Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Depression: HELP
Articles from Vanderbilt University
Based on 416 articles published since 2009
||||

These are the 416 published articles about Depression that originated from Vanderbilt University during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17
1 Editorial Neuromodulation: Past, Present, and Future. 2019

Becker, Jonathan Essary / Maley, Christopher Todd / Shultz, Elizabeth K B / Peters, Todd E. ·Vanderbilt University Medical School, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 1601 23rd Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37212, USA. Electronic address: jonathan.e.becker@vumc.org. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 1601 23rd Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37212, USA. Electronic address: christopher.maley@vumc.org. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 1601 23rd Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37212, USA. Electronic address: elizabeth.shultz@vumc.org. · Child and Adolescent Services, Sheppard Pratt Health System, 6501 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21204, USA. Electronic address: tpeters@sheppardpratt.org. ·Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am · Pubmed #30389080.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Advocating for mutually beneficial access to shelved compounds. 2018

Pulley, Jill M / Jerome, Rebecca N / Shirey-Rice, Jana K / Zaleski, Nicole M / Naylor, Helen M / Pruijssers, Andrea J / Jackson, James C / Bernard, Gordon R / Holroyd, Kenneth J. ·Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical & Translational Research, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 2525 West End Avenue, Suite 600, Nashville, TN 37203, USA. · Center for Knowledge Management, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 3401 West End Avenue, Suite 304, Nashville, TN 37203, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37232, USA. · Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, & Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37232, USA. · Center for Technology Transfer & Commercialization, Vanderbilt University, 1207 17th Avenue South, Suite 105, Nashville, TN 37212, USA. ·Future Med Chem · Pubmed #29788759.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Lack of a Role for Alzheimer's Disease Pathology in Late-Life Depression, or Just No Relationship With Amyloid? 2017

Taylor, Warren D. ·From the Center for Cognitive Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville; and the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, VA Medical Center, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville. ·Am J Psychiatry · Pubmed #28245690.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Vascular depression consensus report - a critical update. 2016

Aizenstein, Howard J / Baskys, Andrius / Boldrini, Maura / Butters, Meryl A / Diniz, Breno S / Jaiswal, Manoj Kumar / Jellinger, Kurt A / Kruglov, Lev S / Meshandin, Ivan A / Mijajlovic, Milija D / Niklewski, Guenter / Pospos, Sarah / Raju, Keerthy / Richter, Kneginja / Steffens, David C / Taylor, Warren D / Tene, Oren. ·Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Memory Disorders Clinic, Riverside Psychiatric Medical Group, Riverside, CA, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Molecular Imaging and Neuropathology, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical School, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA. · Division of Molecular Imaging and Neuropathology, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · Institute of Clinical Neurobiology, Alberichgasse 5/13, Vienna, A-1150, Austria. kurt.jellinger@univie.ac.at. · Department of Geriatric Psychiatry of the St. Petersburg Psychoneurological Research Institute named after V. M. Bekhterev, Medical Faculty of St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg, Russia. · Clinical Department, Scientific and Practical Center of Psychoneurology named after V. M. Soloviev, St. Petersburg, Russia. · Neurology Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, School of Medicine University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · University Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Paracelsus Private Medical University, Nuremberg, Germany. · Consultant in Old Age Psychiatry, Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Chester, UK. · Faculty for Social Sciences, Technical University of Nuremberg Georg Simon Ohm, Nuremberg, Germany. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, The Center for Cognitive Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, The Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center (GRECC), Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN, USA. · Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv, Israel. ·BMC Med · Pubmed #27806704.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Vascular depression is regarded as a subtype of late-life depression characterized by a distinct clinical presentation and an association with cerebrovascular damage. Although the term is commonly used in research settings, widely accepted diagnostic criteria are lacking and vascular depression is absent from formal psychiatric manuals such as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5 DISCUSSION: This diagnosis, based on clinical and MRI findings, suggests that vascular lesions lead to depression by disruption of frontal-subcortical-limbic networks involved in mood regulation. However, despite multiple MRI approaches to shed light on the spatiotemporal structural changes associated with late life depression, the causal relationship between brain changes, related lesions, and late life depression remains controversial. While postmortem studies of elderly persons who died from suicide revealed lacunes, small vessel, and Alzheimer-related pathologies, recent autopsy data challenged the role of these lesions in the pathogenesis of vascular depression. Current data propose that the vascular depression connotation should be reserved for depressed older patients with vascular pathology and evident cerebral involvement. Based on current knowledge, the correlations between intra vitam neuroimaging findings and their postmortem validity as well as the role of peripheral markers of vascular disease in late life depression are discussed. CONCLUSION: The multifold pathogenesis of vascular depression as a possible subtype of late life depression needs further elucidation. There is a need for correlative clinical, intra vitam structural and functional MRI as well as postmortem MRI and neuropathological studies in order to confirm the relationship between clinical symptomatology and changes in specific brain regions related to depression. To elucidate the causal relationship between regional vascular brain changes and vascular depression, animal models could be helpful. Current treatment options include a combination of vasoactive drugs and antidepressants, but the outcomes are still unsatisfying.

