Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Depression: HELP
Articles by Seung-Hwan Lee
Based on 27 articles published since 2010
(Why 27 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Seunghwan Lee wrote the following 27 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Review Non-Conscious Perception of Emotions in Psychiatric Disorders: The Unsolved Puzzle of Psychopathology. 2016

Lee, Seung A / Kim, Chai-Youn / Lee, Seung-Hwan. ·Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang, Republic of Korea. · Department of Psychology, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang, Republic of Korea.; Department of Psychiatry, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang, Republic of Korea. ·Psychiatry Investig · Pubmed #27081376.

ABSTRACT: Psychophysiological and functional neuroimaging studies have frequently and consistently shown that emotional information can be processed outside of the conscious awareness. Non-conscious processing comprises automatic, uncontrolled, and fast processing that occurs without subjective awareness. However, how such non-conscious emotional processing occurs in patients with various psychiatric disorders requires further examination. In this article, we reviewed and discussed previous studies on the non-conscious emotional processing in patients diagnosed with anxiety disorder, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression, to further understand how non-conscious emotional processing varies across these psychiatric disorders. Although the symptom profile of each disorder does not often overlap with one another, these patients commonly show abnormal emotional processing based on the pathology of their mood and cognitive function. This indicates that the observed abnormalities of emotional processing in certain social interactions may derive from a biased mood or cognition process that precedes consciously controlled and voluntary processes. Since preconscious forms of emotional processing appear to have a major effect on behaviour and cognition in patients with these disorders, further investigation is required to understand these processes and their impact on patient pathology.

2 Clinical Trial Tianeptine combination for partial or non-response to selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor monotherapy. 2013

Woo, Young Sup / Bahk, Won-Myong / Jeong, Jong-Hyun / Lee, Seung-Hwan / Sung, Hyeung-Mo / Pae, Chi-Un / Koo, Bon-Hoon / Kim, Won. ·Department of Psychiatry, Yeouido St Mary's Hospital, Seoul, Korea. ·Psychiatry Clin Neurosci · Pubmed #23683152.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of tianeptine in combination with selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) in partial responders or non-responders to SSRI monotherapy. METHODS: In this prospective, open-label, 6-week study, 150 patients with major depressive disorder who had previously not responded or partially responded to SSRI monotherapy were recruited. Tianeptine was given in combination with an SSRI for 6 weeks. RESULTS: Significant improvements were observed in the mean scores of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), and Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S). The change in the mean HDRS, MADRS, and CGI-S scores was significant from week 1. The response rates were 64.7% (HDRS) and 68.7% (MADRS), and the remission rates were 34.0% (HDRS) and 42.0% (MADRS) at week 6. Thirty-six patients (24.0%) reported adverse events that were determined by the investigator to be related to one of the study drugs. The tianeptine and SSRI combination was generally well-tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: A combination strategy with tianeptine may be an effective and well-tolerated tool for patients who have failed to adequately respond to SSRI monotherapy.

3 Article Prediction of Antidepressant Treatment Outcome Using Event-Related Potential in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder. 2020

Lee, Hyun Seo / Baik, Seung Yeon / Kim, Yong-Wook / Kim, Jeong-Youn / Lee, Seung-Hwan. ·Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang 50834, Korea. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Inje University, Ilsan-Paik Hospital, Goyang 50834, Korea. ·Diagnostics (Basel) · Pubmed #32375213.

ABSTRACT: (1) Background: Prediction of treatment outcome has been one of the core objectives in clinical research of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This study explored the possibility of event-related potential (ERP) markers to predict antidepressant treatment outcomes among MDD patients; (2) Methods: Fifty-two patients with MDD were recruited and evaluated through Hamilton depression (HAM-D), Hamilton anxiety rating scale (HAM-A), and CORE. Patients underwent a battery of ERP measures including frontal alpha symmetry (FAA) in the low alpha band (8-10 Hz), mismatch negativity (MMN), and loudness-dependent auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP); (3) Results: During the eight weeks of study, 61% of patients achieved remission, and 77% showed successful treatment responsiveness. Patients with low FAA in F5/F6 demonstrated a significantly higher remission/response ratio and better treatment responsiveness (

4 Article Clinical and psychosocial factors associated with depression in patients with psychosis according to stage of illness. 2020

Kim, Sung-Wan / Kim, Jung Jin / Lee, Bong Ju / Yu, Je-Chun / Lee, Kyu Young / Won, Seung-Hee / Lee, Seung-Hwan / Kim, Seung-Hyun / Kang, Shi-Hyun / Kim, Euitae / Lee, Ju-Yeon / Kim, Jae-Min / Chung, Young Chul. ·Department of Psychiatry, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Eulji University School of Medicine, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Eulji University School of Medicine, Eulji General Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Korea University College of Medicine, Guro Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Republic of Korea. ·Early Interv Psychiatry · Pubmed #30919575.

ABSTRACT: AIM: This study investigated the clinical characteristics and psychosocial factors associated with depression in patients with early psychosis according to stage of illness. METHODS: The present study includes patients who fulfil the DSM-5 criteria for schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders. Patients were divided into two groups according to illness stage (the acute stage of first-episode psychosis and stabilization phase of recent-onset psychosis). Clinically meaningful depression was defined as moderate or severe on the depression dimension of the Clinician-Rated Dimensions of Psychosis Symptom Severity scale in the DSM-5. RESULTS: In total, 340 (207 first-episode and 133 recent-onset) patients were recruited in this study. Patients with comorbid depression were characterized by frequent suicidal ideation, a past suicide attempt, and lower scores on the Subjective Well-being Under Neuroleptics and Brief Resilience Scale in both groups. Long duration of untreated psychosis and higher scores on the Early Trauma Inventory Self Report were associated with depression in the acute stage of first-episode psychosis. In the stabilization phase of recent-onset psychosis group, a monthly income and scores for sexual desire and on the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale-III were significantly lower in patients with depression than in those without depression. CONCLUSION: Comorbid depression was associated with high suicidality, lower quality of life and poor resilience in patients with first-episode and recent-onset psychosis. Depression was associated with factors that had been present before the initiation of treatment in patients with first-episode psychosis and with environmental factors in those in the stabilization phase.

