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Depression: HELP
Articles from Calgary
Based on 468 articles published since 2008
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These are the 468 published articles about Depression that originated from Calgary during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19
1 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and after breast cancer treatment. 2017

Greenlee, Heather / DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J / Balneaves, Lynda G / Carlson, Linda E / Cohen, Misha R / Deng, Gary / Johnson, Jillian A / Mumber, Matthew / Seely, Dugald / Zick, Suzanna M / Boyce, Lindsay M / Tripathy, Debu. ·Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Member, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Doctoral Fellow, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Associate Professor, College of Nursing, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. · Professor, Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Adjunct Professor, American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine at California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco, CA. · Clinic Director, Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA. · Medical Director, Integrative Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Post-Doctoral Scholar, Department of Biobehavioral Health, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA. · Radiation Oncologist, Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA. · Executive Director, Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada. · Executive Director of Research, Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Research Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. · Research Associate Professor, Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. · Research Informationist, Memorial Sloan Kettering Library, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Professor, Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #28436999.

ABSTRACT: Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:194-232. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

2 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines on the use of integrative therapies as supportive care in patients treated for breast cancer. 2014

Greenlee, Heather / Balneaves, Lynda G / Carlson, Linda E / Cohen, Misha / Deng, Gary / Hershman, Dawn / Mumber, Matthew / Perlmutter, Jane / Seely, Dugald / Sen, Ananda / Zick, Suzanna M / Tripathy, Debu / Anonymous320823. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health (HG, DH), Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, (HG, DH), and Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons (DH), Columbia University, New York, NY (HG, DH) · School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (LGB) · Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada (LEC) · Institute for Health and Aging, University of California San Francisco, CA (MC) · Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA (MC) · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (GD) · Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA (MM) · Gemini Group, Ann Arbor, MI (JP) · Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada (DS) · Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada (DS) · Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Health System (AS, SMZ), Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health (SMZ), and Department of Biostatistics (AS), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (AS, SMZ) · Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (DT). ·J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr · Pubmed #25749602.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. METHODS: Following the Institute of Medicine's guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment. Trials were included if the majority of participants had breast cancer and/or breast cancer patient results were reported separately, and outcomes were clinically relevant. Recommendations were organized by outcome and graded based upon a modified version of the US Preventive Services Task Force grading system. RESULTS: The search (January 1, 1990-December 31, 2013) identified 4900 articles, of which 203 were eligible for analysis. Meditation, yoga, and relaxation with imagery are recommended for routine use for common conditions, including anxiety and mood disorders (Grade A). Stress management, yoga, massage, music therapy, energy conservation, and meditation are recommended for stress reduction, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and quality of life (Grade B). Many interventions (n = 32) had weaker evidence of benefit (Grade C). Some interventions (n = 7) were deemed unlikely to provide any benefit (Grade D). Notably, only one intervention, acetyl-l-carnitine for the prevention of taxane-induced neuropathy, was identified as likely harmful (Grade H) as it was found to increase neuropathy. The majority of intervention/modality combinations (n = 138) did not have sufficient evidence to form specific recommendations (Grade I). CONCLUSIONS: Specific integrative therapies can be recommended as evidence-based supportive care options during breast cancer treatment. Most integrative therapies require further investigation via well-designed controlled trials with meaningful outcomes.

3 Guideline Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) clinical guidelines for the management of major depressive disorder in adults. I. Classification, burden and principles of management. 2009