5 Editorial Computerized Cognitive Remediation for Geriatric Depression: Dawn of a New Treatment Modality? 2016

Taylor, Warren D. ·Center for Cognitive Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center (GRECC), Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN. Electronic address: warren.d.taylor@vanderbilt.edu. ·Am J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #27591159.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Moderators of Remission in Patients With Late-Life Depression: Where Do We Go Next? 2016

Taylor, Warren D. ·Center for Cognitive Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee2Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nash. ·JAMA Psychiatry · Pubmed #26963364.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Should antidepressant medication be used in the elderly? 2015

Taylor, Warren D. ·a 1 The Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center (GRECC), Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN, 37212, USA. ·Expert Rev Neurother · Pubmed #26196054.

ABSTRACT: Late-life depression is a serious illness accompanied by medical morbidity, cognitive decline and risk of suicide. Antidepressant medications are a cornerstone of treatment for depressed elders. Although they are optimally provided in conjunction with psychotherapy, in many cases they are used alone. Recently, concern has developed over modern antidepressant medication, including concerns about their ultimate efficacy and particular risks that may be seen in older adult populations. Ultimately, antidepressant medications are effective for many individuals and continue to play an important role in treating depressed elders, although the potential risks must be weighed with the patient and their families. Current data do not support restriction of their use and untreated depression has serious negative health consequences. Patients need treatments with better efficacy and safety, including new pharmacological options and better access to and dissemination of nonpharmacological treatment.

8 Editorial Can the blues make it harder to breathe? 2014

Carroll, Kecia N. ·1 Department of Pediatrics Vanderbilt University Medical Center Nashville, Tennessee. ·Am J Respir Crit Care Med · Pubmed #24787060.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial The role of residual symptoms in nonadherence to treatment. 2009

Shelton, Richard C. ·Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA. ·CNS Spectr · Pubmed #20448514.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Review Recent Developments in the Treatment of Depression. 2019

Hollon, Steven D / Cohen, Zachary D / Singla, Daisy R / Andrews, Paul W. ·Vanderbilt University. Electronic address: steven.d.hollon@vanderbilt.edu. · University of Pennsylvania. · University of Toronto, Sinai Health System. · McMaster University. ·Behav Ther · Pubmed #30824244.

ABSTRACT: The cognitive and behavioral interventions can be as efficacious as antidepressant medications and more enduring, but some patients will be more likely to respond to one than the other. Recent work has focused on developing sophisticated selection algorithms using machine-learning approaches that answer the question, "What works best for whom?" Moreover, the vast majority of people suffering from depression reside in low- and middle-income countries where access to either psychotherapy or medications is virtually nonexistent. Great strides have been made in training nonspecialist providers (known as task sharing) to overcome this gap. Finally, recent work growing out of evolutionary psychology suggests that antidepressant medications may suppress symptoms at the expense of prolonging the underlying episode so as to increase the risk of relapse whenever someone tries to stop. We address each of these developments and their cumulative implications.

