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Depression: HELP
Articles by Nathalie Jetté
Based on 39 articles published since 2010
(Why 39 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, N. Jetté wrote the following 39 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Review Depression screening tools in persons with epilepsy: A systematic review of validated tools. 2017

Gill, Stephanie J / Lukmanji, Sara / Fiest, Kirsten M / Patten, Scott B / Wiebe, Samuel / Jetté, Nathalie. ·Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ·Epilepsia · Pubmed #28064446.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Depression affects approximately 25% of epilepsy patients. However, the optimal tool to screen for depression in epilepsy has not been definitively established. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature on the validity of depression-screening tools in epilepsy. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched until April 4, 2016 with no restriction on dates. Abstract, full-text review and data abstraction were conducted in duplicate. We included studies that evaluated the validity of depression-screening tools and reported measures of diagnostic accuracy (e.g., sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values) in epilepsy. Study quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies Version 2. Medians and ranges for estimates of diagnostic accuracy were calculated when appropriate. RESULTS: A total of 16,070 abstracts were screened, and 38 articles met eligibility criteria. Sixteen screening tools were validated in 13 languages. The most commonly validated screening tool was the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) (n = 26). The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) (n = 19) was the most common reference standard used. At the most common cutpoint of >15 (n = 12 studies), the NDDI-E had a median sensitivity of 80.5% (range 64.0-100.0) and specificity of 86.2 (range 81.0-95.6). Meta-analyses were not possible due to variability in cutpoints assessed, reference standards used, and lack of confidence intervals reported. SIGNIFICANCE: A number of studies validated depression screening tools; however, estimates of diagnostic accuracy were inconsistently reported. The validity of scales in practice may have been overestimated, as cutpoints were often selected post hoc based on the study sample. The NDDI-E, which performed well, was the most commonly validated screening tool, is free to the public, and is validated in multiple languages and is easy to administer, although selection of the best tool may vary depending on the setting and available resources.

2 Review Guidelines for dementia or Parkinson's disease with depression or anxiety: a systematic review. 2016

Goodarzi, Zahra / Mele, Bria / Guo, Selynne / Hanson, Heather / Jette, Nathalie / Patten, Scott / Pringsheim, Tamara / Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna. ·Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. zahra.goodarzi@albertahealthservices.ca. · Department of Medicine, University of Calgary and Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Canada. zahra.goodarzi@albertahealthservices.ca. · , #1104-South Tower. Foothills Medical Centre 3301 Hospital Drive, Calgary, NW, T2N 2T9, Canada. zahra.goodarzi@albertahealthservices.ca. · Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Faculty of Medicine, Undergraduate Medical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Seniors Health Strategic Clinical Network, Alberta Health Services, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Hotchkiss Brain Institute, and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary and Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary and Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Canada. · Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, University of Calgary and Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Calgary and Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Canada. ·BMC Neurol · Pubmed #27887589.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depression and anxiety remain under-diagnosed and under-treated in those with neurologic diseases such as dementia or Parkinson's Disease (PD). Our objectives were to first, to provide a synthesis of high quality guidelines available for the identification and management of depression or anxiety in those with dementia or PD. Second, to identify areas for improvement for future guidelines. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and EMBASE (2009 to July 24, 2015), grey literature (83 sources; July 24-Sept 6, 2015), and bibliographies of included studies. Included studies were evaluated for quality by four independent reviewers the AGREE II tool. Guideline characteristics, statements and recommendations relevant to depression or anxiety for dementia and PD were then extracted. (PROSPERO CRD: 42016014584) RESULTS: 8121 citations were reviewed with 31 full text articles included for assessment with the AGREE II tool. 17 were of sufficient quality for inclusion. Mean overall quality scores were between 4.25 to 6.5. Domain scores were lowest in the areas of stakeholder involvement, applicability, and editorial independence. Recommendations for the screening and diagnosis of depression were found for PD and dementia. There was little evidence to guide diagnosis or management of anxiety. Non-pharmacologic therapies were recommended for dementia patients. Most advocated pharmacologic treatment for depression, for both PD and dementia, but did not specify an agent due to lack of evidence. CONCLUSIONS: The available recent high quality guidelines outline several recommendations for the management of comorbid depression or anxiety in PD or dementia. However there remain significant gaps in the evidence.

3 Review Detecting depression in Parkinson disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2016

Goodarzi, Zahra / Mrklas, Kelly J / Roberts, Derek J / Jette, Nathalie / Pringsheim, Tamara / Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna. ·From the Departments of Community Health Sciences (Z.G., K.J.M., D.J.R., N.J., T.P., J.H.-L.) and Clinical Neurosciences (N.J., T.P.), University of Calgary · Research Priorities and Implementation (K.J.M.), Alberta Health Services, Edmonton · Departments of Critical Care Medicine (D.J.R.) and Surgery (D.J.R.), Hotchkiss Brain Institute and O'Brien Institute for Public Health (N.J., T.P., J.H.-L.), and Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics (T.P.) and Medicine (Z.G., J.H.-L.), University of Calgary and Alberta Health Services, Canada. ·Neurology · Pubmed #27358339.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Failure to detect depression in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) can lead to worsened outcomes for patients and caregivers. Accurate identification of depression would enable practitioners to provide comprehensive care for their patients with PD. METHODS: Our objective was to examine the diagnostic accuracy of tools for detecting depression in adult outpatients with PD. We searched MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and EMBASE (inception to December 1, 2015), gray literature, and bibliographies of included studies. The pooled prevalence of depression across studies and diagnostic accuracy estimates were calculated using random-effects models. Diagnostic accuracy estimates were calculated across the best-reported cutoffs from each study and across specific cutoffs, when feasible. RESULTS: Out of 8,184 citations, 21 studies were included, evaluating 24 tools, with 4 amenable to meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of major depression was 22.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 18.1-27.7). The 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) had a pooled sensitivity of 0.81 (95% CI 0.64-0.91) and specificity of 0.91 (95% CI 0.87-0.94). The most sensitive cutoff for the GDS-15 was 5 at 0.91 (95% CI 0.83-1.00). The Beck Depression Inventory I/Ia had a pooled sensitivity of 0.79 (95% CI 0.61-0.90) and specificity of 0.85 (95% CI 0.79-0.90). The Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale yielded a pooled sensitivity of 0.77 (95% CI 0.69-0.83) and specificity of 0.92 (95% CI 0.79-0.97). The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale had a pooled sensitivity of 0.72 (95% CI 0.64-0.79) and specificity of 0.80 (95% CI 0.70-0.87). All estimates had heterogeneity. CONCLUSIONS: There are several valid tools for detecting depression in patients with PD. Practitioners should choose one that fits their clinical practice.

4 Review Screening for Depression and Anxiety in Epilepsy. 2016

Fiest, Kirsten M / Patten, Scott B / Jetté, Nathalie. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Health Sciences Centre, College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook Street, MS740B, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Foothills Medical Centre, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3rd Floor TRW Building, 3280 Hospital Drive Northwest, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4Z6, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education, Foothills Medical Centre, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3rd Floor TRW Building, 3280 Hospital Drive Northwest, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4Z6, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Foothills Medical Centre, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 1403 29 Street Northwest, Calgary, Alberta T2N 2T9, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences, O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Foothills Medical Centre, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 1403 29 Street Northwest, Calgary, Alberta T2N 2T9, Canada. Electronic address: nathalie.jette@albertahealthservices.ca. ·Neurol Clin · Pubmed #27086983.

ABSTRACT: Depression and anxiety are common comorbidities of epilepsy and have far-reaching effects on patients, family, and the health care system. Although the burden of these conditions is high, a majority of cases are undetected and untreated. Screening tools can be a fast way to establish the presence of clinically relevant symptoms of depression and anxiety in epilepsy. Depression tools have been extensively studied in epilepsy, although no scale has been definitively established for use in this population. Anxiety has been understudied in epilepsy; few scales exist to measure anxiety and these scales have not been well validated.

5 Review Systematic review and assessment of validated case definitions for depression in administrative data. 2014

Fiest, Kirsten M / Jette, Nathalie / Quan, Hude / St Germaine-Smith, Christine / Metcalfe, Amy / Patten, Scott B / Beck, Cynthia A. ·Department of Community Health Sciences & Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary T2N4Z6, Alberta, Canada. kmfiest@ucalgary.ca. ·BMC Psychiatry · Pubmed #25322690.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Administrative data are increasingly used to conduct research on depression and inform health services and health policy. Depression surveillance using administrative data is an alternative to surveys, which can be more resource-intensive. The objectives of this study were to: (1) systematically review the literature on validated case definitions to identify depression using International Classification of Disease and Related Health Problems (ICD) codes in administrative data and (2) identify individuals with and without depression in administrative data and develop an enhanced case definition to identify persons with depression in ICD-coded hospital data. METHODS: (1) Systematic review: We identified validation studies using ICD codes to indicate depression in administrative data up to January 2013. (2) VALIDATION: All depression case definitions from the literature and an additional three ICD-9-CM and three ICD-10 enhanced definitions were tested in an inpatient database. The diagnostic accuracy of all case definitions was calculated [sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV)]. RESULTS: (1) Systematic review: Of 2,014 abstracts identified, 36 underwent full-text review and three met eligibility criteria. These depression studies used ICD-9 and ICD-10 case definitions. (2) VALIDATION: 4,008 randomly selected medical charts were reviewed to assess the performance of new and previously published depression-related ICD case definitions. All newly tested case definitions resulted in Sp >99%, PPV >89% and NPV >91%. Sensitivities were low (28-35%), but higher than for case definitions identified in the literature (1.1-29.6%). CONCLUSIONS: Validating ICD-coded data for depression is important due to variation in coding practices across jurisdictions. The most suitable case definitions for detecting depression in administrative data vary depending on the context. For surveillance purposes, the most inclusive ICD-9 & ICD-10 case definitions resulted in PPVs of 89.7% and 89.5%, respectively. In cases where diagnostic certainty is required, the least inclusive ICD-9 and -10 case definitions are recommended, resulting in PPVs of 92.0% and 91.1%. All proposed case definitions resulted in suboptimal levels of sensitivity (ranging from 28.9%-35.6%). The addition of outpatient data (such as pharmacy records) for depression surveillance is recommended and should result in improved measures of validity.

