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Depression: HELP
Articles from Calgary
Based on 577 articles published since 2010
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These are the 577 published articles about Depression that originated from Calgary during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Guidelines of the International Headache Society for controlled trials of preventive treatment of chronic migraine in adults. 2018

Tassorelli, Cristina / Diener, Hans-Christoph / Dodick, David W / Silberstein, Stephen D / Lipton, Richard B / Ashina, Messoud / Becker, Werner J / Ferrari, Michel D / Goadsby, Peter J / Pozo-Rosich, Patricia / Wang, Shuu-Jiun / Anonymous6710938. ·1 Headache Science Center, C. Mondino Foundation, Pavia, Italy. · 2 Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · 3 Department of Neurology, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany. · 4 Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ, USA. · 5 Jefferson Headache Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · 6 Montefiore Headache Center, Department of Neurology and Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · 7 Danish Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark. · 8 Dept of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · 9 Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · 10 Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. · 11 National Institute for Health Research-Wellcome Trust King's Clinical Research Facility, King's College Hospital, London, England. · 12 Headache Research Group, VHIR, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona Spain. · 13 Neurology Department, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. · 14 Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. ·Cephalalgia · Pubmed #29504482.

ABSTRACT: Background Quality clinical trials form an essential part of the evidence base for the treatment of headache disorders. In 1991, the International Headache Society Clinical Trials Standing Committee developed and published the first edition of the Guidelines for Controlled Trials of Drugs in Migraine. In 2008, the Committee published the first specific guidelines on chronic migraine. Subsequent advances in drug, device, and biologicals development, as well as novel trial designs, have created a need for a revision of the chronic migraine guidelines. Objective The present update is intended to optimize the design of controlled trials of preventive treatment of chronic migraine in adults, and its recommendations do not apply to trials in children or adolescents.

2 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and after breast cancer treatment. 2017

Greenlee, Heather / DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J / Balneaves, Lynda G / Carlson, Linda E / Cohen, Misha R / Deng, Gary / Johnson, Jillian A / Mumber, Matthew / Seely, Dugald / Zick, Suzanna M / Boyce, Lindsay M / Tripathy, Debu. ·Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Member, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Doctoral Fellow, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Associate Professor, College of Nursing, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. · Professor, Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Adjunct Professor, American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine at California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco, CA. · Clinic Director, Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA. · Medical Director, Integrative Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Post-Doctoral Scholar, Department of Biobehavioral Health, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA. · Radiation Oncologist, Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA. · Executive Director, Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada. · Executive Director of Research, Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Research Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. · Research Associate Professor, Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. · Research Informationist, Memorial Sloan Kettering Library, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Professor, Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #28436999.

ABSTRACT: Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:194-232. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

3 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines on the use of integrative therapies as supportive care in patients treated for breast cancer. 2014

Greenlee, Heather / Balneaves, Lynda G / Carlson, Linda E / Cohen, Misha / Deng, Gary / Hershman, Dawn / Mumber, Matthew / Perlmutter, Jane / Seely, Dugald / Sen, Ananda / Zick, Suzanna M / Tripathy, Debu / Anonymous320823. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health (HG, DH), Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, (HG, DH), and Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons (DH), Columbia University, New York, NY (HG, DH) · School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (LGB) · Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada (LEC) · Institute for Health and Aging, University of California San Francisco, CA (MC) · Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA (MC) · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (GD) · Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA (MM) · Gemini Group, Ann Arbor, MI (JP) · Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada (DS) · Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada (DS) · Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Health System (AS, SMZ), Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health (SMZ), and Department of Biostatistics (AS), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (AS, SMZ) · Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (DT). ·J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr · Pubmed #25749602.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. METHODS: Following the Institute of Medicine's guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment. Trials were included if the majority of participants had breast cancer and/or breast cancer patient results were reported separately, and outcomes were clinically relevant. Recommendations were organized by outcome and graded based upon a modified version of the US Preventive Services Task Force grading system. RESULTS: The search (January 1, 1990-December 31, 2013) identified 4900 articles, of which 203 were eligible for analysis. Meditation, yoga, and relaxation with imagery are recommended for routine use for common conditions, including anxiety and mood disorders (Grade A). Stress management, yoga, massage, music therapy, energy conservation, and meditation are recommended for stress reduction, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and quality of life (Grade B). Many interventions (n = 32) had weaker evidence of benefit (Grade C). Some interventions (n = 7) were deemed unlikely to provide any benefit (Grade D). Notably, only one intervention, acetyl-l-carnitine for the prevention of taxane-induced neuropathy, was identified as likely harmful (Grade H) as it was found to increase neuropathy. The majority of intervention/modality combinations (n = 138) did not have sufficient evidence to form specific recommendations (Grade I). CONCLUSIONS: Specific integrative therapies can be recommended as evidence-based supportive care options during breast cancer treatment. Most integrative therapies require further investigation via well-designed controlled trials with meaningful outcomes.

