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Depression: HELP
Articles from San Francisco
Based on 884 articles published since 2008
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These are the 884 published articles about Depression that originated from San Francisco during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and after breast cancer treatment. 2017

Greenlee, Heather / DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J / Balneaves, Lynda G / Carlson, Linda E / Cohen, Misha R / Deng, Gary / Johnson, Jillian A / Mumber, Matthew / Seely, Dugald / Zick, Suzanna M / Boyce, Lindsay M / Tripathy, Debu. ·Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Member, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Doctoral Fellow, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Associate Professor, College of Nursing, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. · Professor, Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Adjunct Professor, American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine at California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco, CA. · Clinic Director, Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA. · Medical Director, Integrative Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Post-Doctoral Scholar, Department of Biobehavioral Health, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA. · Radiation Oncologist, Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA. · Executive Director, Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada. · Executive Director of Research, Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Research Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. · Research Associate Professor, Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. · Research Informationist, Memorial Sloan Kettering Library, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Professor, Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #28436999.

ABSTRACT: Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:194-232. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

2 Guideline Screening for Depression in Adults: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2016

Siu, Albert L / Anonymous2730856 / Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten / Grossman, David C / Baumann, Linda Ciofu / Davidson, Karina W / Ebell, Mark / García, Francisco A R / Gillman, Matthew / Herzstein, Jessica / Kemper, Alex R / Krist, Alex H / Kurth, Ann E / Owens, Douglas K / Phillips, William R / Phipps, Maureen G / Pignone, Michael P. ·Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York2James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, New York. · University of California, San Francisco. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington. · University of Wisconsin, Madison. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Georgia, Athens. · Pima County Department of Health, Tucson, Arizona. · Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Independent consultant, Washington, DC. · Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · Fairfax Family Practice, Fairfax, Virginia13Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · New York University, New York. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California16Stanford University, Stanford, California. · University of Washington, Seattle. · Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. ·JAMA · Pubmed #26813211.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: Update of the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for depression in adults. METHODS: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for depression in adult populations, including older adults and pregnant and postpartum women; the accuracy of depression screening instruments; and the benefits and harms of depression treatment in these populations. POPULATION: This recommendation applies to adults 18 years and older. RECOMMENDATION: The USPSTF recommends screening for depression in the general adult population, including pregnant and postpartum women. Screening should be implemented with adequate systems in place to ensure accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and appropriate follow-up. (B recommendation).

3 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines on the use of integrative therapies as supportive care in patients treated for breast cancer. 2014

Greenlee, Heather / Balneaves, Lynda G / Carlson, Linda E / Cohen, Misha / Deng, Gary / Hershman, Dawn / Mumber, Matthew / Perlmutter, Jane / Seely, Dugald / Sen, Ananda / Zick, Suzanna M / Tripathy, Debu / Anonymous320823. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health (HG, DH), Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, (HG, DH), and Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons (DH), Columbia University, New York, NY (HG, DH) · School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada (LGB) · Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada (LEC) · Institute for Health and Aging, University of California San Francisco, CA (MC) · Chicken Soup Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA (MC) · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (GD) · Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA (MM) · Gemini Group, Ann Arbor, MI (JP) · Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada (DS) · Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada (DS) · Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan Health System (AS, SMZ), Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health (SMZ), and Department of Biostatistics (AS), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (AS, SMZ) · Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (DT). ·J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr · Pubmed #25749602.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. METHODS: Following the Institute of Medicine's guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment. Trials were included if the majority of participants had breast cancer and/or breast cancer patient results were reported separately, and outcomes were clinically relevant. Recommendations were organized by outcome and graded based upon a modified version of the US Preventive Services Task Force grading system. RESULTS: The search (January 1, 1990-December 31, 2013) identified 4900 articles, of which 203 were eligible for analysis. Meditation, yoga, and relaxation with imagery are recommended for routine use for common conditions, including anxiety and mood disorders (Grade A). Stress management, yoga, massage, music therapy, energy conservation, and meditation are recommended for stress reduction, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and quality of life (Grade B). Many interventions (n = 32) had weaker evidence of benefit (Grade C). Some interventions (n = 7) were deemed unlikely to provide any benefit (Grade D). Notably, only one intervention, acetyl-l-carnitine for the prevention of taxane-induced neuropathy, was identified as likely harmful (Grade H) as it was found to increase neuropathy. The majority of intervention/modality combinations (n = 138) did not have sufficient evidence to form specific recommendations (Grade I). CONCLUSIONS: Specific integrative therapies can be recommended as evidence-based supportive care options during breast cancer treatment. Most integrative therapies require further investigation via well-designed controlled trials with meaningful outcomes.

