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Depression: HELP
Articles by Jesse J. Owen
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Jesse Owen wrote the following 8 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Computer-Assisted Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Depression in Primary Care: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 2018

Wells, Michael J / Owen, Jesse J / McCray, Laura W / Bishop, Laura B / Eells, Tracy D / Brown, Gregory K / Richards, Derek / Thase, Michael E / Wright, Jesse H. ·Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. · Department of Counseling Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208. jesse.owen@du.edu. · Department of Counseling Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA. · Family Medicine Residency Program, University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington, Vermont, USA. · Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Residency Program, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. · Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · E-mental Health Research Group, School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin, University of Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · SilverCloud Health, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. ·Prim Care Companion CNS Disord · Pubmed #29570963.

ABSTRACT: Objective: To examine evidence for the effectiveness of computer-assisted cognitive-behavior therapy (CCBT) for depression in primary care and assess the impact of therapist-supported CCBT versus self-guided CCBT. Methods: A search for randomized studies of CCBT compared to control groups for treating depression in primary care settings was conducted using Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Scopus. We extracted the following information from the studies that met inclusion criteria: mean depression rating scale scores before and after treatment, number of patients, type of control group and CCBT program, therapist support time and method of support, and treatment completion rate. Meta-analyses compared differences between posttreatment mean scores in each condition, as well as mean scores at follow-up. Study quality and possible bias also were assessed. Results: Eight studies of CCBT for depression in primary care met inclusion criteria. The overall effect size was g = 0.258, indicating a small but significant advantage for CCBT over control conditions. Therapist support was provided in 4 of the 8 studies. The effect size for therapist-supported CCBT was g = 0.372-a moderate effect. However, the effect size for self-guided CCBT was g = 0.038, indicating little effect. Conclusions: Implementation of therapist-supported CCBT in primary care settings could enhance treatment efficiency, reduce cost, and improve access to effective treatment for depression. However, evidence to date suggests that self-guided CCBT offers no benefits over usual primary care.

2 Article Computer-Assisted Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 2019

Wright, Jesse H / Owen, Jesse J / Richards, Derek / Eells, Tracy D / Richardson, Thomas / Brown, Gregory K / Barrett, Marna / Rasku, Mary Ann / Polser, Geneva / Thase, Michael E. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville School of Medicine, 401 E Chestnut St, Ste 610, Louisville, KY 40202. jwright@iglou.com. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. · Department of Counseling Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA. · E-mental Health Research Group, School of Psychology, University of Dublin, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Clinical Research & Innovation, SilverCloud Health, Dublin, Ireland. · Mental Health Recovery Team North, Solent NHS Trust, Portsmouth, United Kingdom. · Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Mood & Anxiety Disorders Research Program, Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Aurora Behavioral Health Center, Aurora Psychiatric Hospital, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, USA. · Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. ·J Clin Psychiatry · Pubmed #30900849.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of computer-assisted forms of cognitive-behavior therapy for major depressive disorder (MDD) and examine the role of clinician support and other factors that might affect outcomes. DATA SOURCES: Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Scopus from their beginnings to July 18, 2016. Keywords were "randomized, controlled trials of computer-assisted cognitive-behavior therapy for depression" and "randomized, controlled trials of mobile apps for cognitive-behavior therapy of depression." STUDY SELECTION: Of 223 studies identified in the search, 183 were excluded yielding a sample of 40 randomized, controlled investigations of computer-assisted cognitive-behavior therapy (CCBT) for depression. DATA EXTRACTION: Data were abstracted independently by two authors, and consensus was reached by discussion with a third author. RESULTS: The overall mean effect size for CCBT compared to control conditions was g = 0.502, a moderately large effect. Studies that provided support from a clinician or other person yielded significantly larger effects (g = 0.673) than studies in which no support was provided (g = 0.239). Completion rate and study setting also influenced outcomes. Lower mean effect sizes were observed in studies with lower completion rates and in studies conducted in primary care practices. CONCLUSIONS: CCBT with a modest amount of support from a clinician or other helping person was found to be efficacious with relatively large mean effect sizes on measures of depressive symptoms. Self-guided CCBT for depression was considerably less effective. Future research should focus on enhancing the implementation of CCBT, including evaluating the amount and type of support needed for effective delivery, methods to improve engagement with computer-assisted therapies, and ways to improve treatment outcome in primary care settings.