4 Editorial Depressive Symptomatology, Syndromal Depression, and HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder (HAND). 2018

Goodkin, Karl / Patten, Scott B. ·1 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, USA. · 2 Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #29668329.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Updated CANMAT Guidelines for Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder. 2016

Patten, Scott B. ·Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta patten@ucalgary.ca. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #27534886.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Psychiatric Epidemiology: It Is About Much More Than Prevalence. 2015

Patten, Scott B. ·Editor-in-Chief, The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, Ottawa, Ontario; Professor, Departments of Community Health Sciences and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta; Member, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #26720819.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Problems from the past and prevention for the future. 2015

Patten, Scott B. ·Editor-in-Chief, The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, Ottawa, Ontario; Professor, Departments of Community Health Sciences and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta; Member, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #25886542.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Support, patience, and expectancy: therapeutic options alongside intensified treatments for depression? 2014

Patten, Scott B. ·Editor-in-Chief Designate, The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, Ottawa, Ontario; Professor, Departments of Community Health Sciences and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta; Member, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #25007418.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Neuroimaging and electrophysiology in predicting treatment responsiveness in depression: bridging the lab-to-clinic divide? 2013

MacQueen, Glenda. ·Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Vice Dean, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 7th floor TRW Building, 3280 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #24099496.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Review Perinatal depression: The role of maternal adverse childhood experiences and social support. 2019

Racine, Nicole / Zumwalt, Katarina / McDonald, Sheila / Tough, Suzanne / Madigan, Sheri. ·Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. NW, Calgary T2N 1N4, AB, Canada. Electronic address: Nicole.racine2@ucalgary.ca. · Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. NW, Calgary T2N 1N4, AB, Canada. Electronic address: K.Zumwalt@Columbia.edu. · Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. NW, Calgary T2N 1N4, AB, Canada. Electronic address: SheilaW.McDonald@albertahealthservices.ca. · Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. NW, Calgary T2N 1N4, AB, Canada. Electronic address: stough@ucalgary.ca. · Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, University of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, 2500 University Dr. NW, Calgary T2N 1N4, AB, Canada. Electronic address: Sheri.madigan@ucalgary.ca. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #31759669.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A strong association between the number of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and the risk of maternal depression has been demonstrated; however, this association has not been examined with regards to changes in depression across the perinatal period. The objectives of this longitudinal study were to: (1) determine whether ACEs predict depressive symptomology in pregnancy and the postpartum period; (2) test the relative contribution of ACEs, with other established risks of depression, including social support, and (3) examine whether the association between ACEs and depression across the perinatal period vary as a function of social support. METHODS: Data from 1994 women were collected from a prospective pregnancy cohort. Women completed questionnaires related to ACEs prior to the age of 18. In pregnancy and at 4 months postpartum, social support was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey and clinical cut-off scores for depression were assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. RESULTS: Logistic regression demonstrated that after accounting for sociodemographic factors and social support, ACEs predicted depressive symptoms in pregnancy (AOR = =1.26, CI = =1.12-1.43), the postpartum period (AOR = =1.34, CI = =1.17-1.52), and across the perinatal period (AOR = =1.31, CI = =1.12-1.54). Social support did not moderate the association between maternal ACEs and depression for any time point. LIMITATIONS: retrospective and self-report nature of the data. CONCLUSION: ACEs and low social support are both risk factors for depression, however low social support predicted the highest odds of depression, indicating the importance of asking about social support in pregnant and postpartum women.