5 Article Prefrontal Asymmetry during Cognitive Tasks and its Relationship with Suicide Ideation in Major Depressive Disorder: An fNIRS Study. 2019

Baik, Seung Yeon / Kim, Jeong-Youn / Choi, Jongkwan / Baek, Ji Yeong / Park, Yeonsoo / Kim, Yourim / Jung, Minjee / Lee, Seung-Hwan. ·Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang 411-706, Korea. · OBELAB Inc., Seoul 06211, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Inje University, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang 411-706, Korea. ·Diagnostics (Basel) · Pubmed #31731795.

ABSTRACT: Reduced oxygenation changes in the prefrontal cortex during cognitive tasks have been reported in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, prefrontal asymmetry during cognitive tasks and its relation to suicide ideations have been less frequently examined in patients with MDD. This study investigated prefrontal asymmetry and its moderating effect on the relationship between depression severity and suicidal ideation in MDD patients during cognitive tasks. Forty-two patients with MDD and 64 healthy controls (HCs) were assessed for changes in oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb) in the prefrontal cortex using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during the verbal fluency task (VFT), Stroop task, and two-back task. Depression, anxiety, and suicide ideation were measured through self-report questionnaires. Relatively smaller left oxy-Hb changes during VFT, but not during the Stroop or two-back tasks, were found in MDD patients compared with HCs. Furthermore, prefrontal asymmetry during VFT moderated the effect of depression severity on suicide ideation, and was significantly and positively correlated with suicide ideation in patients with MDD. Specifically, relatively greater left oxy-Hb changes were associated with greater suicide ideation. These findings suggest fNIRS-measured prefrontal asymmetry as a potential biomarker for MDD and for the assessment of suicidal risk in patients with MDD.

6 Article Frontal Alpha Asymmetry Correlates with Suicidal Behavior in Major Depressive Disorder. 2019

Park, Yeonsoo / Jung, Wookyoung / Kim, Sungkean / Jeon, Hyunjin / Lee, Seung-Hwan. ·Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Inje University, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Psychology, Keimyung University, Daegu, Korea. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, Korea. ·Clin Psychopharmacol Neurosci · Pubmed #31352704.

ABSTRACT: Objective: Based on the constant associations made between major depressive disorder (MDD) and alpha asymmetry, and MDD and suicide, this study aimed to examine the relationship between frontal alpha asymmetry and suicide in MDD patients. Methods: Sixty-six MDD patients, of whom fifteen were male and fifty-one were female, were recruited. Independent groups were created based on the median score of frontal alpha asymmetry: the left dominant (LD) group and the right dominant (RD) group. The alpha band (8‒12 Hz) and its sub-bands (i.e., low alpha band: 8‒10 Hz; high alpha band: 10‒12 Hz) were of interest. Source level alpha asymmetry was calculated as well. Results: Suicidal behavior was positively correlated with the asymmetry indices of the low alpha band and the alpha band in the LD group and that of the high alpha band in the RD group. Source level analysis revealed positive correlations between suicidal behavior and the asymmetry index of the low alpha band in the LD group. Conclusion: Frontal alpha asymmetry, especially that of the low alpha band, might reflect the cognitive deficits associated with suicidal behaviors in MDD patients.

7 Article Self-Forgiveness Moderates the Effects of Depression on Suicidality. 2019

Jung, Minjee / Park, Yeonsoo / Baik, Seung Yeon / Kim, Cho Long / Kim, Hyang Sook / Lee, Seung-Hwan. ·Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Inje University, Goyang, Republic of Korea. · Department of Psychology, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, USA. · Department of Psychology, Sogang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Inje University College of Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang, Republic of Korea. ·Psychiatry Investig · Pubmed #30808118.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Not all depressive individuals are suicidal. An increasing body of studies has examined forgiveness, especially self-forgiveness, as a protective factor of suicide based on that suicide is often accompanied by negative self-perceptions. However, less has been studied on how different subtypes of forgiveness (i.e., forgiveness-of-self, forgiveness-of-others and forgiveness-of-situations) could alleviate the effects of depression on suicide. Hence, this study examined forgiveness as a moderator of depression and suicidality. METHODS: 305 participants, consisted of 87 males and 218 females, were included in the study. The mean age was 41.05 (SD: 14.48; range: 19-80). Depression, anxiety, and forgiveness were measured through self-report questionnaires, and suicidal risk was measured through a structuralized interview. Moderations were examined through hierarchical regression analyses. RESULTS: Depression positively correlated with suicidality. RESULTS: of the hierarchical regression analysis indicated forgiveness as a moderator of depression on suicidality. Further analysis indicated only forgiveness-of-self as a significant moderator; the effects of forgiveness-of-others and forgiveness-of-situation were not significant. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that forgiveness-of-self is essential in reducing of the effects of depression on suicidality. It is suggested that self-acceptance and the promotion of self-forgiveness should be considered as an important factor when developing suicide prevention strategies.

8 Article Altered cortical functional network in major depressive disorder: A resting-state electroencephalogram study. 2018

Shim, Miseon / Im, Chang-Hwan / Kim, Yong-Wook / Lee, Seung-Hwan. ·Psychiatry Department, University of Missouri, Kansas City, USA; Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Goyang, Republic of Korea. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Goyang, Republic of Korea. · Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Goyang, Republic of Korea; Psychiatry Department, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Goyang, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: lshpss@paik.ac.kr. ·Neuroimage Clin · Pubmed #30003037.