6 Review Depression in epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2013

Fiest, Kirsten M / Dykeman, Jonathan / Patten, Scott B / Wiebe, Samuel / Kaplan, Gilaad G / Maxwell, Colleen J / Bulloch, Andrew G M / Jette, Nathalie. ·Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Canada. ·Neurology · Pubmed #23175727.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of depression in persons with epilepsy (PWE) and the strength of association between these 2 conditions. METHODS: The MEDLINE (1948-2012), EMBASE (1980-2012), and PsycINFO (1806-2012) databases, reference lists of retrieved articles, and conference abstracts were searched. Content experts were also consulted. Two independent reviewers screened abstracts and extracted data. For inclusion, studies were population-based, original research, and reported on epilepsy and depression. Estimates of depression prevalence among PWE and of the association between epilepsy and depression (estimated with reported odds ratios [ORs]) are provided. RESULTS: Of 7,106 abstracts screened, 23 articles reported on 14 unique data sources. Nine studies reported on 29,891 PWE who had an overall prevalence of active (current or past-year) depression of 23.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 20.6%-28.31%). Five of the 14 studies reported on 1,217,024 participants with an overall OR of active depression of 2.77 (95% CI 2.09-3.67) in PWE. For lifetime depression, 4 studies reported on 5,454 PWE, with an overall prevalence of 13.0% (95% CI 5.1-33.1), and 3 studies reported on 4,195 participants with an overall OR of 2.20 (95% CI 1.07-4.51) for PWE. CONCLUSIONS: Epilepsy was significantly associated with depression and depression was observed to be highly prevalent in PWE. These findings highlight the importance of proper identification and management of depression in PWE.

7 Article Probability of major depression diagnostic classification based on the SCID, CIDI and MINI diagnostic interviews controlling for Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale - Depression subscale scores: An individual participant data meta-analysis of 73 primary studies. 2020

Wu, Yin / Levis, Brooke / Sun, Ying / Krishnan, Ankur / He, Chen / Riehm, Kira E / Rice, Danielle B / Azar, Marleine / Yan, Xin Wei / Neupane, Dipika / Bhandari, Parash Mani / Imran, Mahrukh / Chiovitti, Matthew J / Saadat, Nazanin / Boruff, Jill T / Cuijpers, Pim / Gilbody, Simon / McMillan, Dean / Ioannidis, John P A / Kloda, Lorie A / Patten, Scott B / Shrier, Ian / Ziegelstein, Roy C / Henry, Melissa / Ismail, Zahinoor / Loiselle, Carmen G / Mitchell, Nicholas D / Tonelli, Marcello / Al-Adawi, Samir / Beraldi, Anna / Braeken, Anna P B M / Büel-Drabe, Natalie / Bunevicius, Adomas / Carter, Gregory / Chen, Chih-Ken / Cheung, Gary / Clover, Kerrie / Conroy, Ronán M / Cukor, Daniel / da Rocha E Silva, Carlos E / Dabscheck, Eli / Daray, Federico M / Douven, Elles / Downing, Marina G / Feinstein, Anthony / Ferentinos, Panagiotis P / Fischer, Felix H / Flint, Alastair J / Fujimori, Maiko / Gallagher, Pamela / Gandy, Milena / Goebel, Simone / Grassi, Luigi / Härter, Martin / Jenewein, Josef / Jetté, Nathalie / Julião, Miguel / Kim, Jae-Min / Kim, Sung-Wan / Kjærgaard, Marie / Köhler, Sebastian / Loosman, Wim L / Löwe, Bernd / Martin-Santos, Rocio / Massardo, Loreto / Matsuoka, Yutaka / Mehnert, Anja / Michopoulos, Ioannis / Misery, Laurent / Navines, Ricard / O'Donnell, Meaghan L / Öztürk, Ahmet / Peceliuniene, Jurate / Pintor, Luis / Ponsford, Jennie L / Quinn, Terence J / Reme, Silje E / Reuter, Katrin / Rooney, Alasdair G / Sánchez-González, Roberto / Schwarzbold, Marcelo L / Senturk Cankorur, Vesile / Shaaban, Juwita / Sharpe, Louise / Sharpe, Michael / Simard, Sébastien / Singer, Susanne / Stafford, Lesley / Stone, Jon / Sultan, Serge / Teixeira, Antonio L / Tiringer, Istvan / Turner, Alyna / Walker, Jane / Walterfang, Mark / Wang, Liang-Jen / White, Jennifer / Wong, Dana K / Benedetti, Andrea / Thombs, Brett D. ·Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Mental Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada. · Schulich Library of Physical Sciences, Life Sciences, and Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · EMGO Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Hull York Medical School and the Department of Health Sciences, University of York, Heslington, York, UK. · Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, Department of Medicine, Department of Health Research and Policy, Department of Biomedical Data Science, Department of Statistics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. · Library, Concordia University, Montréal, QC, Canada. · Departments of Community Health Sciences and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; Cuthbertson & Fischer Chair in Pediatric Mental Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Hotchkiss Brain Institute & O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Calgary, AB, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Neuroscience and Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada; Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada; Centre for Nursing Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Department of Behavioural Medicine, College of Medicine & Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman, Oman. · Psychotherapie und Psychsomatik, kbo Lech-Mangfall-Klinik für Psychatrie, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Bayern, Germany. · Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands; Faculty of Psychology, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, the Netherlands; Department of Health Services Research, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. · Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA; Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · University of Newcastle, Australia; Calvary Mater Newcastle, Australia. · Community Medicine Research Center, Keelung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Keelung, Taiwan; Department of Psychiatry, Keelung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Keelung, Taiwan. · University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. · Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia. · Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Division of Population Health Sciences, Dublin, Ireland. · Rogosin Institute, NY, New York, USA. · Clementino Fraga Filho University Hospital, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · The Alfred Hospital, Prahran, VIC, Australia; Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. · National Scientific and Technical Research Council, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Alzheimer Center Limburg and School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNs), Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. · School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; Monash Epworth Rehabilitation Research Centre, Epworth HealthCare, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada. · 2nd Department of Psychiatry, Attikon General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, UK. · Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Center for Internal Medicine and Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany. · University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Section of Psychological Science, Division of Health Care Research, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan. · School of Psychology, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland. · The Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Institute of Psychology, Christian-Albrechts University, Kiel, Germany. · Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Psychiatric Unit, Integrated Department of Mental Health and Addictive Behavior, Health Trust, University Hospital, Ferrara, Italy. · Department of Medical Psychology, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinic Zugersee, Center for Psychiatry and Psychotherapie, Oberwil-Zug, Switzerland; University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Departments of Neurology and Population Health Science and Policy, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, New York, USA. · Equipa Comunitária de Suporte em Cuidados Paliativos de Sintra, Portugal. · Chonnam National University Medical School, Republic of Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Chonnam National University Medical School, Republic of Korea. · Endocrinology Research Group, Medical Clinic, University Hospital of North Norway, Norway; Department of Internal Medicine, Kolding Hospital, Hospital Lillebaelt, Denmark. · Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. · Onze Lieve vrouw Gasthuis, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, CIBERSAM, Barcelona, Spain; Department of Medicine, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Centro de Biología Celular y Biomedicina, Facultad de Medicina y Ciencia, Universidad San Sebastián. Santiago, Chile. · Division of Health Care Research, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan; Lifestyle Medicine, Cooperative Graduate Program, The Jikei University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University of Leipzig, Germany. · 2nd Department of Psychiatry, Attikon General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Brest, Brest, France. · Phoenix Australia, Carlton, VIC, Australia. · Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey. · Clinic of Internal Diseases, Family Medicine and Oncology, Vilnius University Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius, Lithuania. · Consultation Liaison Psychiatry Unit, Hospital Clínico de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas Augusto Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain. · Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Pain Management and Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Private Practice for Psychotherapy and Psycho-oncology, Freiburg, Germany. · Division of Psychiatry, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Robert Fergusson Unit, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh, UK. · Department of Psychiatry, Institut de Neuropsiquiatria i Addiccions, Centre Emili Mira, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain; IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica En Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Internal Medicine, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. · Ankara University Faculty of Medicine Psychiatry Department, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Family Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia. · School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Département des sciences de la santé, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi (UQAC), QC, Canada; Centre intersectoriel en santé durable (CISD), QC, Canada; Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec (IUCPQ), QC, Canada. · Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University Medical Centre Mainz, Mainz, Germany. · Centre for Women's Mental Health, Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Australia; Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Université de Montréal, QC, Canada; CHU Sainte-Justine, Montréal, QC, Canada. · University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA; Santa Casa BH Ensino & Pesquisa, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. · Institute of Behavioral Sciences, Pécs University, Medical School, Pécs, Hungary. · IMPACT Strategic Research Centre and School of Medicine, Barwon Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia; Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia; Department of Psychiatry, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia. · Neuropsychiatry Unit, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. · School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; School of Psychology & Public Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada; Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada. Electronic address: andrea.benedetti@mcgill.ca. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada. Electronic address: brett.thombs@mcgill.ca. ·J Psychosom Res · Pubmed #31911325.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Two previous individual participant data meta-analyses (IPDMAs) found that different diagnostic interviews classify different proportions of people as having major depression overall or by symptom levels. We compared the odds of major depression classification across diagnostic interviews among studies that administered the Depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D). METHODS: Data accrued for an IPDMA on HADS-D diagnostic accuracy were analysed. We fit binomial generalized linear mixed models to compare odds of major depression classification for the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID), Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), and Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), controlling for HADS-D scores and participant characteristics with and without an interaction term between interview and HADS-D scores. RESULTS: There were 15,856 participants (1942 [12%] with major depression) from 73 studies, including 15,335 (97%) non-psychiatric medical patients, 164 (1%) partners of medical patients, and 357 (2%) healthy adults. The MINI (27 studies, 7345 participants, 1066 major depression cases) classified participants as having major depression more often than the CIDI (10 studies, 3023 participants, 269 cases) (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.70 (0.84, 3.43)) and the semi-structured SCID (36 studies, 5488 participants, 607 cases) (aOR = 1.52 (1.01, 2.30)). The odds ratio for major depression classification with the CIDI was less likely to increase as HADS-D scores increased than for the SCID (interaction aOR = 0.92 (0.88, 0.96)). CONCLUSION: Compared to the SCID, the MINI may diagnose more participants as having major depression, and the CIDI may be less responsive to symptom severity.

