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Depression: HELP
Articles by Thomas Munk Laursen
Based on 13 articles published since 2010
(Why 13 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, T. M. Laursen wrote the following 13 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Mortality and life expectancy in persons with severe unipolar depression. 2016

Laursen, Thomas Munk / Musliner, Katherine L / Benros, Michael E / Vestergaard, Mogens / Munk-Olsen, Trine. ·National Centre for Register-based Research, Department of Economics and Business, Aarhus University, Denmark. · National Centre for Register-based Research, Department of Economics and Business, Aarhus University, Denmark; Department of Mental Health, Bloomberg school of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA. · Mental Health Centre Copenhagen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. · Research Unit for General Practice, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #26773921.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depression is a common psychiatric disorder, with a lifetime prevalence of 10-15% in the Danish population. Although depression is associated with excess mortality, it is not yet understood how this affects life expectancy. Our aim was to examine mortality rates and life expectancy in patients with unipolar depression compared to the general population, and to assess the impact of comorbid somatic illness and substance abuse. METHODS: We followed a Danish population-based cohort from 1995-2013 (N=5,103,699). The cohort included all residents in Denmark during the study period. Mortality rate ratios (MRRs) and life expectancy in persons with unipolar depression were calculated using survival analysis techniques. RESULTS: The overall MRR was 2.07 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 2.05-2.09) in people with a previous unipolar depression diagnosis compared to the general Danish population. This excess mortality translated into a reduced life expectancy of 14.0 years in men and 10.1 years in women (assuming onset at age 15). The MRR was highest for death due to suicide and accidents (MRR: 4.66; 95% CI: 4.53-4.79), but the absolute number of deaths was highest for natural causes. CONCLUSION: People with unipolar depression have a significant shorter life expectancy, especially men.

2 Article Self-harm in women with postpartum mental disorders. 2019

Johannsen, Benedicte Marie / Larsen, Janne Tidselbak / Laursen, Thomas Munk / Ayre, Karyn / Howard, Louise M / Meltzer-Brody, Samantha / Bech, Bodil Hammer / Munk-Olsen, Trine. ·National Center for Register-based Research,Aarhus University,Fuglesangs Allé 26, 8210 Aarhus,Denmark. · Section of Women's Mental Health,Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London,London,UK. · Department of Psychiatry,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine,Chapel Hill,USA. · Department of Public Health,Research Unit of Epidemiology,Aarhus University,Aarhus,Denmark. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #31298172.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Women suffering from first onset postpartum mental disorders (PPMD) have a highly elevated risk of suicide. The current study aimed to: (1) describe the risk of self-harm among women with PPMD and (2) investigate the extent to which self-harm is associated with later suicide. METHODS: We conducted a register-based cohort study linking national Danish registers. This identified women with any recorded first inpatient or outpatient contact to a psychiatric facility within 90 days after giving birth to their first child. The main outcome of interest was defined as the first hospital-registered episode of self-harm. Our cohort consisted of 1 202 292 women representing 24 053 543 person-years at risk. RESULTS: Among 1554 women with severe first onset PPMD, 64 had a first-ever hospital record of self-harm. Women with PPMD had a hazard ratio (HR) for self-harm of 6.2 (95% CI 4.9-8.0), compared to mothers without mental disorders; but self-harm risk was lower in PPMD women compared to mothers with non-PPMD [HR: 10.1, (95% CI 9.6-10.5)] and childless women with mental disorders [HR: 9.3 (95% CI 8.9-9.7)]. Women with PPMD and records of self-harm had a significantly greater risk for later suicide compared with all other groups of women in the cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Women with PPMD had a high risk of self-harm, although lower than risks observed in other psychiatric patients. However, PPMD women who had self-harmed constituted a vulnerable group at significantly increased risk of later suicide.

3 Article Examining the Association of Antidepressant Prescriptions With First Abortion and First Childbirth. 2018

Steinberg, Julia R / Laursen, Thomas M / Adler, Nancy E / Gasse, Christiane / Agerbo, Esben / Munk-Olsen, Trine. ·Department of Family Science, University of Maryland, College Park. · Centre for Integrated Register-Based Research (CIRRAU), National Centre for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research (iPSYCH), Aarhus, Denmark. · National Centre for Register-Based Research (NCRR), Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco. ·JAMA Psychiatry · Pubmed #29847626.