ABSTRACT: Background: Electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain network analysis is a useful biological correlate reflecting brain function. Sensor-level network analysis might be contaminated by volume conduction and does not explain regional brain characteristics. Source-level network analysis could be a useful alternative. We analyzed EEG-based source-level network in major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: Resting-state EEG was recorded in 87 MDD and 58 healthy controls, and cortical source signals were estimated. Network measures were calculated: global indices (strength, clustering coefficient (CC), path length (PL), and efficiency) and nodal indices (eigenvector centrality and nodal CC) in six frequency. Correlation analyses were performed between network indices and symptom scales. Results: At the global level, MDD showed decreased strength, CC in theta and alpha bands, and efficiency in alpha band, while enhanced PL in alpha band. At nodal level, eigenvector centrality of alpha band showed region dependent changes in MDD. Nodal CCs of alpha band were reduced in MDD and were negatively correlated with depression and anxiety scales. Conclusion: Disturbances in EEG-based brain network indices might reflect altered emotional processing in MDD. These source-level network indices might provide useful biomarkers to understand regional brain pathology in MDD.

9 Article ERP investigation of attentional disengagement from suicide-relevant information in patients with major depressive disorder. 2018

Baik, Seung Yeon / Jeong, Minkyung / Kim, Hyang Sook / Lee, Seung-Hwan. ·Department of Psychology, Sogang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang, Republic of Korea. · Department of Psychology, Sogang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Psychology, Sogang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: hyangkim@sogang.ac.kr. · Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang, Republic of Korea; Department of Psychiatry, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Ilsan, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: lshpss@paik.ac.kr. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #28846957.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest the presence of attentional bias towards suicide-relevant information in suicidal individuals. However, the findings are limited by their reliance on behavioral measures. This study investigates the role of difficulty in disengaging attention from suicide-relevant stimuli using the P300 component of event-related potentials (ERPs). METHODS: Forty-four adults with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) were administered the spatial cueing task using suicide-relevant and negatively-valenced words as cue stimuli. Disengagement difficulty was measured using reaction time and P300 during invalid trials. RESULTS: P300 amplitudes at Pz were higher in suicide-relevant compared to negatively-valenced word condition on invalid trials for participants with low rates of suicidal behavior. However, no such difference was found among participants with high rates of suicidal behavior. P300 amplitudes for suicide-relevant word condition were negatively correlated with "lifetime suicide ideation and attempt" at Pz. No significant results were found for the reaction time data, indicating that the ERP may be more sensitive in capturing the attentional disengagement effect. LIMITATIONS: The groups were divided according to Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised (SBQ-R) total score. Neutral stimulus was not included as cue stimuli. Most participants were under medication during the experiment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that patients with MDD and low rates of suicidal behavior show difficulty in disengaging attention from suicide-relevant stimuli. We suggest that suicide-specific disengagement difficulties may be related to recentness of suicide attempt and that acquired capability for suicide may contribute to reduced disengagement difficulties.

10 Article Life Space Assessment in Stroke Patients. 2017

Yang, You-Na / Kim, Bo-Ram / Uhm, Kyeong Eun / Kim, Soo Jin / Lee, Seunghwan / Oh-Park, Mooyeon / Lee, Jongmin. ·Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine and Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA; Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, West Orange, NJ; Kessler Foundation, West Orange NJ, USA. · International Healthcare Research Institute, Konkuk University, Seoul, Korea. ·Ann Rehabil Med · Pubmed #29201814.

ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate the reliability of the practical life space in post-stroke patients using the Korean version of the Life-Space Assessment (K-LSA) questionnaire and to assess the relationships between the K-LSA and physical function, daily activity, quality of life, and post-stroke depression. Methods: The LSA questionnaire was translated into Korean, and the translated version was authorized by the author of the LSA questionnaire. In a cross-sectional study, the performance of the K-LSA was evaluated in 34 stroke patients (20 males and 14 females; mean age 65.11±2.39 years) who were receiving physical and occupational therapy at the outpatient clinic in the rehabilitation medicine department of a university medical center at the time of evaluation. Performances were assessed twice by one examiner at a 2-week interval to test the reliability. The patients were evaluated using the Functional Ambulation Category (FAC) scale, Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scale, and mobility subscale of the FIM to assess their relationships with the K-LSA. They were also evaluated using the EuroQol 5 Dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) to determine the relationship with quality of life and post-stroke depression. Results: Test-retest reliability at the first (62.20±32.14) and second (63.15±32.22) assessment was 0.993 (p<0.01). The K-LSA showed significant correlations with the FAC (r=0.848, p<0.01), FIM (r=0.765, p<0.01), mobility category of the FIM (r=0.764, p<0.01), GDS (r=-0.657, p<0.01), and EQ-5D (r=0.506, p<0.01). Conclusion: This study suggests that the practical life space of post-stroke patients, assessed by the K-LSA, has a significant correlation with patients' functional mobility, independence in daily activity, quality of life, and depression.

11 Article Childhood Trauma Associated with Enhanced High Frequency Band Powers and Induced Subjective Inattention of Adults. 2017

Lee, Seung-Hwan / Park, Yeonsoo / Jin, Min Jin / Lee, Yeon Jeong / Hahn, Sang Woo. ·Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje UniversityGoyang, South Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Inje University, Ilsan-Paik HospitalGoyang, South Korea. · Department of Psychology, Sogang UniversitySeoul, South Korea. · Department of Psychology, Chung-Ang UniversitySeoul, South Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Soonchunhyang University Seoul HospitalSeoul, South Korea. ·Front Behav Neurosci · Pubmed #28860979.