11 Review A systematic review of the safety and effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of peripartum depression. 2019

Cole, Jaeden / Bright, Katherine / Gagnon, Lisa / McGirr, Alexander. ·Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: alexander.mcgirr@ucalgary.ca. ·J Psychiatr Res · Pubmed #31129438.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) is an efficacious treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD), however there is limited safety and efficacy data in the peripartum period. The purpose of this review is to systematically examine the safety, acceptability and effectiveness of rTMS administered during the peripartum period as an intervention for MDD. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsychINFO from 2008 to January 2019 to identify peer reviewed publications evaluating rTMS during the peripartum period as an intervention for peripartum MDD. We systematically extracted reported adverse events, side effects, rates of discontinuation, as well as clinical response and remission. RESULTS: Data was synthesized from 1 randomized control trial, 3 uncontrolled trials, 3 case series and 5 case studies, representing a total of 87 patients. No serious adverse events were reported. Side effects occurred at rates comparable to those observed in the non-peripartum population, and obstetric and neonatal complications are infrequent and do not separate from sham-rTMS. Randomized controlled data suggests antidepressant efficacy with an effect size of 0.87. Uncontrolled studies report rates of clinical response between 41.4% and 71.4%, and rates of clinical remission between 20.7 and 30.0%. The treatment appears acceptable, with few patients opting to discontinue treatment. LIMITATIONS: Due to the paucity of research in this population, majority of data comes from sources with inherently higher risk of bias. CONCLUSIONS: rTMS in the peripartum period appears to be efficacious, acceptable and well tolerated. Additional research is required, however rTMS's risk benefit profile may be attractive to women in the peripartum period.

12 Review A scoping review on the relations between urban form and health: a focus on Canadian quantitative evidence. 2019

McCormack, Gavin R / Cabaj, Jason / Orpana, Heather / Lukic, Ryan / Blackstaffe, Anita / Goopy, Suzanne / Hagel, Brent / Keough, Noel / Martinson, Ryan / Chapman, Jonathan / Lee, Celia / Tang, Joyce / Fabreau, Gabriel. ·Department of Community Health Science, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Alberta Health Services, Alberta, Canada. · Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Paediatrics, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary. · Stantec, Alberta, Canada. · City of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Sustainable Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ·Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can · Pubmed #31091062.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Despite the accumulating Canadian evidence regarding the relations between urban form and health behaviours, less is known about the associations between urban form and health conditions. Our study aim was to undertake a scoping review to synthesize evidence from quantitative studies that have investigated the relationship between built environment and chronic health conditions, self-reported health and quality of life, and injuries in the Canadian adult population. METHODS: From January to March 2017, we searched 13 databases to identify peer-reviewed quantitative studies from all years that estimated associations between the objectively-measured built environment and health conditions in Canadian adults. Studies under-taken within urban settings only were included. Relevant studies were catalogued and synthesized in relation to their reported study and sample design, and health outcome and built environment features. RESULTS: Fifty-five articles met the inclusion criteria, 52 of which were published after 2008. Most single province studies were undertaken in Ontario (n = 22), Quebec (n = 12), and Alberta (n = 7). Associations between the built environment features and 11 broad health outcomes emerged from the review, including injury (n = 19), weight status (n = 19), cardiovascular disease (n = 5), depression/anxiety (n = 5), diabetes (n = 5), mortality (n = 4), self-rated health (n = 2), chronic conditions (n = 2), metabolic condi-tions (n = 2), quality of life (n = 1), and cancer (n = 1). Consistent evidence for associations between aggregate built environment indicators (e.g., walkability) and diabetes and weight and between connectivity and route features (e.g., transportation route, trails, pathways, sidewalks, street pattern, intersections, route characteristics) and injury were found. Evidence for greenspace, parks and recreation features impacting multiple health outcomes was also found. CONCLUSION: Within the Canadian context, the built environment is associated with a range of chronic health conditions and injury in adults, but the evidence to date has limitations. More research on the built environment and health incorporating rigorous study designs are needed to provide stronger causal evidence to inform policy and practice.

