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Depression: HELP
Articles by Colleen J. Maxwell
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Colleen J. Maxwell wrote the following 8 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Predictors of long-term care placement in persons with dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2016

Cepoiu-Martin, Monica / Tam-Tham, Helen / Patten, Scott / Maxwell, Colleen J / Hogan, David B. ·Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. mcepoiu@ucalgary.ca. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Schools of Pharmacy and Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. ·Int J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #27045271.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to summarize the effects of various individual, caregiver, and system-related factors on the risk of long-term care (LTC) placement for persons with dementia. METHODS: We searched electronic databases for longitudinal studies reporting on predictors of LTC placement for persons with dementia residing in the community or supportive care settings. We performed meta-analyses with hazard ratios (HRs) of various predictors using random effects models and stratified the HRs with several study variables. Data on predictors not included in the meta-analyses were summarized descriptively. RESULTS: Full-text reviews of 360 papers were performed with data from 37 papers used to calculate pooled HRs for LTC placement of select person with dementia (age, sex, race, marital status, type of dementia, living arrangement, and relationship to caregiver) and caregiver (age, sex, and depressive symptoms) characteristics. White race [HR = 1.67, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.41-1.99], greater dementia severity (HR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.03-1.06), and older age (HR = 1.02, 95% CI: 1.01-1.03) increased the risk of LTC placement. Married persons with dementia (HR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.16-0.86) and living with their caregiver (HR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.56-0.92) had a lower risk. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, the degree of functional impairment, and caregiver burden had a consistent effect on the risk of LTC placement in our descriptive review. CONCLUSION: We quantified the predictive effect of several risk factors for LTC placement. These estimates could be used to more precisely categorize the risk of institutionalization and potentially link those at higher risk to appropriate services. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

2 Review Depression in epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2013

Fiest, Kirsten M / Dykeman, Jonathan / Patten, Scott B / Wiebe, Samuel / Kaplan, Gilaad G / Maxwell, Colleen J / Bulloch, Andrew G M / Jette, Nathalie. ·Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Canada. ·Neurology · Pubmed #23175727.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of depression in persons with epilepsy (PWE) and the strength of association between these 2 conditions. METHODS: The MEDLINE (1948-2012), EMBASE (1980-2012), and PsycINFO (1806-2012) databases, reference lists of retrieved articles, and conference abstracts were searched. Content experts were also consulted. Two independent reviewers screened abstracts and extracted data. For inclusion, studies were population-based, original research, and reported on epilepsy and depression. Estimates of depression prevalence among PWE and of the association between epilepsy and depression (estimated with reported odds ratios [ORs]) are provided. RESULTS: Of 7,106 abstracts screened, 23 articles reported on 14 unique data sources. Nine studies reported on 29,891 PWE who had an overall prevalence of active (current or past-year) depression of 23.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 20.6%-28.31%). Five of the 14 studies reported on 1,217,024 participants with an overall OR of active depression of 2.77 (95% CI 2.09-3.67) in PWE. For lifetime depression, 4 studies reported on 5,454 PWE, with an overall prevalence of 13.0% (95% CI 5.1-33.1), and 3 studies reported on 4,195 participants with an overall OR of 2.20 (95% CI 1.07-4.51) for PWE. CONCLUSIONS: Epilepsy was significantly associated with depression and depression was observed to be highly prevalent in PWE. These findings highlight the importance of proper identification and management of depression in PWE.