8 Article The Accuracy of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Algorithm for Screening to Detect Major Depression: An Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis. 2020

He, Chen / Levis, Brooke / Riehm, Kira E / Saadat, Nazanin / Levis, Alexander W / Azar, Marleine / Rice, Danielle B / Krishnan, Ankur / Wu, Yin / Sun, Ying / Imran, Mahrukh / Boruff, Jill / Cuijpers, Pim / Gilbody, Simon / Ioannidis, John P A / Kloda, Lorie A / McMillan, Dean / Patten, Scott B / Shrier, Ian / Ziegelstein, Roy C / Akena, Dickens H / Arroll, Bruce / Ayalon, Liat / Baradaran, Hamid R / Baron, Murray / Beraldi, Anna / Bombardier, Charles H / Butterworth, Peter / Carter, Gregory / Chagas, Marcos Hortes Nisihara / Chan, Juliana C N / Cholera, Rushina / Clover, Kerrie / Conwell, Yeates / de Man-van Ginkel, Janneke M / Fann, Jesse R / Fischer, Felix H / Fung, Daniel / Gelaye, Bizu / Goodyear-Smith, Felicity / Greeno, Catherine G / Hall, Brian J / Harrison, Patricia A / Härter, Martin / Hegerl, Ulrich / Hides, Leanne / Hobfoll, Stevan E / Hudson, Marie / Hyphantis, Thomas N / Inagaki, Masatoshi / Ismail, Khalida / Jetté, Nathalie / Khamseh, Mohammad E / Kiely, Kim M / Kwan, Yunxin / Lamers, Femke / Liu, Shen-Ing / Lotrakul, Manote / Loureiro, Sonia R / Löwe, Bernd / Marsh, Laura / McGuire, Anthony / Mohd-Sidik, Sherina / Munhoz, Tiago N / Muramatsu, Kumiko / Osório, Flávia L / Patel, Vikram / Pence, Brian W / Persoons, Philippe / Picardi, Angelo / Reuter, Katrin / Rooney, Alasdair G / da Silva Dos Santos, Iná S / Shaaban, Juwita / Sidebottom, Abbey / Simning, Adam / Stafford, Lesley / Sung, Sharon / Tan, Pei Lin Lynnette / Turner, Alyna / van Weert, Henk C P M / White, Jennifer / Whooley, Mary A / Winkley, Kirsty / Yamada, Mitsuhiko / Thombs, Brett D / Benedetti, Andrea. ·Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Schulich Library of Physical Sciences, Life Sciences and Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Hull York Medical School and the Department of Health Sciences, University of York, Heslington, United Kingdom. · Department of Medicine, Department of Health Research and Policy, Department of Biomedical Data Science, Department of Statistics, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA. · Library, Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Hotchkiss Brain Institute and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda. · Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. · Louis and Gabi Weisfeld School of Social Work, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel. · Endocrine Research Center, Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Ageing Clinical and Experimental Research Team, Institute of Applied Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences and Nutrition, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom. · Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Kbo-Lech-Mangfall-Klinik Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Klinik für Psychiatrie, Psychotherapie und Psychosomatik, Lehrkrankenhaus der Technischen Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia. · Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. · Asia Diabetes Foundation, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China. · Hong Kong Institute of Diabetes and Obesity, Hong Kong SAR, China. · Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · Psycho-Oncology Service, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Center for Internal Medicine and Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Mental Health, Singapore, Singapore. · Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore. · Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore. · Programme in Health Services and Systems Research, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. · Global and Community Mental Health Research Group, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Macau, Macau SAR, China. · Department of Health, Behavior, and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · City of Minneapolis Health Department, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Medical Psychology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, German Depression Foundation, Frankfurt, Germany. · School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · STAR-Stress, Anxiety and Resilience Consultants, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. · Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane University, Shimane, Japan. · Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neurosciences, King's College London Weston Education Centre, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Neurology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. · School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Psychological Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Baylor College of Medicine Houston and Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Nursing, St. Joseph's College, Standish, Maine, USA. · Cancer Resource and Education Centre, and Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia. · Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil. · Department of Clinical Psychology, Graduate School of Niigata Seiryo University, Niigata, Japan. · National Institute of Science and Technology, Translational Medicine, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. · Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · Department of Adult Psychiatry, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Neurosciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Centre for Behavioural Sciences and Mental Health, Italian National Institute of Health, Rome, Italy. · Practice for Psychotherapy and Psycho-Oncology, Freiburg, Germany. · Division of Psychiatry, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, University of Edinburg, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. · Department of Family Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia. · Allina Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Centre for Women's Mental Health, Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. · Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. · IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia. · Department of General Practice, Amsterdam Institute for General Practice and Public Health, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA. · Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Palliative Care, King's College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Neuropsychopharmacology, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Japan. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Québec, Canada, brett.thombs@mcgill.ca. · Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada, brett.thombs@mcgill.ca. · Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada, brett.thombs@mcgill.ca. · Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada, brett.thombs@mcgill.ca. · Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada, brett.thombs@mcgill.ca. · Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada, brett.thombs@mcgill.ca. · Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Québec, Canada. ·Psychother Psychosom · Pubmed #31593971.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Screening for major depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) can be done using a cutoff or the PHQ-9 diagnostic algorithm. Many primary studies publish results for only one approach, and previous meta-analyses of the algorithm approach included only a subset of primary studies that collected data and could have published results. OBJECTIVE: To use an individual participant data meta-analysis to evaluate the accuracy of two PHQ-9 diagnostic algorithms for detecting major depression and compare accuracy between the algorithms and the standard PHQ-9 cutoff score of ≥10. METHODS: Medline, Medline In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, PsycINFO, Web of Science (January 1, 2000, to February 7, 2015). Eligible studies that classified current major depression status using a validated diagnostic interview. RESULTS: Data were included for 54 of 72 identified eligible studies (n participants = 16,688, n cases = 2,091). Among studies that used a semi-structured interview, pooled sensitivity and specificity (95% confidence interval) were 0.57 (0.49, 0.64) and 0.95 (0.94, 0.97) for the original algorithm and 0.61 (0.54, 0.68) and 0.95 (0.93, 0.96) for a modified algorithm. Algorithm sensitivity was 0.22-0.24 lower compared to fully structured interviews and 0.06-0.07 lower compared to the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Specificity was similar across reference standards. For PHQ-9 cutoff of ≥10 compared to semi-structured interviews, sensitivity and specificity (95% confidence interval) were 0.88 (0.82-0.92) and 0.86 (0.82-0.88). CONCLUSIONS: The cutoff score approach appears to be a better option than a PHQ-9 algorithm for detecting major depression.

9 Article Equivalency of the diagnostic accuracy of the PHQ-8 and PHQ-9: a systematic review and individual participant data meta-analysis. 2019