13 Review The effect of skin-to-skin care on postpartum depression among mothers of preterm or low birthweight infants: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2019

Scime, Natalie V / Gavarkovs, Adam G / Chaput, Katie H. ·Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. NW, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada. Electronic address: natalie.scime@ucalgary.ca. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. NW, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada; Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #31078838.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mothers of preterm or low birthweight (LBW) infants are at two to three times greater risk of postpartum depression (PPD) than mothers of healthy infants, which may be partially due to mother-infant separation during hospitalization. Skin-to-skin care could protect against PPD among these vulnerable mothers. We examined the effect of skin-to-skin care on PPD among mothers of preterm or LBW infants through a systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: We searched six peer-reviewed databases for prospective studies of skin-to-skin interventions that took place in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), used a validated PPD tool, and were published in English between 1979 and 2017. Data were standardized and pooled using Hedges method in a quality-weighted meta-analysis. RESULTS: Eight studies detailing seven interventions met inclusion criteria. Intervention characteristics varied with duration ranging from one week to over two months, skin-to-skin sessions ranging from 15 min to 1 h, and frequency ranging from thrice daily to thrice weekly. Five PPD tools were used predominantly as continuous measures. Meta-analysis demonstrated that skin-to-skin interventions were associated with a 1.04% reduction in standardized depression scores versus standard care (p < 0.001), though high heterogeneity was evident (I LIMITATIONS: Studies differed markedly with respect to design and intervention features, and were methodologically limited by using continuous depressive scores (not dichotomous PPD diagnoses) as the outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Skin-to-skin care has a small protective effect on maternal depressive scores, however the clinical relevance of this finding is arguably minimal. Additional well-designed studies are warranted to conclusively assess the effects of skin-to-skin on PPD.

14 Review A narrative review of studies addressing the clinical effectiveness of perinatal depression screening programs. 2019

Reilly, Nicole / Kingston, Dawn / Loxton, Deborah / Talcevska, Kristina / Austin, Marie-Paule. ·Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Perinatal and Women's Mental Health Unit, St John of God Health Care, NSW, Australia; School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: nicole.reilly@newcastle.edu.au. · Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia. · Perinatal and Women's Mental Health Unit, St John of God Health Care, NSW, Australia. · Perinatal and Women's Mental Health Unit, St John of God Health Care, NSW, Australia; School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia; Black Dog Institute, NSW, Australia; Royal Hospital for Women, NSW, Australia. ·Women Birth · Pubmed #30954483.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines recommend that women be screened for depression as a routine component of maternity care however there is ongoing debate about the benefits of depression screening programs in this context. AIM: This narrative review identifies and describes the clinical effectiveness of perinatal depression screening programs in relation to one or more of the following interrelated domains: referral for additional mental health support or treatment; engagement with mental health support or treatment options; and, maternal mental health or parenting outcomes. METHODS: English-language studies, published up to July 2017, were identified and their methodological quality was assessed. RCTs and non-RCTs were included. RESULTS: Overall, the majority of the fourteen studies identified showed that participation in a perinatal depression screening program increases referral rates and service use, and is associated with more optimal emotional health outcomes. One of four available studies demonstrated an improvement in parenting outcomes as a result of participation in an integrated postnatal depression screening program. CONCLUSION: This small but important body of work is integral to the continuing debate over the merits of screening for depression in the perinatal period. Current evidence favours the overall benefits of perinatal depression screening programs across the three focus areas of this review. Future research should consider a woman's broader psychosocial context and should address the economic as well as clinical outcomes of these programs. Rigorous evaluation of emerging digital approaches to perinatal depression screening is also required.

15 Review Yoga for symptom management in oncology: A review of the evidence base and future directions for research. 2019

Danhauer, Suzanne C / Addington, Elizabeth L / Cohen, Lorenzo / Sohl, Stephanie J / Van Puymbroeck, Marieke / Albinati, Natalia K / Culos-Reed, S Nicole. ·Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. · Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Palliative, Rehabilitation, and Integrative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · School of Health Research, College of Behavioral, Social, and Health Sciences, Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. · Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ·Cancer · Pubmed #30933317.