ABSTRACT: Childhood trauma can lead to various psychological and cognitive symptoms. It has been demonstrated that high frequency electroencephalogram (EEG) powers could be closely correlated with inattention. In this study, we explored the relationship between high frequency EEG powers, inattention, symptoms of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and childhood traumatic experiences. A total of 157 healthy Korean adult volunteers were included and divided into two groups using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) score. The subjective inattention scores, ADHD scale, and anxiety and depression symptom were evaluated. EEG was recorded and quantitative band powers were analyzed. The results were as follows: (1) the high CTQ group showed significantly increased delta, beta1, beta2, beta3 and gamma, and significantly decreased low alpha power compared to the low CTQ group; (2) the high CTQ group had higher inattention score compared to the low CTQ group; (3) the high CTQ group had higher adult ADHD scores; (4) CTQ scores showed significant positive correlations with inattention scores, and adult ADHD scores; (5) unexpectedly, the inattention scores showed significant positive correlations with beta powers and a negative correlation with low alpha power; and (6) the moderated mediation model was confirmed: the depression fully mediated the path from state anxiety to inattention, and the CTQ significantly moderated the pathway between anxiety and depression. Our results show the possibility that childhood adversity may cause subjective inattention and adult ADHD symptoms. Depressive symptoms fully mediated the path from anxiety to inattention, especially in those who report severe childhood traumatic experiences.

12 Article Auditory evoked potential could reflect emotional sensitivity and impulsivity. 2016

Kim, Ji Sun / Kim, Sungkean / Jung, Wookyoung / Im, Chang-Hwan / Lee, Seung-Hwan. ·Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang, Republic of Korea. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Inje University, Ilsan-Paik Hospital, Goyang, Republic of Korea. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #27910865.

ABSTRACT: Emotional sensitivity and impulsivity could cause interpersonal conflicts and neuropsychiatric problems. Serotonin is correlated with behavioral inhibition and impulsivity. This study evaluated whether the loudness dependence of auditory evoked potential (LDAEP), a potential biological marker of central serotonergic activity, could reflect emotional sensitivity and impulsivity. A total of 157 healthy individuals were recruited, who performed LDAEP and Go/Nogo paradigms during electroencephalogram measurement. Barratt impulsivity scale (BIS), Conners' Adult ADHD rating scale (CAARS), and affective lability scale (ALS) were evaluated. Comparison between low and high LDAEP groups was conducted for behavioural, psychological, and event-related potential (ERP) measures. The high LDAEP group showed significantly increased BIS, a subscale of the CAARS, ALS, and false alarm rate of Nogo stimuli compared to the low LDAEP group. LDAEP showed significant positive correlations with the depression scale, ALS scores, subscale of the CAARS and Nogo-P3 amplitude. In the source activity of Nogo-P3, the cuneus, lingual gyrus, and precentral gyrus activities were significantly increased in the high LDAEP group. Our study revealed that LDAEP could reflect emotional sensitivity and impulsivity. LDAEP, an auditory evoked potential could be a useful tool to evaluate emotional regulation.

13 Article EEG beta and low gamma power correlates with inattention in patients with major depressive disorder. 2016

Roh, Sang-Choong / Park, Eun-Jin / Shim, Miseon / Lee, Seung-Hwan. ·Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang, Republic of Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Inje University, Ilsan-Paik Hospital, Juhwa-ro 170, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang 411-706, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: uma99@hanmail.net. · Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang, Republic of Korea; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang, Republic of Korea; Department of Psychiatry, Inje University, Ilsan-Paik Hospital, Juhwa-ro 170, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang 411-706, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: lshpss@paik.ac.kr. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #27344621.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Inattention is a common feature of major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) power of a specific band and inattention severity in patients with MDD. METHODS: EEG recordings of 73 patients with MDD were collected in during both eyes closed and eyes open conditions. Inattention was assessed by the inattention sub-scale of the Korean version of the Adult ADHD scale (K-AADHD). The severity of symptoms associated with depression and anxiety was assessed with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A), the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Multiple regression and Hayes mediation model were applied for the statistical analysis to verify the effects of clinical variables on inattention score. RESULTS: The beta (12-30Hz) and low gamma (30-50Hz) powers in fronto-central regions were negatively correlated with inattention scores. Symptom severity scores strongly predicted inattention scores; in particular, the BDI accounted for 23.9% of the variance. In mediation analysis, BDI fully mediated the path of anxiety to inattention. LIMITATIONS: The medication effect and comorbidity in our participants were not fully controlled. A subjective assessment tool was hired to measure inattention. CONCLUSIONS: Beta and low gamma power of the fronto-central regions might be a reliable measure of attention deficits in patients with MDD, which in turn, seems to be related to the severity of subjective depressive symptoms. Further work is needed to confirm this finding on larger, drug and comorbidity-free samples, and to test the clinical utility.

14 Article Expected Emotional Usefulness and Emotional Preference in Individuals with Major Depressive Disorder. 2016

Yoon, Sunkyung / Lee, Seung-Hwan / Kim, Hyang Sook. ·Department of Psychology, Sogang University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Inje University College of Medicine, Gimhae, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang, Korea. ·Clin Psychopharmacol Neurosci · Pubmed #27121431.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Previous studies indicate that emotion regulation problems in major depressive disorder (MDD) may be caused by difficulties in preferring useful emotions according to their goals. We investigated expected emotional usefulness and emotional preference in individuals with MDD (MDDs) and healthy controls (HCs). METHODS: Participants were given an interpersonal scenario with two different goals (confrontation and collaboration) and rated their willingness to participate in emotion-provoking activities and the expected usefulness of a particular emotion. RESULTS: MDDs were similar to HCs in expected emotional usefulness but showed different patterns of emotional preference. HCs preferred happiness to negative emotions across goals whereas MDDs did not show such pattern. In addition, HCs displayed goal-appropriate preferences whereas MDDs did not prefer certain emotions for specific goals. CONCLUSION: Although MDDs seemed to understand how useful an emotion can be, they did not show preference for goal-appropriate emotions. Interventions should address why MDDs have difficulty engaging in goal-appropriate emotions despite having full knowledge of the utility of emotions in achieving goals.

