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Depression: HELP
Articles from St. Louis
Based on 572 articles published since 2008
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These are the 572 published articles about Depression that originated from St. Louis during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Editorial Depression and Functional Impairment: A Pernicious Pairing in Older Adults. 2018

Lenze, Eric J / Barco, Peggy P / Bland, Marghuretta D. ·Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, St Louis, MO. Electronic address: lenzee@wustl.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, St Louis, MO. ·Am J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #29107459.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Depression in patients with coronary artery disease: a more significant problem than previously recognized? 2017

Carney, Robert M / Freedland, Kenneth E. ·Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 4320 Forest Park Ave., Suite 301, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA. ·Eur Heart J Qual Care Clin Outcomes · Pubmed #29044397.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Diet, Depression, and Destiny in Heart Failure. 2015

Freedland, Kenneth E. ·Department of Psychiatry, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. Electronic address: freedlak@bmc.wustl.edu. ·J Card Fail · Pubmed #26499954.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Risk for mood pathology: neural and psychological markers of abnormal negative information processing. 2014

Barch, Deanna M. ·Washington University. Electronic address: dbarch@artsci.wustl.edu. ·J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry · Pubmed #24745949.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Mild cognitive impairment-a treatable condition. 2014

Morley, John E. ·Division of Geriatric Medicine and Endocrinology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO. Electronic address: morley@slu.edu. ·J Am Med Dir Assoc · Pubmed #24359697.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Review The Efficacy of Buprenorphine in Major Depression, Treatment-Resistant Depression and Suicidal Behavior: A Systematic Review. 2018

Serafini, Gianluca / Adavastro, Giulia / Canepa, Giovanna / De Berardis, Domenico / Valchera, Alessandro / Pompili, Maurizio / Nasrallah, Henry / Amore, Mario. ·Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy. gianluca.serafini@unige.it. · IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, 16132 Genoa, Italy. gianluca.serafini@unige.it. · Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy. siriogiulia@libero.it. · IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, 16132 Genoa, Italy. siriogiulia@libero.it. · Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy. giovanna.canepa@ordinepsicologiliguria.it. · Villa San Giuseppe Hospital, Hermanas Hospitalarias, Ascoli Piceno, Italy, Polyedra Research Group, 64100 Teramo, Italy. dodebera@aliceposta.it. · NHS, Department of Mental Health, Psychiatric Service of Diagnosis and Treatment, Hospital "G. Mazzini", Asl 4, 64100 Teramo, Italy. a.valchera@ospedaliere.it. · Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Organs, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. maurizio.pompili@uniroma1.it. · Department of Neurology & Psychiatry, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63104, USA. hnasral@slu.edu. · Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy. mario.amore@unige.it. · IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, 16132 Genoa, Italy. mario.amore@unige.it. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #30111745.

ABSTRACT: Although several pharmacological options to treat depression are currently available, approximately one third of patients who receive antidepressant medications do not respond adequately or achieve a complete remission. Thus, novel strategies are needed to successfully address those who did not respond, or partially respond, to available antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Research findings revealed that the opioid system is significantly involved in the regulation of mood and incentives salience and may be an appropriate target for novel therapeutic agents. The present study aimed to systematically review the current literature about the use of buprenorphine (BUP) for major depression, treatment-resistant depression (TRD), non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) behavior, and suicidal behavior. We investigated Pubmed and Scopus databases using the following keywords: "buprenorphine AND depression", "buprenorphine AND treatment resistant depression", "buprenorphine AND suicid*", "buprenorphine AND refractory depression". Several evidence demonstrate that, at low doses, BUP is an efficacious, well-tolerated, and safe option in reducing depressive symptoms, serious suicidal ideation, and NSSI, even in patients with TRD. However, more studies are needed to evaluate the long-term effects, and relative efficacy of specific combinations (e.g., BUP + samidorphan (BUP/SAM), BUP + naloxone (BUP/NAL), BUP + naltrexone) over BUP monotherapy or adjunctive BUP treatment with standard antidepressants, as well as to obtain more uniform guidance about the optimal BUP dosing interval.