Patten, Scott B / Kennedy, Sidney H / Lam, Raymond W / O'Donovan, Claire / Filteau, Marie J / Parikh, Sagar V / Ravindran, Arun V / Anonymous150636. ·University of Calgary, Canada. patten@ucalgary.ca ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #19674796.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most burdensome illnesses in Canada. The purpose of this introductory section of the 2009 revised CANMAT guidelines is to provide definitions of the depressive disorders (with an emphasis on MDD), summarize Canadian data concerning their epidemiology and describe overarching principles of managing these conditions. This section on "Classification, Burden and Principles of Management" is one of 5 guideline articles in the 2009 CANMAT guidelines. METHODS: The CANMAT guidelines are based on a question-answer format to enhance accessibility to clinicians. An evidence-based format was used with updated systematic reviews of the literature and recommendations were graded according to the Level of Evidence using pre-defined criteria. Lines of Treatment were identified based on criteria that included evidence and expert clinical support. RESULTS: Epidemiologic data indicate that MDD afflicts 11% of Canadians at some time in their lives, and approximately 4% during any given year. MDD has a detrimental impact on overall health, role functioning and quality of life. Detection of MDD, accurate diagnosis and provision of evidence-based treatment are challenging tasks for both clinicians and for the health systems in which they work. LIMITATIONS: Epidemiologic and clinical data cannot be seamlessly linked due to heterogeneity of syndromes within the population. CONCLUSIONS: In the eight years since the last CANMAT Guidelines for Treatment of Depressive Disorders were published, progress has been made in understanding the epidemiology and treatment of these disorders. Evidence supporting specific therapeutic interventions is summarized and evaluated in subsequent sections.

4 Editorial Depressive Symptomatology, Syndromal Depression, and HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder (HAND). 2018

Goodkin, Karl / Patten, Scott B. ·1 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, USA. · 2 Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #29668329.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Updated CANMAT Guidelines for Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder. 2016

Patten, Scott B. ·Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta patten@ucalgary.ca. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #27534886.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Psychiatric Epidemiology: It Is About Much More Than Prevalence. 2015

Patten, Scott B. ·Editor-in-Chief, The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, Ottawa, Ontario; Professor, Departments of Community Health Sciences and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta; Member, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #26720819.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Problems from the past and prevention for the future. 2015

Patten, Scott B. ·Editor-in-Chief, The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, Ottawa, Ontario; Professor, Departments of Community Health Sciences and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta; Member, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #25886542.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Support, patience, and expectancy: therapeutic options alongside intensified treatments for depression? 2014

Patten, Scott B. ·Editor-in-Chief Designate, The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, Ottawa, Ontario; Professor, Departments of Community Health Sciences and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta; Member, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #25007418.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Neuroimaging and electrophysiology in predicting treatment responsiveness in depression: bridging the lab-to-clinic divide? 2013

MacQueen, Glenda. ·Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Vice Dean, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 7th floor TRW Building, 3280 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #24099496.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Review Vitamin D Deficiency and Antenatal and Postpartum Depression: A Systematic Review. 2018

Aghajafari, Fariba / Letourneau, Nicole / Mahinpey, Newsha / Cosic, Nela / Giesbrecht, Gerald. ·Department of Family Medicine and Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Sunridge Family Medicine Teaching Centre, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada. fariba.aghajafari@ucalgary.ca. · Faculty of Nursing and Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada. nicole.letourneau@ucalgary.ca. · Life Science Program, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada. 16nm5@queensu.ca. · Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada. ncosic@ucalgary.ca. · Departments of Paediatrics and Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada. ggiesbre@ucalgary.ca. ·Nutrients · Pubmed #29649128.

ABSTRACT: Vitamin D has been implicated in antenatal depression (AD) and postpartum depression (PPD) in many studies; however, results have been inconsistent due to the complexity of this association. We searched the MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and Maternity and Infant Care databases for literature addressing associations between vitamin D and AD and PPD. Two independent authors reviewed titles and abstracts of the search results and selected studies for full review. Data were extracted, and a quality rating was done using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) on the selected studies. A total of 239 studies were identified; 14 were included in the review. The quality assessment of the included studies ranged from moderate to high. Of the studies on PPD, five of nine (55%) showed a significant association between vitamin D and PPD. Five of seven (71%) studies on AD showed a significant association with vitamin D status. As the included studies used different effect estimates and statistical analyses to report the association, it was not possible to transform the existing data into one single effect measure to employ meta-analytic techniques. While results of this systematic review vary, they indicate a significant association between vitamin D status and AD and PD.

11 Review Inflammatory cytokines and depression in children with cancer: A review of the literature. 2018

Narendran, Gaya / Tomfohr, Lianne / Schulte, Fiona. ·a Division of Pediatric Oncology, Alberta Children's Hospital , Calgary , Alberta , Canada. · b Department of Psychology , Faculty of Arts, University of Calgary , Calgary , Alberta , Canada. ·Pediatr Hematol Oncol · Pubmed #29648904.