ABSTRACT: Importance: The repercussions of abortion for mental health have been used to justify state policies that limit access to abortion in the United States. Much earlier research has relied on self-report of abortion or mental health conditions or on convenience samples. This study uses data that rely on neither. Objective: To examine whether first-trimester first abortion or first childbirth is associated with an increase in women's initiation of a first-time prescription for an antidepressant. Design, Setting, and Participants: This study linked data and identified a cohort of women from Danish population registries who were born in Denmark between January 1, 1980, and December 30, 1994. Overall, 396 397 women were included in this study; of these women, 30 834 had a first-trimester first abortion and 85 592 had a first childbirth. Main Outcomes and Measure: First-time antidepressant prescription redemptions were determined and used as indication of an episode of depression or anxiety, and incident rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated comparing women who had an abortion vs women who did not have an abortion and women who had a childbirth vs women who did not have a childbirth. Results: Of 396 397 women whose data were analyzed, 17 294 (4.4%) had a record of at least 1 first-trimester abortion and no children, 72 052 (18.2%) had at least 1 childbirth and no abortions, 13 540 (3.4%) had at least 1 abortion and 1 childbirth, and 293 511 (74.1%) had neither an abortion nor a childbirth. A total of 59 465 (15.0%) had a record of first antidepressant use. In the basic and fully adjusted models, relative to women who had not had an abortion, women who had a first abortion had a higher risk of first-time antidepressant use. However, the fully adjusted IRRs that compared women who had an abortion with women who did not have an abortion were not statistically different in the year before the abortion (IRR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.38-1.54) and the year after the abortion (IRR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.45-1.62) (P = .10) and decreased as time from the abortion increased (1-5 years: IRR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.19-1.29; >5 years: IRR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.05-1.18). The fully adjusted IRRs that compared women who gave birth with women who did not give birth were lower in the year before childbirth (IRR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.43-0.50) compared with the year after childbirth (IRR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.88-0.98) (P < .001) and increased as time from the childbirth increased (1-5 years: IRR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.47-1.56; >5 years: IRR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.91-2.09). Across all women in the sample, the strongest risk factors associated with antidepressant use in the fully adjusted model were having a previous psychiatric contact (IRR, 3.70; 95% CI, 3.62-3.78), having previously obtained an antianxiety medication (IRR, 3.03; 95% CI, 2.99-3.10), and having previously obtained antipsychotic medication (IRR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.81-1.96). Conclusions and Relevance: Women who have abortions are more likely to use antidepressants compared with women who do not have abortions. However, additional aforementioned findings from this study support the conclusion that increased use of antidepressants is not attributable to having had an abortion but to differences in risk factors for depression. Thus, policies based on the notion that abortion harms women's mental health may be misinformed.

4 Article Incidence of child and adolescent mental disorders in children aged 0-17 with familial high risk for severe mental illness - A Danish register study. 2018