ABSTRACT: Because yoga is increasingly recognized as a complementary approach to cancer symptom management, patients/survivors and providers need to understand its potential benefits and limitations both during and after treatment. The authors reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of yoga conducted at these points in the cancer continuum (N = 29; n = 13 during treatment, n = 12 post-treatment, and n = 4 with mixed samples). Findings both during and after treatment demonstrated the efficacy of yoga to improve overall quality of life (QOL), with improvement in subdomains of QOL varying across studies. Fatigue was the most commonly measured outcome, and most RCTs conducted during or after cancer treatment reported improvements in fatigue. Results also suggested that yoga can improve stress/distress during treatment and post-treatment disturbances in sleep and cognition. Several RCTs provided evidence that yoga may improve biomarkers of stress, inflammation, and immune function. Outcomes with limited or mixed findings (eg, anxiety, depression, pain, cancer-specific symptoms, such as lymphedema) and positive psychological outcomes (such as benefit-finding and life satisfaction) warrant further study. Important future directions for yoga research in oncology include: enrolling participants with cancer types other than breast, standardizing self-report assessments, increasing the use of active control groups and objective measures, and addressing the heterogeneity of yoga interventions, which vary in type, key components (movement, meditation, breathing), dose, and delivery mode.

16 Review Moving pharmacoepigenetics tools for depression toward clinical use. 2019

Hack, Laura M / Fries, Gabriel R / Eyre, Harris A / Bousman, Chad A / Singh, Ajeet B / Quevedo, Joao / John, Vineeth P / Baune, Bernhard T / Dunlop, Boadie W. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA; Sierra Pacific Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Centers, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA. Electronic address: lhack@stanford.edu. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, McGovern Medical School, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA; Innovation Institute, Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA; IMPACT SRC, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia; Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Departments of Medical Genetics, Psychiatry, Physiology & Pharmacology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · IMPACT SRC, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #30802699.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide, and over half of patients do not achieve symptom remission following an initial antidepressant course. Despite evidence implicating a strong genetic basis for the pathophysiology of MDD, there are no adequately validated biomarkers of treatment response routinely used in clinical practice. Pharmacoepigenetics is an emerging field that has the potential to combine both genetic and environmental information into treatment selection and further the goal of precision psychiatry. However, this field is in its infancy compared to the more established pharmacogenetics approaches. METHODS: We prepared a narrative review using literature searches of studies in English pertaining to pharmacoepigenetics and treatment of depressive disorders conducted in PubMed, Google Scholar, PsychINFO, and Ovid Medicine from inception through January 2019. We reviewed studies of DNA methylation and histone modifications in both humans and animal models of depression. RESULTS: Emerging evidence from human and animal work suggests a key role for epigenetic marks, including DNA methylation and histone modifications, in the prediction of antidepressant response. The challenges of heterogeneity of patient characteristics and loci studied as well as lack of replication that have impacted the field of pharmacogenetics also pose challenges to the development of pharmacoepigenetic tools. Additionally, given the tissue specific nature of epigenetic marks as well as their susceptibility to change in response to environmental factors and aging, pharmacoepigenetic tools face additional challenges to their development. LIMITATIONS: This is a narrative and not systematic review of the literature on the pharmacoepigenetics of antidepressant response. We highlight key studies pertaining to pharmacoepigenetics and treatment of depressive disorders in humans and depressive-like behaviors in animal models, regardless of sample size or methodology. While we discuss DNA methylation and histone modifications, we do not cover microRNAs, which have been reviewed elsewhere recently. CONCLUSIONS: Utilization of genome-wide approaches and reproducible epigenetic assays, careful selection of the tissue assessed, and integration of genetic and clinical information into pharmacoepigenetic tools will improve the likelihood of developing clinically useful tests.