ABSTRACT: Compared to the general pediatric population, pediatric cancer patients are at increased risk of experiencing depressive symptoms during and after their treatment. Clinically, there exist few resources to guide health care professionals in the care of children with cancer who report depressive symptomatology. Pediatric cancer patients experience unique inflammatory changes secondary to their disease and accompanying treatments. It has been reported that inflammatory changes in the context of illness are related to cytokine dysregulation which in turn may influence the expression of depressive symptoms. In this review of current literature, we summarize the existing knowledge, relevant models and studies in progress with respect to this concept.

12 Review Cognitive hypnotherapy for psychological management of depression in palliative care. 2018

Alladin, Assen. ·Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary Medical School, Calgary, Canada. dralladin@shaw.ca. ·Ann Palliat Med · Pubmed #29307205.

ABSTRACT: The prevalence of psychiatric disorders in palliative care is well documented, yet they often remain undetected and untreated, adding further to the burden of suffering on patients who are already facing severe physical and psychosocial problems. This article will focus on depression as it represents one of the most common psychiatric disorders treated by psychiatrists and psychotherapists in palliative care. Although depression in palliative care can be treated successfully with antidepressant medication and psychotherapy, a significant number of depressives do not respond to either medication or existing psychotherapies. This is not surprising considering depression is a complex disorder. Moreover, the presentation of depression in palliative care is compounded by the severity of the underlying medical conditions. It is thus important for clinicians to continue to develop more effective treatments for depression in palliative care. This article describes cognitive hypnotherapy (CH), an evidence-based multimodal treatment for depression which can be applied to a wide range of depressed patients in palliative care. CH, however, does not represent a finished product; it is a work in progress to be empirically validated and refined by advances in cancer and clinical depression.

13 Review Neuroimaging biomarkers as predictors of treatment outcome in Major Depressive Disorder. 2018

Fonseka, Trehani M / MacQueen, Glenda M / Kennedy, Sidney H. ·Department of Psychiatry, Krembil Research Centre, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Calgary, AB, Canada; Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, Krembil Research Centre, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Electronic address: KennedyS@smh.ca. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #29150145.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Current practice for selecting pharmacological and non-pharmacological antidepressant treatments has yielded low response and remission rates in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Neuroimaging biomarkers of brain structure and function may be useful in guiding treatment selection by predicting response vs. non-response outcomes. METHODS: In this review, we summarize data from studies examining predictors of treatment response using structural and functional neuroimaging modalities, as they pertain to pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and stimulation treatment strategies. A literature search was conducted in OVID Medline, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases with coverage from January 1990 to January 2017. RESULTS: Several imaging biomarkers of therapeutic response in MDD emerged: frontolimbic regions, including the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, and insula were regions of interest. Since these sub-regions are implicated in the etiology of MDD, their association with response outcomes may be the result of treatments having a normalizing effect on structural or activation abnormalities. LIMITATIONS: The direction of findings is inconsistent in studies examining these biomarkers, and variation across 'biotypes' within MDD may account for this. Limitations in sample size and differences in methodology likely also contribute. CONCLUSIONS: The identification of accurate, reliable neuroimaging biomarkers of treatment response holds promise toward improving treatment outcomes and reducing burden of illness for patients with MDD. However, before these biomarkers can be translated into clinical practice, they will need to be replicated and validated in large, independent samples, and integrated with data from other biological systems.

14 Review Functional Recovery in Major Depressive Disorder: Providing Early Optimal Treatment for the Individual Patient. 2018

Oluboka, Oloruntoba J / Katzman, Martin A / Habert, Jeffrey / McIntosh, Diane / MacQueen, Glenda M / Milev, Roumen V / McIntyre, Roger S / Blier, Pierre. ·Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · START Clinic for Mood and Anxiety Disorders, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry and Pharmacology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario. ·Int J Neuropsychopharmacol · Pubmed #29024974.