Thorup, Anne A E / Laursen, Thomas Munk / Munk-Olsen, Trine / Ranning, Anne / Mortensen, Preben Bo / Plessen, Kerstin J / Nordentoft, Merete. ·Child and Adolescent Mental Health Center, Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark; iPsych - The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Denmark. Electronic address: Anne.Amalie.Elgaard.Thorup@regionh.dk. · National Center for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Denmark; iPsych - The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, Denmark. Electronic address: tml@econ.au.dk. · National Center for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Denmark; iPsych - The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, Denmark. Electronic address: tmo@econ.au.dk. · Reseach Unit at Mental Health Center Copenhagen, Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark; iPsych - The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, Denmark. Electronic address: Anne.Ranning@regionh.dk. · National Center for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Denmark; Cirrau - Centre for Integrated Register-based Research at Aarhus University, Denmark. Electronic address: pbm@econ.au.dk. · Child and Adolescent Mental Health Center, Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark; iPsych - The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Denmark. Electronic address: Kerstin.Jessica.Plessen@regionh.dk. · Reseach Unit at Mental Health Center Copenhagen, Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark; iPsych - The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Denmark. Electronic address: Merete.Nordentoft@dadlnet.dk. ·Schizophr Res · Pubmed #29132814.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Offspring of parents with severe mental illness (SMI: schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder) have an increased risk of developing mental disorder themselves. In childhood they may have neurodevelopmental delays, cognitive deficits and social adversities. We aimed to investigate if these individuals are more at risk of being diagnosed with a mental disorder during childhood/adolescence in a national sample. METHODS: By linking Danish registers we established a cohort consisting of all persons born to parents with SMI with those born to parents without SMI serving as a reference group. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for offspring diagnosed with a mental disorder by parental mental disorder were calculated. RESULTS: Offspring of parents with SMI showed increased IRR for all diagnoses of child and adolescent mental disorders compared to the reference group. Offspring of mothers with schizophrenia had IRR of 2.60 (CI: 2.50-2.70, N=2550) of having any diagnoses, for children of fathers with schizophrenia IRR was 2.06 (CI: 1.97-2.16, N=1901) and for offspring of two parents with schizophrenia IRR was 4.57 (CI: 3.94-5.31, N=175). For individuals with a mother with bipolar disorder the IRR was 2.29 (CI: 2.09-2.50, N=502), with a father 1.77 (CI: 1.74-1.87, N=320), whereas the IRR was 2.96 (CI: 2.63-3.34, N=264) if both parents had unipolar depression. DISCUSSION: Offspring of parents with a SMI have a higher risk of being diagnosed with any child and adolescent mental disorder. The IRRs for all diagnoses during childhood were increased by a factor 2-4. Having two ill parents increased the IRR.

5 Article Vascular Pathology and Trajectories of Late-Life Major Depressive Disorder in Secondary Psychiatric Care. 2018

Musliner, Katherine L / Zandi, Peter P / Liu, Xiaoqin / Laursen, Thomas M / Munk-Olsen, Trine / Mortensen, Preben B / Eaton, William W. ·National Center for Register-based Research, Department of Economics and Business Economics, School of Business and Social Sciences, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; iPSYCH, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrated Psychiatric Research, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Mental Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: klm@econ.au.dk. · Department of Mental Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. · National Center for Register-based Research, Department of Economics and Business Economics, School of Business and Social Sciences, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; iPSYCH, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrated Psychiatric Research, Copenhagen, Denmark. · National Center for Register-based Research, Department of Economics and Business Economics, School of Business and Social Sciences, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; iPSYCH, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrated Psychiatric Research, Copenhagen, Denmark; CIRRAU - Center for Integrated Register-based Research at Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. ·Am J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #28807498.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To examine 5-year trajectories of psychiatrist-treated late-life major depressive disorder (MDD), and evaluate whether previous vascular pathology is associated with more severe trajectories of late-life MDD. METHODS: Data were obtained from nationally representative civil, psychiatric, hospital, and prescription registers in Denmark. The sample included 11,092 older adults (≥60 years) who received their first diagnosis of MDD in a psychiatric facility in Denmark between 2000 and 2007. Trajectories of inpatient or outpatient contact at psychiatric hospitals for MDD over the 5-year period following index MDD diagnosis were modeled using latent class growth analysis. Measures of vascular disease (stroke, heart disease, vascular dementia) and vascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes) were defined based on medication prescriptions and hospital-based diagnoses. Other predictors included demographic characteristics and characteristics of the index MDD diagnosis. RESULTS: The final model included 4 trajectories with consistently low (66% of the sample), high decreasing (19%), consistently high (9%), and moderate fluctuating (6%) probabilities of contact at a psychiatric hospital for MDD during the 5-year period following the index MDD diagnosis. We found no significant associations between any form of vascular pathology and trajectory class membership. Relative to the consistently low class, older age, greater severity and >12 months of prior antidepressant medication use predicted membership in the other three classes. CONCLUSIONS: A notable proportion (34%) of individuals diagnosed with MDD in late-life require secondary psychiatric treatment for extended time periods. We did not find evidence that vascular pathology predicts hospital contact trajectories in secondary-treated late-life MDD.