7 Review Vagus Nerve Stimulation: Changing the Paradigm for Chronic Severe Depression? 2018

Aaronson, Scott T / Conway, Charles R. ·Clinical Research Programs, Sheppard Pratt Health System, 6501 North Charles Street, Towson, MD 21204, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland Medical School, 655 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address: saaronson@sheppardpratt.org. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8134, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. ·Psychiatr Clin North Am · Pubmed #30098654.

ABSTRACT: Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been studied for its effect on treatment-resistant depression. Open-label studies have shown a significant positive effect in an especially treatment-resistant depressive population. Insurance company support for VNS has been limited but may be reviewed given recent positive open-label data. Coming developments in novel external ways to stimulate the vagus nerve may revive interest in this area. This article reviews the clinical development of VNS starting with the first recognition of its potential for treating depression, parses the results of several large clinical trials, and suggests a future path for optimal clinical development and use.

8 Review The Mechanism of Action of Vagus Nerve Stimulation in Treatment-Resistant Depression: Current Conceptualizations. 2018

Conway, Charles R / Xiong, Willa. ·Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8134, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address: conwaycr@wustl.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8134, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. ·Psychiatr Clin North Am · Pubmed #30098653.

ABSTRACT: Stimulation of the left cervical vagus nerve, or vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), brings about an antidepressant response in a subset of treatment-resistant depression (TRD) patients. How this occurs is poorly understood; however, knowledge of the neuroanatomic vagal pathways, in conjunction with functional brain imaging studies, suggests several brain regions associated with mood regulation are critical: brainstem nuclei (locus coeruleus, dorsal raphe, and ventral tegmental area), thalamus, and insular and prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, animal studies suggest that VNS enhances neuroplasticity and changes in neuronal firing patterns. Continued study to better understand the mechanism of action of VNS in TRD is warranted.

9 Review Understanding Mechanisms of Genetic Risk for Adolescent Internalizing and Externalizing Problems: The Mediating Role of Parenting and Personality. 2018

Su, Jinni / Kuo, Sally I-Chun / Bucholz, Kathleen K / Edenberg, Howard J / Kramer, John R / Schuckit, Marc / Dick, Danielle M. ·Department of Psychology,Virginia Commonwealth University,Richmond,Virginia,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis,St. Louis,Missouri,USA. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,Indiana University,Bloomington,Indiana,47405,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,University of Iowa,Iowa City,Iowa,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,University of California at San Diego,La Jolla,California,USA. ·Twin Res Hum Genet · Pubmed #30027866.

ABSTRACT: Genetic predispositions play an important role in the development of internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Understanding the mechanisms through which genetic risk unfolds to influence these developmental outcomes is critical for developing prevention and intervention efforts, capturing key elements of Irv's research agenda and scientific legacy. In this study, we examined the role of parenting and personality in mediating the effect of genetic risk on adolescents' major depressive disorder and conduct disorder symptoms. Longitudinal data were drawn from a sample of 709 European American adolescents and their mothers from the Collaborative Studies on Genetics of Alcoholism. Results from multivariate path analysis indicated that adolescents' depressive symptoms genome-wide polygenic scores (DS_GPS) predicted lower parental knowledge, which in turn was associated with more subsequent major depressive disorder and conduct disorder symptoms. Adolescents' DS_GPS also had indirect effects on these outcomes via personality, with a mediating effect via agreeableness but not via other dimensions of personality. Findings revealed that the pattern of associations was similar across adolescent gender. Our findings emphasize the important role of evocative gene-environment correlation processes and intermediate phenotypes in the pathways of risk from genetic predispositions to complex adolescent outcomes.

10 Review Effort-cost decision-making in psychosis and depression: could a similar behavioral deficit arise from disparate psychological and neural mechanisms? 2018

Culbreth, A J / Moran, E K / Barch, D M. ·Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences,Washington University in Saint Louis,St. Louis, MO,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,Washington University in Saint Louis,St. Louis, MO,USA. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #28889803.