17 Review Practical Guidelines for Managing Patients With Psoriasis on Biologics: An Update. 2019

Poelman, Susan M / Keeling, Christopher P / Metelitsa, Andrei I. ·1 Cumming School of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · 2 Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Alberta, and Symmetry Dermatology, Edmonton, AB, Canada. ·J Cutan Med Surg · Pubmed #30789012.

ABSTRACT: The paradigm for treating inflammatory diseases has shifted dramatically in the past 10 to 20 years with the discovery of targeted therapeutics or "biologic" agents. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriatic arthritis, and psoriasis, among others, are reaping the benefits of decades of bench to bedside research, allowing them to live more productive lives with less side effects than traditional systemic therapies. Despite these advances, many physicians unfamiliar with biologics are left to care for the basic needs of these patients and may be unaware of the multisystem comorbidities associated with psoriasis and the screening, monitoring, and other special considerations required of biologics patients. This can be overwhelming to primary care physicians and inadvertently expose patients to undue risks. The aim of this review is to provide a practical approach for all health care providers caring for patients with psoriasis being treated with biologics to facilitate communication with their treating dermatologist and ultimately provide patients with more comprehensive care.

18 Review Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Adolescent Depression. 2019

Croarkin, Paul E / MacMaster, Frank P. ·Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address: croarkin.paul@mayo.edu. · Strategic Clinical Network for Addictions and Mental Health, University of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, Office Number: B4-511, 2500 University Dr. NWCalgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4, Canada. ·Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am · Pubmed #30389074.

ABSTRACT: Adolescent depression is a substantial global public health problem that contributes to academic failure, occupational impairment, deficits in social functioning, substance use disorders, teen pregnancy, and completed suicide. Existing treatment options often have suboptimal results and uncertain safety profiles. Transcranial magnetic stimulation may be a promising, brain-based intervention for adolescents with depression. Existing work has methodological weaknesses, and larger, neurodevelopmentally informed studies are urgently needed. Treatment with transcranial magnetic stimulation may modulate cortical GABAergic and glutamatergic imbalances. Future study will inform dosing approaches for TMS based on GABAergic and glutamatergic biomarkers.

19 Review Pharmacogenetic guidelines and decision support tools for depression treatment: application to late-life. 2018

Chang, Donald D / Eyreeuro, Harris A / Abbott, Ryan / Coudreaut, Michael / Baune, Bernhard T / Shaman, Jeffrey A / Lavretsky, Helen / Lenze, Eric J / Merrill, David A / Singh, Ajeet B / Mulsant, Benoit H / Reynolds, Charles F / Müller, Daniel J / Bousman, Chad. ·School of Medicine, University of Queensland-Ochsner Clinical School, Brisbane, Queensland, 4072, Australia. · Innovation Institute, Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX 77006, USA. · IMPACT SRC, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, 3220, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, 3003, Australia. · Discipline of Psychiatry, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, 5055, Australia. · University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK. · David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, UT 84102, USA. · Coriell Life Sciences, Philadelphia, PA 19112, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H7, Canada. · Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction & Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H7, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA. · Departments of Medical Genetics, Psychiatry, & Physiology & Pharmacology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, AN T2N 1N4, Canada. ·Pharmacogenomics · Pubmed #30422065.

ABSTRACT: Late-life depression (LLD) is a major depressive disorder that affects someone after the age of 60 years. LLD is frequently associated with inadequate response and remission from antidepressants, in addition to polypharmacy. Pharmacogenetics offers a promising approach to improve clinical outcomes in LLD via new discoveries determining the genetic basis of response rates and side effects, as well as the development of tailored pharmacogenetic-based decision support tools. This invited review evaluates the LLD pharmacogenetic evidence base and the extent to which this was incorporated into existing commercial decision support tools and clinical pharmacogenetic guidelines.