Wu, Yin / Levis, Brooke / Riehm, Kira E / Saadat, Nazanin / Levis, Alexander W / Azar, Marleine / Rice, Danielle B / Boruff, Jill / Cuijpers, Pim / Gilbody, Simon / Ioannidis, John P A / Kloda, Lorie A / McMillan, Dean / Patten, Scott B / Shrier, Ian / Ziegelstein, Roy C / Akena, Dickens H / Arroll, Bruce / Ayalon, Liat / Baradaran, Hamid R / Baron, Murray / Bombardier, Charles H / Butterworth, Peter / Carter, Gregory / Chagas, Marcos H / Chan, Juliana C N / Cholera, Rushina / Conwell, Yeates / de Man-van Ginkel, Janneke M / Fann, Jesse R / Fischer, Felix H / Fung, Daniel / Gelaye, Bizu / Goodyear-Smith, Felicity / Greeno, Catherine G / Hall, Brian J / Harrison, Patricia A / Härter, Martin / Hegerl, Ulrich / Hides, Leanne / Hobfoll, Stevan E / Hudson, Marie / Hyphantis, Thomas / Inagaki, M D / Jetté, Nathalie / Khamseh, Mohammad E / Kiely, Kim M / Kwan, Yunxin / Lamers, Femke / Liu, Shen-Ing / Lotrakul, Manote / Loureiro, Sonia R / Löwe, Bernd / McGuire, Anthony / Mohd-Sidik, Sherina / Munhoz, Tiago N / Muramatsu, Kumiko / Osório, Flávia L / Patel, Vikram / Pence, Brian W / Persoons, Philippe / Picardi, Angelo / Reuter, Katrin / Rooney, Alasdair G / Santos, Iná S / Shaaban, Juwita / Sidebottom, Abbey / Simning, Adam / Stafford, M D / Sung, Sharon / Tan, Pei Lin Lynnette / Turner, Alyna / van Weert, Henk C / White, Jennifer / Whooley, Mary A / Winkley, Kirsty / Yamada, Mitsuhiko / Benedetti, Andrea / Thombs, Brett D. ·Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Schulich Library of Physical Sciences, Life Sciences, and Engineering, McGill University,Montreal,Quebec,Canada. · Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology,Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit,Amsterdam,the Netherlands. · Hull York Medical School and the Department of Health Sciences,University of York,Heslington, York,UK. · Department of Medicine,Department of Health Research and Policy,Department of Biomedical Data Science,Department of Statistics,Stanford University, Stanford,California,USA. · Library, Concordia University,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences,University of Calgary,Calgary, Alberta,Canada. · Department of Medicine,Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine,Baltimore,Maryland,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,Makerere University College of Health Sciences,Kampala,Uganda. · Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care,University of Auckland, Auckland,New Zealand. · Louis and Gabi Weisfeld School of Social Work, Bar Ilan University,Ramat Gan,Israel. · Endocrine Research Center, Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Iran University of Medical Sciences,Tehran,Iran. · Department of Rehabilitation Medicine,University of Washington,Seattle,Washington,USA. · Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University,Canberra,Australia. · Centre for Brain and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle,New South Wales,Australia. · Department of Neurosciences and Behavior,Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo,Ribeirão Preto,Brazil. · Department of Medicine and Therapeutics,Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR),China. · Department of Pediatrics,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine,Chapel Hill,North Carolina,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,University of Rochester Medical Center,New York,USA. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht,Utrecht,the Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,University of Washington,Seattle, Washington,USA. · Department of Psychosomatic Medicine,Center for Internal Medicine and Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin,Germany. · Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry,Institute of Mental Health,Singapore,Singapore. · Department of Epidemiology,Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health,Boston, Massachusetts,USA. · School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh,Pittsburgh,Pennsylvania,USA. · Global and Community Mental Health Research Group,Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences,University of Macau, Macau Special Administrative Region,China. · City of Minneapolis Health Department,Minneapolis,Minnesota,USA. · Department of Medical Psychology,University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf,Hamburg,Germany. · Depression Research Center of the German Depression Foundation and Department of Psychiatry,Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Goethe University, Frankfurt,Germany. · School of Psychology, University of Queensland,Brisbane,Queensland,Australia. · STAR-Stress, Anxiety & Resilience Consultants,Chicago,Illinois,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,University of Ioannina,Ioannina,Greece. · Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine,Shimane University,Shimane,Japan. · School of Psychology, University of New South Wales,Sydney,Australia. · Department of Psychological Medicine,Tan Tock Seng Hospital,Singapore,Singapore. · Department of Psychiatry,Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute,Amsterdam,the Netherlands. · Programme in Health Services & Systems Research, Duke-NUS Medical School,Singapore,Singapore. · Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine,Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University,Bangkok,Thailand. · Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy,University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf,Hamburg,Germany. · Department of Nursing,St. Joseph's College,Standish,Maine,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences,Cancer Resource & Education Centre, Universiti Putra Malaysia,Serdang,Selangor,Malaysia. · Post-graduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas,Pelotas,RS,Brazil. · Department of Clinical Psychology,Graduate School of Niigata Seiryo University,Niigata,Japan. · Department of Global Health and Social Medicine,Harvard Medical School,Boston,Massachusetts,USA. · Department of Epidemiology,Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Chapel Hill,North Carolina,USA. · Department of Adult Psychiatry,University Hospitals Leuven,Leuven,Belgium. · Centre for Behavioural Sciences and Mental Health, Italian National Institute of Health,Rome,Italy. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,University Medical Center Freiburg,Freiburg,Germany. · Division of Psychiatry,Royal Edinburgh Hospital, University of Edinburg,Edinburgh, Scotland,UK. · Department of Family Medicine,School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia,Kelantan,Malaysia. · Allina Health,Minneapolis,Minnesota,USA. · Centre for Women's Mental Health, Royal Women's Hospital,Parkville,Melbourne,Australia. · School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle,New South Wales,Newcastle,Australia. · Department of General Practice,Amsterdam Institute for General Practice and Public Health, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, location AMC,Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Monash University,Melbourne,Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics,University of California San Francisco,San Francisco,California,USA. · Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery & Palliative Care, King's College London,London,UK. · Department of Neuropsychopharmacology,National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry,Ogawa-Higashi,Kodaira,Tokyo,Japan. · Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health,McGill University,Montréal,Québec,Canada. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #31298180.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Item 9 of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) queries about thoughts of death and self-harm, but not suicidality. Although it is sometimes used to assess suicide risk, most positive responses are not associated with suicidality. The PHQ-8, which omits Item 9, is thus increasingly used in research. We assessed equivalency of total score correlations and the diagnostic accuracy to detect major depression of the PHQ-8 and PHQ-9. METHODS: We conducted an individual patient data meta-analysis. We fit bivariate random-effects models to assess diagnostic accuracy. RESULTS: 16 742 participants (2097 major depression cases) from 54 studies were included. The correlation between PHQ-8 and PHQ-9 scores was 0.996 (95% confidence interval 0.996 to 0.996). The standard cutoff score of 10 for the PHQ-9 maximized sensitivity + specificity for the PHQ-8 among studies that used a semi-structured diagnostic interview reference standard (N = 27). At cutoff 10, the PHQ-8 was less sensitive by 0.02 (-0.06 to 0.00) and more specific by 0.01 (0.00 to 0.01) among those studies (N = 27), with similar results for studies that used other types of interviews (N = 27). For all 54 primary studies combined, across all cutoffs, the PHQ-8 was less sensitive than the PHQ-9 by 0.00 to 0.05 (0.03 at cutoff 10), and specificity was within 0.01 for all cutoffs (0.00 to 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: PHQ-8 and PHQ-9 total scores were similar. Sensitivity may be minimally reduced with the PHQ-8, but specificity is similar.

10 Article Global assessment of migraine severity measure: preliminary evidence of construct validity. 2019

Sajobi, Tolulope T / Amoozegar, Farnaz / Wang, Meng / Wiebe, Natalie / Fiest, Kirsten M / Patten, Scott B / Jette, Nathalie. ·Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine 3280 Hospital Drive NW Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4Z6, Canada. ttsajobi@ucalgary.ca. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine 3280 Hospital Drive NW Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4Z6, Canada. · Department of Critical Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Neurology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA. ·BMC Neurol · Pubmed #30947702.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In persons with migraine, severity of migraine is an important determinant of several health outcomes (e.g., patient quality of life and health care resource utilization). This study investigated how migraine patients rate the severity of their disease and how these ratings correlate with their socio-demographic, clinical, and psycho-social characteristics. METHODS: This is a cohort of 263 adult migraine patients consecutively enrolled in the Neurological Disease and Depression Study (NEEDs). We obtained a broad range of clinical and patient-reported measures (e.g., patients' ratings of migraine severity using the Global Assessment of Migraine Severity (GAMS), and migraine-related disability, as measured by the Migraine Disability Scale (MIDAS)). Depression was measured using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the 14-item Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Median regression analysis was used to examine the predictors of patient ratings of migraine severity. RESULTS: The mean age for the patients was 42.5 years (SD = 13.2). While 209 (79.4%) patients were females, 177 (67.4%) participants reported "moderately severe" to "extremely severe" migraine on the GAMS, and 100 (31.6%) patients had chronic migraine. Patients' report of severity on the GAMS was strongly correlated with patients' ratings of MIDAS global severity question, overall MIDAS score, migraine type, PHQ-9 score, and frequency of migraine attacks. Mediation analyses revealed that MIDAS mediated the effect of depression on patient ratings of migraine severity, accounting for about 32% of the total effect of depression. Overall, migraine subtype, frequency of migraine, employment status, depression, and migraine-related disability were statistically significant predictors of patient-ratings of migraine severity. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the impact of clinical and psychosocial determinants of patient-ratings of migraine severity. GAMS is a brief and valid tool that can be used to assess migraine severity in busy clinical settings.

11 Article Living with Migraine in Canada - A National Community-Based Study. 2019

Altura, Kristianne Chelsea / Patten, Scott B / Williams, Jeanne V A / Fiest, Kirsten M / Jetté, Nathalie. ·From the Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Hotchkiss Brain Institute,University of Calgary,Calgary, Alberta,Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health,University of Calgary,Calgary, Alberta,Canada. ·Can J Neurol Sci · Pubmed #30816083.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop a detailed profile of individuals living with migraine in Canada. Such a profile is important for planning and administration of services. METHODS: The 2011-2012 Survey of Living with Neurological Conditions in Canada (SLNCC), a cross-sectional community-based survey, was used to examine a representative sample of migraineurs (N = 949) aged 15 years and older. Several health-related variables were examined (e.g., general health, health utility index (HUI) [a measure of health status and health-related quality of life, where dead = 0.00 and perfect health = 1.00], stigma, depression, and social support). Respondents were further stratified by sex, age, and age of migraine onset. Weighted overall and stratified prevalence estimates and odds ratios, both with 95% CIs, were used to estimate associations. RESULTS: Overall, males had poorer health status compared with females (e.g., mean HUI was 0.67 in males vs. 0.82 in females; men had over two times the odds of their migraine limiting educational and job opportunities compared with females). Poorer health-related variables were seen in the older age groups (35-64 years/≥65 years) compared with the 15-34-year age group. There were no differences between those whose migraine symptoms began before versus after the age of 20 years. CONCLUSIONS: In this Canadian sample, migraine was associated with worse health-related variables in men compared with women. However, both men and women were significantly affected by migraine across various health-related variables. Thus, it is important to improve clinical and public health interventions addressing the impact of migraine across individuals of all ages, sexes, and sociodemographic backgrounds.

12 Article Validation of a case definition for depression in administrative data against primary chart data as a reference standard. 2019

Doktorchik, Chelsea / Patten, Scott / Eastwood, Cathy / Peng, Mingkai / Chen, Guanmin / Beck, Cynthia A / Jetté, Nathalie / Williamson, Tyler / Quan, Hude. ·Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, TRW Building 3rd Floor 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 4Z6, Canada. ctadokto@ucalgary.ca. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, TRW Building 3rd Floor 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 4Z6, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 1403-29 Street NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 2T9, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 1403 29 Street NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 2T9, Canada. ·BMC Psychiatry · Pubmed #30616546.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Because the collection of mental health information through interviews is expensive and time consuming, interest in using population-based administrative health data to conduct research on depression has increased. However, there is concern that misclassification of disease diagnosis in the underlying data might bias the results. Our objective was to determine the validity of International Classification of Disease (ICD)-9 and ICD-10 administrative health data case definitions for depression using review of family physician (FP) charts as the reference standard. METHODS: Trained chart reviewers reviewed 3362 randomly selected charts from years 2001 and 2004 at 64 FP clinics in Alberta (AB) and British Columbia (BC), Canada. Depression was defined as presence of either: 1) documentation of major depressive episode, or 2) documentation of specific antidepressant medication prescription plus recorded depressed mood. The charts were linked to administrative data (hospital discharge abstracts and physician claims data) using personal health numbers. Validity indices were estimated for six administrative data definitions of depression using three years of administrative data. RESULTS: Depression prevalence by chart review was 15.9-19.2% depending on year, region, and province. An ICD administrative data definition of '2 depression claims with depression ICD codes within a one-year window OR 1 discharge abstract data (DAD) depression diagnosis' had the highest overall validity, with estimates being 61.4% for sensitivity, 94.3% for specificity, 69.7% for positive predictive value, and 92.0% for negative predictive value. Stratification of the validity parameters for this case definition showed that sensitivity was fairly consistent across groups, however the positive predictive value was significantly higher in 2004 data compared to 2001 data (78.8 and 59.6%, respectively), and in AB data compared to BC data (79.8 and 61.7%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Sensitivity of the case definition is often moderate, and specificity is often high, possibly due to undercoding of depression. Limitations to this study include the use of FP charts data as the reference standard, given the potential for missed or incorrect depression diagnoses. These results suggest that that administrative data can be used as a source of information for both research and surveillance purposes, while remaining aware of these limitations.