ABSTRACT: Major depressive disorder is an often chronic and recurring illness. Left untreated, major depressive disorder may result in progressive alterations in brain morphometry and circuit function. Recent findings, however, suggest that pharmacotherapy may halt and possibly reverse those effects. These findings, together with evidence that a delay in treatment is associated with poorer clinical outcomes, underscore the urgency of rapidly treating depression to full recovery. Early optimized treatment, using measurement-based care and customizing treatment to the individual patient, may afford the best possible outcomes for each patient. The aim of this article is to present recommendations for using a patient-centered approach to rapidly provide optimal pharmacological treatment to patients with major depressive disorder. Offering major depressive disorder treatment determined by individual patient characteristics (e.g., predominant symptoms, medical history, comorbidities), patient preferences and expectations, and, critically, their own definition of wellness provides the best opportunity for full functional recovery.

15 Review Affective and emotional dysregulation as pre-dementia risk markers: exploring the mild behavioral impairment symptoms of depression, anxiety, irritability, and euphoria. 2018

Ismail, Zahinoor / Gatchel, Jennifer / Bateman, Daniel R / Barcelos-Ferreira, Ricardo / Chantillon, Marc / Jaeger, Judith / Donovan, Nancy J / Mortby, Moyra E. ·Departments of Psychiatry,Clinical Neurosciences,and Community Health Sciences,Cumming School of Medicine,University of Calgary,Calgary,Canada. · Department of Psychiatry,Massachusetts General Hospital,Harvard Medical School,Boston,MA,USA. · Indiana University Center for Aging Research,Indianapolis,IN,USA. · School of Medicine,Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF),Juiz de Fora,Brazil. · Department of Psychiatry Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Wellness Management Center,New Brunswick,NJ,USA. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine,Bronx,NY,USAandCognitionMetrics,Wilmington,DE,USA. · Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology,Brigham and Women's Hospital,Harvard Medical School,Boston,MA,USA. · Centre for Research on Ageing,Health and Wellbeing,Research School of Population Health,The Australian National University,Canberra,Australia. ·Int Psychogeriatr · Pubmed #28899446.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Affective and emotional symptoms such as depression, anxiety, euphoria, and irritability are common neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in pre-dementia and cognitively normal older adults. They comprise a domain of Mild Behavioral Impairment (MBI), which describes their emergence in later life as an at-risk state for cognitive decline and dementia, and as a potential manifestation of prodromal dementia. This selective scoping review explores the epidemiology and neurobiological links between affective and emotional symptoms, and incident cognitive decline, focusing on recent literature in this expanding field of research. METHODS: Existing literature in prodromal and dementia states was reviewed, focusing on epidemiology, and neurobiology. Search terms included: "mild cognitive impairment," "dementia," "prodromal dementia," "preclinical dementia," "Alzheimer's," "depression," "dysphoria," "mania," "euphoria," "bipolar disorder," and "irritability." RESULTS: Affective and emotional dysregulation are common in preclinical and prodromal dementia syndromes, often being harbingers of neurodegenerative change and progressive cognitive decline. Nosological constraints in distinguishing between pre-existing psychiatric symptomatology and later life acquired NPS limit historical data utility, but emerging research emphasizes the importance of addressing time frames between symptom onset and cognitive decline, and age of symptom onset. CONCLUSION: Affective symptoms are of prognostic utility, but interventions to prevent dementia syndromes are limited. Trials need to assess interventions targeting known dementia pathology, toward novel pathology, as well as using psychiatric medications. Research focusing explicitly on later life onset symptomatology will improve our understanding of the neurobiology of NPS and neurodegeneration, enrich the study sample, and inform observational and clinical trial design for prevention and treatment strategies.

16 Review Treating depression in multiple sclerosis with antidepressants: A brief review of clinical trials and exploration of clinical symptoms to guide treatment decisions. 2017

Nathoo, Nabeela / Mackie, Aaron. ·Department of Radiology & Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: nnathoo@ucalgary.ca. · Departments of Psychiatry & Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ·Mult Scler Relat Disord · Pubmed #29141805.