6 Article Increased mortality among people with anxiety disorders: total population study. 2016

Meier, Sandra M / Mattheisen, Manuel / Mors, Ole / Mortensen, Preben B / Laursen, Thomas M / Penninx, Brenda W. ·Sandra M. Meier, PhD, National Centre for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus, and Mental Health Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Copenhagen Region, Denmark; Manuel Mattheisen, MD, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus, and Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; Ole Mors, PhD, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus, and Research Department P, Aarhus University Hospital, Risskov, Denmark; Preben B. Mortensen, DrMedSc, National Centre for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus, and The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus, Denmark; Thomas M. Laursen, PhD, National Centre for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus, and The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus, Denmark; Brenda W. Penninx, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands smeier@econ.au.dk. · Sandra M. Meier, PhD, National Centre for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus, and Mental Health Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Copenhagen Region, Denmark; Manuel Mattheisen, MD, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus, and Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; Ole Mors, PhD, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus, and Research Department P, Aarhus University Hospital, Risskov, Denmark; Preben B. Mortensen, DrMedSc, National Centre for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus, and The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus, Denmark; Thomas M. Laursen, PhD, National Centre for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus, and The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus, Denmark; Brenda W. Penninx, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ·Br J Psychiatry · Pubmed #27388572.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders and depression are the most common mental disorders worldwide and have a striking impact on global disease burden. Although depression has consistently been found to increase mortality; the role of anxiety disorders in predicting mortality risk is unclear. AIMS: To assess mortality risk in people with anxiety disorders. METHOD: We used nationwide Danish register data to conduct a prospective cohort study with over 30 million person-years of follow-up. RESULTS: In total, 1066 (2.1%) people with anxiety disorders died during an average follow-up of 9.7 years. The risk of death by natural and unnatural causes was significantly higher among individuals with anxiety disorders (natural mortality rate ratio (MRR) = 1.39, 95% CI 1.28-1.51; unnatural MRR = 2.46, 95% CI 2.20-2.73) compared with the general population. Of those who died from unnatural causes, 16.5% had comorbid diagnoses of depression (MRR = 11.72, 95% CI 10.11-13.51). CONCLUSIONS: Anxiety disorders significantly increased mortality risk. Comorbidity of anxiety disorders and depression played an important part in the increased mortality.

7 Article Heterogeneity in 10-Year Course Trajectories of Moderate to Severe Major Depressive Disorder: A Danish National Register-Based Study. 2016

Musliner, Katherine L / Munk-Olsen, Trine / Laursen, Thomas M / Eaton, William W / Zandi, Peter P / Mortensen, Preben B. ·National Centre for Register-Based Research, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark2The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Denmark3Department of Mental Health, The Johns. · National Centre for Register-Based Research, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark2The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Denmark. · Department of Mental Health, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. ·JAMA Psychiatry · Pubmed #26934026.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Evidence suggests that long-term trajectories of major depressive disorder (MDD) are heterogeneous. The Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register (DPCRR) provides a rare opportunity to examine patterns and correlates of long-term trajectories in a large sample of patients with moderate to severe MDD. OBJECTIVE: To characterize patterns and correlates of 10-year course trajectories of MDD in the DPCRR. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A cohort containing 11 640 individuals born in Denmark in 1955 or later with their first recorded MDD diagnosis in the DPCRR between 1995 and 2002 was established. Patients were followed for 10 years from the date of their initial MDD diagnosis. Data were obtained from Danish civil and psychiatric national registers in June 2013 and were analyzed from April 4, 2014, to December 17, 2015. Correlates of trajectory class membership were sex, characteristics of the first recorded MDD episode (ie, age, severity, inpatient treatment, and record of suicide attempt or self-harm), and psychiatric diagnoses in parents (ie, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, substance abuse, and anxiety or somatoform disorders). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The outcome variable was past-year contact at a psychiatric hospital with a main diagnosis of MDD during each of the 10 years following the initial MDD diagnosis. Trajectories were modeled using latent class growth analysis. RESULTS: The sample included 11 640 individuals (7493 [64.4%] women) aged 18 to 48 years (mean [SD], 31.4 [7.3]) at their first recorded MDD diagnosis. Four trajectory classes were identified: brief contact (77.0%) (characterized by low probability of contact after 2 years); prolonged initial contact (12.8%) (characterized by high decreasing probability of contact during the first 5 years); later reentry (7.1%) (characterized by moderate probability of contact during the second 5 years); and persistent contact (3.1%) (characterized by high or moderate probability of contact throughout). Female sex (odds ratio [OR] range, 1.82-2.22), inpatient treatment (OR range, 1.40-1.50), and severity at first recorded MDD episode (OR range: moderate, 1.61-1.84; severe, 1.93-2.23; and psychotic, 2.73-3.07) were associated with more severe trajectories. Parental anxiety (OR, 1.34 [95% CI, 1.10-1.63]) and depression (OR, 1.63 [95% CI, 1.28-2.09]) were associated with the prolonged initial contact and later reentry classes, respectively. Parental schizophrenia was associated with the persistent contact class (OR range, 2.55-3.04). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Most people treated for moderate to severe MDD in Danish psychiatric hospitals do not receive additional MDD treatment after 2 years; however, a minority receive specialty treatment for up to a decade. Observable heterogeneity in the course may be indicative of underlying etiologic differences.