13 Article Shortening self-report mental health symptom measures through optimal test assembly methods: Development and validation of the Patient Health Questionnaire-Depression-4. 2019

Ishihara, Miyabi / Harel, Daphna / Levis, Brooke / Levis, Alexander W / Riehm, Kira E / Saadat, Nazanin / Azar, Marleine / Rice, Danielle B / Sanchez, Tatiana A / Chiovitti, Matthew J / Cuijpers, Pim / Gilbody, Simon / Ioannidis, John P A / Kloda, Lorie A / McMillan, Dean / Patten, Scott B / Shrier, Ian / Arroll, Bruce / Bombardier, Charles H / Butterworth, Peter / Carter, Gregory / Clover, Kerrie / Conwell, Yeates / Goodyear-Smith, Felicity / Greeno, Catherine G / Hambridge, John / Harrison, Patricia A / Hudson, Marie / Jetté, Nathalie / Kiely, Kim M / McGuire, Anthony / Pence, Brian W / Rooney, Alasdair G / Sidebottom, Abbey / Simning, Adam / Turner, Alyna / White, Jennifer / Whooley, Mary A / Winkley, Kirsty / Benedetti, Andrea / Thombs, Brett D. ·Department of Statistics, University of California, Berkeley, California. · PRIISM Applied Statistics Center, New York University, New York, New York. · Department of Applied Statistics, Social Science, and Humanities, New York University, New York, New York. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, EMGO Institute, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Health Sciences, Hull York Medical School, University of York, Heslington, York, UK. · Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Department of Statistics, Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Library, Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Auckland, New Zealand. · Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. · Centre for Mental Health, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. · Psycho-Oncology Service, Calvary Mater Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. · School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Liaison Psychiatry Department, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, Australia. · Minneapolis Health Department, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Nursing, St. Joseph's College, Standish, Maine. · Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. · Division of Psychiatry, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. · Allina Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Newcastle, Australia. · IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia. · Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, California. · Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California. · Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. ·Depress Anxiety · Pubmed #30238571.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a short form of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), a self-report questionnaire for assessing depressive symptomatology, using objective criteria. METHODS: Responses on the PHQ-9 were obtained from 7,850 English-speaking participants enrolled in 20 primary diagnostic test accuracy studies. PHQ unidimensionality was verified using confirmatory factor analysis, and an item response theory model was fit. Optimal test assembly (OTA) methods identified a maximally precise short form for each possible length between one and eight items, including and excluding the ninth item. The final short form was selected based on prespecified validity, reliability, and diagnostic accuracy criteria. RESULTS: A four-item short form of the PHQ (PHQ-Dep-4) was selected. The PHQ-Dep-4 had a Cronbach's alpha of 0.805. Sensitivity and specificity of the PHQ-Dep-4 were 0.788 and 0.837, respectively, and were statistically equivalent to the PHQ-9 (sensitivity = 0.761, specificity = 0.866). The correlation of total scores with the full PHQ-9 was high (r = 0.919). CONCLUSION: The PHQ-Dep-4 is a valid short form with minimal loss of information of scores when compared to the full-length PHQ-9. Although OTA methods have been used to shorten patient-reported outcome measures based on objective, prespecified criteria, further studies are required to validate this general procedure for broader use in health research. Furthermore, due to unexamined heterogeneity, there is a need to replicate the results of this study in different patient populations.

14 Article Probability of major depression diagnostic classification using semi-structured versus fully structured diagnostic interviews. 2018