ABSTRACT: Depression is a common comorbidity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Those with MS and concurrent depression have poorer quality of life and are also less likely to be compliant with disease-modifying treatment, which may ultimately affect their MS disease course. Treating depression in MS with pharmacological agents can improve not only depression, but may also impact the MS disease course. However, no guidelines exist around treating depression in MS. Few randomized-controlled trials using antidepressants in MS exist. Here, we briefly review trials using antidepressant medications to treat depression in MS. We also propose individualizing treatment of depression in MS, as the depressive symptoms and MS symptoms and disease course differ significantly between patients. We explore the heterogeneity in presentation of depression through different comorbid symptoms in MS, and discuss which antidepressant options would be appropriate in each situation. We propose that future clinical trials should incorporate differences in issues between those with depression (e.g. sexual dysfunction, urinary incontinence) into analysis. As MS is incredibly heterogeneous, treating concurrent depression on a case-by-case basis may enable for improving quality of life and the MS disease course.

17 Review The effect of perinatal depression treatment for mothers on parenting and child development: A systematic review. 2017

Letourneau, Nicole L / Dennis, Cindy-Lee / Cosic, Nela / Linder, Jordana. ·Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Cumming School of Medicine, Departments of Pediatrics & Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. ·Depress Anxiety · Pubmed #28962068.

ABSTRACT: Antenatal and postpartum depression are very common and have significant consequences for mothers and their children. This review examines which antenatal depression (AD) and postpartum depression (PPD) treatment interventions are most efficacious in improving parenting and/or child development. CINAHL, Scopus, Cochrane Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Controlled Trials, Medline (OVID), Embase (OVID), PsychINFO, PsycARTICLES, AMED, and reference lists were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-experimental studies assessing the effect of AD, PPD, or both treatment interventions on parenting and/or child development were included. Meta-analysis was conducted using random effects when possible. Thirty-six trials (within 40 articles) met criteria for review. Interventions include interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), peer support, maternal-child interaction guidance, and other interventions, such as massage. For AD, IPT, CBT, and massage produced large effects on parenting (e.g. adjustment and attention toward infant) and child development (e.g. behaviour). For PPD, maternal-child interaction guidance and psychotherapeutic group support produced large effects on parenting (e.g. sense of competence) and child development (e.g. cortisol). However, meta-analysis revealed nonsignificant effects of IPT on maternal-child attachment and CBT on parenting stress. Promising findings exist for IPT, CBT, maternal-child interaction guidance, massage, and psychotherapeutic group support for specific parenting and/or child development outcomes. Additional RCTs using measures already employed in the literature are required to conduct necessary meta-analysis and fully elucidate treatment effects.

18 Review Depression Screening and Health Outcomes in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review. 2017

Roseman, Michelle / Saadat, Nazanin / Riehm, Kira E / Kloda, Lorie A / Boruff, Jill / Ickowicz, Abel / Baltzer, Franziska / Katz, Laurence Y / Patten, Scott B / Rousseau, Cécile / Thombs, Brett D. ·1 Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario. · 2 Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Québec. · 3 Library, Concordia University, Montréal, Québec. · 4 Schulich Library of Science and Engineering, McGill University, Montréal, Québec. · 5 Department of Psychiatry, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. · 6 Montréal Children's Hospital, Montréal, Québec. · 7 Department of Pediatrics, McGill University, Montréal, Québec. · 8 Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg. · 9 Departments of Psychiatry and Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta. · 10 Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec. · 11 Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, Québec. · 12 Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Québec. · 13 Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec. · 14 Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec. ·Can J Psychiatry · Pubmed #28851234.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Depression screening among children and adolescents is controversial. In 2009, the United States Preventive Services Task Force first recommended routine depression screening for adolescents, and this recommendation was reiterated in 2016. However, no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of screening were identified in the original 2009 systematic review or in an updated review through February 2015. The objective of this systematic review was to provide a current evaluation to determine whether there is evidence from RCTs that depression screening in childhood and adolescence improves depression outcomes. METHOD: Data sources included the MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane CENTRAL and LILACS databases searched February 2, 2017. Eligible studies had to be RCTs that compared depression outcomes between children or adolescents aged 6 to 18 years who underwent depression screening and those who did not. RESULTS: Of 552 unique title/abstracts, none received full-text review. No RCTs that investigated the effects of screening on depression outcomes in children or adolescents were identified. CONCLUSIONS: There is no direct RCT evidence that supports depression screening among children and adolescents. Groups that consider recommending screening should carefully consider potential harms, as well as the use of scarce health resources, that would occur with the implementation of screening programs.