8 Article Secondary depression in severe anxiety disorders: a population-based cohort study in Denmark. 2015

Meier, Sandra M / Petersen, Liselotte / Mattheisen, Manuel / Mors, Ole / Mortensen, Preben B / Laursen, Thomas M. ·National Centre for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus V, Denmark; The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus C, Denmark. Electronic address: smeier@econ.au.dk. · National Centre for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus V, Denmark; The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus C, Denmark. · The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus C, Denmark; Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark. · The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus C, Denmark; Research Department P, Aarhus University Hospital, Risskov, Denmark. ·Lancet Psychiatry · Pubmed #26360447.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depression and anxiety disorders are highly comorbid conditions and a worldwide disease burden; however, large-scale studies delineating their association are scarce. In this retrospective study, we aimed to assess the effect of severe anxiety disorders on the risk and course of depression. METHODS: We did a population-based cohort study with prospectively gathered data in Denmark using data from three Danish population registers: The Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, and the Danish National Hospital Registry. We selected the cohort from people born in Denmark between Jan 1, 1955, and Dec 31, 2002, who we followed up from Jan 1, 1994, to Dec 31, 2012. The cohort was restricted to individuals with known parents. First, we investigated the effect of specific anxiety diagnoses on risk of single depressive episodes and recurrent depressive disorder. Second, we investigated the effect of comorbid anxiety on risk of readmission for depression, adjusting for sex, age, calendar year, parental age, place at residence at time of birth, and the interaction of age with sex. FINDINGS: We included 3,380,059 individuals in our study cohort. The adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) for single depressive episodes was 3·0 (95% CI 2·8-3·1, p<0·0001) and for recurrent depressive disorder was 5·0 (4·8-5·2) in patients with severe anxiety disorders compared with the general population. Compared with control individuals, the offspring of parents with anxiety disorders were more likely to be diagnosed with single depressive episodes (1·9, 1·8-2·0) or recurrent depressive disorder (2·1, 1·9-2·2). Comorbid anxiety increased the readmission rates in both patients with single depressive episodes and patients with recurrent depressive disorder. INTERPRETATION: Severe anxiety constitutes a significant risk factor for depression. Focusing on specific anxiety disorders might help to identify individuals at risk of depression, thereby providing new insights for prevention and treatment. FUNDING: The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research (iPSYCH).