Levis, Brooke / Benedetti, Andrea / Riehm, Kira E / Saadat, Nazanin / Levis, Alexander W / Azar, Marleine / Rice, Danielle B / Chiovitti, Matthew J / Sanchez, Tatiana A / Cuijpers, Pim / Gilbody, Simon / Ioannidis, John P A / Kloda, Lorie A / McMillan, Dean / Patten, Scott B / Shrier, Ian / Steele, Russell J / Ziegelstein, Roy C / Akena, Dickens H / Arroll, Bruce / Ayalon, Liat / Baradaran, Hamid R / Baron, Murray / Beraldi, Anna / Bombardier, Charles H / Butterworth, Peter / Carter, Gregory / Chagas, Marcos H / Chan, Juliana C N / Cholera, Rushina / Chowdhary, Neerja / Clover, Kerrie / Conwell, Yeates / de Man-van Ginkel, Janneke M / Delgadillo, Jaime / Fann, Jesse R / Fischer, Felix H / Fischler, Benjamin / Fung, Daniel / Gelaye, Bizu / Goodyear-Smith, Felicity / Greeno, Catherine G / Hall, Brian J / Hambridge, John / Harrison, Patricia A / Hegerl, Ulrich / Hides, Leanne / Hobfoll, Stevan E / Hudson, Marie / Hyphantis, Thomas / Inagaki, Masatoshi / Ismail, Khalida / Jetté, Nathalie / Khamseh, Mohammad E / Kiely, Kim M / Lamers, Femke / Liu, Shen-Ing / Lotrakul, Manote / Loureiro, Sonia R / Löwe, Bernd / Marsh, Laura / McGuire, Anthony / Mohd Sidik, Sherina / Munhoz, Tiago N / Muramatsu, Kumiko / Osório, Flávia L / Patel, Vikram / Pence, Brian W / Persoons, Philippe / Picardi, Angelo / Rooney, Alasdair G / Santos, Iná S / Shaaban, Juwita / Sidebottom, Abbey / Simning, Adam / Stafford, Lesley / Sung, Sharon / Tan, Pei Lin Lynnette / Turner, Alyna / van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M / van Weert, Henk C / Vöhringer, Paul A / White, Jennifer / Whooley, Mary A / Winkley, Kirsty / Yamada, Mitsuhiko / Zhang, Yuying / Thombs, Brett D. ·Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,Jewish General Hospital,Montréal,Québec,CanadaandDepartment of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health,McGill University,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health,McGill University,Montréal,Québec,Canada;Department of Medicine,McGill University,Montréal,Québec,CanadaandRespiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit,McGill University Health Centre,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,Jewish General Hospital,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,Jewish General Hospital,Montréal,Québec,CanadaandDepartment of Psychology,McGill University,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology,EMGO Institute, VU University,Amsterdam,the Netherlands. · Hull York Medical School and the Department of Health Sciences,University of York,York,UK. · Department of Medicine,Department of Health Research and Policy,Department of Biomedical Data Science,Department of Statistics,Stanford University,Stanford,California,USA. · Library,Concordia University,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences,University of Calgary,Calgary,Alberta,Canada and Hotchkiss Brain Institute and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary,Calgary,Alberta,Canada. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,Jewish General Hospital,Montréal,Québec,CanadaandDepartment of Mathematics and Statistics,McGill University,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Department of Medicine,Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine,Baltimore,Maryland,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,Makerere University College of Health Sciences,Kampala,Uganda. · Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care,University of Auckland,New Zealand. · Louis and Gabi Weisfeld School of Social Work,Bar Ilan University,Ramat Gan,Israel. · Endocrine Research Center,Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Iran University of Medical Sciences,Tehran,Iran. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,Jewish General Hospital,Montréal,Québec,CanadaandDepartment of Medicine,McGill University,Montréal,Québec,Canada. · Kbo-Lech-Mangfall-Klinik Garmisch-Partenkirchen,Klinik für Psychiatrie,Psychotherapie & Psychosomatik,Lehrkrankenhaus der Technischen Universität München,Munich,Germany. · Department of Rehabilitation Medicine,University of Washington,Seattle,Washington,USA. · Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing,Research School of Population Health,The Australian National University,Canberra,Australia;Centre for Mental Health,Melbourne School of Population and Global Health,University of Melbourne,Melbourne,AustraliaandMelbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, University of Melbourne,Melbourne,Australia. · Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health,University of Newcastle,New South Wales,Australia. · Department of Neurosciences and Behavior,Ribeirão Preto Medical School,University of São Paulo,Ribeirão Preto,Brazil. · Department of Medicine and Therapeutics,Prince of Wales Hospital,The Chinese University of Hong Kong,Hong Kong Special Administrative Region,China;Asia Diabetes Foundation,Prince of Wales Hospital,Hong Kong Special Administrative Region,China and Hong Kong Institute of Diabetes and Obesity,Hong Kong Special Administrative Region,China. · Department of Pediatrics,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine,Chapel Hill,North Carolina,USA. · Clinical Psychiatrist, Mumbai,India. · Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health,University of Newcastle,New South Wales,AustraliaandPsycho-Oncology Service,Calvary Mater Newcastle,New South Wales,Australia. · Department of Psychiatry,University of Rochester Medical Center,New York,USA. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care,University Medical Center Utrecht,Utrecht,the Netherlands. · Clinical Psychology Unit,Department of Psychology,University of Sheffield,Sheffield,UK. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,University of Washington,Seattle,Washington,USA. · Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics,Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin,GermanyandDepartment of Psychosomatic Medicine,Center for Internal Medicine and Dermatology,Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin,Germany. · Private Practice,Brussels,Belgium. · Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry,Institute of Mental Health,Singapore;Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine,National University of Singapore,Singapore;Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine,Nanyang Technological University,SingaporeandOffice of Clinical Sciences,Duke-NUS Medical School,Singapore. · Department of Epidemiology,Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health,Boston,Massachusetts,USA. · School of Social Work,University of Pittsburgh,Pittsburgh,Pennsylvania,USA. · Global and Community Mental Health Research Group,Department of Psychology,Faculty of Social Sciences,University of Macau,Macau Special Administrative Region,ChinaandDepartment of Health, Behavior, and Society,Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,Baltimore,Maryland,USA. · Liaison Psychiatry Department,John Hunter Hospital,Newcastle,Australia. · City of Minneapolis Health Department,Minneapolis,Minnesota,USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,University Hospital Leipzig,Leipzig,Germany. · Centre for Children's Health Research,Institute of Health & Biomedical Innovation,School of Psychology,University of Queensland,Brisbane,Queensland,Australia. · Department of Behavioral Sciences,Rush University Medical Center,Chicago,Illinois,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,University of Ioannina,Ioannina,Greece. · Department of Neuropsychiatry,Okayama University Hospital,Okayama,Japan. · Department of Psychological Medicine,Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neurosciences,King's College London Weston Education Centre,London,UK. · Department of Community Health Sciences,University of Calgary,Calgary,Alberta,Canada;Hotchkiss Brain Institute and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary,Calgary,Alberta,CanadaandDepartment of Clinical Neurosciences,University of Calgary,Calgary,Alberta,Canada. · Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing,Research School of Population Health,The Australian National University,Canberra,Australia. · Department of Psychiatry,Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center,Amsterdam,the Netherlands. · Office of Clinical Sciences,Duke-NUS Medical School,Singapore;Department of Psychiatry,Mackay Memorial Hospital,Taipei,Taiwan;Department of Medical Research,Mackay Memorial Hospital,Taipei,TaiwanandDepartment of Medicine,Mackay Medical College,Taipei,Taiwan. · Department of Psychiatry,Faculty of Medicine,Ramathibodi Hospital,Mahidol University,Bangkok,Thailand. · Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy,University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf,Hamburg,GermanyandSchön Klinik Hamburg Eilbek,Hamburg,Germany. · Baylor College of Medicine,HoustonandMichael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center,Houston,Texas,USA. · Department of Nursing,St. Joseph's College,Standish,Maine,USA. · Cancer Resource & Education Centre, and Department of Psychiatry,Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences,Universiti Putra Malaysia,Serdang,Selangor,Malaysia. · Post-graduate Program in Epidemiology,Federal University of Pelotas,Pelotas,RS,Brazil. · Department of Clinical Psychology,Graduate School of Niigata Seiryo University,Niigata,Japan. · Department of Neurosciences and Behavior,Ribeirão Preto Medical School,University of São Paulo,Ribeirão Preto,Brazil and National Institute of Science and Technology,Translational Medicine,Ribeirão Preto,Brazil. · Department of Global Health and Social Medicine,Harvard Medical School,Boston,Massachusetts,USA;London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine,London,UKandCentre for Chronic Conditions and Injuries,Public Health Foundation of India,New Delhi,India. · Department of Epidemiology,Gillings School of Global Public Health,The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Chapel Hill,North Carolina,USA. · Department of Adult Psychiatry,University Hospitals Leuven,Leuven,BelgiumandDepartment of Neurosciences,Katholieke Universiteit Leuven,Leuven,Belgium. · Centre for Behavioural Sciences and Mental Health,Italian National Institute of Health,Rome,Italy. · Division of Psychiatry,Royal Edinburgh Hospital,University of Edinburg,Edinburgh,Scotland,UK. · Department of Family Medicine,School of Medical Sciences,Universiti Sains Malaysia,Kelantan,Malaysia. · Allina Health,Minneapolis,Minnesota,USA. · Centre for Women's Mental Health,Royal Women's Hospital,Parkville,AustraliaandMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences,University of Melbourne,Australia. · Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry,Institute of Mental Health,SingaporeandOffice of Clinical Sciences,Duke-NUS Medical School,Singapore. · Department of Psychological Medicine,Tan Tock Seng Hospital,Singapore. · School of Medicine and Public Health,University of Newcastle,New South Wales,Newcastle,AustraliaandIMPACT Strategic Research Centre,School of Medicine,Deakin University,Geelong,Victoria,Australia. · Clinical Center of Excellence for Body, Mind and Health,GGz Breburg,Tilburg,the Netherlands and Tilburg University,Faculty of Social Sciences,Tranzo Department,Tilburg,the Netherlands. · Department of General Practice,Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam,University of Amsterdam,Amsterdam,the Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health,Clinical Hospital,Universidad de Chile,Santiago,Chile;Millennium Institute for Depression and Personality Research (MIDAP),Ministry of Economy,Macul,Santiago,ChileandMood Disorders Program,Tufts Medical Center,Tufts University,Boston,USA. · Monash University,Melbourne,Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics,University of California San Francisco,San Francisco,California,USA;Department of Medicine,Veterans Affairs Medical Center,San Francisco,California,USAandDepartment of Medicine,University of California San Francisco,San Francisco,California,USA. · Department of Neuropsychopharmacology,National Institute of Mental Health,National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry,Ogawa-Higashi,Kodaira,Tokyo,Japan. · Department of Medicine and Therapeutics,Prince of Wales Hospital,The Chinese University of Hong Kong,Hong Kong Special Administrative Region,ChinaandAsia Diabetes Foundation,Prince of Wales Hospital,Hong Kong Special Administrative Region,China. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,Jewish General Hospital,Montréal,Québec,CanadaandDepartment of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health,Department of Medicine,Department of Psychology,Department of Psychiatry, andDepartment of Educational and Counselling Psychology,McGill University,Montréal, Québec,Canada. ·Br J Psychiatry · Pubmed #29717691.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Different diagnostic interviews are used as reference standards for major depression classification in research. Semi-structured interviews involve clinical judgement, whereas fully structured interviews are completely scripted. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), a brief fully structured interview, is also sometimes used. It is not known whether interview method is associated with probability of major depression classification.AimsTo evaluate the association between interview method and odds of major depression classification, controlling for depressive symptom scores and participant characteristics. METHOD: Data collected for an individual participant data meta-analysis of Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) diagnostic accuracy were analysed and binomial generalised linear mixed models were fit. RESULTS: A total of 17 158 participants (2287 with major depression) from 57 primary studies were analysed. Among fully structured interviews, odds of major depression were higher for the MINI compared with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) (odds ratio (OR) = 2.10; 95% CI = 1.15-3.87). Compared with semi-structured interviews, fully structured interviews (MINI excluded) were non-significantly more likely to classify participants with low-level depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 scores ≤6) as having major depression (OR = 3.13; 95% CI = 0.98-10.00), similarly likely for moderate-level symptoms (PHQ-9 scores 7-15) (OR = 0.96; 95% CI = 0.56-1.66) and significantly less likely for high-level symptoms (PHQ-9 scores ≥16) (OR = 0.50; 95% CI = 0.26-0.97). CONCLUSIONS: The MINI may identify more people as depressed than the CIDI, and semi-structured and fully structured interviews may not be interchangeable methods, but these results should be replicated.Declaration of interestDrs Jetté and Patten declare that they received a grant, outside the submitted work, from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, which was jointly funded by the Institute and Pfizer. Pfizer was the original sponsor of the development of the PHQ-9, which is now in the public domain. Dr Chan is a steering committee member or consultant of Astra Zeneca, Bayer, Lilly, MSD and Pfizer. She has received sponsorships and honorarium for giving lectures and providing consultancy and her affiliated institution has received research grants from these companies. Dr Hegerl declares that within the past 3 years, he was an advisory board member for Lundbeck, Servier and Otsuka Pharma; a consultant for Bayer Pharma; and a speaker for Medice Arzneimittel, Novartis, and Roche Pharma, all outside the submitted work. Dr Inagaki declares that he has received grants from Novartis Pharma, lecture fees from Pfizer, Mochida, Shionogi, Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma, Daiichi-Sankyo, Meiji Seika and Takeda, and royalties from Nippon Hyoron Sha, Nanzando, Seiwa Shoten, Igaku-shoin and Technomics, all outside of the submitted work. Dr Yamada reports personal fees from Meiji Seika Pharma Co., Ltd., MSD K.K., Asahi Kasei Pharma Corporation, Seishin Shobo, Seiwa Shoten Co., Ltd., Igaku-shoin Ltd., Chugai Igakusha and Sentan Igakusha, all outside the submitted work. All other authors declare no competing interests. No funder had any role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis and interpretation of the data; preparation, review or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

15 Article Effects of depression and anxiety on quality of life in five common neurological disorders. 2018

Prisnie, Joey C / Sajobi, Tolulope T / Wang, Meng / Patten, Scott B / Fiest, Kirsten M / Bulloch, Andrew G M / Pringsheim, Tamara / Wiebe, Samuel / Jette, Nathalie. ·Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada. · Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada; Department of Psychiatry and Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research, University of Calgary, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada; Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Canada; Department of Neurology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, United States. Electronic address: nathalie.jette@mssm.edu. ·Gen Hosp Psychiatry · Pubmed #29684713.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether anxiety and depression impact health-related quality of life (HRQoL) equally across neurological diseases. This study examines the association between anxiety or depression and HRQoL in select neurological disorders. METHODS: HRQoL was measured using the Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) in neurological patients: epilepsy (n = 279), migraine (n = 268), multiple sclerosis (MS) (n = 222), stroke (n = 204), and Parkinson's disease (PD) (n = 224). Depression and anxiety symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A), respectively. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate variables associated with the SF-12 mental health component (MCS) and physical health component scores (PCS). Pratt index was used to estimate the relative importance of anxiety and depression on HRQoL. RESULTS: Anxiety and depression had the largest contribution to PCS in stroke and to MCS in epilepsy. Overall, anxiety and depression had a larger contribution to MCS as compared to PCS, except in stroke patients. Different patterns were seen across neurological diseases, with mental health variables strongly affecting MCS in all conditions, with also a sizable contribution to PCS in migraine, MS, and stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Anxiety and depression have varying impacts on HRQoL across neurological diseases. It is important for clinicians to be aware of how these patterns differ in each condition.

16 Article Barriers and Facilitators for Guidelines with Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease or Dementia. 2018

Goodarzi, Zahra / Hanson, Heather M / Jette, Nathalie / Patten, Scott / Pringsheim, Tamara / Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna. ·Department of Community Health Sciences,University of Calgary. ·Can J Aging · Pubmed #29618389.

ABSTRACT: ABSTRACTOur primary objective was to understand the barriers and facilitators associated with the implementation of high-quality clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for depression and anxiety in patients with dementia or Parkinson's disease (PD). We conducted focus groups or interviews with participants experiencing dementia or PD, their caregivers, and physicians in Calgary, Alberta, and applied the theoretical domains framework and behaviour change wheel to guide data collection and perform a framework analysis. Thirty-three physicians and seven PD patients/caregivers participated. We report barriers and facilitators to the implementation of guideline recommendations for diagnosis, management, and the use of the guidelines. An overarching theme was the lack of evidence for depression or anxiety disorders in dementia or PD, which was prominent for anxiety versus depression. Patients noted difficulties with communicating symptoms and accessing services. Although guidelines are available, physicians have difficulty implementing certain recommendations due primarily to a lack of evidence regarding efficacy.