15 Article Prenatal maternal distress affects atopic dermatitis in offspring mediated by oxidative stress. 2016

Chang, Hyoung Yoon / Suh, Dong In / Yang, Song-I / Kang, Mi-Jin / Lee, So-Yeon / Lee, Eun / Choi, In Ae / Lee, Kyung-Sook / Shin, Yee-Jin / Shin, Youn Ho / Kim, Yoon Hee / Kim, Kyung Won / Ahn, Kangmo / Won, Hye-Sung / Choi, Suk-Joo / Oh, Soo-Young / Kwon, Ja-Young / Kim, Young Han / Park, Hee Jin / Lee, Kyung-Ju / Jun, Jong Kwan / Yu, Ho-Sung / Lee, Seung-Hwa / Jung, Bok Kyoung / Kwon, Ji-Won / Choi, Yoon Kyung / Do, Namhee / Bae, Yun Jin / Kim, Ho / Chang, Woo-Sung / Kim, Eun-Jin / Lee, Jeom Kyu / Hong, Soo-Jong. ·Department of Psychiatry, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea; Sunflower Center of Southern Gyeonggi for Women and Children Victims of Violence, Suwon, Korea; Center for Traumatic Stress, Ajou University Medical Center, Suwon, Korea. · Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Pediatrics, Hallym Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea. · Asan Institute for Life Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Pediatrics, Childhood Asthma Atopy Center, Research Center for Standardization of Allergic Diseases, Environmental Health Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Sewon Infant Child Development Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Rehabilitation, Hanshin University, Osan, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Pediatrics, CHA Gangnam Medical Center, CHA University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Pediatrics, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, CHA Gangnam Medical Center, CHA University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. · Korea Institute of Child Care and Education, Seoul, Korea. · Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Allergy and Chronic Respiratory Diseases, Center for Biomedical Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Cheongju, Korea. · Asan Institute for Life Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; Department of Pediatrics, Childhood Asthma Atopy Center, Research Center for Standardization of Allergic Diseases, Environmental Health Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: sjhong@amc.seoul.kr. ·J Allergy Clin Immunol · Pubmed #27016803.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests that prenatal maternal distress increases the risk of allergic diseases in offspring. However, the effect of prenatal maternal depression and anxiety on atopic dermatitis (AD) risk remains poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether prenatal maternal distress is associated with AD risk in offspring and whether the mechanism is mediated by reactive oxygen species. METHODS: Two general population-based birth cohorts formed the study. One cohort (Cohort for Childhood Origin of Asthma and Allergic Diseases [COCOA]) consisted of 973 mother-baby dyads, and the other (Panel Study on Korean Children [PSKC]) consisted of 1531 mother-baby dyads. The association between prenatal distress and AD was assessed by using Cox proportional hazards and logistic regression models. In COCOA placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 and glutathione levels and serum IgE levels in 1-year-old children were measured. RESULTS: In COCOA and PSKC AD occurred in 30.6% (lifetime prevalence) and 11.6% (1 year prevalence) of offspring, respectively. Prenatal maternal distress increased the risk of AD in offspring, both in COCOA (hazard ratio for depression, 1.31 [95% CI, 1.02-1.69]; hazard ratio for anxiety, 1.41 [95% CI, 1.06-1.89]) and PSKC (odds ratio for distress, 1.85 [95% CI, 1.06-3.25]). In COCOA both prenatal maternal depression and anxiety scores were positively related to the predicted probability of AD (P < .001 in both). Prenatal distress decreased placental glutathione to glutathione disulfide ratios (P = .037) and, especially in those who later had AD, decreased placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 levels (P = .010) and increased IgE levels at 1 year of age (P = .005). CONCLUSION: Prenatal maternal depression and anxiety promote risk of AD in offspring. Maternal distress increases the predicted probability of AD. The mechanism might involve chronic stress, abnormal steroid levels, and reactive oxygen species.

16 Article Reading simple and complex facial expressions in patients with major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders. 2016

Yoon, Sunkyung / Kim, Hyang Sook / Kim, Jeong-In / Lee, Seunga / Lee, Seung-Hwan. ·Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Psychology, Sogang University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychology, Korea University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Inje University, Ilsan-Paik Hospital, Goyang, Korea. ·Psychiatry Clin Neurosci · Pubmed #26522432.

ABSTRACT: AIM: Decoding facial expression is important for psychological well-being. This study examined facial emotion recognition of simple/complex and pleasant/unpleasant emotions in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders (AnD). METHODS: Patients with MDD (n = 37), AnD (n = 36) and healthy controls (HC) (n = 40) participated in this study. The recognition accuracy of emotional faces was calculated. RESULTS: Patients with MDD had significantly lower recognition accuracy compared to HC. Patients with MDD exhibited lower recognition accuracy for simple emotions compared to patients with AnD and HC, and lower accuracy for complex emotions compared only to HC. Patients with AnD and HC showed comparable recognition accuracy for simple emotions, which were lower than that of patients with MDD. However, in recognition accuracy of complex emotions, AnD was not significantly different from either MDD or HC. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with MDD and AnD have a distinctive difficulty with the recognition of facial expressions. The recognition of complex emotions in patients with MDD and AnD should be studied further.

