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Depression: HELP
Articles by Jeff Zarp Petersen
Based on 4 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, J. Z. Petersen wrote the following 4 articles about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Systematic review of randomized controlled trials of candidate treatments for cognitive impairment in depression and methodological challenges in the field. 2016

Miskowiak, K W / Ott, C V / Petersen, J Z / Kessing, L V. ·Copenhagen Psychiatric Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. Electronic address: kamilla@miskowiak.dk. · Copenhagen Psychiatric Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. Electronic address: caroline.vintergaard.ott@regionh.dk. · Copenhagen Psychiatric Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. Electronic address: jeff.zarp.petersen@regionh.dk. · Copenhagen Psychiatric Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. Electronic address: lars.vedel.kessing@regionh.dk. ·Eur Neuropsychopharmacol · Pubmed #27745932.

ABSTRACT: Cognitive impairment is a core feature of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) but treatments targeting cognition are lacking. Numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies have investigated potential cognition treatments, but overall the evidence is conflicting. We conducted a systematic search following the PRISMA guidelines on PubMed and PsychInfo to evaluate the extant evidence and methodological challenges in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of biological, psychological and behavioural candidate treatments targeting cognition in MDD. Inclusion criteria were RCTs with a placebo control assessing potential pro-cognitive effects of candidate treatments in MDD. Two independent authors reviewed the studies and assessed their risk of bias with the Cochrane Collaboration׳s Risk of Bias tool. Twenty-eight eligible studies (24 biological and four psychological or behavioural studies) were identified. Cognition was the primary treatment target in ten (36%) trials and an additional treatment outcome together with mood symptoms in 18 (64%) trials. The risk of bias was high or unclear in 93% of trials due to potential selective outcome reporting or 'pseudospecificity' (unspecific cognitive improvement due to reduced depression severity), and/or insufficient details on how the allocation sequence was generated or how blinding was maintained. Several promising treatments were identified, including vortioxetine, erythropoietin, transcranial direct current stimulation and cognitive remediation. However, several common methodological challenges may impede advances in the field. In particular, future trials should select one cognitive composite score as primary outcome, screen for cognitive impairment before inclusion of participants and address 'pseudospecificity' issues. Together, these strategies may improve the success of future cognition trials in MDD.

2 Article Clinical characteristics associated with the discrepancy between subjective and objective cognitive impairment in depression. 2019

Petersen, J Z / Porter, R J / Miskowiak, K W. ·Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet Dep. 6233, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 2A, DK-1353, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: jeff.zarp.petersen@regionh.dk. · Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. Electronic address: richard.porter@otago.ac.nz. · Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet Dep. 6233, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 2A, DK-1353, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: kamilla.miskowiak@regionh.dk. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #30623822.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with unipolar disorder (UD) commonly experience cognitive dysfunction during symptomatic and remitted phases. However, it is not necessarily the patients with the greatest subjective complaints, who display the largest objectively-measured deficits on neuropsychological tests. OBJECTIVE: This report investigated the demographic and clinical factors associated with the discrepancy between subjective and objective measures of cognition in two separate depressed patient populations in Denmark and New Zealand, respectively, using a new methodology. METHODS: Data from 137 depressed patients and 103 healthy controls including neuropsychological test scores, self-reported cognitive difficulties, and ratings of mood were pooled from two studies conducted in Copenhagen, Denmark, and Christchurch, New Zealand, respectively. Cognitive discrepancy scores were calculated using a novel methodology, with positive values indicating disproportionately more subjective than objective difficulties (i.e., "sensitivity") and negative values indicating more objective than subjective impairments (i.e., "stoicism"). RESULTS: In the Danish partially remitted patient sample, greater 'sensitivity' was associated with more subsyndromal depression severity (standardized Beta (std. β )= 0.4, p < 0.01)), illness duration (std. β = 0.4, p < 0.01), and younger age (std. β = 0.6, p < 0.001). This association was replicated in the New Zealand sample of more symptomatic patients (p-values ≤ 0.05). LIMITATIONS: The cross-sectional design hampered causal inferences. We had obtained different measures of objective and subjective cognition from the two studies. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with more depressive symptoms and younger age overreported cognitive impairments across all illness states. The use of an objective cognition screener thus seems particularly relevant for these patients to assess whether subjective complaints are accompanied by measurable cognitive deficits.

3 Article Effects of recombinant human erythropoietin on cognition and neural activity in remitted patients with mood disorders and first-degree relatives of patients with psychiatric disorders: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. 2018