17 Article The prevalence of anxiety and associated factors in persons with multiple sclerosis. 2018

Pham, Tram / Jetté, Nathalie / Bulloch, Andrew G M / Burton, Jodie M / Wiebe, Samuel / Patten, Scott B. ·Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1; The Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1. Electronic address: trampham@live.ca. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1; The Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1; Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1. · Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1; The Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1; Department of Psychiatry, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1. Electronic address: bulloch@ucalgary.ca. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1; The Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1; Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1. Electronic address: jodie.burton@alberthealthservices.ca. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1; The Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1; Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1. Electronic address: swiebe@ucalgary.ca. · The Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1; Department of Psychiatry, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1. Electronic address: Patten@ucalgary.ca. ·Mult Scler Relat Disord · Pubmed #29125968.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The prevalence of anxiety and its association with sociodemographic and clinical factors is not well characterized in those with multiple sclerosis (MS). We aimed to estimate the prevalence and examine associated factors of anxiety in persons with MS. METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was conducted utilizing data from 244 participants from the Neurological Disease and Depression study. Anxiety was assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression was used to examine anxiety and associated factors. RESULTS: Nearly 30.0% of participants had anxiety according to the HADS. The most prevalent symptom of anxiety was "worrying thoughts" (26.6%). After adjustment for various confounders, depression (OR: 7.31 95% CI 3.29-16.26) was found to be associated with higher odds of anxiety, while lower odds of anxiety were associated with higher education (OR: 0.51, 95% CI 0.28-0.94). Furthermore, anxiety was strongly associated with decreased quality of life. CONCLUSION: Anxiety represents a substantial burden for those with MS and is associated with a variety of adverse outcomes including decreased quality of life. Our results further emphasize the importance of understanding the impact of anxiety in this population.

18 Article Patterns of association of chronic medical conditions and major depression. 2018

Patten, S B / Williams, J V A / Lavorato, D H / Wang, J L / Jetté, N / Sajobi, T T / Fiest, K M / Bulloch, A G M. ·Department of Community Health Sciences and Department of Psychiatry,Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary,Calgary, AB, T2N 4Z6,Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences,University of Calgary,Calgary, AB, T2N 4Z6,Canada. · Department of Psychiatry and Department of Community Health Sciences,University of Calgary, Mathison Centre for Research & Education in Mental Health, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary,Calgary, AB, T2N 4Z6,Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Department of Community Health Sciences,Hotchkiss Brain Institute and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary,Calgary, AB, T2N 4Z6,Canada. · Critical Care Medicine,University of Calgary,Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4,Canada. ·Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci · Pubmed #27784343.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: Age and sex-related patterns of association between medical conditions and major depressive episodes (MDE) are important for understanding disease burden, anticipating clinical needs and for formulating etiological hypotheses. General population estimates are especially valuable because they are not distorted by help-seeking behaviours. However, even large population surveys often deliver inadequate precision to adequately describe such patterns. In this study, data from a set of national surveys were pooled to increase precision, supporting more precise characterisation of these associations. METHODS: The data were from a series of Canadian national surveys. These surveys used comparable sampling strategies and assessment methods for MDE. Chronic medical conditions were assessed using items asking about professionally diagnosed medical conditions. Individual-level meta-analysis methods were used to generate unadjusted, stratified and adjusted prevalence odds ratios for 11 chronic medical conditions. Random effects models were used in the meta-analysis. A procedure incorporating rescaled replicate bootstrap weights was used to produce 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Overall, conditions characterised by pain and inflammation tended to show stronger associations with MDE. The meta-analysis uncovered two previously undescribed patterns of association. Effect modification by age was observed in varying degrees for most conditions. This effect was most prominent for high blood pressure and cancer. Stronger associations were found in younger age categories. Migraine was an exception: the strength of association increased with age, especially in men. Second, especially for conditions predominantly affecting older age groups (arthritis, diabetes, back pain, cataracts, effects of stroke and heart disease) confounding by age was evident. For each condition, age adjustment resulted in strengthening of the associations. In addition to migraine, two conditions displayed distinctive patterns of association. Age adjusted odds ratios for thyroid disease reflected a weak association that was only significant in women. In epilepsy, a similar strength of association was found irrespective of age or sex. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of MDE is elevated in association with most chronic conditions, but especially those characterised by inflammation and pain. Effect modification by age may reflect greater challenges or difficulties encountered by young people attempting to cope with these conditions. This pattern, however, does not apply to migraine or epilepsy. Neurobiological changes associated with these conditions may offset coping-related effects, such that the association does not weaken with age. Prominent confounding by age for several conditions suggests that age adjustments are necessary in order to avoid underestimating the strength of these associations.

19 Article Discriminative ability of quality of life measures in multiple sclerosis. 2017

Fiest, Kirsten M / Greenfield, Jamie / Metz, Luanne M / Patten, Scott B / Jetté, Nathalie / Marrie, Ruth Ann. ·Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, GF533, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, MB, R3A 1R9, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, GF533, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, MB, R3A 1R9, Canada. rmarrie@hsc.mb.ca. · Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. rmarrie@hsc.mb.ca. ·Health Qual Life Outcomes · Pubmed #29268750.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Though many people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have comorbidities, the use of generic and disease-specific health related quality of life (HRQOL) scales to discriminate the effects of comorbidity has not been established. The utility of these scales to discriminate differences between persons with varying levels of disability is also unknown. METHODS: Using online questionnaires, a convenience sample of Albertans with MS was recruited between July 2011 and March 2013. Participants completed demographic questions, a validated comorbidity questionnaire, a self-reported disability scale, and the following HRQOL scales: the Short Form (SF)-36, SF-6D, Health Utilities Index-Mark III (HUI-III), and Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 (MSQOL-54). The ability of each HRQOL scale to distinguish between comorbidity groups was assessed using a one-way analysis of covariance, adjusting for age, sex, disease course, and disability level. RESULTS: Five hundred sixty three participants completed all relevant questionnaires. All HRQOL measures distinguished between persons with or without depression, while none were able to distinguish between participants with or without hypertension, thyroid disease, irritable bowel syndrome, or osteoporosis. The SF-36 physical scale, SF-6D, HUI-III, and MSQOL-54 physical scales were able to distinguish between all disability groups, though the HUI-III was better able to distinguish between individuals with moderate versus severe disability. CONCLUSIONS: Disease-specific measures would discriminate better between those with and without comorbidities than generic-specific measures and the HUI-III would discriminate best between persons with differing severities of disability. Generic or disease-specific measures may be useful in future studies examining the effects of comorbidity in MS and the effects of treatment of comorbidities in MS.

20 Article The prevalence of depression and the accuracy of depression screening tools in migraine patients. 2017

Amoozegar, Farnaz / Patten, Scott B / Becker, Werner J / Bulloch, Andrew G M / Fiest, Kirsten M / Davenport, W Jeptha / Carroll, Christopher R / Jette, Nathalie. ·Dept of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Canada. Electronic address: farnaz.amoozegar@albertahealthservices.ca. · Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Canada; Dept of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Dept of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education, Canada. · Dept of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Canada. · Dept of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Canada; Dept of Medical Genetics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Dept of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Dept of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Canada; Dept of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Canada. ·Gen Hosp Psychiatry · Pubmed #28917391.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Migraine and depression are common comorbid conditions. The purpose of this study was to assess how well the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) perform as depression screening tools in patients with migraine. METHODS: Three hundred consecutive migraine patients were recruited from a large headache center. The PHQ-9 and HADS were self-administered and validated against the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV, a gold standard for the diagnosis of depression. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and receiver-operator characteristic curves were calculated for the PHQ-9 and HADS. RESULTS: At the traditional cut-point of 10, the PHQ-9 demonstrated 82.0% sensitivity and 79.9% specificity. At a cut-point of 8, the HADS demonstrated 86.5% sensitivity and specificity. The PHQ-9 algorithm performed poorly (53.8% sensitivity, 94.9% specificity). The point prevalence of depression in this study was 25.0% (95% CI 19.0-31.0), and 17.0% of patients had untreated depression. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the PHQ-9 and HADS performed well in migraine patients attending a headache clinic, but optimal cut-points to screen for depression vary depending on the goals of the assessment. Also, migraine patients attending a headache clinic have a high prevalence of depression and many are inadequately treated. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings and to evaluate the impact of depression screening.

21 Article Psychiatric comorbidities in epilepsy. 2017

Josephson, Colin B / Jetté, Nathalie. ·a Department of Clinical Neurosciences , Hotchkiss Brain Institute and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary , Calgary , AB , Canada. ·Int Rev Psychiatry · Pubmed #28681667.

ABSTRACT: Psychiatric comorbidities, including mood, anxiety, and psychotic disorders, are common in epilepsy, often occurring at rates 2-3-fold or higher than in the general population without epilepsy. This article discusses the epidemiology of psychiatric disorders in epilepsy, hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of these comorbidities, and treatment implications. More specifically, it addresses: (1) How common are major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and psychotic disorders in epilepsy? (2) How does one screen for these psychiatric disorders in persons with epilepsy? (3) Why do psychiatric conditions occur in epilepsy? (4) Is the treatment of psychiatric comorbidity in epilepsy associated with seizures? The important topic of suicide and suicidal ideation in epilepsy, risk factors for their occurrence, and how to screen for these co-existent conditions is also discussed. Finally, gaps in knowledge regarding psychiatric conditions in epilepsy are briefly discussed.