17 Article Influence of the 5-HT3A Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Childhood Sexual Trauma on Central Serotonin Activity. 2015

Jang, Kuk-In / Lee, Seung-Hwan / Huh, Hyu Jung / Chae, Jeong-Ho. ·Department of Biomedicine & Health Sciences, The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Inje University College of Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #26701104.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gene-environment interactions are important for understanding alterations in human brain function. The loudness dependence of auditory evoked potential (LDAEP) is known to reflect central serotonergic activity. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 5-HT3A serotonin receptor gene are associated with psychiatric disorders. This study aimed to investigate the effect between 5-HT3A receptor gene polymorphisms and childhood sexual trauma on the LDAEP as an electrophysiological marker in healthy subjects. METHODS: A total of 206 healthy subjects were recruited and evaluated using the childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ) and hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Peak-to-peak N1/P2 was measured at five stimulus intensities, and the LDAEP was calculated as the linear-regression slope. In addition, the rs1062613 SNPs of 5-HT3A (CC, CT, and TT) were analyzed in healthy subjects. RESULTS: There was a significant interaction between scores on the CTQ-sexual abuse subscale and 5-HT3A genotype on the LDAEP. Subjects with the CC polymorphism had a significantly higher LDEAP than T carriers in the sexually abused group. In addition, CC genotype subjects in the sexually abused group showed a significantly higher LDAEP compared with CC genotype subjects in the non-sexually abused group. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that people with the CC polymorphism of the 5-HT3A gene have a greater risk of developing mental health problems if they have experienced childhood sexual abuse, possibly due to low central serotonin activity. Conversely, the T polymorphism may be protective against any central serotonergic changes following childhood sexual trauma.

18 Article Prediction by data mining, of suicide attempts in Korean adolescents: a national study. 2015

Bae, Sung Man / Lee, Seung A / Lee, Seung-Hwan. ·Department of Counseling Psychology, The Cyber University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea. · Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Goyang, South Korea. · Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Goyang, South Korea ; Department of Psychiatry, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, South Korea. ·Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat · Pubmed #26396521.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to develop a prediction model for suicide attempts in Korean adolescents. METHODS: We conducted a decision tree analysis of 2,754 middle and high school students nationwide. We fixed suicide attempt as the dependent variable and eleven sociodemographic, intrapersonal, and extrapersonal variables as independent variables. RESULTS: The rate of suicide attempts of the total sample was 9.5%, and severity of depression was the strongest variable to predict suicide attempt. The rates of suicide attempts in the depression and potential depression groups were 5.4 and 2.8 times higher than that of the non-depression group. In the depression group, the most powerful factor to predict a suicide attempt was delinquency, and the rate of suicide attempts in those in the depression group with higher delinquency was two times higher than in those in the depression group with lower delinquency. Of special note, the rate of suicide attempts in the depressed females with higher delinquency was the highest. Interestingly, in the potential depression group, the most impactful factor to predict a suicide attempt was intimacy with family, and the rate of suicide attempts of those in the potential depression group with lower intimacy with family was 2.4 times higher than that of those in the potential depression group with higher intimacy with family. And, among the potential depression group, middle school students with lower intimacy with family had a 2.5-times higher rate of suicide attempts than high school students with lower intimacy with family. Finally, in the non-depression group, stress level was the most powerful factor to predict a suicide attempt. Among the non-depression group, students who reported high levels of stress showed an 8.3-times higher rate of suicide attempts than students who reported average levels of stress. DISCUSSION: Based on the results, we especially need to pay attention to depressed females with higher delinquency and those with potential depression with lower intimacy with family to prevent suicide attempts in teenagers.

19 Article Influence of anxiety symptoms on improvement of neurocognitive functions in patients with major depressive disorder: A 12-week, multicenter, randomized trial of tianeptine versus escitalopram, the CAMPION study. 2015

Yoo, Ikki / Woo, Jong-Min / Lee, Seung-Hwan / Fava, Maurizio / Mischoulon, David / Papakostas, George I / Kim, Eui-Joong / Chung, Seockhoon / Ha, Jee Hyun / Jeon, Hong Jin. ·Department of Psychiatry, Depression Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Seoul Paik Hospital, Inje University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University School of Medicine, Ilsan, Korea. · Depression Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Eulji University School of Medicine, Eulji General Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Depression Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; Department of Clinical Research Design and Evaluation, and Department of Medical Device Management and Research, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences & Technology (SAIHST), Seoul, Korea; Depression Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. Electronic address: jeonhj@skku.edu. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #26142691.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous research has reported evidence that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) show anxiety symptoms and neurocognitive impairments. However, the influence of anxiety on neurocognitive function in MDD patients during antidepressant treatment is unclear. METHOD: MDD patients (n=164) completed a 12-week, multicenter, randomized trial assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either tianeptine or escitalopram. Changes of anxiety symptoms were assessed by the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D), self-rated subjective cognitive impairment on memory and concentration, the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Continuous Performance Test (CPT), Verbal Learning Test (VLT), and Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM) were assessed every 4 weeks. RESULTS: During 12 weeks of treatment, decrease in the HAM-A score was significantly associated with improvement of subjective cognitive impairments on memory (p<0.001) and concentration (p<0.001), and objective measures on delayed memory (p=0.006) and reasoning ability (p=0.002), after adjusting for covariates such as baseline HAM-A scores, time, sex, age, education years and assigned medication using the Mixed effects and Generalized Estimated Equation model analysis. However, the other cognitive outcome variables, immediate memory, commission error, and MMSE, which showed significant improvement through 12-week study period, showed no significant association with improvement of anxiety. CONCLUSION: Improvement of anxiety symptoms was significantly associated with improvement in subjective and objective neurocognitive functions such as delayed memory and reasoning ability in elderly MDD patients during antidepressant treatment, but not significantly associated with improvement of immediate memory and commission error. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01309776.

20 Article Association of CLOCK, ARNTL, and NPAS2 gene polymorphisms and seasonal variations in mood and behavior. 2015

Kim, Hae-In / Lee, Heon-Jeong / Cho, Chul-Hyun / Kang, Seung-Gul / Yoon, Ho-Kyoung / Park, Young-Min / Lee, Seung-Hwan / Moon, Joung-Ho / Song, Hye-Min / Lee, Eunil / Kim, Leen. ·Department of Psychiatry, Korea University College of Medicine , Seoul , Korea . ·Chronobiol Int · Pubmed #26134245.