3 Article Depressive symptoms and functional decline following coronary interventions in older patients with coronary artery disease: a prospective cohort study. 2016

Wilcox, M Elizabeth / Freiheit, Elizabeth A / Faris, Peter / Hogan, David B / Patten, Scott B / Anderson, Todd / Ghali, William A / Knudtson, Merril / Demchuk, Andrew / Maxwell, Colleen J. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Respirology, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. · Interdepartmental Division of Critical Care Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Institute of Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Research, Innovation and Analytics, Alberta Health Services, Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Medicine (Division of Geriatric Medicine), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry and Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Cardiac Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Departments of Clinical Neurosciences and Radiology, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. colleen.maxwell@uwaterloo.ca. · Schools of Pharmacy and Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, N2L 3G1, ON, Canada. colleen.maxwell@uwaterloo.ca. · Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), Toronto, Canada. colleen.maxwell@uwaterloo.ca. ·BMC Psychiatry · Pubmed #27491769.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depressive symptoms are prevalent in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). It is unclear, however, how depressive symptoms change over time and the impact of these changes on long-term functional outcomes. We examined the association between different trajectories of depressive symptoms over 1 year and change in functional status over 30 months among patients undergoing coronary angiography. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study of 350 patients aged 60 and older undergoing non-emergent cardiac catheterization (October 2003-February 2007). A dynamic measure of significant depressive symptoms (i.e., Geriatric Depression Scale score 5+) capturing change over 12 months was derived that categorized patients into the following groups: (i) no clinically important depressive symptoms (at baseline, 6 and 12 months); (ii) baseline-only symptoms (at baseline but not at 6 and 12 months); (iii) new onset symptoms (not at baseline but present at either 6 or 12 months); and, (iv) persistent symptoms (at baseline and at either 6 or 12 month assessment). Primary outcomes were mean change in Older Americans Resources and Services (OARS) instrumental (IADL) and basic activities of daily living (BADL) scores (range 0-14 for each) across baseline (pre-procedure) and 6, 12, and 30 months post-procedure visits. RESULTS: Estimates for the symptom categories were 71 % (none), 9 % (baseline only), 8 % (new onset) and 12 % (persistent). In adjusted models, patients with persistent symptoms showed a significant decrease in mean IADL and BADL scores from baseline to 6 months (-1.32 [95 % CI -1.78 to -0.86] and -0.63 [-0.97 to -0.30], respectively) and from 12 to 30 months (-0.79 [-1.27 to -0.31] and -1.00 [-1.35 to -0.65], respectively). New onset symptoms were associated with a significant decrease in mean IADL scores at 6 months and from 6 to 12 months. Patients with no depressive symptoms showed little change in scores whereas those with baseline only symptoms showed significant improvement in mean IADL at 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with persistent depressive symptoms were at greatest risk for worse functional status 30 months following coronary interventions. Proactive screening and follow-up for depression in this population offers prognostic value and may facilitate the implementation of targeted interventions.

4 Article Identifying Fallers among Home Care Clients with Dementia and Parkinson's Disease. 2016

Bansal, Symron / Hirdes, John P / Maxwell, Colleen J / Papaioannou, Alexandra / Giangregorio, Lora M. ·Department of Kinesiology,University of Waterloo. · School of Public Health and Health Systems,University of Waterloo. · School of Pharmacy,University of Waterloo. · Department of Medicine,McMaster University. ·Can J Aging · Pubmed #27426223.

ABSTRACT: Few studies have focused on falls among home care (HC) clients with neurological conditions. This study identified factors that increase risk of falling among HC clients with no recent history of falls, and explored whether risk profiles varied among those with dementia or parkinsonism compared to those without selected neurological conditions. A retrospective cohort design was used and analysis of data from community-based HC clients across Ontario was conducted on a sample of ambulatory clients with dementia, parkinsonism, or none of the selected neurological conditions. Data were obtained from the Resident Assessment Instrument for HC (RAI-HC) assessment. The outcome used in multivariable analyses was whether clients fell during follow-up. Unsteady gait was a strong predictor of falls across all three groups. Co-morbid parkinsonism most strongly predicted falls in the dementia group. Clients with borderline intact to mild cognitive impairment had higher odds of falling within the parkinsonism and comparison groups.