11 Review Perspectives on the Management of Vascular Depression. 2018

Taylor, Warren D / Schultz, Susan K / Panaite, Vanessa / Steffens, David C. ·From the Center for Cognitive Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn.; the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville; the Center of Innovation on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, VA Health Services Research and Development Service, James A. Haley Veterans Hospital, Tampa, Fla.; the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa; and the Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington. ·Am J Psychiatry · Pubmed #30501416.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Review Psychosocial Treatments Targeting Anxiety and Depression in Adolescents and Adults on the Autism Spectrum: Review of the Latest Research and Recommended Future Directions. 2018

White, Susan W / Simmons, Grace Lee / Gotham, Katherine O / Conner, Caitlin M / Smith, Isaac C / Beck, Kelly B / Mazefsky, Carla A. ·Department of Psychology, University of Alabama, Box 870348, Tuscaloosa, AL, 35487-0348, USA. swwhite1@ua.edu. · Department of Psychology, University of Alabama, Box 870348, Tuscaloosa, AL, 35487-0348, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Clinical Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. ·Curr Psychiatry Rep · Pubmed #30155584.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This synthesis of treatment research related to anxiety and depression in adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) focuses on the scientific support for various forms of psychosocial interventions, useful adaptations to standard interventions, and engagement of candidate therapeutic mechanisms. RECENT FINDINGS: There is considerable evidence for the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to treat co-occurring problems with anxiety, but there has been relatively little research on treatment of co-occurring depression. Multiple mechanisms of treatment effect have been proposed, but there has been little demonstration of target engagement via experimental therapeutics. Comorbidity between ASD and anxiety and/or mood problems is common. Although there is evidence for the use of CBT for anxiety, little work has addressed how to effectively treat depression. There is emerging support for alternative treatment approaches, such as mindfulness-based interventions. We encourage rigorous, collaborative approaches to identify and manipulate putative mechanisms of change.

13 Review Nicotine and networks: Potential for enhancement of mood and cognition in late-life depression. 2018

Gandelman, Jason A / Newhouse, Paul / Taylor, Warren D. ·Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, 37212, USA. · The Center for Cognitive Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, 37212, USA; Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN, 37212, USA. · The Center for Cognitive Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, 37212, USA; Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN, 37212, USA. Electronic address: warren.d.taylor@vanderbilt.edu. ·Neurosci Biobehav Rev · Pubmed #28859996.

ABSTRACT: Late-life depression is characterized by both lower mood and poor cognitive performance, symptoms that often do not fully respond to current antidepressant medications. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists such as nicotine may serve as a novel therapeutic approach for this population. Both preclinical and preliminary clinical studies suggest that nAChR agonists can improve depressive behavior in animal models and improve mood in depressed individuals. Substantial literature also supports that nAChR agonists benefit cognitive performance, particularly in older populations. These potential benefits may be mediated by the effects of nAChR stimulation on neural network function and connectivity. Functional neuroimaging studies detail effects of nAChR agonists on the default mode network, central-executive network, and salience network that may oppose or reverse network changes seen in depression. We propose that, given the existent literature and the clinical presentation of late-life depression, nicotine or other nAChR agonists may have unique therapeutic benefits in this population and that clinical trials examining nicotine effects on mood, cognition, and network dynamics in late-life depression are justified.