19 Review Depression comorbidity in migraine. 2017

Amoozegar, Farnaz. ·a Department of Clinical Neurosciences & Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine , University of Calgary , Calgary , AB , Canada. ·Int Rev Psychiatry · Pubmed #28681617.

ABSTRACT: Migraine and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) are highly prevalent conditions that can lead to significant disability. These conditions are often comorbid, and several studies shed light on the underlying reasons for this comorbidity. The purpose of this review article is to have a closer look at the epidemiology, pathophysiology, genetic and environmental factors, temporal association, treatment options, and prognosis of patients suffering from both conditions, to allow a better understanding of what factors underlie this comorbidity. Studies show that patients with migraine are 2-4-times more likely to develop lifetime MDD, predominantly due to similar underlying pathophysiologic and genetic mechanisms. There appears to be a bidirectional temporal association between the two conditions, although longitudinal studies are needed to determine this more definitively. Quality-of-life and health-related outcomes are worse for patients that suffer from both conditions. Thus, a careful assessment of the patient with access to appropriate resources and follow-up is paramount. Future studies in genetics and brain imaging will be helpful in further elucidating the underlying mechanisms in these comorbid conditions, which will hopefully lead to better treatment options.

20 Review Depression in multiple sclerosis. 2017

Patten, Scott B / Marrie, Ruth Ann / Carta, Mauro G. ·a Department of Community Health Sciences , University of Calgary, Calgary , Alberta , Canada. · b Department of Internal Medicine (Neurology) , University of Manitoba , Manitoba , Canada. · c Department of Community Health Sciences , University of Manitoba , Manitoba , Canada. · d Department of Medical Sciences and Public Health , Quality of Care, University of Cagliari , Cagliari , Italy. ·Int Rev Psychiatry · Pubmed #28681616.

ABSTRACT: Depressive disorders occur in up to 50% of people living with multiple sclerosis (MS). Prevalence estimates are generally 2-3-times higher than those of the general population. Myriad aetiologic factors may contribute to the aetiology of depression in MS including biological mechanisms (e.g. hippocampal microglial activation, lesion burden, regional atrophy), as well as the stressors, threats, and losses that accompany living with an unpredictable and often disabling disease. Some prominent risk factors for depression such as (younger) age, (female) sex, and family history of depression are less consistently associated with depression in MS than they are in the general population. Management of depression in MS has not been well studied, but available data on detection and treatment align with general principles of depression management. While the validity of standard measurement scales has often been questioned, available evidence suggests that standard scales provide valid ratings. Evidence for the effectiveness of depression treatments in MS is limited, but available evidence supports the effectiveness of standard treatment approaches, including both cognitive behavioural therapies and antidepressant medications.

21 Review Neurobehavioral comorbidities of epilepsy: Role of inflammation. 2017

Mazarati, Andrey M / Lewis, Megan L / Pittman, Quentin J. ·Neurology Division, Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A. · Department of Physiology & Pharmacology, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ·Epilepsia · Pubmed #28675557.

ABSTRACT: Epilepsy is associated with a high incidence of comorbid neurologic and psychiatric disorders. This review focuses on the association of epilepsy with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and depression. There is high concordance of these behavioral pathologies with epilepsy. We review data that unambiguously reveal that epilepsy, ASD, and depression are associated with elevated brain inflammatory markers and that these may interact with serotoninergic pathways. Interference with inflammatory pathways or actions can reduce the severity of seizures, depression, and ASD-like behavior. Inflammation in the brain can be induced by seizure activity as well as by behavioral, environmental, and physiologic stressors. Furthermore, induction of inflammation at an early time point during gestation and in early neonatal life can precipitate both an ASD-like phenotype as well as a more excitable brain. It appears likely that priming of the brain due to early inflammation could provide a means by which subsequent inflammatory processes associated with epilepsy, ASD, and depression may lead to comorbidity.