9 Article Pre-eclampsia and first-onset postpartum psychiatric episodes: a Danish population-based cohort study. 2015

Bergink, V / Laursen, T M / Johannsen, B M W / Kushner, S A / Meltzer-Brody, S / Munk-Olsen, T. ·National Center for Register-Based Research,Aarhus School of Business and Social Sciences,Aarhus University,Fuglesangs Allé 4,Aarhus,Denmark. · Department of Psychiatry, Erasmus Medical Center,'s Gravendijkwal 230,3000 CA,Rotterdam,The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry,The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Campus Box #7160,Chapel Hill,NC 27599,USA. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #26243040.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests that postpartum psychiatric episodes may share similar etiological mechanisms with immune-related disorders. Pre-eclampsia is one of the most prevalent immune-related disorders of pregnancy. Multiple clinical features are shared between pre-eclampsia and postpartum psychiatric disorders, most prominently a strong link to first pregnancies. Therefore, we aimed to study if pre-eclampsia is a risk factor for first-onset postpartum psychiatric episodes. METHOD: We conducted a cohort study using the Danish population registry, with a total of 400 717 primiparous women with a singleton delivery between 1995 and 2011. First-lifetime childbirth was the main exposure variable and the outcome of interest was first-onset postpartum psychiatric episodes. The main outcome measures were monthly incidence rate ratios (IRRs), with the period 11-12 months after birth as the reference category. Adjustments were made for age, calendar period, reproductive history, and perinatal maternal health including somatic and obstetric co-morbidity. RESULTS: Primiparous women were at particularly high risk of first-onset psychiatric episodes during the first month postpartum [IRR 2.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.53-3.40] and pre-eclampsia added to that risk (IRR 4.21, 95% CI 2.89-6.13). Having both pre-eclampsia and a somatic co-morbidity resulted in the highest risk of psychiatric episodes during the 3-month period after childbirth (IRR 4.81, 95% CI 2.72-8.50). CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed an association between pre-eclampsia and postpartum psychiatric episodes. The possible explanations for this association, which are not mutually exclusive, include the psychological impact of a serious medical condition such as pre-eclampsia and the neurobiological impact of pre-eclampsia-related vascular pathology and inflammation.

10 Article Use of primary health care prior to a postpartum psychiatric episode. 2015

Munk-Olsen, Trine / Pedersen, Henrik Søndergaard / Laursen, Thomas Munk / Fenger-Grøn, Morten / Vedsted, Peter / Vestergaard, Mogens. ·National Centre for Register-based Research, Department of Economics and Business; School of Business and Social Sciences, Aarhus University , Denmark , The Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research (iPSYCH). ·Scand J Prim Health Care · Pubmed #26174691.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Childbirth is a strong trigger of psychiatric episodes. Nevertheless, use of primary care before these episodes is not quantified. The aim was to study the use of general practice in Denmark from two years before to one year after childbirth in women who developed postpartum psychiatric disorders. DESIGN: A matched cohort study was conducted including women who gave birth in the period 1996-2010. Women were divided into four groups: (i) all mothers with postpartum psychiatric episodes 0-3 months after birth, n = 939; 2: All mothers with a postpartum psychiatric episode 3-12 months after birth, n = 1 436; and (iii) two comparison groups of mothers, total n = 6 630 among 320 620 eligible women. SETTING: Denmark. SUBJECTS: Women born in Denmark after 1 January 1960, restricting the cohort to women who gave birth to their first singleton child between 1 January 1996 and 20 October 2010. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The main outcome measures were consultation rates, consultation rate ratios, and rate differences. RESULTS: Women who developed a psychiatric episode after childbirth had higher GP consultation rates before, during, and after the pregnancy. Women with a psychiatric episode 0-3 months postpartum had 6.89 (95% CI 6.60; 7.18) mean number of consultations during pregnancy, corresponding to 1.52 (95% CI 1.22; 1.82) more visits than the comparison group. CONCLUSION: Women with a postpartum psychiatric episode had higher use of GP-based primary health care services years before the childbirth, and in this specific group of patients childbirth itself triggered a marked increase in the number of GP contacts postpartum.

11 Article Parental history of psychiatric diagnoses and unipolar depression: a Danish National Register-based cohort study. 2015