4 Editorial What is a person with depression who wants to have a baby to do? 2018

Holley, Sarah R. ·Department of Psychology, San Francisco State University and Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, California. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #29778377.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Expanding Adolescent Depression Prevention Through Simple Communication Technologies. 2016

Suffoletto, Brian / Aguilera, Adrian. ·Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · School of Social Welfare, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California; Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California. ·J Adolesc Health · Pubmed #27664464.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Minor Depression: Is it Important? How Should it be Treated? 2016

Nelson, J Craig. ·University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. Electronic address: craig.nelson@ucsf.edu. ·Am J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #27217256.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Screening for Depression--A Tale of Two Questions. 2016

Whooley, Mary A. ·San Francisco VA Health Care System, San Francisco, California2Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco. ·JAMA Intern Med · Pubmed #26814016.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Adjunctive Ziprasidone in Major Depression and the Current Status of Adjunctive Atypical Antipsychotics. 2015

Nelson, J Craig. ·From the Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco. ·Am J Psychiatry · Pubmed #26619770.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial The role of stimulants in late-life depression. 2015

Nelson, J Craig. ·From the Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco. ·Am J Psychiatry · Pubmed #26029800.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Enhancing our understanding of perinatal depression. 2015

Finley, Patrick R / Brizendine, Louann. ·Department of Clinical Pharmacy,University of California-San Francisco,San Francisco,California,USA. ·CNS Spectr · Pubmed #25778690.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Inflammation and depression: unraveling the complex interplay in inflammatory bowel disease. 2014

O'Donovan, Aoife. ·Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco. ·J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr · Pubmed #24385077.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Review Glabellar Botulinum Toxin Injections in Major Depressive Disorder: A Critical Review. 2018

Stearns, Toren P / Shad, Mujeeb U / Guzman, Gabriela C. ·Samaritan Mental Health, 3509 NW Samaritan Drive Ste 215, Corvallis, OR 97330. tstearns@samhealth.org. · Samaritan Mental Health, Samaritan Health Services, Corvallis, Oregon, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Oregon State Hospital, Salem, Oregon, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA. · Department of Psychology, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California, USA. ·Prim Care Companion CNS Disord · Pubmed #30326186.

ABSTRACT: Objective: To provide a critical appraisal of the primary clinical trials exploring the use of glabellar botulinum toxin type A (BTA) injections in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) and propose future directions for research on this topic. Data Sources: A search in PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases was performed in September 2017. Search terms included ("botulinum" OR "botox" OR "abobotulinumtoxin" OR "onabotulinum" OR "onabotulinumtoxin" OR "botulinumtoxin") AND ("antidepressant" OR "depression" OR "depressive" OR "depressed"). No other search parameters were utilized. Study Selection: Studies were selected for review if they were found to be a primary clinical trial on the use of BTA for the treatment of MDD. Data Extraction: Six studies were identified and scored by the authors using a 5-point Jadad scoring system. Results: Three of the 6 studies were found to be of high quality with a Jadad score ≥ 3. The remainder had Jadad scores of 1. Conclusions: In general, the results from the reviewed studies suggest that BTA may be a promising treatment for MDD. However, these findings need to be interpreted with caution due to several limitations of the reviewed studies such as lack of a priori hypotheses, limited sample sizes, large gender bias, and significant difficulty in ensuring blinding.