ABSTRACT: Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a condition of seasonal mood changes characterized by recurrent depression in autumn or winter that spontaneously remits in spring or summer. Evidence has suggested that circadian gene variants contribute to the pathogenesis of SAD. In this study, we investigated polymorphisms in the CLOCK, ARNTL, and NPAS2 genes in relation to seasonal variation in 507 healthy young adults. Seasonal variations were assessed with the Seasonality Pattern Assessment Questionnaire. The prevalence of SAD was 12.0% (winter-type 9.3%, summer-type 2.8%). No significant difference was found between the groups in the genotype distribution of ARNTL rs2278749 and NPAS2 rs2305160. The T allele of CLOCK rs1801260 was significantly more frequent in seasonals (SAD + subsyndromal SAD) compared with non-seasonals (p = 0.020, odds ratio = 1.89, 95% confidence interval = 1.09-3.27). Global seasonality score was significantly different among genotypes of CLOCK rs1801260, but not among genotypes of ARNTL rs2278749 and NPAS2 rs2305160. However, statistical difference was observed in the body weight and appetite subscales among genotypes of ARNTL rs2278749 and in the body weight subscale among genotypes of NPAS2 rs2305160. There was synergistic interaction between CLOCK rs1801260 and ARNTL rs2278749 on seasonality. To our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal an association between the CLOCK gene and seasonal variations in mood and behavior in the Korean population. Although we cannot confirm previous findings of an association between SAD and the ARNTL and NPAS2 genes, these genes may influence seasonal variations through metabolic factors such as body weight and appetite. The interaction of the CLOCK and ARNTL genes contributes to susceptibility for SAD.

21 Article Prediction of long-term treatment response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) using scalp and source loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP) analysis in patients with major depressive disorder. 2015

Lee, Bun-Hee / Park, Young-Min / Lee, Seung-Hwan / Shim, Miseon. ·Department of Psychiatry, Seoul Eunpyeong Hospital, 90, Baengnyeonsan-ro, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul 122-913, Korea. punzza91@naver.com. · Department of Psychiatry, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, 2240, Daehwa-dong, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang 411-706, Korea. medipark@hanmail.net. · Department of Psychiatry, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, 2240, Daehwa-dong, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang 411-706, Korea. lshpss@hanmail.net. · Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang 411-706, Korea. lshpss@hanmail.net. · Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang 411-706, Korea. miseon@bme.hanyang.ac.kr. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea. miseon@bme.hanyang.ac.kr. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #25794285.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Animal and clinical studies have demonstrated that the loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP) is inversely related to central serotonergic activity, with a high LDAEP reflecting weak serotonergic neurotransmission and vice versa, though the findings in humans have been less consistent. In addition, a high pretreatment LDAEP appears to predict a favorable response to antidepressant treatments that augment the actions of serotonin. The aim of this study was to test whether the baseline LDAEP is correlated with response to long-term maintenance treatment in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). METHODS: Scalp N1, P2 and N1/P2 LDAEP and standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography-localized N1, P2, and N1/P2 LDAEP were evaluated in 41 MDD patients before and after they received antidepressant treatment (escitalopram (n = 32, 10.0 ± 4.0 mg/day), sertraline (n = 7, 78.6 ± 26.7 mg/day), and paroxetine controlled-release formulation (n = 2, 18.8 ± 8.8 mg/day)) for more than 12 weeks. A treatment response was defined as a reduction in the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score of >50% between baseline and follow-up. RESULTS: The responders had higher baseline scalp P2 and N1/P2 LDAEP than nonresponders (p = 0.017; p = 0.036). In addition, changes in total BDI score between baseline and follow-up were larger in subjects with a high baseline N1/P2 LDAEP than those with a low baseline N1/P2 LDAEP (p = 0.009). There were significantly more responders in the high-LDAEP group than in the low-LDAEP group (p = 0.041). CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study reveal that a high baseline LDAEP is associated with a clinical response to long-term antidepressant treatment.

22 Article Biological rhythm differences and suicidal ideation in patients with major depressive disorder. 2014

Bahk, Yong-Chun / Han, Esther / Lee, Seung-Hwan. ·Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang, Republic of Korea; Department of Psychology, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Psychology, Duke University, Durham, United States. · Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Inje University, Goyang, Republic of Korea; Department of Psychiatry, Inje University College of Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Juhwa-ro 170, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang, 411-706 Republic of Korea. Electronic address: lshpss@paik.ac.kr. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #25080393.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Suicidal behavior has been reported to be associated with seasonality and chronotype. However, no study has reported the suicidality according to chronotype and seasonality in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This study evaluated the relationship of suicidality and biological rhythm in patients with MDD. METHODS: A total of 120 patients with MDD participated. We evaluated their seasonal patterns, chronotypes (morningness, wake up early and are at their best during the first part of the day; eveningness, feel best and most alert during late hours), suicidal ideations, and other clinical variables including symptom severity. RESULTS: Patients with seasonality showed significantly higher suicidal ideation than patients without seasonality. Compared to morning-type participants, the evening-type participants showed higher suicidality. Suicidal ideation was positively correlated with eveningness tendencies and hypomanic personality traits. LIMITATIONS: First, we did not analyze the causal relationship between biological rhythm and suicidality. Secondly, suicidal ideation does not in most cases reflect an actual attempt. Lastly, we did not categorize seasonal pattern into summer or winter type. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that biological rhythm is significantly associated with suicidal ideation in patients with MDD.