ABSTRACT: Motivational impairment is a common feature of both depression and psychosis; however, the psychological and neural mechanisms that give rise to motivational impairment in these disorders are poorly understood. Recent research has suggested that aberrant effort-cost decision-making (ECDM) may be a potential contributor to motivational impairment in both psychosis and depression. ECDM refers to choices that individuals make regarding the amount of 'work' they are willing to expend to obtain a certain outcome or reward. Recent experimental work has suggested that those with psychosis and depression may be less willing to expend effort to obtain rewards compared with controls, and that this effort deficit is related to motivational impairment in both disorders. In the current review, we aim to summarize the current literature on ECDM in psychosis and depression, providing evidence for transdiagnostic impairment. Next, we discuss evidence for the hypothesis that a seemingly similar behavioral ECDM deficit might arise from disparate psychological and neural mechanisms. Specifically, we argue that effort deficits in psychosis might be largely driven by deficits in cognitive control and the neural correlates of cognitive control processes, while effort deficits in depression might be largely driven by reduced reward responsivity and the associated neural correlates of reward responsivity. Finally, we will provide some discussion regarding future directions, as well as interpretative challenges to consider when examining ECDM transdiagnostically.

11 Review The undiagnosed pandemic: Burnout and depression within the surgical community. 2017

DeCaporale-Ryan, Lauren / Sakran, Joseph V / Grant, Scott B / Alseidi, Adnan / Rosenberg, Tziporah / Goldberg, Ross F / Sanfey, Hilary / Dubose, Joseph / Stawicki, Stanislaw / Ricca, Robert / Derrick, Ellen Thomason / Bernstein, Carol A / Jardine, Dinchen A / Stefanou, Amalia J / Aziz, Ben / He, Ellie / Dissanaike, Sharmila / Fortuna, Col Gerald R / Oviedo, Rodolfo J / Shapiro, Jo / Galowitz, Pamela / Moalem, Jacob. ·Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. · Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. · Division of Endocrine Surgery, MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. · Department of Surgery, Virginia Mason Hospital, Seattle, WA. · Departments of psychiatry and Family Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. · Department of Surgery, Maricopa Integrated Health System, Phoenix, AZ. · Department of Surgery, Southern Illinois University, Springfield, IL. · Department of Surgery, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA. · Department of Surgery, Temple University School of Medicine, St. Luke's University Campus, Bethlehem, PA. · Department of Surgery, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Naval Medical Center, Portsmouth, VA. · Department of Surgery, Providence Regional Medical Center, Everett, WA. · Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. · Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, Naval Medical Center, Portsmouth, VA; Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, McDonald Army Health Center, Fort Eustis, VA. · Department of Surgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI. · Texas Tech University School of Medicine, Lubbock, TX. · Department of Surgery, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Medical Director, John A. Griswold Level 1 Trauma Center, Timothy J. Harnar Regional Burn Center, Lubbock, TX. · Department of Surgery, Washington University Medical Center, St Louis, MO. · Department of Surgery, Florida State University College of Medicine, Tallahassee, FL. · Department of surgery and Center for Professionalism and Peer Support, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA. · Department of Otolaryngology, Center for Professionalism and Peer Support, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA. · Department of surgery, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. ·Curr Probl Surg · Pubmed #29073980.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Review Selection and implementation of emotion regulation strategies in major depressive disorder: An integrative review. 2017

Liu, Daphne Y / Thompson, Renee J. ·Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, MO, USA. Electronic address: daphne.liu@wustl.edu. · Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, MO, USA. ·Clin Psychol Rev · Pubmed #28739277.

ABSTRACT: Emotion regulation (ER), broadly defined, has been implicated in mental health, including major depressive disorder (MDD). We review empirical studies examining selection and implementation of ER strategies in adults with current or past MDD. We focus on eight strategies (rumination, distraction, cognitive reappraisal, suppression, acceptance, savoring, positive rumination, dampening), organizing the review by research design: (1) self-reported habitual use (i.e., trait) of ER strategies, (2) spontaneous use of ER strategies in laboratory settings, (3) experimentally instructed ER strategies, and (4) use of ER strategies in naturalistic settings. Reviewed findings suggest that MDD is associated with unskillful selection of ER strategies-indexed by self-reported habitual use of ER strategies-but not impaired abilities to implement them; in fact, those with current MDD and MDD in remission show intact abilities to implement many ER strategies when instructed to do so. Additionally, the vast majority of research examines trait ER, while there is a dearth of laboratory and naturalistic studies using MDD samples. There are also discrepant findings on habitual use of ER strategies assessed by self-reports and spontaneous use of ER strategies in the lab. We discuss implications of reviewed findings and five areas for future research in emotion dysregulation in MDD.