13 Review The HPA Axis During the Perinatal Period: Implications for Perinatal Depression. 2018

Dickens, Molly J / Pawluski, Jodi L. ·Bloomlife, San Francisco, California. · Univ Rennes, Inserm, EHESP, Irset (Institut de Recherche en Santé, Environnement et Travail), UMR_S 1085, Rennes, France. ·Endocrinology · Pubmed #30256957.

ABSTRACT: The transition to motherhood is characterized by some of the most pronounced endocrine changes a woman will experience in her lifetime. Unfortunately, matrescence is also a time in a woman's life when she is most susceptible to mental illness such as perinatal depression. A growing body of research has aimed to determine how key endocrine systems, such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, are involved in the dysregulation of perinatal mental health. However, very little research has consistently linked perinatal changes in the HPA axis with maternal mental illness. Therefore, the aims of this mini review are to: (i) clearly summarize the normative changes in the HPA axis that occur during pregnancy and the postpartum period; (ii) summarize what we know about the HPA axis in perinatal depression, and (iii) propose key areas for future research. Understanding physiological biomarkers that can predict which women are at risk for perinatal mood disorders will lead to better tools for treating, and ultimately preventing, these debilitating disorders, improving the health of mother, child, and family.

14 Review Review of biologic and behavioral risk factors linking depression and peripheral artery disease. 2018

Ramirez, Joel L / Drudi, Laura M / Grenon, S Marlene. ·1 Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · 2 Division of Vascular Surgery, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · 3 Vascular Surgery Section, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA. ·Vasc Med · Pubmed #29801423.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of depression has been rising rapidly, and depression has been recognized as one of the world's leading causes of disability. More recently, depression has been associated with an increased risk of symptomatic atherosclerotic disease as well as worse perioperative outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease. Additionally, recent studies have demonstrated an association between depression and peripheral artery disease (PAD), which has been estimated to affect more than 200 million people worldwide. These studies have identified that depression is associated with poor functional and surgical outcomes in patients with PAD. Although the directionality and specific mechanisms underlying this association have yet to be clearly defined, several biologic and behavioral risk factors have been identified to play a role in this relationship. These factors include tobacco use, physical inactivity, medical non-adherence, endothelial and coagulation dysfunction, and dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic system, and immune system. In this article, we review these potential mechanisms and the current evidence linking depression and PAD, as well as future directions for research and interventional strategies. Understanding and elucidating this relationship may assist in preventing the development of PAD and may improve the care that patients with PAD and comorbid depression receive.

15 Review An energetic view of stress: Focus on mitochondria. 2018

Picard, Martin / McEwen, Bruce S / Epel, Elissa S / Sandi, Carmen. ·Department of Psychiatry, Division of Behavioral Medicine, Columbia University, Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Neurology, The H. Houston Merritt Center, Columbia Translational Neuroscience Initiative, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA; Columbia Aging Center, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: martin.picard@columbia.edu. · Laboratory for Neuroendocrinology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Brain Mind Institute, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland. ·Front Neuroendocrinol · Pubmed #29339091.

ABSTRACT: Energy is required to sustain life and enable stress adaptation. At the cellular level, energy is largely derived from mitochondria - unique multifunctional organelles with their own genome. Four main elements connect mitochondria to stress: (1) Energy is required at the molecular, (epi)genetic, cellular, organellar, and systemic levels to sustain components of stress responses; (2) Glucocorticoids and other steroid hormones are produced and metabolized by mitochondria; (3) Reciprocally, mitochondria respond to neuroendocrine and metabolic stress mediators; and (4) Experimentally manipulating mitochondrial functions alters physiological and behavioral responses to psychological stress. Thus, mitochondria are endocrine organelles that provide both the energy and signals that enable and direct stress adaptation. Neural circuits regulating social behavior - as well as psychopathological processes - are also influenced by mitochondrial energetics. An integrative view of stress as an energy-driven process opens new opportunities to study mechanisms of adaptation and regulation across the lifespan.