5 Article Validity of four screening scales for major depression in MS. 2015

Patten, Scott B / Burton, Jodie M / Fiest, Kirsten M / Wiebe, Samuel / Bulloch, Andrew G M / Koch, Marcus / Dobson, Keith S / Metz, Luanne M / Maxwell, Colleen J / Jetté, Nathalie. ·Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada/Mathison Centre for Research & Education in Mental Health, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada patten@ucalgary.ca. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada/Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Mathison Centre for Research & Education in Mental Health, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada/Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. ·Mult Scler · Pubmed #25583846.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is a role for brief assessment instruments in detection and management of major depression in MS. However, candidate scales have rarely been validated against a validated diagnostic interview. In this study, we evaluated the performance of several candidate scales: Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9, PHQ-2, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression rating scale (CES-D), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D) in relation to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). METHODS: The sample was an unselected series of 152 patients attending a multiple sclerosis (MS) clinic. Participants completed the scales during a clinic visit or returned them by mail. The SCID was administered by telephone within two weeks. The diagnosis of major depressive episode, according to the SCID, was used as a reference standard. Receiver-operator curves (ROC) were fitted and indices of measurement accuracy were calculated. RESULTS: All of the scales performed well, each having an area under the ROC > 90%. For example, the PHQ-9 had 95% sensitivity and 88.3% specificity when scored with a cut-point of 11. This cut-point achieved a 56% positive predictive value for major depression. CONCLUSIONS: While all of the scales performed well in terms of their sensitivity and specificity, the availability of the PHQ-9 in the public domain and its brevity may enhance the feasibility of its use.

6 Article Patterns and frequency of the treatment of depression in persons with epilepsy. 2014

Fiest, Kirsten M / Patten, Scott B / Altura, K Chelsea / Bulloch, Andrew G M / Maxwell, Colleen J / Wiebe, Samuel / Macrodimitris, Sophia / Jetté, Nathalie. ·Department of Community Health Sciences, Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, 3rd Floor TRW Building, 3280 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Mathison Center for Mental Health Research & Education, University of Calgary, 4th Floor TRW Building, 3280 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada; Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, 1403 29 Street NW, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada. Electronic address: kmfiest@ucalgary.ca. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, 3rd Floor TRW Building, 3280 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Mathison Center for Mental Health Research & Education, University of Calgary, 4th Floor TRW Building, 3280 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, 1403 29 Street NW, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, 3rd Floor TRW Building, 3280 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada; School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada; School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo, 10 Victoria Street South, Kitchener, ON N2G 2B2, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, 3rd Floor TRW Building, 3280 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada; Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, 1403 29 Street NW, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada. ·Epilepsy Behav · Pubmed #25203325.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Though depression is common in persons with epilepsy, it often remains undiagnosed and/or untreated. The current study aimed to determine the proportion of persons with epilepsy receiving depression-related treatment and to characterize the type of treatment received. METHODS: Persons with epilepsy (n=185) from the only epilepsy clinic in a city of 1.2 million people completed questionnaires and the gold-standard Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID) to assess current and past depression. Treatment for depression (pharmacological and nonpharmacological) was ascertained through patient self-report and chart review. RESULTS: Of those with current depression (n=27), the majority (70.3%) were not on any depression-related treatment. In persons with current depression, nonpharmacological management was the most common treatment method, followed by treatment with psychotropic medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. More individuals with a past history of depression but without a current episode (n=43) were treated (37.2%); it was more common for these individuals to be treated with pharmacological measures. After using an algorithm that adjusts the treated prevalence for those who are successfully treated, the adjusted proportion of depression treatment was 53.1%. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of people treated for current depression in this cohort was very low. Future studies should investigate barriers to treatment and how depression treatment can be optimized for those with epilepsy.