13 Review Rapid Depression Assessment in Geriatric Patients. 2017

Grossberg, George T / Beck, David / Zaidi, Syed Noman Y. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, Saint Louis University, 1438 South Grand Boulevard, St Louis, MO 63104, USA; Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Saint Louis University, 1438 South Grand Boulevard, St Louis, MO 63104, USA; Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Dementia, Health Aging, Saint Louis University, 1438 South Grand Boulevard, St Louis, MO 63104, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, Saint Louis University, 1438 South Grand Boulevard, St Louis, MO 63104, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, Saint Louis University, 1438 South Grand Boulevard, St Louis, MO 63104, USA. Electronic address: Zaidis@slu.edu. ·Clin Geriatr Med · Pubmed #28689570.

ABSTRACT: Depression is common in geriatric patients, especially in those with multiple comorbidities and polypharmacy. Depression in older adults is often underdiagnosed and undertreated. Initial screening for depression can easily be accomplished in the waiting room. Yet the clinical interview still remains the gold standard for diagnosing geriatric depression. Key components of the clinical interview are observant watching of the patient for the subtle signs of depression. Clinical interview should be done with sensitivity to the importance of privacy. Illicit substances and medical conditions may significantly contribute. Suicide assessment should be done in a step wise manner.

14 Review Interaction between the 2017

Rivera, Margarita / Locke, Adam E / Corre, Tanguy / Czamara, Darina / Wolf, Christiane / Ching-Lopez, Ana / Milaneschi, Yuri / Kloiber, Stefan / Cohen-Woods, Sarah / Rucker, James / Aitchison, Katherine J / Bergmann, Sven / Boomsma, Dorret I / Craddock, Nick / Gill, Michael / Holsboer, Florian / Hottenga, Jouke-Jan / Korszun, Ania / Kutalik, Zoltan / Lucae, Susanne / Maier, Wolfgang / Mors, Ole / Müller-Myhsok, Bertram / Owen, Michael J / Penninx, Brenda W J H / Preisig, Martin / Rice, John / Rietschel, Marcella / Tozzi, Federica / Uher, Rudolf / Vollenweider, Peter / Waeber, Gerard / Willemsen, Gonneke / Craig, Ian W / Farmer, Anne E / Lewis, Cathryn M / Breen, Gerome / McGuffin, Peter. ·Margarita Rivera, PhD, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II and Institute of Neurosciences, Center for Biomedical Research, University of Granada, Granada, Spain, and MRC Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, Kinǵs College London, UK; Adam E. Locke, PhD, Department of Biostatistics and Center for Statistical Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; Tanguy Corre, PhD, Department of Medical Genetics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland; Darina Czamara, PhD, Christiane Wolf, PhD, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany; Ana Ching-Lopez, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Granada, and Institute of Neurosciences Federico Olóriz, Centra de Investigación Biomédica, University of Granada, Spain; Yuri Milaneschi, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center/GGZ in Geest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Stefan Kloiber, MD, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany; Sara Cohen-Woods, PhD, School of Psychology, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; James Rucker, MD, PhD, MRC Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, UK; Katherine J. Aitchison, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada; Sven Bergmann, PhD, Department of Medical Genetics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland; Dorret I. Boomsma, PhD, Department of Biological Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Nick Craddock, MB, PhD, FMedSci, Department of Psychological Medicine and Neurology, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Henry Wellcome Building, Cardiff, UK; Michael Gill, MD, Department of Psychiatry, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, Dublin 8, Ireland; Florian Holsboer, MD, PhD, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany; Jouke-Jan Hottenga, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada; Ania Korszun, PhD, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK; Zoltan Kutalik, PhD, Department of Medical Genetics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland; Susanne Lucae, MD, PhD, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany; Wolfgang Maier, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; Ole Mors, MD, PhD, Research Department P, Aarhus University Hospital, Risskov, Denmark; Bertram Müller-Myhsok MD, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany; Michael J. Owen, MB, PhD, FMedSci, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatry Genetics and Genomics, Department of Psychological Medicine and Neurology, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; Brenda W. J. H. Penninx, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center/GGZ in Geest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Martin Preisig, MD, Department of Psychiatry, Lausanne University Hospital, 1008 Prilly-Lausanne, Switzerland; John