16 Review The relationship of person-specific eveningness chronotype, greater seasonality, and less rhythmicity to suicidal behavior: A literature review. 2018

Rumble, Meredith E / Dickson, Daniel / McCall, W Vaughn / Krystal, Andrew D / Case, Doug / Rosenquist, Peter B / Benca, Ruth M. ·Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, United States. Electronic address: rumble@wisc.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, United States. · Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, United States. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, United States; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States. · Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, United States. · Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, United States. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #29179142.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Epidemiological data have demonstrated seasonal and circadian patterns of suicidal deaths. Several reviews and meta-analyses have confirmed the relationship between sleep disturbance and suicidality. However, these reviews/meta-analyses have not focused on seasonal and circadian dysfunction in relation to suicidality, despite the common presence of this dysfunction in patients with mood disorders. Thus, the current literature review analyzed studies investigating person-specific chronotype, seasonality, and rhythmicity in relation to suicidal thoughts and behaviors. METHODS: Study authors reviewed articles related to individual-level chronotype, seasonality, and rhythmicity and suicidality that were written in English and not case reports or reviews. RESULTS: This review supports a relationship between an eveningness chronotype, greater seasonality, and decreased rhythmicity with suicidal thoughts and behaviors in those with unipolar depression, as well as in other psychiatric disorders and in children/adolescents. LIMITATIONS: These findings need to be explored more fully in mood disordered populations and other psychiatric populations, in both adults and children, with objective measurement such as actigraphy, and with chronotype, seasonality, and rhythmicity as well as broader sleep disturbance measurement all included so the construct(s) most strongly linked to suicidality can be best identified. CONCLUSIONS: Eveningness, greater seasonality, and less rhythmicity should be considered in individuals who may be at risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors and may be helpful in further tailoring assessment and treatment to improve patient outcome.

17 Review Epidemiology of mental health comorbidity in psoriasis. 2018

Wu, J J / Feldman, S R / Koo, J / Marangell, L B. ·a Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center , Los Angeles , CA , USA. · b Wake Forest University School of Medicine , Winston-Salem , NC , USA. · c University of California San Francisco , San Francisco , CA , USA. · d The University of Texas McGovern School of Medicine , Houston , TX , USA. · e Brain Health Consultants , Houston , TX , USA. ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #29057684.

ABSTRACT: AIM: The occurrence of mental health comorbidities such as depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation or behavior is not uncommon in the context of psoriasis. The negative influence of psoriatic disease on a patient's physical and mental well-being, in combination with overlapping pathophysiology, increase the risk for clinically significant psychiatric conditions. These psychiatric conditions, in turn, influence the patient's outlook and potentially, prognosis. Although the healthcare community increasingly recognizes the association of mental health comorbidities with psoriasis, the extent of the correlation is not fully appreciated. To better understand the relationship between mental health comorbidities and psoriasis, including prevalence, risk factors, and response of psychiatric comorbidities to psoriasis treatment, a narrative review of the published literature was conducted. METHODS: Data from epidemiologic, observational, and clinical studies demonstrate a substantially greater mental health comorbidity burden in patients with psoriasis compared with those without psoriasis or patients with other dermatologic conditions. RESULT: The influence of contemporary drug therapies on measures of depression and anxiety are predominantly positive, although further data are needed to better understand the effects of long-term therapy. CONCLUSION: Clinicians should consider the heightened potential for mental health comorbidities when determining an optimal management strategy for their patients with psoriasis.