3 Article Dissemination of computer-assisted cognitive-behavior therapy for depression in primary care. 2019

Antle, Becky F / Owen, Jesse J / Eells, Tracy D / Wells, Michael J / Harris, Lesley M / Cappiccie, Amy / Wright, Brent / Williams, Sara M / Wright, Jesse H. ·Kent School of Social Work, University of Louisville, United States. Electronic address: becky.antle@louisville.edu. · Department of Counseling Psychology, Denver University, United States. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville School of Medicine, United States. · Department of Social Work, Western Kentucky University, United States. · Kent School of Social Work, University of Louisville, United States. ·Contemp Clin Trials · Pubmed #30572162.

ABSTRACT: Computer-assisted cognitive-behavior therapy (CCBT) for depression in primary care will be evaluated in a trial with 240 patients randomly assigned to CCBT or treatment as usual (TAU). The study will disseminate a therapy method found to be effective in psychiatric settings into primary care - a setting in which there have been significant problems in the delivery of adequate, evidence-based treatment for depression. The study will include a high percentage of disadvantaged (low-income) patients - a population that has been largely ignored in previous research in CCBT. There have been no previous studies of CCBT for depression in primary care that have enrolled large numbers of disadvantaged patients. The form of CCBT used in this study is designed to increase access to effective therapy, provide a cost-effective method, and be a sustainable model for wide-spread use in primary care. In order to deliver therapy in a practical manner that can be replicated in other primary care practices, patients with significant symptoms of depression will receive treatment with an empirically supported computer program that builds cognitive-behavior therapy skills. Support for CCBT will be provided by telephone and/or e-mail contact with a care coordinator (CC) instead of face-to-face treatment with a cognitive-behavior therapist. Outcome will be assessed by measuring CCBT completion rate, comprehension of CBT concepts, and satisfaction with treatment, in addition to ratings of depressive symptoms, negative thoughts, and quality of life. The cost-effectiveness analysis and exploration of possible predictors of outcome should help clinicians, health care organizations, and others plan further dissemination of CCBT in primary care.

4 Article Adherence, flexibility, and outcome in psychodynamic treatment of depression. 2019

Katz, Michael / Hilsenroth, Mark J / Gold, Jerold R / Moore, Michael / Pitman, Seth R / Levy, Saryn R / Owen, Jesse. ·Derner School of Psychology. · Austen Riggs Center. · Department of Counseling Psychology. ·J Couns Psychol · Pubmed #30035588.

ABSTRACT: This study examined the relationship between adherence flexibility early in treatment and outcome within psychodynamic psychotherapy of depression. For this purpose, we used multilevel modeling (MLM) to examine the relationship between adherence to global psychodynamic-interpersonal (PI) technique early in treatment with outcome, the impact of flexibly incorporating some limited cognitive-behavioral (CB) interventions, as well the role of therapist effects. Our sample included 46 outpatients who were consecutively enrolled in individual psychodynamic psychotherapy, received a

5 Article Feedback informed treatment: An empirically supported case study of psychodynamic treatment. 2017

Winkeljohn Black, Stephanie / Owen, Jesse / Chapman, Norah / Lavin, Kelly / Drinane, Joanna M / Kuo, Patty. ·Penn State Harrisburg. · University of Denver. · Spalding University. · University of Utah. ·J Clin Psychol · Pubmed #29044599.

ABSTRACT: The use of client feedback, via self-report measures of psychological functioning and working alliance, is an effective way to improve therapy outcomes. Despite this progress, there are many questions about the mechanisms of change for these systems. The current study employed a case study approach to examine the effectiveness of feedback informed treatment within a psychodynamic therapy. We examined the case based on therapy outcomes, alliance processes, and verbatim dialogue of in-session exchanges. We also conducted a semistructured interview with the therapist to understand how she used and interpreted the feedback within her psychodynamic approach. The results demonstrated positive therapy outcomes and that feedback assisted with alliance formation, specifically decision making about therapeutic tasks and managing negative countertransference. The therapist reported that the feedback enhanced her ability to work in the here and now and to identify relational patterns. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