22 Review A systematic review of potential long-term effects of sport-related concussion. 2017

Manley, Geoff / Gardner, Andrew J / Schneider, Kathryn J / Guskiewicz, Kevin M / Bailes, Julian / Cantu, Robert C / Castellani, Rudolph J / Turner, Michael / Jordan, Barry D / Randolph, Christopher / Dvořák, Jiří / Hayden, K Alix / Tator, Charles H / McCrory, Paul / Iverson, Grant L. ·Department of Neurological Surgery, Brain and Spinal Injury Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA. · Centre for Stroke and Brain Injury, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle; Hunter New England Local Health District Sports Concussion Program, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, Australia. · Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology; Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute for Child & Maternal Health, Cumming School of Medicine; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related TBI Research Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA. · Department of Neurosurgery, NorthShore University Health System, Co-Director, NorthShore Neurological Institute; University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Evanston, USA. · Department of Neurosurgery, Emerson Hospital, Concord, MA, and Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, USA. · Center for Neuropathology, Western Michigan University, and Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, USA. · The International Concussion and Head Injury Research Foundation, Marylebone, UK. · Burke Rehabilitation Hospital, White Plains, USA. · Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, USA. · Department of Nerology, University of Zurich, Schulthess Clinic, Swiss Concussion Center, Zurich, Switzerland. · Libraries and Cultural Resources, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Canadian Concussion Centre, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Krembil Neuroscience Centre, Toronto, Canada. · The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne Brain Centre - Austin Campus, Heidelberg, Australia. · Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School; Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital; MassGeneral Hospital for Children Sports Concussion Program; & Home Base, a Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Program, Boston, USA. ·Br J Sports Med · Pubmed #28455362.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Systematic review of possible long-term effects of sports-related concussion in retired athletes. DATA SOURCES: Ten electronic databases. STUDY SELECTION: Original research; incidence, risk factors or causation related to long-term mental health or neurological problems; individuals who have suffered a concussion; retired athletes as the subjects and possible long-term sequelae defined as DATA EXTRACTION: Study population, exposure/outcome measures, clinical data, neurological examination findings, cognitive assessment, neuroimaging findings and neuropathology results. Risk of bias and level of evidence were evaluated by two authors. RESULTS: Following review of 3819 studies, 47 met inclusion criteria. Some former athletes have depression and cognitive deficits later in life, and there is an association between these deficits and multiple prior concussions. Former athletes are not at increased risk for death by suicide (two studies). Former high school American football players do not appear to be at increased risk for later life neurodegenerative diseases (two studies). Some retired professional American football players may be at increased risk for diminishment in cognitive functioning or mild cognitive impairment (several studies), and neurodegenerative diseases (one study). Neuroimaging studies show modest evidence of macrostructural, microstructural, functional and neurochemical changes in some athletes. CONCLUSION: Multiple concussions appear to be a risk factor for cognitive impairment and mental health problems in some individuals. More research is needed to better understand the prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurological conditions and diseases, and the extent to which they are related to concussions and/or repetitive neurotrauma sustained in sports.

23 Review Children's Physical Activity and Depression: A Meta-analysis. 2017

Korczak, Daphne J / Madigan, Sheri / Colasanto, Marlena. ·Department of Psychiatry, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; daphne.korczak@sickkids.ca. · Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and. · Department of Psychology, Aberta Children's Research Institute, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #28314824.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Research regarding the protective effects of early physical activity on depression has yielded conflicting results. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to synthesize observational studies examining the association of physical activity in childhood and adolescence with depression. DATA SOURCES: Studies (from 2005 to 2015) were identified by using a comprehensive search strategy. STUDY SELECTION: The included studies measured physical activity in childhood or adolescence and examined its association with depression. DATA EXTRACTION: Data were extracted by 2 independent coders. Estimates were examined by using random-effects meta-analysis. RESULTS: Fifty independent samples (89 894 participants) were included, and the mean effect size was significant ( LIMITATIONS: Limitations included a lack of standardized measures of physical activity; use of self-report of depression in majority of studies; and a small number of longitudinal studies. CONCLUSIONS: Physical activity is associated with decreased concurrent depressive symptoms; the association with future depressive symptoms is weak.