7 Article Validating screening tools for depression in epilepsy. 2014

Fiest, Kirsten M / Patten, Scott B / Wiebe, Samuel / Bulloch, Andrew G M / Maxwell, Colleen J / Jetté, Nathalie. ·Department of Community Health Sciences, Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ·Epilepsia · Pubmed #25169800.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Depression is a common comorbidity of epilepsy, and its timely identification in persons with epilepsy is essential. The use of screening tools to detect depression is common in epilepsy, but some scales in current use have not been validated using a gold standard in this population. The present study aims to validate three commonly used depression-screening scales and assess new cut points for scoring in those with epilepsy. METHODS: Persons with epilepsy (n = 300) from the only epilepsy clinic in a large urban health region completed questionnaires (e.g., sociodemographics, adverse event profile) and three depression-screening tools (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]; Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ]-9 and PHQ-2). One hundred eighty-five patients participated in a gold-standard structured clinical interview to assess depression. The diagnostic accuracy of the depression scales was assessed comparing a variety of scoring cut points to the gold-standard diagnosis of depression. RESULTS: The prevalence of current depression in this population, according to the gold-standard, was 14.6%. The scale with the highest sensitivity (84.6%) was the HADS with a cut point of 6 and the scale with the highest specificity (96.2%) was the PHQ-9 algorithm scoring method. Overall, the PHQ-9 at a cut point of 9 and the HADS at a cut point of 7 resulted in the greatest balance of sensitivity and specificity (area under the curve: 88% and 90%, respectively). SIGNIFICANCE: The PHQ-9 at a cut point of 9 and the HADS at a cut point of 7 had the best overall balance of sensitivity and specificity. However, for screening purposes the PHQ-9 algorithm method is ideal (optimizing specificity), whereas for case finding the HADS at a cut point of 6 performed best (optimizing sensitivity). Appropriate scale cut points should be chosen based on the study's goals and available resources. Disease-specific scale cut points are recommended for future studies assessing depression in persons with epilepsy.

8 Article A dynamic view of depressive symptoms and neurocognitive change among patients with coronary artery disease. 2012

Freiheit, Elizabeth A / Hogan, David B / Eliasziw, Misha / Patten, Scott B / Demchuk, Andrew M / Faris, Peter / Anderson, Todd / Galbraith, Diane / Parboosingh, Jillian S / Ghali, William A / Knudtson, Merril / Maxwell, Colleen J. ·Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Third Floor Teaching Research and Wellness, Calgary. ·Arch Gen Psychiatry · Pubmed #22393217.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Older patients with coronary artery disease often experience depressive symptoms and are vulnerable to developing cognitive impairment. Whether depressive symptoms increase their risk of cognitive decline is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between the stability of depressive symptoms and cognitive decline for 30 months among patients undergoing coronary angiography and to explore whether any observed associations were modified by the presence of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING: Urban tertiary care hospital serving southern Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred fifty patients 60 years or older (73.7% male) undergoing nonemergent catheterization (October 27, 2003, through February 28, 2007) without prior revascularization. We compared a baseline measure of depressive symptoms (Geriatric Depression Scale score ≥5) with a dynamic measure capturing change from baseline to 12 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean change in domain (z scores for attention/executive function, learning/memory, and verbal fluency) and global (raw Mini-Mental State Examination) cognitive scores from baseline to 6, 12, and 30 months and from 12 to 30 months. RESULTS: In adjusted models, participants with persistent depressive symptoms (at baseline and ≥1follow-up visit) showed significantly greater declines at 30 months in attention/executive function (mean z score change, -0.22), learning/memory (-0.19), verbal fluency (-0.18), and global cognition (mean Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] score change, -0.99) compared with participants with no or baseline-only depressive symptoms. Persistent depressive symptoms were associated with significantly greater declines in all cognitive measures from 12 to 30 months after adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical factors. For global cognition, a significantly greater decline was evident for patients with persistent depressive symptoms and the APOE ε4 allele (mean MMSE score change, -2.93 [95% CI, -4.40 to -1.45]). CONCLUSIONS: Depressive symptoms persist in some patients with coronary artery disease, placing them at a greater risk for cognitive decline. Whether this decline is additionally modified by the presence of APOE ε4 requires further investigation.