20 Review The Role of Hypnosis in Cancer Care. 2018

Carlson, Linda E / Toivonen, Kirsti / Flynn, Michelle / Deleemans, Julie / Piedalue, Katherine-Anne / Tolsdorf, Emma / Subnis, Utkarsh. ·Department of Oncology, Cumming School of Medicine, Psychosocial Resources, University of Calgary, 2202 2nd St SW, Calgary, AB, T2S 3C1, Canada. lcarlso@ucalgary.ca. · Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, 225 Administration Building, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4, Canada. · Department of Oncology, Cumming School of Medicine, Psychosocial Resources, University of Calgary, 2202 2nd St SW, Calgary, AB, T2S 3C1, Canada. ·Curr Oncol Rep · Pubmed #30421307.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This paper reviews the current evidence-base for the use of hypnosis as an adjunct treatment for common cancer-related symptoms and side effects, including those experienced during treatment, as well as long-term and late effects. First, a general description and history of medical hypnosis in cancer care is provided, followed by a review of the latest evidence across a range of common symptoms. RECENT FINDINGS: The evidence suggests that hypnosis may help treat symptoms of nausea and vomiting in breast cancer patients, manage pain in a variety of contexts, and also reduce levels of anxiety and overall distress around surgical and medical procedures, both in children and adults. Emerging research shows promise for treating hot flashes in women with breast cancer. The research in this area would benefit from assessing populations beyond women with breast cancer, including late-stage disease, using more rigorous study designs, following published reporting guidelines and better describing and standardizing interventions.

21 Review Interaction Between Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and Cognitive Performance in Parkinson's Disease: What Do Clinical and Neuroimaging Studies Tell Us? 2018

Hanganu, Alexandru / Monchi, Oury. ·Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Department of Radiology, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital DR NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1, Canada. · Cumming School of Medicine, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Psychology, University of Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Department of Radiology, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital DR NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1, Canada. oury.monchi@ucalgary.ca. · Cumming School of Medicine, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. oury.monchi@ucalgary.ca. · Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. oury.monchi@ucalgary.ca. · Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. oury.monchi@ucalgary.ca. ·Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep · Pubmed #30324260.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Parkinson's disease was studied for a long time from the prism of a motor impairment. Recent advances have outlined the importance of cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in the PD equation. This review concentrates on the present possibilities of using neuroimaging techniques in order to quantify the cognitive performance and NPS in PD patients. RECENT FINDINGS: Mild cognitive impairment as well as many NPS have been acknowledged as important criteria for assessing the quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease and have been shown as potential factors in predicting further evolution of PD from a clinical perspective. Some NPS strongly influence cognition (depression, REM sleep behavior disorder), while others are less specifically associated with it (impulse control disorders). Neuroimaging techniques reported specific structural, functional, and metabolic brain changes that might be specific for each NPS type. Recent neuroimaging advances report a strong interrelation between NPS and cognitive performance in PD. A special place for consideration is given to REM sleep behavior disorder, depression, and hallucinations. Nevertheless, some studies report distinct results, outlining that the neuroimaging acquisition and analysis techniques still have limitations and also likely represent the complexity of the manifestation of NPS in PD.

22 Review A Meta-Analysis of Maternal Prenatal Depression and Anxiety on Child Socioemotional Development. 2018

Madigan, Sheri / Oatley, Hannah / Racine, Nicole / Fearon, R M Pasco / Schumacher, Lea / Akbari, Emis / Cooke, Jessica E / Tarabulsy, George M. ·University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: sheri.madigan@ucalgary.ca. · Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · University College London, UK. · University of Groningen, The Netherlands. · George Brown College, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Laval University, Québec City, Canada. ·J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry · Pubmed #30196868.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Observed associations between maternal prenatal stress and children's socioemotional development have varied widely in the literature. The objective of the current study was to provide a synthesis of studies examining maternal prenatal anxiety and depression and the socioemotional development of their children. METHOD: Eligible studies through to February 2018 were identified using a comprehensive search strategy. Included studies examined the association between maternal prenatal depression or anxiety and the future development of their children's socioemotional development (eg, difficult temperament, behavioral dysregulation) up to 18 years later. Two independent coders extracted all relevant data. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to derive mean effect sizes and test for potential moderators. RESULTS: A total of 71 studies met full inclusion criteria for data analysis. The weighted average effect size for the association between prenatal stress and child socioemotional problems was as follows: odds ratio (OR) = 1.66 (95% CI = 1.54-1.79). Effect sizes were stronger for depression (OR = 1.79; 95% CI = 1.61-1.99) compared to anxiety (OR = 1.50; 95% CI = 1.36-1.64). Moderator analyses indicated that effect sizes were stronger when depression was more severe and when socio-demographic risk was heightened. CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that maternal prenatal stress is associated with offspring socioemotional development, with the effect size for prenatal depression being more robust than for anxiety. Mitigating stress and mental health difficulties in mothers during pregnancy may be an effective strategy for reducing offspring behavioral difficulties, especially in groups with social disadvantage and greater severity of mental health difficulties.

