of (b) depressed (c) adult patients (d) receiving STPP. We will next invite the authors of these studies to share the participant-level data of their trials and combine these data to conduct IPD meta-analyses. The primary outcome for this study is post-treatment efficacy as assessed by a continuous depression measure. Potential predictors and moderators include all sociodemographic variables, clinical variables and psychological patient characteristics that are measured before the start of treatment and are assessed consistently across studies. One-stage IPD meta-analyses will be conducted using mixed-effects models. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Institutional review board approval is not required for this study. We intend to submit reports of the outcomes of this study for publication to international peer-reviewed journals in the fields of psychiatry or clinical psychology. We also intend to present the outcomes at international scientific conferences aimed at psychotherapy researchers and clinicians. The findings of this study can have important clinical implications, as they can inform expectations of STPP efficacy for individual patients, and help to make an informed choice concerning the best treatment option for a given patient. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42017056029.

25 Article Prevention of Depression in At-Risk Adolescents: Moderators of Long-term Response. 2018

Garber, J / Weersing, V R / Hollon, S D / Porta, G / Clarke, G N / Dickerson, J F / Beardslee, W R / Lynch, F L / Gladstone, T G / Shamseddeen, W / Brent, D A. ·Department of Psychology and Human Development, Vanderbilt University, 552 Peabody, 230 Appleton Pl, Nashville, TN, USA. judy.garber@vanderbilt.edu. · Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychiatry, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA. · University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. · Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Center for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Portland, OR, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA, USA. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. ·Prev Sci · Pubmed #26830893.

ABSTRACT: In a randomized controlled trial, we found that a cognitive behavioral program (CBP) was significantly more effective than usual care (UC) in preventing the onset of depressive episodes, although not everyone benefitted from the CBP intervention. The present paper explored this heterogeneity of response. Participants were 316 adolescents (M

Next