Rice, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA; Marcella Rietschel, MD, Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany; Federica Tozzi, MD, Genetics Division, Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline Research and Development, Verona, Italy; Rudolf Uher, MD, PhD, MRC Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, UK, and Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Peter Vollenweider, MD, PhD, Gerard Waeber, MD, PhD, Division of Internal Medicine, CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland; Gonneke Willemsen, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada; Ian W. Craig, PhD, Anne E. Farmer, MD, MRC Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, UK; Cathryn M. Lewis, PhD, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, and Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, School of Medicine, King's College London, UK; Gerome Breen, PhD, Peter McGuffin, MB, PhD, FMedSci, MRC Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, UK margarita.rivera_sanchez@kcl.ac.uk. · Margarita Rivera, PhD, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II and Institute of Neurosciences, Center for Biomedical Research, University of Granada, Granada, Spain, and MRC Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, Kinǵs College London, UK; Adam E. Locke, PhD, Department of Biostatistics and Center for Statistical Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; Tanguy Corre, PhD, Department of Medical Genetics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland; Darina Czamara, PhD, Christiane Wolf, PhD, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany; Ana Ching-Lopez, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Granada, and Institute of Neurosciences Federico Olóriz, Centra de Investigación Biomédica, University of Granada, Spain; Yuri Milaneschi, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center/GGZ in Geest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Stefan Kloiber, MD, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany; Sara Cohen-Woods, PhD, School of Psychology, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; James Rucker, MD, PhD, MRC Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, UK; Katherine J. Aitchison, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada; Sven Bergmann, PhD, Department of Medical Genetics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland; Dorret I. Boomsma, PhD, Department of Biological Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Nick Craddock, MB, PhD, FMedSci, Department of Psychological Medicine and Neurology, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Henry Wellcome Building, Cardiff, UK; Michael Gill, MD, Department of Psychiatry, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, Dublin 8, Ireland; Florian Holsboer, MD, PhD, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany; Jouke-Jan Hottenga, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada; Ania Korszun, PhD, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK; Zoltan Kutalik, PhD, Department of Medical Genetics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland; Susanne Lucae, MD, PhD, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany; Wolfgang Maier, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; Ole Mors, MD, PhD, Research Department P, Aarhus University Hospital, Risskov, Denmark; Bertram Müller-Myhsok MD, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany; Michael J. Owen, MB, PhD, FMedSci, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatry Genetics and Genomics, Department of Psychological Medicine and Neurology, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; Brenda W. J. H. Penninx, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center/GGZ in Geest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Martin Preisig, MD, Department of Psychiatry, Lausanne University Hospital, 1008 Prilly-Lausanne, Switzerland; John Rice, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA; Marcella Rietschel, MD, Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany; Federica Tozzi, MD, Genetics Division, Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline Research and Development, Verona, Italy; Rudolf Uher, MD, PhD, MRC Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, UK, and Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Peter Vollenweider, MD, PhD, Gerard Waeber, MD, PhD, Division of Internal Medicine, CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland; Gonneke Willemsen, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada; Ian W. Craig, PhD, Anne E. Farmer, MD, MRC Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, UK; Cathryn M. Lewis, PhD, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, and Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, School of Medicine, King's College London, UK; Gerome Breen, PhD, Peter McGuffin, MB, PhD, FMedSci, MRC Social Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, UK. ·Br J Psychiatry · Pubmed #28642257.

ABSTRACT:

15 Review Exercise and pregnancy in recreational and elite athletes: 2016/17 evidence summary from the IOC Expert Group Meeting, Lausanne. Part 3-exercise in the postpartum period. 2017