23 Article Clinical implications of loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials in patients with atypical depression. 2014

Lee, Seung-Hwan / Park, Young-Cheon / Yoon, Sunkyung / Kim, Jeong-In / Hahn, Sang Woo. ·Department of Psychiatry, Inje University, Ilsan-Paik Hospital, Juhwa-ro 170, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang, Republic of Korea; Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Juhwa-ro 170, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang, Republic of Korea. · Clinical Emotion and Cognition Research Laboratory, Juhwa-ro 170, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang, Republic of Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Soonchunhyang University of College of Medicine, 22, Daesagwan-gil, Yongsan-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: ha5hn@schmc.ac.kr. ·Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry · Pubmed #24865151.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP) has been proposed as a useful biomarker of serotonin activity, and the LDAEP value is low in patients with melancholic depression. In this study, we evaluated LDAEP levels in patients with atypical depression. METHODS: We recruited 53 patients with atypical depression and 68 patients with non-atypical depression. Subjects were evaluated by the Atypical Depression Diagnostic Scale (ADDS), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD), Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAMA), Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation (BSI), Behavioral Inhibition System and Behavioral Activation System (BIS/BAS) scales, and Hypomanic Personality Scale (HPS). To determine LDAEP, the peak-to-peak N1/P2 was measured at five stimulus intensities and the LDAEP was calculated as the linear-regression slope. RESULTS: Patients with atypical depression had stronger LDAEP values and higher BAS and HPS scores than those with non-atypical depression. LDAEP showed a pattern of gradual decrease according to ADDS score hierarchy in patients with major depressive disorder. In the atypical depression group, LDAEP showed significant negative correlation with the BSI score and significant positive correlation with BAS score. In the non-atypical depression group, LDAEP did not show any significant correlations with the scores of psychological scales. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that there is a relatively deficient serotonergic activity in patients with atypical depression and that LDAEP reflects mood reactivity. The transient drop of serotonergic activity induced by mood vulnerability might contribute to suicidal tendencies in patients with atypical depression.

24 Article The association between serum lipid levels, suicide ideation, and central serotonergic activity in patients with major depressive disorder. 2014

Park, Young-Min / Lee, Bun-Hee / Lee, Seung-Hwan. ·Department of Psychiatry, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, 2240, Daehwa-dong, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang 411-706, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: medipark@hanmail.net. · Department of Psychiatry, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, 2240, Daehwa-dong, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang 411-706, Republic of Korea. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #24679391.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that low lipid levels cause suicide in depressed patients. The purpose of this study was to identify whether low serum lipid levels are associated with suicide ideation or are correlated with central serotonin function. METHODS: Auditory processing for the loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP) was measured in 73 outpatients with major depressive disorder. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered on the same day as measurement of the LDAEP. In addition, serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglyceride (TG) levels were measured. All subjects had received antidepressant monotherapy. RESULTS: The depressed subjects were divided into those with and without suicide ideation according to the score for HAMD item 3 or BDI item 9. TG levels differed significantly between the two groups, whereas body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and LDAEP did not. The scores for HAMD item 3 and BDI item 9 were negatively correlated with TG levels (p=0.045 and 0.026, respectively). The LDAEP was negatively correlated with TG levels (p=0.012). Although there was tendency toward a negative correlation between the LDAEP and serum LDL, it did not reach statistical significance (p=0.068). LIMITATIONS: The cross-sectional design of this study means that baseline serum lipid levels were not measured. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study revealed a relationship between TG and suicide ideation that is independent of both BMI and body weight. Furthermore, serum lipid levels were associated with central serotonergic activity, as assessed using the LDAEP.

25 Article Improvement in subjective and objective neurocognitive functions in patients with major depressive disorder: a 12-week, multicenter, randomized trial of tianeptine versus escitalopram, the CAMPION study. 2014

Jeon, Hong Jin / Woo, Jong-Min / Lee, Seung-Hwan / Kim, Eui-Joong / Chung, Seockhoon / Ha, Jee Hyun / Fava, Maurizio / Mischoulon, David / Kim, Ji-Hae / Heo, Jung-Yoon / Yu, Bum-Hee. ·From the *Department of Psychiatry, Depression Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; †Depression Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; ‡Department of Psychiatry, Seoul Paik Hospital, Inje University School of Medicine, Seoul; §Department of Psychiatry, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University School of Medicine, Ilsan; ∥Department of Psychiatry, Eulji University School of Medicine, Eulji General Hospital; ¶Department of Psychiatry, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine; and #Department of Psychiatry, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. ·J Clin Psychopharmacol · Pubmed #24525660.

ABSTRACT: Although many patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) complain of neurocognitive impairment, the effects of antidepressant medications on neurocognitive functions remain unclear. This study compares neurocognitive effects of tianeptine and escitalopram in MDD. Patients with MDD (N = 164) were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either tianeptine (37.5 mg/d) or escitalopram (10 mg/d) for 12 weeks. Outcome measures included clinical improvement, subjective cognitive impairment on memory and concentration, the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Continuous Performance Test, the Verbal Learning Test, and the Raven Progressive Matrices, assessed every 4 weeks. After 12 weeks, the tianeptine group showed significant improvement in commission errors (P = 0.002), verbal immediate memory (P < 0.0001), Mini-Mental State Examination (P < 0.0001), delayed memory (P < 0.0001), and reasoning ability (P = 0.0010), whereas the escitalopram group improved in delayed memory and reasoning ability but not in the other measures. Both groups significantly improved in subjective cognitive impairment in memory (P < 0.0001) and concentration (P < 0.0001). Mixed effects model repeated measures analyses revealed that the tianeptine group had a significant improvement in scores of commission errors (F = 6.64, P = 0.011) and verbal immediate memory (F = 4.39, P = 0.038) from baseline to 12 weeks, compared with the escitalopram group, after controlling for age, sex, education years, baseline scores, and changes of depression severity. The treatment of MDD with tianeptine led to more improvements in neurocognitive functions, especially in commission errors and verbal immediate memory, compared with escitalopram, after controlling for changes in depression severity. Both drugs improved subjective cognitive impairment of memory and concentration.

Next