22 Article Mind the gap: Exploring information gaps for the development of an online resource hub for epilepsy and depression. 2017

Crooks, Rachel E / Bell, Meaghan / Patten, Scott B / Wiebe, Samuel / Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna / Bulloch, Andrew G / Macrodimitris, Sophia / Mackie, Aaron / Sauro, Khara M / Federico, Paolo / Jetté, Nathalie. ·Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Room 1195, Foothills Hospital, 1403-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 2T9, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Health Research Innovation Centre, Room 1A10, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1, Canada. · Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Health Research Innovation Centre, Room 1A10, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences & O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3rd Floor TRW Building, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada; The Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, TRW Building, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4Z6, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 1403-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 2T9, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Room 1195, Foothills Hospital, 1403-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 2T9, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Health Research Innovation Centre, Room 1A10, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences & O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3rd Floor TRW Building, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada. · Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Health Research Innovation Centre, Room 1A10, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences & O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3rd Floor TRW Building, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada; Department of Medicine, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 1403-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 2T9, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 1403-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 2T9, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Room 1195, Foothills Hospital, 1403-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 2T9, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Health Research Innovation Centre, Room 1A10, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences & O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3rd Floor TRW Building, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada. Electronic address: Nathalie.Jette@albertahealthservices.ca. ·Epilepsy Behav · Pubmed #28407525.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Depression is common in epilepsy, and is often under-detected and under-treated. The motivation to create a depression eHub for persons with epilepsy is to connect them to the best available online resources to effectively manage their depression. The study sought to: 1) identify facilitators and barriers to accessing resources related to management of epilepsy and/or depression and 2) discuss gaps in available resources (free and in the public domain) and 3) identify suggestions for future content. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten patients with epilepsy and a history of depression. Using inductive analysis, two team members engaged in a process of textual open-coding utilizing a conventional content analysis approach whereby content was conceptually clustered based on the research questions. A phenomenological framework was applied to describe the phenomenon of online health resource access and utilization from the perspective of people with epilepsy. RESULTS: Facilitators to the use of online resources included information credibility, thoughtful organization, and accessibility of resources. Barriers included difficulties finding and piecing together information from many different sites. Patients reported difficulty having the motivation to seek out resources while depressed, which was compounded by feelings of stigma, social isolation, and lack of control. Gaps in resources included a lack of information about living with epilepsy day-to-day and resources for family and friends. Suggested content included information to raise awareness about epilepsy and depression; questionnaires to screen for symptoms of depression; stories of other patients with epilepsy and depression via video or moderated forums; current research and news; local community resources; and tools and strategies to manage depression in epilepsy. CONCLUSIONS: There is a gap in accessible resources for patients with epilepsy and depression as well as barriers that include epilepsy-related restrictions, depression-related impairments, lack of awareness, and stigmatization. These results should be used to guide the development of e-Health resources for patients with epilepsy.

23 Article The impact of seizures on epilepsy outcomes: A national, community-based survey. 2017

Josephson, Colin B / Patten, Scott B / Bulloch, Andrew / Williams, Jeanne V A / Lavorato, Dina / Fiest, Kirsten M / Secco, Mary / Jette, Nathalie. ·Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · O'Brien Institute of Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Critical Care, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Canadian Epilepsy Alliance, London, Ontario, Canada. · Neurological Health Charities Canada, London, Ontario, Canada. ·Epilepsia · Pubmed #28345152.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the impact of seizures on persons living with epilepsy in a national, community-based setting. METHODS: The data source was the Survey of Living with Neurological Conditions in Canada (SLNCC), a cohort derived from a national population-based survey of noninstitutionalized persons aged 15 or more years. Participants had to be on a seizure drug or to have had a seizure in the past 5 years to meet the definition of active epilepsy. The respondents were further stratified by seizure status: the seizure group experienced ≥1 seizure in the past 5 years versus the no seizure group who were seizure-free in the past ≥5 years regardless of medication status. Weighted overall and stratified prevalence estimates and odds ratios were used to estimate associations. RESULTS: The SLNCC included 713 persons with epilepsy with a mean age of 45.4 (standard deviation 18.0) years. Fewer people in the seizure group (42.7%) reported being much better than a year ago versus those in the no seizure group (70.1%). Of those with seizures, 32.1% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 18.8-45.3) had symptoms suggestive of major depression (as per the Patient Health Questionnaire-9) compared to 7.7% (95% CI 3.4-11.9) of those without seizures. Driving, educational, and work opportunities were also significantly limited, whereas stigma was significantly greater in those with seizures. SIGNIFICANCE: This community-based study emphasizes the need for seizure freedom to improve clinical and psychosocial outcomes in persons with epilepsy. Seizure freedom has an important influence on overall health, as those with at least one seizure over the prior 5 years had an increased risk of mood disorders, worse quality of life, and faced significantly more stigma.

24 Article Association of Depression and Treated Depression With Epilepsy and Seizure Outcomes: A Multicohort Analysis. 2017

Josephson, Colin B / Lowerison, Mark / Vallerand, Isabelle / Sajobi, Tolulope T / Patten, Scott / Jette, Nathalie / Wiebe, Samuel. ·Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada2Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada3Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada4O'Brien Institute of Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada5Clinical Research Unit, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada3Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada4O'Brien Institute of Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada6Department of Psychiatry, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada2Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada3Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada4O'Brien Institute of Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada5Clinical Research Unit, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ·JAMA Neurol · Pubmed #28241168.

ABSTRACT: Importance: A bidirectional relationship exists between epilepsy and depression. However, any putative biological gradient between depression severity and the risk of epilepsy, and the degree to which depression mediates the influence of independent risk factors for epilepsy, has yet to be examined. Objective: To determine the effect of depression on the risk of epilepsy and seizure outcomes. Design, Setting, and Participants: An observational study of a population-based primary care cohort (all patients free of prevalent depression and epilepsy at 18-90 years of age who were active after the Acceptable Mortality Reporting date in The Health Improvement Network database) and a prospectively collected tertiary care cohort (all patients whose data were prospectively collected from the Calgary Comprehensive Epilepsy Programme). The analyses were performed on March 16, 2016. Main Outcome and Measures: The hazard of developing epilepsy after incident depression and vice versa was calculated. In addition, a mediation analysis of the effect of depression on risk factors for epilepsy and the odds of seizure freedom stratified by the presence of depression were performed. Results: We identified 10 595 709 patients in The Health Improvement Network of whom 229 164 (2.2%) developed depression and 97 177 (0.9%) developed epilepsy. The median age was 44 years (interquartile range, 32-58 years) for those with depression and 56 years (interquartile range, 43-71 years) for those with epilepsy. Significantly more patients with depression (144 373 [63%] were women, and 84 791 [37%] were men; P < .001) or epilepsy (54 419 [56%] were women, and 42 758 [44%] were men; P < .001) were female. Incident epilepsy was associated with an increased hazard of developing depression (hazard ratio [HR], 2.04 [95% CI, 1.97-2.09]; P < .001), and incident depression was associated with an increased hazard of developing epilepsy (HR, 2.55 [95% CI, 2.49-2.60]; P < .001) There was an incremental hazard according to depression treatment type with lowest risk for those receiving counselling alone (HR, 1.84 [95% CI, 1.30-2.59]; P < .001), an intermediate risk for those receiving antidepressants alone (HR, 3.43 [95% CI, 3.37-3.47]; P < .001), and the highest risk for those receiving both (HR, 9.85 [95% CI, 5.74-16.90]; P < .001). Furthermore, depression mediated the relationship between sex, social deprivation, and Charlson Comorbidity Index with incident epilepsy, accounting for 4.6%, 7.1%, and 20.6% of the total effects of these explanatory variables, respectively. In the Comprehensive Epilepsy Programme, the odds of failing to achieve 1-year seizure freedom were significantly higher for those with depression or treated depression. Conclusions and Relevance: Common underlying pathophysiological mechanisms may explain the risk of developing epilepsy following incident depression. Treated depression is associated with worse epilepsy outcomes, suggesting that this may be a surrogate for more severe depression and that severity of depression is associated with severity of epilepsy.

25 Article Physical comorbidities increase the risk of psychiatric comorbidity in multiple sclerosis. 2016

Marrie, Ruth Ann / Patten, Scott B / Greenfield, Jamie / Svenson, Lawrence W / Jette, Nathalie / Tremlett, Helen / Wolfson, Christina / Warren, Sharon / Profetto-McGrath, Joanne / Fisk, John D / Anonymous28080882 / Blanchard, James / Caetano, Patricia / Elliott, Lawrence / Yu, Bo Nancy / Bhan, Virender / Svenson, Larry. ·Department of Internal Medicine University of Manitoba Winnipeg Manitoba Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences University of Manitoba Winnipeg Manitoba Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences University of Calgary Calgary Alberta Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Hotchkiss Brain Institute University of Calgary Calgary Alberta Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences University of Calgary Calgary Alberta Canada; School of Public Health University of Alberta Edmonton Alberta Canada; Surveillance and Assessment Alberta Health Edmonton Alberta Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences University of Calgary Calgary Alberta Canada; Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Hotchkiss Brain Institute University of Calgary Calgary Alberta Canada; O'Brien Institute for Public Health University of Calgary Calgary Alberta Canada. · Department of Medicine (Neurology) University of British Columbia Vancouver British Columbia Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Occupational Health McGill University Montreal Quebec Canada. · Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine University of Alberta Edmonton Alberta Canada. · Faculty of Nursing University of Alberta Edmonton Alberta Canada. · Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine Dalhousie University Halifax Nova Scotia Canada. · Department of Internal Medicine University of Manitoba Winnipeg Manitoba Canada. ·Brain Behav · Pubmed #27688933.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Risk factors for psychiatric comorbidity in multiple sclerosis (MS) are poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the association between physical comorbidity and incident depression, anxiety disorder, and bipolar disorder in a MS population relative to a matched general population cohort. METHODS: Using population-based administrative data from Alberta, Canada we identified 9624 persons with MS, and 41,194 matches. Using validated case definitions, we estimated the incidence of depression, anxiety disorder, and bipolar disorder, and their association with physical comorbidities using Cox regression, adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and index year. RESULTS: In both populations, men had a lower risk of depression and anxiety disorders than women, as did individuals who were ≥45 years versus <45 years at the index date. The risk of bipolar disorder declined with increasing age. The risks of incident depression (HR 1.92; 1.82-2.04), anxiety disorders (HR 1.52; 1.42-1.63), and bipolar disorder (HR 2.67; 2.29-3.11) were higher in the MS population than the matched population. These associations persisted essentially unchanged after adjustment for covariates including physical comorbidities. Multiple physical comorbidities were associated with psychiatric disorders in both populations. CONCLUSION: Persons with MS are at increased risk of psychiatric comorbidity generally, and some physical comorbidities are associated with additional risk.

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