14 Review Later school start times for supporting the education, health, and well-being of high school students. 2017

Marx, Robert / Tanner-Smith, Emily E / Davison, Colleen M / Ufholz, Lee-Anne / Freeman, John / Shankar, Ravi / Newton, Lisa / Brown, Robert S / Parpia, Alyssa S / Cozma, Ioana / Hendrikx, Shawn. ·Department of Human and Organizational Development, Peabody College of Education and Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. ·Cochrane Database Syst Rev · Pubmed #28670711.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A number of school systems worldwide have proposed and implemented later school start times as a means of avoiding the potentially negative impacts that early morning schedules can have on adolescent students. Even mild sleep deprivation has been associated with significant health and educational concerns: increased risk for accidents and injuries, impaired learning, aggression, memory loss, poor self-esteem, and changes in metabolism. Although researchers have begun to explore the effects of delayed school start time, no one has conducted a rigorous review of evidence to determine whether later school start times support adolescent health, education, and well-being. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess the effects of a later school start time for supporting health, education, and well-being in high school students.Secondary objectives were to explore possible differential effects of later school start times in student subgroups and in different types of schools; to identify implementation practices, contextual factors, and delivery modes associated with positive and negative effects of later start times; and to assess the effects of later school start times on the broader community (high school faculty and staff, neighborhood, and families). SEARCH METHODS: We conducted the main search for this review on 28 October 2014 and updated it on 8 February 2016. We searched CENTRAL as well as 17 key electronic databases (including MEDLINE, Embase, ERIC, PsycINFO, and Sociological Abstracts), current editions of relevant journals and organizational websites, trial registries, and Google Scholar. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included any randomized controlled trials, controlled before-and-after studies, and interrupted time series studies with sufficient data points that pertained to students aged 13 to 19 years and that compared different school start times. Studies that reported either primary outcomes of interest (academic outcomes, amount or quality of sleep, mental health indicators, attendance, or alertness) or secondary outcomes (health behaviors, health and safety indicators, social outcomes, family outcomes, school outcomes, or community outcomes) were eligible. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: At least two review authors independently determined inclusion and exclusion decisions through screening titles, abstracts, and full-text reports. Two review authors independently extracted data for all eligible studies. We presented findings through a narrative synthesis across all studies. When two or more study samples provided sufficient information to permit effect size calculations, we conducted random-effects meta-analyses to synthesize effects across studies. MAIN RESULTS: Our search located 17 eligible records reporting on 11 unique studies with 297,994 participants; the studies examined academic outcomes, amount and quality of sleep, mental health indicators, attendance, and student alertness. Overall, the quality of the body of evidence was very low, as we rated most studies as being at high or unclear risk of bias with respect to allocation, attrition, absence of randomization, and the collection of baseline data. Therefore, we cannot be confident about the effects of later school start times.Preliminary evidence from the included studies indicated a potential association between later school start times and academic and psychosocial outcomes, but quality and comparability of these data were low and often precluded quantitative synthesis. Four studies examined the association between later school start times and academic outcomes, reporting mixed results. Six studies examined effects on total amount of sleep and reported significant, positive relationships between later school start times and amount of sleep. One study provided information concerning mental health outcomes, reporting an association between decreased depressive symptoms and later school start times. There were mixed results for the association between later school start times and absenteeism. Three studies reported mixed results concerning the association between later school start times and student alertness. There was limited indication of potential adverse effects on logistics, as the qualitative portions of one study reported less interaction between parents and children, and another reported staffing and scheduling difficulties. Because of the insufficient evidence, we cannot draw firm conclusions concerning adverse effects at this time.It is important to note the limitations of this evidence, especially as randomized controlled trials and high-quality primary studies are difficult to conduct; school systems are often unwilling or unable to allow researchers the necessary control over scheduling and data collection. Moreover, this evidence does not speak to the process of implementing later school starts, as the included studies focused on reporting the effects rather than exploring the process. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review on later school start times suggests several potential benefits for this intervention and points to the need for higher quality primary studies. However, as a result of the limited evidence base, we could not determine the effects of later school start times with any confidence.

15 Review Impulsivity and cue reactivity in smokers with comorbid depression and anxiety: Possible implications for smoking cessation treatment strategies. 2017

Keyser-Marcus, Lori / Vassileva, Jasmin / Stewart, Karen / Johns, Sade. ·a Institute for Drug and Alcohol Studies, Department of Psychiatry , Virginia Commonwealth University , Richmond , VA , USA. · b Department of Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences , Vanderbilt University Medical Center , Nashville , TN , USA. ·Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse · Pubmed #28590844.