Bø, Kari / Artal, Raul / Barakat, Ruben / Brown, Wendy J / Davies, Gregory A L / Dooley, Michael / Evenson, Kelly R / Haakstad, Lene A H / Kayser, Bengt / Kinnunen, Tarja I / Larsén, Karin / Mottola, Michelle F / Nygaard, Ingrid / van Poppel, Mireille / Stuge, Britt / Khan, Karim M / Anonymous7190910. ·Department of Sport Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health, Saint Louis University, St Louis, Missouri, USA. · Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte - INEF, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. · Centre for Research on Exercise Physical Activity and Health, School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia. · Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada. · Department of Sport Gynaecology, Poundbury Clinic, Dorchester, UK. · Poundbury Clinic, King Edward VII Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · Faculty of Biology and Medicine, Institute of Sport Science, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. · The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden. · R Samuel McLaughlin Foundation-Exercise and Pregnancy Lab, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. · Institute of Sport Science, University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Family Practice and School of Kinesiology, Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. ·Br J Sports Med · Pubmed #28642221.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Review Depression and Anxiety in Preschoolers: A Review of the Past 7 Years. 2017

Whalen, Diana J / Sylvester, Chad M / Luby, Joan L. ·Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 4444 Forest Park, Suite 2100, St Louis, MO 63108, USA. Electronic address: diana.whalen@wustl.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 4444 Forest Park, Suite 2100, St Louis, MO 63108, USA. ·Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am · Pubmed #28577606.

ABSTRACT: This article reviews recent empirical literature on the prevalence, correlates, assessment, and treatment of preschool-onset internalizing disorders. Major advances in the acceptance and recognition of both preschool-onset depression and anxiety have occurred over the past decade. This work has been greatly enhanced by the discovery of genetic, neural, and physiologic indicators, which further validate these constellations of symptoms in young children. Despite this growth in research, much work still needs to be done to further elucidate the cause, risk, treatment, and protective factors for preschool-onset internalizing disorders.

17 Review Depression and coronary heart disease. 2017

Carney, Robert M / Freedland, Kenneth E. ·Washington University School of Medicine, 4320 Forest Park Avenue, Suite 301, St. Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. ·Nat Rev Cardiol · Pubmed #27853162.

ABSTRACT: Depression is a highly prevalent risk factor for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with established CHD. Several biological and behavioural mechanisms have been hypothesized to underlie the relationship between depression and CHD, but none has been shown to account for more than a small proportion of the risk. Only a few clinical trials have examined whether treating depression decreases the risk of cardiac events in patients with established CHD. None of these trials has shown that treatment results in improved cardiac outcomes, but the differences in depression outcomes between the intervention and control groups have been small and not clinically significant. Nevertheless, secondary analyses of these trials suggest that prognosis improves when depression improves. Concerted efforts to develop more potent interventions for depression, identification of high-risk subtypes of depression, and further research on the biobehavioural mechanisms linking depression to CHD are needed to pave the way for definitive clinical trials.

18 Review Anorexia of aging and its role for frailty. 2017

Sanford, Angela M. ·Division of Geriatric Medicine, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. ·Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care · Pubmed #27749690.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to examine the concept of anorexia of aging, including its complex pathophysiology and the multifaceted interventions required to prevent adverse health consequences from this geriatric syndrome. RECENT FINDINGS: Anorexia of aging is extremely common, occurring in up to 30% of elderly individuals; however, this diagnosis is frequently missed or erroneously attributed to a normal part of the aging process. With aging, impairments in smell and taste can limit the desire to eat. Alterations in stress hormones and inflammatory mediators can lead to excess catabolism, cachexia, and reduced appetite. In addition, mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression, are powerful inhibitors of appetite. Anorexia of aging, with its negative consequences on weight and muscle mass, is a risk factor for the development of frailty and is important to screen for, as early intervention is key to reversing this debilitating condition. SUMMARY: Anorexia of aging is a complex geriatric syndrome and a direct risk factor for frailty and thus should not be accepted as normal consequence of aging. Early diagnosis and formulating a plan for targeted interventions is critical to prevent disability and preserve function in elderly patients.

19 Review The impact of cognitive challenges in major depression: the role of the primary care physician. 2016

Mattingly, Gregory / Anderson, Richard H / Mattingly, Stephen G / Anderson, Elizabeth Q. ·a Department of Psychiatry , Washington University School of Medicine , Saint Charles , MO , USA. · b Midwest Research Group , Saint Charles , MO , USA. ·Postgrad Med · Pubmed #27500820.