18 Review Psychiatric adverse events during treatment with brodalumab: Analysis of psoriasis clinical trials. 2018

Lebwohl, Mark G / Papp, Kim A / Marangell, Lauren B / Koo, John / Blauvelt, Andrew / Gooderham, Melinda / Wu, Jashin J / Rastogi, Shipra / Harris, Susan / Pillai, Radhakrishnan / Israel, Robert J. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: lebwohl@aol.com. · K. Papp Clinical Research and Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · The McGovern School of Medicine of the University of Texas, Houston, Texas; Brain Health Consultants, Houston, Texas. · University of California San Francisco Psoriasis and Skin Treatment Center, San Francisco, California. · Oregon Medical Research Center, Portland, Oregon. · Skin Centre for Dermatology and Probity Medical Research, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada. · Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC, Bridgewater, New Jersey. · Dow Pharmaceutical (a division of Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC), Petaluma, California. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #28985956.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Individuals with psoriasis are at increased risk for psychiatric comorbidities, including suicidal ideation and behavior (SIB). OBJECTIVE: To distinguish between the underlying risk and potential for treatment-induced psychiatric adverse events in patients with psoriasis being treated with brodalumab, a fully human anti-interleukin 17 receptor A monoclonal antibody. METHODS: Data were evaluated from a placebo-controlled, phase 2 clinical trial; the open-label, long-term extension of the phase 2 clinical trial; and three phase 3, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trials (AMAGINE-1, AMAGINE-2, and AMAGINE-3) and their open-label, long-term extensions of patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. RESULTS: The analysis included 4464 patients with 9161.8 patient-years of brodalumab exposure. The follow-up time-adjusted incidence rates of SIB events were comparable between the brodalumab and ustekinumab groups throughout the 52-week controlled phases (0.20 vs 0.60 per 100 patient-years). In the brodalumab group, 4 completed suicides were reported, 1 of which was later adjudicated as indeterminate; all patients had underlying psychiatric disorders or stressors. LIMITATIONS: There was no comparator arm past week 52. Controlled study periods were not powered to detect differences in rare events such as suicide. CONCLUSIONS: Comparison with controls and the timing of events do not indicate a causal relationship between SIB and brodalumab treatment.

19 Review Cyclodextrins improving the physicochemical and pharmacological properties of antidepressant drugs: a patent review. 2018

Diniz, Tâmara Coimbra / Pinto, Tiago Coimbra Costa / Menezes, Paula Dos Passos / Silva, Juliane Cabral / Teles, Roxana Braga de Andrade / Ximenes, Rosana Christine Cavalcanti / Guimarães, Adriana Gibara / Serafini, Mairim Russo / Araújo, Adriano Antunes de Souza / Quintans Júnior, Lucindo José / Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva. ·a Postgraduate Program in Biotechnology , State University of Feira de Santana , Feira de Santana , Brazil. · b Postgraduate Program in Neuropsychiatry and Behavioural Science , Federal University of Pernambuco , Recife , Brazil. · c Department of Physiology , Federal University of Sergipe , São Cristóvão , Brazil. · d Nucleus of Biological Sciences , State University of Health Sciences of Alagoas , Maceió , Brazil. · e Center for Studies and Research of Medicinal Plants , Federal University of San Francisco Valley , Petrolina , Brazil. ·Expert Opin Ther Pat · Pubmed #28965471.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Depression is a serious mood disorder and is one of the most common mental illnesses. Despite the availability of several classes of antidepressants, a substantial percentage of patients are unresponsive to these drugs, which have a slow onset of action in addition to producing undesirable side effects. Some scientific evidence suggests that cyclodextrins (CDs) can improve the physicochemical and pharmacological profile of antidepressant drugs (ADDs). The purpose of this paper is to disclose current data technology prospects involving antidepressant drugs and cyclodextrins. AREAS COVERED: We conducted a patent review to evaluate the antidepressive activity of the compounds complexed in CDs, and we analyzed whether these complexes improved their physicochemical properties and pharmacological action. The present review used 8 specialized patent databases for patent research, using the term 'cyclodextrin' combined with 'antidepressive agents' and its related terms. We found 608 patents. In the end, considering the inclusion criteria, 27 patents reporting the benefits of complexation of ADDs with CDs were included. EXPERT OPINION: The use of CDs can be considered an important tool for the optimization of physicochemical and pharmacological properties of ADDs, such as stability, solubility and bioavailability.