ABSTRACT: Smoking remains one of the most preventable causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States (1). A number of factors contribute to the initiation and maintenance of smoking behavior, including psychosocial influences (2,3), neurobehavioral traits (4), and genetic susceptibility (5-7). Prevalence rates of tobacco dependence among individuals with mental health issues are strikingly high when compared to the general population, particularly among individuals with depression and anxiety disorders (8). There are well-established relationships between impulsivity, cue reactivity, and tobacco use in the literature (9). However, the interaction between these relationships remains unclear. The primary goal of this paper is to provide an overview of the existing literature across these domains and explore their interrelationship and subsequent impact on smoking initiation and tobacco dependence. Further, the clinical implications regarding the development of potential targeted smoking cessation strategies for this population are presented.

16 Review Predictors of clinical recovery from concussion: a systematic review. 2017

Iverson, Grant L / Gardner, Andrew J / Terry, Douglas P / Ponsford, Jennie L / Sills, Allen K / Broshek, Donna K / Solomon, Gary S. ·Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA. · Sport Concussion Program, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Centre for Stroke and Brain Injury, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. · School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Neurological Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department of Psychiatry & Neurobehavioral Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA. · Departments of Neurological Surgery, Orthopaedic Surgery & Rehabilitation, and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. ·Br J Sports Med · Pubmed #28566342.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: A systematic review of factors that might be associated with, or influence, clinical recovery from sport-related concussion. Clinical recovery was defined functionally as a return to normal activities, including school and sports, following injury. DESIGN: Systematic review. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, SPORTDiscus, Scopus and Web of Science. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR SELECTING STUDIES: Studies published by June of 2016 that addressed clinical recovery from concussion. RESULTS: A total of 7617 articles were identified using the search strategy, and 101 articles were included. There are major methodological differences across the studies. Many different clinical outcomes were measured, such as symptoms, cognition, balance, return to school and return to sports, although symptom outcomes were the most frequently measured. The most consistent predictor of slower recovery from concussion is the severity of a person's acute and subacute symptoms. The development of subacute problems with headaches or depression is likely a risk factor for persistent symptoms lasting greater than a month. Those with a preinjury history of mental health problems appear to be at greater risk for having persistent symptoms. Those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or learning disabilities do not appear to be at substantially greater risk. There is some evidence that the teenage years, particularly high school, might be the most vulnerable time period for having persistent symptoms-with greater risk for girls than boys. CONCLUSION: The literature on clinical recovery from sport-related concussion has grown dramatically, is mostly mixed, but some factors have emerged as being related to outcome.

17 Review Immune System Activation and Depression: Roles of Serotonin in the Central Nervous System and Periphery. 2017

Robson, Matthew J / Quinlan, Meagan A / Blakely, Randy D. ·Department of Biomedical Science, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University , Jupiter, Florida 33458, United States. · Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University , Nashville, Tennessee 37240-7933, United States. ·ACS Chem Neurosci · Pubmed #28345868.

ABSTRACT: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has long been recognized as a key contributor to the regulation of mood and anxiety and is strongly associated with the etiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Although more known for its roles within the central nervous system (CNS), 5-HT is recognized to modulate several key aspects of immune system function that may contribute to the development of MDD. Copious amounts of research have outlined a connection between alterations in immune system function, inflammation status, and MDD. Supporting this connection, peripheral immune activation results in changes in the function and/or expression of many components of 5-HT signaling that are associated with depressive-like phenotypes. How 5-HT is utilized by the immune system to effect CNS function and ultimately behaviors related to depression is still not well understood. This Review summarizes the evidence that immune system alterations related to depression affect CNS 5-HT signaling that can alter MDD-relevant behaviors and that 5-HT regulates immune system signaling within the CNS and periphery. We suggest that targeting the interrelationships between immune and 5-HT signaling may provide more effective treatments for subsets of those suffering from inflammation-associated MDD.