Petersen, Jeff Zarp / Schmidt, Lejla Sjanic / Vinberg, Maj / Jørgensen, Martin Balslev / Hageman, Ida / Ehrenreich, Hannelore / Knudsen, Gitte Moos / Kessing, Lars Vedel / Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica. ·Neurocognition and Emotion in Affective Disorder (NEAD) Group, Copenhagen Affective Disorder Research Centre (CADIC), Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 2A, DK-1353, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Clinical Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine, Göttingen, Germany. · DFG Center for Nanoscale Microscopy & Molecular Physiology of the Brain (CNMPB), Göttingen, Germany. · Neurobiology Research Unit and Center for Integrated Molecular Imaging, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Neurocognition and Emotion in Affective Disorder (NEAD) Group, Copenhagen Affective Disorder Research Centre (CADIC), Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. kamilla.woznica.miskowiak@regionh.dk. · Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 2A, DK-1353, Copenhagen, Denmark. kamilla.woznica.miskowiak@regionh.dk. ·Trials · Pubmed #30400939.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Bipolar disorder (BD) and unipolar disorder (UD) are associated with cognitive deficits and abnormal neural activity in a "cognitive control network." There is an increased prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in psychiatric patients' first-degree relatives, which constitutes a risk factor for psychiatric illness onset. However, there is no treatment with enduring pro-cognitive efficacy. We found preliminary evidence for beneficial effects of eight weekly doses of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) on cognition in BD in a recent randomized controlled trial (RCT). The present RCT consists of two sub-studies that extend our previous work by investigating important novel aspects: (1) the effects of 12 weekly doses of EPO on cognition in first-degree relatives of patients with BD, UD, or schizophrenia; and (2) the effects of extending the treatment schedule from 8 to 12 weeks in remitted patients with BD or UD; and (3) assessment of early treatment-associated neural activity changes that may predict cognitive improvement. METHODS: The trial comprises two parallel sub-studies with randomized, controlled, double-blinded, parallel group designs. First-degree relatives (sub-study 1; n = 52) and partially or fully remitted patients with BD or UD (sub-study 2; n = 52) with objectively verified cognitive dysfunction are randomized to receive weekly high-dose EPO (40,000 IU/mL) or placebo (saline) infusions for 12 weeks. Assessments of cognition and mood are conducted at baseline, after two weeks of treatment, after treatment completion, and at six-month follow-up. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is conducted at baseline and after two weeks of treatment. Psychosocial function is assessed at baseline, after treatment completion and six-month follow-up. The primary outcome is change in a cognitive composite score of attention, verbal memory, and executive functions. Statistical power of ≥ 80% is reached to detect a clinically relevant between-group difference by including 52 first-degree relatives and 52 patients with BD or UD, respectively. Behavioral data are analyzed with an intention-to-treat approach using mixed models. fMRI data are analyzed with the FMRIB Software Library. DISCUSSION: If this trial reveals pro-cognitive effects of EPO, this may influence future treatment of mood disorders and/or preventive strategies in at-risk populations. The fMRI analyses may unravel key neurobiological targets for pro-cognitive treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov , NCT03315897. Registered on 20 October 2017.

4 Article Erythropoietin as an add-on treatment for cognitive side effects of electroconvulsive therapy: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. 2018

Schmidt, Lejla Sjanic / Petersen, Jeff Zarp / Vinberg, Maj / Hageman, Ida / Olsen, Niels Vidiendal / Kessing, Lars Vedel / Jørgensen, Martin Balslev / Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica. ·Copenhagen Affective Disorder Research Center (CADIC), Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Neurocognition and Emotion in Affective Disorder (NEAD) Group, Copenhagen Affective Disorder Research Center, Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 2A, DK-1353, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Neuroanaesthesia, The Neuroscience Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Copenhagen Affective Disorder Research Center (CADIC), Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. kamilla.miskowiak@regionh.dk. · Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 2A, DK-1353, Copenhagen, Denmark. kamilla.miskowiak@regionh.dk. · Neurocognition and Emotion in Affective Disorder (NEAD) Group, Copenhagen Affective Disorder Research Center, Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. kamilla.miskowiak@regionh.dk. ·Trials · Pubmed #29673379.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for severe depression, but its use is impeded by its cognitive side effects. Novel treatments that can counteract these side effects may therefore improve current treatment strategies for depression. The present randomized trial investigates (1) whether short-term add-on treatment with erythropoietin (EPO) can reduce the cognitive side -effects of ECT and (2) whether such effects are long-lasting. Further, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be used to explore the neural underpinnings of such beneficial effects of EPO. Finally, the trial examines whether potential protective effects of EPO on cognition are accompanied by changes in markers of oxidative stress, inflammation, and neuroplasticity. METHODS/DESIGN: The trial has a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Patients with unipolar or bipolar disorder with current moderate to severe depression referred to ECT (N = 52) are randomized to receive four high-dose infusions of EPO (40,000 IU/ml) or placebo (saline). The first EPO/saline infusion is administered within 24 h before the first ECT. The following three infusions are administered at weekly intervals immediately after ECT sessions 1, 4, and 7. Cognition assessments are conducted at baseline, after the final EPO/saline infusion (3 days after eight ECT sessions), and at a 3 months follow-up after ECT treatment completion. The neuronal substrates for potential cognitive benefits of EPO are investigated with structural and functional MRI after the final EPO/saline infusion. The primary outcome is change from baseline to after EPO treatment (3 days after eight ECT sessions) in a cognitive composite score spanning attention, psychomotor speed, and executive functions. With a sample size of N = 52 (n = 26 per group), we have ≥ 80% power to detect a clinically relevant between-group difference in the primary outcome measure at an alpha level of 5% (two-sided test). Behavioral, mood, and blood-biomarker data will be analyzed using repeated measures analysis of covariance. Functional MRI data will be preprocessed and analyzed using the FMRIB Software Library. DISCUSSION: If EPO is found to reduce the cognitive side effects of ECT, this could have important implications for future treatment strategies for depression and for the scientific understanding of the neurobiological etiology of cognitive dysfunction in patients treated with ECT. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03339596 . Registered on 10 November 2017.