20 Review Effects of obesity on depression: A role for inflammation and the gut microbiota. 2018

Schachter, Julieta / Martel, Jan / Lin, Chuan-Sheng / Chang, Chih-Jung / Wu, Tsung-Ru / Lu, Chia-Chen / Ko, Yun-Fei / Lai, Hsin-Chih / Ojcius, David M / Young, John D. ·Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal de Rio de Janeiro, 21941-902, 373 Avenida Carlos Chagas Filho, Cidade Universitária - Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Center for Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan. · Center for Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan; Chang Gung Immunology Consortium, Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsing Street, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan. · Center for Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan; Chang Gung Immunology Consortium, Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsing Street, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan; Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan; Research Center of Bacterial Pathogenesis, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan. · Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan. · Department of Respiratory Therapy, Fu Jen Catholic University, 510 Zhong-Zheng Street, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan. · Chang Gung Immunology Consortium, Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsing Street, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan; Chang Gung Biotechnology Corporation, 201 Tung-Hua North Road, Taipei 10508, Taiwan; Biochemical Engineering Research Center, Ming Chi University of Technology, 84 Gungjuan Road, New Taipei City 24301, Taiwan. · Center for Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan; Chang Gung Immunology Consortium, Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsing Street, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan; Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan; Research Center of Bacterial Pathogenesis, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsing Street, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan; Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, College of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, 261 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33303, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Health Industry and Technology, College of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, 261 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33303, Taiwan. · Center for Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan; Chang Gung Immunology Consortium, Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsing Street, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan; Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of the Pacific, Arthur Dugoni School of Dentistry, 155 Fifth Street, San Francisco, CA 94103, USA. · Center for Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua First Road, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan; Chang Gung Immunology Consortium, Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsing Street, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan; Chang Gung Biotechnology Corporation, 201 Tung-Hua North Road, Taipei 10508, Taiwan; Biochemical Engineering Research Center, Ming Chi University of Technology, 84 Gungjuan Road, New Taipei City 24301, Taiwan; Laboratory of Cellular Physiology and Immunology, Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA. Electronic address: jdyoung@mail.cgu.edu.tw. ·Brain Behav Immun · Pubmed #28888668.

ABSTRACT: Depression is a mental disorder associated with environmental, genetic and psychological factors. Recent studies indicate that chronic neuro-inflammation may affect brain physiology and alter mood and behavior. Consumption of a high-fat diet leads to obesity and chronic systemic inflammation. The gut microbiota mediates many effects of a high-fat diet on human physiology and may also influence the mood and behavior of the host. We review here recent studies suggesting the existence of a link between obesity, the gut microbiota and depression, focusing on the mechanisms underlying the effects of a high-fat diet on chronic inflammation and brain physiology. This body of research suggests that modulating the composition of the gut microbiota using prebiotics and probiotics may produce beneficial effects on anxiety and depression.

21 Review Depression and suicidality in psoriasis: review of the literature including the cytokine theory of depression. 2017

Koo, J / Marangell, L B / Nakamura, M / Armstrong, A / Jeon, C / Bhutani, T / Wu, J J. ·San Francisco Medical Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Brain Health Consultants, Houston, TX, USA. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28681405.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis can be a socially isolating disease due to debilitating physical symptoms and the stigma patients feel because of the appearance of their skin. Mental health comorbidities such as anxiety, depression and suicidal ideation and behaviour (SIB) are prevalent in patients with psoriasis. Patients with mild psoriasis can experience psychiatric comorbidities; however, disorders such as depression and SIB are more common in patients with severe psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Psychiatric disorders can both result from and contribute to progression of psoriasis, suggesting that psoriasis and psychiatric conditions, such as depression, may have overlapping biological mechanisms. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 are elevated in both psoriasis and depression, indicating that the inflammatory process may be involved in the progression of both diseases. Elevated cytokine levels in the central nervous system cause physiologic and biochemical changes that may contribute to the development of depression. In this review of the literature, we discuss the evidence that supports the association of psoriasis with mental health disorders and the tools used to detect the presence of these comorbidities. Additionally, we review the most prominent hypotheses on the mechanisms by which the inflammatory response and elevated cytokines can cause depression. These results highlight the role that systemic inflammation plays in the various mental health comorbidities associated with psoriasis, including depression and SIB.