18 Review Evidence-Based Interventions for Depressed Mothers and Their Young Children. 2017

Goodman, Sherryl H / Garber, Judy. ·Emory University. · Vanderbilt University. ·Child Dev · Pubmed #28160275.

ABSTRACT: Depression in mothers is a significant risk factor for the development of maladjustment in children. This article focuses on modifiable risk processes linking depression in mothers and adaptation in their young children (i.e., infancy through preschool age). First, the authors present evidence of the efficacy of interventions for reducing the primary source of risk: maternal depression. Second, they describe a central mechanism-parenting behaviors-underlying the relation between maternal depression and children's adjustment. Third, the authors recommend two different integrated interventions that successfully treat mothers' depression and enhance parenting skills with infants and young children. Finally, the authors note the possible need for supplementary interventions to address severity and comorbidity of mothers' depression, barriers to engaging in treatment, and the sustainability of program benefits.

19 Review Initial severity of depression and efficacy of cognitive-behavioural therapy: individual-participant data meta-analysis of pill-placebo-controlled trials. 2017

Furukawa, Toshi A / Weitz, Erica S / Tanaka, Shiro / Hollon, Steven D / Hofmann, Stefan G / Andersson, Gerhard / Twisk, Jos / DeRubeis, Robert J / Dimidjian, Sona / Hegerl, Ulrich / Mergl, Roland / Jarrett, Robin B / Vittengl, Jeffrey R / Watanabe, Norio / Cuijpers, Pim. ·Toshi A. Furukawa, MD, PhD, Departments of Health Promotion and Human Behavior and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Erica S. Weitz, MA, Department of Clinical Psychology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Shiro Tanaka, PhD, Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Steven D. Hollon, PhD, Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD, Department of Psychological and Brain Science, Boston University, Massachusetts, USA; Gerhard Andersson, PhD, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden and Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stokholm, Sweden; Jos Twisk, PhD, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Robert J. DeRubeis, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Sona Dimidjian, PhD, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, USA; Ulrich Hegerl, MD, PhD, Roland Mergl, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Robin B. Jarrett, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA; Jeffrey R. Vittengl, PhD, Department of Psychology, Truman State University, Kirksville, Missouri, USA; Norio Watanabe, MD, PhD, Departments of Health Promotion and Human Behavior and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Pim Cuijpers, PhD, Department of Clinical Psychology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands furukawa@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp. · Toshi A. Furukawa, MD, PhD, Departments of Health Promotion and Human Behavior and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Erica S. Weitz, MA, Department of Clinical Psychology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Shiro Tanaka, PhD, Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Steven D. Hollon, PhD, Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD, Department of Psychological and Brain Science, Boston University, Massachusetts, USA; Gerhard Andersson, PhD, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden and Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stokholm, Sweden; Jos Twisk, PhD, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Robert J. DeRubeis, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Sona Dimidjian, PhD, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, USA; Ulrich Hegerl, MD, PhD, Roland Mergl, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Robin B. Jarrett, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA; Jeffrey R. Vittengl, PhD, Department of Psychology, Truman State University, Kirksville, Missouri, USA; Norio Watanabe, MD, PhD, Departments of Health Promotion and Human Behavior and of Clinical Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; Pim Cuijpers, PhD, Department of Clinical Psychology and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Br J Psychiatry · Pubmed #28104735.

ABSTRACT:

20 Review Biological Aging and the Future of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2017

Rutherford, Bret R / Taylor, Warren D / Brown, Patrick J / Sneed, Joel R / Roose, Steven P. ·Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York State Psychiatric Institute. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs, Tennessee Valley Health Care Center. · Queens College of the City University of New York. ·J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci · Pubmed #27994004.