Musliner, K L / Trabjerg, B B / Waltoft, B L / Laursen, T M / Mortensen, P B / Zandi, P P / Munk-Olsen, T. ·Department of Mental Health,Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,Baltimore,MD,USA. · National Centre for Register-based Research,University of Aarhus,Aarhus,Denmark and The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research,iPSYCH,Denmark. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #25920726.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depression is known to run in families, but the effects of parental history of other psychiatric diagnoses on depression rates are less well studied. Few studies have examined the impact of parental psychopathology on depression rates in older age groups. METHOD: We established a population-based cohort including all individuals born in Denmark after 1954 and alive on their 10th birthday (N = 29 76 264). Exposure variables were maternal and paternal history of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety or 'other' psychiatric diagnoses. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated using Poisson regressions. RESULTS: Parental history of any psychiatric diagnosis increased incidence rates of outpatient (maternal: IRR 1.88, p < 0.0001; paternal: IRR 1.68, p < 0.0001) and inpatient (maternal: IRR 1.99, p < 0.0001; paternal: IRR 1.83, p < 0.0001) depression relative to no parental history. IRRs for parental history of non-affective disorders remained relatively stable across age groups, while IRRs for parental affective disorders (unipolar or bipolar) decreased with age from 2.29-3.96 in the youngest age group to 1.53-1.90 in the oldest group. IRR estimates for all parental diagnoses were similar among individuals aged ⩾41 years (IRR range 1.51-1.90). CONCLUSIONS: Parental history of any psychiatric diagnosis is associated with increased incidence rates of unipolar depression. In younger age groups, parental history of affective diagnoses is more strongly associated with rates of unipolar depression than non-affective diagnoses; however, this distinction disappears after age 40, suggesting that parental psychopathology in general, rather than any one disorder, confers risk for depression in middle life.

12 Article Major depression and first-time hospitalization with ischemic heart disease, cardiac procedures and mortality in the general population: a retrospective Danish population-based cohort study. 2014

Gasse, Christiane / Laursen, Thomas M / Baune, Bernhard T. ·National Centre of Register-based Research, Aarhus University, Denmark. ·Eur J Prev Cardiol · Pubmed #23155197.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between unipolar depression and incident hospital admissions due to ischemic heart disease, invasive cardiac procedures and mortality independent of other medical illnesses. METHODS: A population-based cohort of 4.6 million persons aged 15 years or older and born in Denmark was followed up from 1995-2009. Incidence rate ratio (IRR) and mortality rate ratio (MRR) were estimated by survival analysis, stratified by or adjusted for gender, age, severe chronic somatic comorbidity and calendar time. RESULTS: Adjusted risks of cardiac hospital admissions and death were significantly increased by up to 15% and 68%, respectively, in persons with hospital admissions due to depression, and were most increased in 15-59 year old women (IRR: 1.64; MRR: 2.57) and men with depression (IRR: 1.39; MRR: 2.21), and during the first 180 days after being diagnosed with depression (women: IRR: 1.38; MRR: 2.35; men: IRR: 1.42; MRR: 2.67). One-year mortality after new ischemic heart disease was elevated by 34% in women and men. By contrast, overall rates of invasive cardiac procedures following cardiac hospitalizations were significantly decreased by 34% in persons with depression but were twofold increased in men recently diagnosed with depression. CONCLUSION: Clinical depression leading to hospitalization was a risk factor for new cardiac complications independent of somatic comorbidity in the magnitude of other cardiac risk factors, particularly in individuals between 15-59 years of age and during the first weeks following psychiatric admission. Our findings support recent cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines on assessing depression among other psychosocial factors in patients at increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk.

13 Article Prevalence of antidepressant use and contacts with psychiatrists and psychologists in pregnant and postpartum women. 2012

Munk-Olsen, T / Gasse, C / Laursen, T M. ·National Centre for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Taasingegade, Denmark. tmo@ncrr.dk ·Acta Psychiatr Scand · Pubmed #22118213.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: We aimed to study prevalence of antidepressant drug use from 12 months prior childbirth to 12 months postpartum and to compare the prevalences with those in a group of women of similar age who did not give birth. We additionally studied prevalences of contacts with private practicing psychiatrists and psychologists during a similar time period. METHOD: Our study population comprised of pregnant women, and their controls were drawn from a 25% sample of the entire Danish population. Information on redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants and referrals to psychiatrists and psychologists was extracted. The outcome measure was period prevalence calculated in 3-month intervals from 12 months before childbirth to 12 months postpartum. RESULTS: In the 2-year observation period around childbirth, 2733 (3.17%) women had one or more prescriptions for an antidepressant and 935 (1.18%) and 1399 (1.76%) were referred to consultations with a psychiatrist or psychologist, respectively. Women giving birth had a markedly lower use of antidepressants compared to controls, with the largest observed difference during third trimester of pregnancy (0.6% vs. 2.20%). CONCLUSION: We found that the prevalence of redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants decreased during pregnancy and increased postpartum. Similar patterns were observed for contacts with private practicing psychiatrists and psychologists.