23 Review Long-term neurological, vascular, and mortality outcomes after stroke. 2018

Singh, Ravinder-Jeet / Chen, Shuo / Ganesh, Aravind / Hill, Michael D. ·Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. ·Int J Stroke · Pubmed #30160619.

ABSTRACT: Background Despite improved survival and short-term (90-day) outcomes of ischemic stroke patients, only sparse data exist describing the sustained benefits of acute stroke care interventions and long-term prognosis of stroke survivors. Aim We review the contemporary literature assessing long-term (5 years or more) outcomes after stroke and acute stroke treatment. Summary of review Acute stroke unit care and intravenous thrombolysis have sustained benefits over longer follow-up, but few data exist on the long-term outcome after endovascular thrombectomy (EVT). A large proportion of stroke survivors face challenges of residual disability and neuropsychiatric sequelae (especially affective disorders and epilepsy) which affects their quality of life and is associated with poorer prognosis due to increase in stroke recurrences/mortality. Nearly, a quarter of stroke survivors have a recurrent stroke at 5 years, and nearly double that at 10 years. Mortality after recurrent stroke is high, and half of the stroke survivors are deceased at 5 years after stroke and three fourth at 10 years. Long-term all-cause mortality is largely due to conditions other than stroke. Both stroke recurrence and long-term mortality are affected by several modifiable risk factors, and thus amenable to secondary prevention strategies. Conclusions There is a need for studies reporting longer term effects of acute interventions, especially EVT. Better preventive strategies are warranted to reduce the vascular and non-vascular mortality long after stroke.

24 Review Dosing of Electrical Parameters in Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) for Intractable Depression: A Review of Clinical Studies. 2018

Ramasubbu, Rajamannar / Lang, Stefan / Kiss, Zelma H T. ·Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. ·Front Psychiatry · Pubmed #30050474.

ABSTRACT:

25 Review Vitamin D Deficiency and Antenatal and Postpartum Depression: A Systematic Review. 2018

Aghajafari, Fariba / Letourneau, Nicole / Mahinpey, Newsha / Cosic, Nela / Giesbrecht, Gerald. ·Department of Family Medicine and Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Sunridge Family Medicine Teaching Centre, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada. fariba.aghajafari@ucalgary.ca. · Faculty of Nursing and Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada. nicole.letourneau@ucalgary.ca. · Life Science Program, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada. 16nm5@queensu.ca. · Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada. ncosic@ucalgary.ca. · Departments of Paediatrics and Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada. ggiesbre@ucalgary.ca. ·Nutrients · Pubmed #29649128.

ABSTRACT: Vitamin D has been implicated in antenatal depression (AD) and postpartum depression (PPD) in many studies; however, results have been inconsistent due to the complexity of this association. We searched the MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and Maternity and Infant Care databases for literature addressing associations between vitamin D and AD and PPD. Two independent authors reviewed titles and abstracts of the search results and selected studies for full review. Data were extracted, and a quality rating was done using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) on the selected studies. A total of 239 studies were identified; 14 were included in the review. The quality assessment of the included studies ranged from moderate to high. Of the studies on PPD, five of nine (55%) showed a significant association between vitamin D and PPD. Five of seven (71%) studies on AD showed a significant association with vitamin D status. As the included studies used different effect estimates and statistical analyses to report the association, it was not possible to transform the existing data into one single effect measure to employ meta-analytic techniques. While results of this systematic review vary, they indicate a significant association between vitamin D status and AD and PD.

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