ABSTRACT: Advances in understanding the biological bases of aging have intellectually revitalized the field of geriatric psychiatry and broadened its scope to include promoting successful aging and studying resilience factors in older adults. To describe the process by which this paradigm shift has occurred and illustrate its implications for treatment and research of late-life brain disorders, late-life depression is discussed as a prototype case. Prior phases of geriatric psychiatry research were focused on achieving depressive symptom relief, outlining pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences between older and younger adults, and identifying moderators of treatment response. Building on this work, current geriatric psychiatry researchers have begun to disentangle the etiologic complexity in late-life depression by focusing on the causative aging-related processes involved, identifying both neurobiological and behavioral intermediates, and finally delineating depression subtypes that are distinguishable by their underlying biology and the treatment approach required. In this review, we discuss several age-related processes that are critical to the development of late-life mood disorders, outline implications of these processes for the clinical evaluation and management of later-life psychiatric disorders, and finally put forth suggestions for better integrating aging and developmental processes into the National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria.

21 Review Treatment and Prevention of Depression and Anxiety in Youth: Test of Cross-Over Effects. 2016

Garber, Judy / Brunwasser, Steven M / Zerr, Argero A / Schwartz, Karen T G / Sova, Karen / Weersing, V Robin. ·Department of Psychology and Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. jgarber.vanderbilt@gmail.com. · Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, & Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. · San Diego State University/UC San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology. · Department of Psychology and Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. ·Depress Anxiety · Pubmed #27699941.

ABSTRACT: Anxiety and depression are highly comorbid and share several common etiological processes. Therefore, it may be more efficient to develop interventions that treat or prevent these problems together rather than as separate entities. The present meta-analytic review examined whether interventions for children and adolescents that explicitly targeted either anxiety or depression showed treatment specificity or also impacted the other outcome (i.e. cross-over effects). We addressed this question both within the same type of study (i.e. treatment, prevention) and across study types. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed both constructs with dimensional measures were included in this review. For treatment studies, RCTs targeting anxiety (n = 18) showed significant effects on both anxious and depressive symptoms, although more strongly on anxiety than depression; similarly, RCTs treating depression (n = 9) yielded significant effects on both depressive and anxious symptoms, but stronger effects on depression than anxiety. Thus, there were cross-over effects in treatments purportedly targeting either anxiety or depression, and also treatment specificity, such that larger effects were seen for the target problem at which the treatment was aimed. Anxiety prevention studies (n = 14) significantly affected anxious, but not depressive symptoms, indicating no cross-over effect of anxiety prevention trials on depression. For depression prevention studies (n = 15), the effects were not significant for either depressive or anxiety symptoms, although the effect was significantly larger for depressive than for anxious symptoms. Post-hoc analyses revealed that the effect on depressive symptoms was significant in depression preventions trials of targeted but not universal samples. Implications for transdiagnostic interventions are discussed.

22 Review Learning about stress: neural, endocrine and behavioral adaptations. 2016

McCarty, Richard. ·a Department of Psychology , Vanderbilt University , Nashville , TN , USA. ·Stress · Pubmed #27294884.

ABSTRACT: In this review, nonassociative learning is advanced as an organizing principle to draw together findings from both sympathetic-adrenal medullary and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis responses to chronic intermittent exposure to a variety of stressors. Studies of habituation, facilitation and sensitization of stress effector systems are reviewed and linked to an animal's prior experience with a given stressor, the intensity of the stressor and the appraisal by the animal of its ability to mobilize physiological systems to adapt to the stressor. Brain pathways that regulate physiological and behavioral responses to stress are discussed, especially in light of their regulation of nonassociative processes in chronic intermittent stress. These findings may have special relevance to various psychiatric diseases, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

23 Review Developmental Demands of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Children and Adolescents: Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Processes. 2016

Garber, Judy / Frankel, Sarah A / Herrington, Catherine G. ·Department of Psychology and Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37203-5721; email: jgarber.vanderbilt@gmail.com , sarf@mail.med.upenn.edu , catherine.g.herrington@vanderbilt.edu. ·Annu Rev Clin Psychol · Pubmed #27019397.