6 Article Benchmarking outcomes in a public behavioral health setting: feedback as a quality improvement strategy. 2014

Reese, Robert J / Duncan, Barry L / Bohanske, Robert T / Owen, Jesse J / Minami, Takuya. ·Department of Educational, School, and Counseling Psychology, University of Kentucky. · The Heart and Soul of Change Project. · Southwest Behavioral Health Services. · Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, Counseling, University of Louisville. · Department of Counseling and School Psychology, University of Massachusetts Boston. ·J Consult Clin Psychol · Pubmed #24841863.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a large public behavioral health (PBH) agency serving only clients at or below the federal poverty level that had implemented continuous outcome feedback as a quality improvement strategy. METHOD: The authors investigated the post treatment outcomes of 5,168 individuals seeking treatment for a broad range of diagnoses who completed at least 2 psychotherapy sessions. The Outcome Rating Scale (ORS; Duncan, 2011; Miller & Duncan, 2004) was used to measure outcomes. Clients had a mean age of 36.7 years and were predominantly female (60.7%) and White (67.8%), with 17.7% being Hispanic, 9.3% being African American, and 2.8% being Native American. Forty-six percent were diagnosed with depression, mood, and anxiety disorders; 18.8% were diagnosed with substance abuse disorders; and 14.4% were diagnosed with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. A subset of clients with a primary diagnosis of a depressive disorder was compared to treatment efficacy benchmarks derived from clinical trials of major depression. Given that the PBH agency had also implemented an outcome management system, the total sample was also compared to benchmarks derived from clinical trials of continuous outcome feedback. RESULTS: Treatment effect sizes of psychotherapy delivered at the PBH agency were comparable to effect size estimates of clinical trials of depression and feedback. Observed effect sizes were smaller, however, when compared to feedback benchmarks that used the ORS. CONCLUSIONS: Services to the poor and disabled can be effective, and continuous outcome feedback may be a viable means both to improve outcomes and to narrow the gap between research and practice.

7 Article Toward a more complete understanding of reactions to hooking up among college women. 2014

Owen, Jesse / Quirk, Kelley / Fincham, Frank. ·a Counseling Psychology, College of Education and Human Development , University of Louisville , Louisville , Kentucky , USA. ·J Sex Marital Ther · Pubmed #23905685.

ABSTRACT: Hooking up, a relatively common behavior among young adults, refers to a casual sexual encounter, ranging from kissing to sexual intercourse, without an expectation of ongoing physical encounters or relational commitment. Reactions to hooking up have examined psychosocial outcomes as a proxy for specific reactions. The present study examined the reactions of 190 college women, with a specific focus on the effect of hooking up on their social/peer network, their sexual/romantic sense of self, and their academic performance. Results demonstrated large positive effects for sexual/romantic reactions and social/academic engagement reactions in comparison with negative personal reactions. In addition, higher ratings of anxious attachment, loneliness, and relational/intimacy sex motives were related to less positive reactions, highlighting the importance of attachment and motivations behind hookup experiences. Implications for educational practice and future research are offered.

8 Article A latent class regression analysis of men's conformity to masculine norms and psychological distress. 2012

Wong, Y Joel / Owen, Jesse / Shea, Munyi. ·Department of Education and Counseling Psychology, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. joelwong@indiana.edu ·J Couns Psychol · Pubmed #22229799.

ABSTRACT: How are specific dimensions of masculinity related to psychological distress in specific groups of men? To address this question, the authors used latent class regression to assess the optimal number of latent classes that explained differential relationships between conformity to masculine norms and psychological distress in a racially diverse sample of 223 men. The authors identified a 2-class solution. Both latent classes demonstrated very different associations between conformity to masculine norms and psychological distress. In Class 1 (labeled risk avoiders; n = 133), conformity to the masculine norm of risk-taking was negatively related to psychological distress. In Class 2 (labeled detached risk-takers; n = 90), conformity to the masculine norms of playboy, self-reliance, and risk-taking was positively related to psychological distress, whereas conformity to the masculine norm of violence was negatively related to psychological distress. A post hoc analysis revealed that younger men and Asian American men (compared with Latino and White American men) had significantly greater odds of being in Class 2 versus Class 1. The implications of these findings for future research and clinical practice are examined.