22 Review Ecological momentary interventions for depression and anxiety. 2017

Schueller, Stephen M / Aguilera, Adrian / Mohr, David C. ·Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. · School of Social Welfare, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco General Hospital, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. ·Depress Anxiety · Pubmed #28494123.

ABSTRACT: Ecological momentary interventions (EMIs) are becoming more popular and more powerful resources for the treatment and prevention of depression and anxiety due to advances in technological capacity and analytic sophistication. Previous work has demonstrated that EMIs can be effective at reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as related outcomes of stress and at increasing positive psychological functioning. In this review, we highlight the differences between EMIs and other forms of treatment due to the nature of EMIs to be deeply integrated into the fabric of people's day-to-day lives. EMIs require unique considerations in their design, deployment, and evaluation. Furthermore, given that EMIs have been advanced by changes in technologies and that the use of behavioral intervention technologies for mental health has been increasing, we discuss how technologies and analytics might usher in a new era of EMIs. Future EMIs might reduce user burden and increase intervention personalization and sophistication by leveraging digital sensors and advances in natural language processing and machine learning. Thus, although current EMIs are effective, the EMIs of the future might be more engaging, responsive, and adaptable to different people and different contexts.

23 Review A systematic review of potential long-term effects of sport-related concussion. 2017

Manley, Geoff / Gardner, Andrew J / Schneider, Kathryn J / Guskiewicz, Kevin M / Bailes, Julian / Cantu, Robert C / Castellani, Rudolph J / Turner, Michael / Jordan, Barry D / Randolph, Christopher / Dvořák, Jiří / Hayden, K Alix / Tator, Charles H / McCrory, Paul / Iverson, Grant L. ·Department of Neurological Surgery, Brain and Spinal Injury Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA. · Centre for Stroke and Brain Injury, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle; Hunter New England Local Health District Sports Concussion Program, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, Australia. · Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology; Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute for Child & Maternal Health, Cumming School of Medicine; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related TBI Research Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA. · Department of Neurosurgery, NorthShore University Health System, Co-Director, NorthShore Neurological Institute; University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Evanston, USA. · Department of Neurosurgery, Emerson Hospital, Concord, MA, and Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, USA. · Center for Neuropathology, Western Michigan University, and Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, USA. · The International Concussion and Head Injury Research Foundation, Marylebone, UK. · Burke Rehabilitation Hospital, White Plains, USA. · Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, USA. · Department of Nerology, University of Zurich, Schulthess Clinic, Swiss Concussion Center, Zurich, Switzerland. · Libraries and Cultural Resources, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. · Canadian Concussion Centre, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Krembil Neuroscience Centre, Toronto, Canada. · The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne Brain Centre - Austin Campus, Heidelberg, Australia. · Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School; Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital; MassGeneral Hospital for Children Sports Concussion Program; & Home Base, a Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Program, Boston, USA. ·Br J Sports Med · Pubmed #28455362.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Systematic review of possible long-term effects of sports-related concussion in retired athletes. DATA SOURCES: Ten electronic databases. STUDY SELECTION: Original research; incidence, risk factors or causation related to long-term mental health or neurological problems; individuals who have suffered a concussion; retired athletes as the subjects and possible long-term sequelae defined as DATA EXTRACTION: Study population, exposure/outcome measures, clinical data, neurological examination findings, cognitive assessment, neuroimaging findings and neuropathology results. Risk of bias and level of evidence were evaluated by two authors. RESULTS: Following review of 3819 studies, 47 met inclusion criteria. Some former athletes have depression and cognitive deficits later in life, and there is an association between these deficits and multiple prior concussions. Former athletes are not at increased risk for death by suicide (two studies). Former high school American football players do not appear to be at increased risk for later life neurodegenerative diseases (two studies). Some retired professional American football players may be at increased risk for diminishment in cognitive functioning or mild cognitive impairment (several studies), and neurodegenerative diseases (one study). Neuroimaging studies show modest evidence of macrostructural, microstructural, functional and neurochemical changes in some athletes. CONCLUSION: Multiple concussions appear to be a risk factor for cognitive impairment and mental health problems in some individuals. More research is needed to better understand the prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurological conditions and diseases, and the extent to which they are related to concussions and/or repetitive neurotrauma sustained in sports.