ABSTRACT: Although some treatments for depression in children and adolescents have been found to be efficacious, the effects sizes have tended to be modest. Thus, there is considerable room to improve upon existing depression treatments. Some children may respond poorly because they do not yet have the cognitive, social, or emotional maturity needed to understand and apply the skills being taught in therapy. Therefore, treatments for depression may need to be tailored to match children's ability to both comprehend and implement the therapeutic techniques. This review outlines the steps needed for such developmental tailoring: (a) Specify the skills being taught in depression treatments; (b) identify what cognitive, social, and emotional developmental abilities are needed to attain these skills; (c) describe the normative developmental course of these skills and how to determine a child's developmental level; and (d) use this information to design an individualized treatment plan. Possible approaches to intervening include: alter the therapy to meet the child's level of development, train the child on the skills needed to engage in the therapy, or apply a dynamic assessment approach that integrates evaluation into treatment and measures children's current abilities as well as their potential.

24 Review Depression as a Modifying Factor in Sport-Related Concussion: A Critical Review of the Literature. 2016

Solomon, Gary S / Kuhn, Andrew W / Zuckerman, Scott L. ·a Vanderbilt Sports Concussion Center, Department of Neurological Surgery , Vanderbilt University Medical School , Nashville , TN , USA. · b MedSport - Sports Medicine and Physical Therapy , University of Michigan Health System , Ann Arbor , MI , USA. ·Phys Sportsmed · Pubmed #26567843.

ABSTRACT: Since its third iteration in 2008, the international Concussion in Sport Group (CISG) has delineated several 'modifying factors' that have the potential to influence the management of sport-related concussions (SRC). One of these factors is co- and pre-morbidities, which includes migraines, mental health disorders, attention-deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), learning disability, and sleep disorders. Mental health disorders, and in particular, depression, have received some attention in the management of SRC and in this review we summarize the empirical evidence for its inclusion as a modifying factor. This review is divided into three main bodies of findings: (1) the incidence and prevalence of depression and depressive symptoms in non-concussed and concussed athletes, with comparison made to the general population; (2) managing the post-concussion athlete and accounting for premorbid depressive symptoms; and (3) depression as a long-term effect of repetitive head trauma. Overall, it has been reported that certain subpopulations of athletes have similar or even higher rates of depressive symptoms when compared to the general population. The challenge of accounting for these baseline-depressive symptoms while managing the post-concussive athlete is stressed. And lastly, the prevalence of depression and its relationship to concussion in later-life is discussed.

25 Review Dose-response association of screen time-based sedentary behaviour in children and adolescents and depression: a meta-analysis of observational studies. 2016

Liu, Mingli / Wu, Lang / Yao, Shuqiao. ·Medical Psychological Institute, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China School of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan, China. · Center for Clinical and Translational Science, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Medical Psychological Institute, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China. ·Br J Sports Med · Pubmed #26552416.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depression represents a growing public health burden. Understanding how screen time (ST) in juveniles may be associated with risk of depression is critical for the development of prevention and intervention strategies. Findings from studies addressing this question thus far have been inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of data related to this question. METHODS: The meta-analysis was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA guideline. We searched the electronic databases of PubMed, Web of Science and EBSCO systematically (up to 6 May 2015). OR was adopted as the pooled measurement of association between ST and depression risk. Dose-response was estimated by a generalised least squares trend estimation. RESULTS: Twelve cross-sectional studies and four longitudinal studies (including 1 cohort study) involving a total of 127 714 participants were included. Overall, higher ST in preadolescent children and adolescents was significantly associated with a higher risk of depression (OR=1.12; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.22). Screen type, age, population and reference category acted as significant moderators. Compared with the reference group who had no ST, there was a non-linear dose-response association of ST with a decreasing risk of depression at ST<2 h/day, with the lowest risk being observed for 1 h/day (OR=0.88; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis suggests that ST in children and adolescents is associated with depression risk in a non-linear dose-response manner.

Next