24 Review Depression Case Finding in Individuals with Dementia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 2017

Goodarzi, Zahra S / Mele, Bria S / Roberts, Derek J / Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna. ·Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Calgary and Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Quest University Canada, Squamish, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Calgary and Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Surgery, University of Calgary and Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ·J Am Geriatr Soc · Pubmed #28152174.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of depression case finding tools with a criterion standard in the outpatient setting among adults with dementia. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. SETTING: Studies of older outpatients with dementia. PARTICIPANTS: Elderly outpatients (clinic and long-term care) with dementia (N = 3,035). MEASUREMENTS: Prevalence of major depression and diagnostic accuracy measures including sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios. RESULTS: From the 11,539 citations, 20 studies were included for qualitative synthesis and 15 for a meta-analysis. Tools included were the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Single Question, Nijmegen Observer-Rated Depression Scale, and Even Briefer Assessment Scale-Depression. The pooled prevalence of depression in individuals with dementia was 30.3% (95% CI = 22.1-38.5). The average age was 75.2 (95% CI = 71.7-78.7), and mean Mini-Mental State Examination scores ranged from 11.2 to 24. The diagnostic accuracy of the individual tools was pooled for the best-reported cutoffs and for each cutoff, if available. The CSDD had a sensitivity of 0.84 (95% CI = 0.73-0.91) and a specificity of 0.80 (95% CI = 0.65-0.90), the 30-item GDS (GDS-30) had a sensitivity of 0.62 (95% CI = 0.45-0.76) and a specificity 0.81 (95% CI = 0.75-0.85), and the HDRS had a sensitivity of 0.86 (95% CI = 0.63-0.96) and a specificity of 0.84 (95% CI = 0.76-0.90). Summary statistics for all tools across best-reported cutoffs had significant heterogeneity. CONCLUSION: There are many validated tools for the detection of depression in individuals with dementia. Tools that incorporate a physician interview with patient and collateral histories, the CSDD and HDRS, have higher sensitivities, which would ensure fewer false-negatives.

25 Review Depression screening tools in persons with epilepsy: A systematic review of validated tools. 2017

Gill, Stephanie J / Lukmanji, Sara / Fiest, Kirsten M / Patten, Scott B / Wiebe, Samuel / Jetté, Nathalie. ·Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Community Health Sciences and O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ·Epilepsia · Pubmed #28064446.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Depression affects approximately 25% of epilepsy patients. However, the optimal tool to screen for depression in epilepsy has not been definitively established. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature on the validity of depression-screening tools in epilepsy. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched until April 4, 2016 with no restriction on dates. Abstract, full-text review and data abstraction were conducted in duplicate. We included studies that evaluated the validity of depression-screening tools and reported measures of diagnostic accuracy (e.g., sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values) in epilepsy. Study quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies Version 2. Medians and ranges for estimates of diagnostic accuracy were calculated when appropriate. RESULTS: A total of 16,070 abstracts were screened, and 38 articles met eligibility criteria. Sixteen screening tools were validated in 13 languages. The most commonly validated screening tool was the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) (n = 26). The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) (n = 19) was the most common reference standard used. At the most common cutpoint of >15 (n = 12 studies), the NDDI-E had a median sensitivity of 80.5% (range 64.0-100.0) and specificity of 86.2 (range 81.0-95.6). Meta-analyses were not possible due to variability in cutpoints assessed, reference standards used, and lack of confidence intervals reported. SIGNIFICANCE: A number of studies validated depression screening tools; however, estimates of diagnostic accuracy were inconsistently reported. The validity of scales in practice may have been overestimated, as cutpoints were often selected post hoc based on the study sample. The NDDI-E, which performed well, was the most commonly validated screening tool, is free to the public, and is validated in multiple languages and is easy to administer, although selection of the best tool may vary depending on the setting and available resources.

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