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Depression: HELP
Articles by Sasia Volden
Based on 1 article published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Sasia Volden wrote the following article about Depression.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Does vital exhaustion increase the risk of type 2 diabetes? A prospective study. 2017

Volden, Sasia / Wimmelmann, Cathrine Lawaetz / Flensborg-Madsen, Trine. ·The Copenhagen City Heart Study, Hovedvejen, entrance 5, 1st floor, Frederiksberg Hospital, 2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark. Electronic address: sasia.volden@gmail.com. · Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, Building 05 1353 Copenhagen, Denmark; Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: calw@sund.ku.dk. · Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, Building 05 1353 Copenhagen, Denmark; Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: tfma@sund.ku.dk. ·J Psychosom Res · Pubmed #28712434.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is evidence that both stress and depression have a causal relationship with type 2 diabetes suggesting that vital exhaustion (VE) too could be a risk factor. The association between VE and type 2 diabetes has, however, not been investigated prospectively. AIM: To prospectively investigate whether VE is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in a Danish population. METHODS: A prospective cohort study based on the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1991-1993). The degree of VE was measured among 9075 participants without type 1 or 2 diabetes at baseline. To detect type 2 diabetes in the follow-up period, two different approaches were used: In the first substudy, type 2 diabetes was defined based on blood samples and questionnaires from a follow-up study in 2001-2003 (N=4708). The second substudy was register-based, and the study population was linked to the Danish Hospital Discharge Register to detect registrations with type 2 diabetes until 2014. RESULTS: A high degree of VE was associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in both substudies. In the first substudy, the OR for developing type 2 diabetes was 2.56 (95% CI, 1.53; 4,29, P<0,001) among the quartile of participants reporting the highest degree of VE. In the second substudy, the OR was 1.31 (95% CI, 0.99; 1.72, P=0.053) for this group. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that VE may be a useful measure in clinical practice in order to discover individuals at risk of type 2 diabetes.