24 Review A Consensus Statement on the Use of Ketamine in the Treatment of Mood Disorders. 2017

Sanacora, Gerard / Frye, Mark A / McDonald, William / Mathew, Sanjay J / Turner, Mason S / Schatzberg, Alan F / Summergrad, Paul / Nemeroff, Charles B / Anonymous201043. ·Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Psychiatry, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Psychiatry, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Psychiatry, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas5Department of Psychiatry, Michael E. Debakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Psychiatry, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, San Francisco. · Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California. · Department of Psychiatry, Tufts University School of Medicine and Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida. ·JAMA Psychiatry · Pubmed #28249076.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Several studies now provide evidence of ketamine hydrochloride's ability to produce rapid and robust antidepressant effects in patients with mood and anxiety disorders that were previously resistant to treatment. Despite the relatively small sample sizes, lack of longer-term data on efficacy, and limited data on safety provided by these studies, they have led to increased use of ketamine as an off-label treatment for mood and other psychiatric disorders. Observations: This review and consensus statement provides a general overview of the data on the use of ketamine for the treatment of mood disorders and highlights the limitations of the existing knowledge. While ketamine may be beneficial to some patients with mood disorders, it is important to consider the limitations of the available data and the potential risk associated with the drug when considering the treatment option. Conclusions and Relevance: The suggestions provided are intended to facilitate clinical decision making and encourage an evidence-based approach to using ketamine in the treatment of psychiatric disorders considering the limited information that is currently available. This article provides information on potentially important issues related to the off-label treatment approach that should be considered to help ensure patient safety.

25 Review Mental Health Among Parents of Children With Critical Congenital Heart Defects: A Systematic Review. 2017

Woolf-King, Sarah E / Anger, Alexandra / Arnold, Emily A / Weiss, Sandra J / Teitel, David. ·Department of Psychology, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY sewoolf@syr.edu. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. · Department of Community Health Systems, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. · Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Heart Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. ·J Am Heart Assoc · Pubmed #28151402.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Parents of children with critical congenital heart defects (PCCHDs) may be at high risk for mental health morbidity; however, the literature is not well characterized. Given that compromised parental mental health can lead to long-term cognitive, health-related, and behavioral problems in children, a systematic review of this literature could provide informed recommendations for continued research and enhance the care of families of children living with critical congenital heart defects. METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted a systematic review using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines that resulted in 30 studies on the mental health of PCCHDs. The literature revealed that PCCHDs are at an elevated risk for psychological problems, particularly in the immediate weeks and months following cardiac surgery. Up to 30% of PCCHDs have symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder, with over 80% presenting with clinically significant symptoms of trauma; 25% to 50% of PCCHDs reported clinically elevated symptoms of depression and/or anxiety, and 30% to 80% reported experiencing severe psychological distress. There was high variability in measurements used to assess study outcomes, methodological quality, and sociocultural composition of the parents included in the studies. CONCLUSIONS: There is an urgent need for additional research on the severity, course, persistence, and moderators of these mental health problems over time, and for the development and testing of screening approaches and interventions that can be feasibly delivered in the context of ongoing pediatric cardiac care.

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