ABSTRACT: Nearly 1 in 5 Americans will struggle with major depression in their lives; some will have recurring bouts. Recent psychiatric research has given new attention to the prevalence of cognitive deficits in major depression and the impact such deficits have on remission and overall life functioning. When depression is partially treated i.e., leaving residual symptoms, patients have higher rates of relapse and lower functional outcomes. Impaired cognitive functioning is a frequent residual symptom, persisting in about 45% of patients even when emotional symptoms have improved, and results in a disproportionate share of the functional impairment, particularly in the workplace. Patients with depression have disrupted circuitry in brain regions responsible for cognition and it is therefore important to screen depressed patients for cognitive as well as emotional symptoms. Cognitive dysfunction should be evaluated in every mood disordered patient with validated self-report scales such as the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 or the Beck Depression Inventory and objective measures of cognitive function are also very very useful. Two easily administered tests are the Trails B Test and the Digit Symbol Substitution Test. Each take less than two minutes and measure working memory, executive function, and processing speed and can track cognitive improvement in depressed patients. Treatment of cognitive dysfunction in major depression is complicated by the 'serotonin conundrum': SSRI's frequently do not treat to full remission, and can cause cognitive blunting-actually adding to cognitive problems. Based on recent data including results from a recently completed meta-analysis by McIntyre and colleagues, an evidence-based algorithm for treating cognitive symptoms in depression is presented. A hierarchy of antidepressants and augmentation strategies based on the best available evidence is discussed. In conclusion, cognitive symptoms in major depressive disorder have been recognized as a target of therapeutic improvement by the FDA and have become a focus of clinical importance.

20 Review Yoga in Pregnancy. 2016

Babbar, Shilpa / Shyken, Jaye. ·St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri. ·Clin Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #27152528.

ABSTRACT: Yoga is a mind-body practice that encompasses a system of postures (asana), deep breathing (pranayama), and meditation. Over 36 million Americans practice yoga of which the majority are reproductive-aged women. Literature to support this practice is limited, albeit on the rise. A prenatal yoga practice has been shown to benefit women who suffer from anxiety, depression, stress, low back pain, and sleep disturbances. A small number of studies have been performed in high-risk pregnancies that also demonstrate an improvement in outcomes. The safety of performing yoga for the first time in pregnancy and fetal tolerance has been demonstrated.

21 Review Reward Processing and Risk for Depression Across Development. 2016

Luking, Katherine R / Pagliaccio, David / Luby, Joan L / Barch, Deanna M. ·Department of Psychology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA. Electronic address: katherine.luking@gmail.com. · Emotion and Development Branch, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA; Department of Psychology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA; Department of Radiology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA; Neuroscience Program, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA. ·Trends Cogn Sci · Pubmed #27131776.

ABSTRACT: Striatal response to reward has been of great interest in the typical development and psychopathology literatures. These parallel lines of inquiry demonstrate that although typically developing adolescents show robust striatal response to reward, adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) and those at high risk for MDD show a blunted response to reward. Understanding how these findings intersect is crucial for the development and application of early preventative interventions in at-risk children, ideally before the sharp increase in the rate of MDD onset that occurs in adolescence. Robust findings relating blunted striatal response to reward and MDD risk are reviewed and situated within a normative developmental context. We highlight the need for future studies investigating longitudinal development, specificity to MDD, and roles of potential moderators and mediators.

22 Review Kappa Opioids, Salvinorin A and Major Depressive Disorder. 2016

Taylor, George T / Manzella, Francesca. ·Behavioral Neuroscience/ Psychology Univ. Missouri - St. Louis, One University Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63121 USA. fmmf47@mail.umsl.edu. ·Curr Neuropharmacol · Pubmed #26903446.

ABSTRACT: Opioids are traditionally associated with pain, analgesia and drug abuse. It is now clear, however, that the opioids are central players in mood. The implications for mood disorders, particularly clinical depression, suggest a paradigm shift from the monoamine neurotransmitters to the opioids either alone or in interaction with monoamine neurons. We have a special interest in dynorphin, the last of the major endogenous opioids to be isolated and identified. Dynorphin is derived from the Greek word for power, dynamis, which hints at the expectation that the neuropeptide held for its discoverers. Yet, dynorphin and its opioid receptor subtype, kappa, has always taken a backseat to the endogenous b-endorphin and the exogenous morphine that both bind the mu opioid receptor subtype. That may be changing as the dynorphin/ kappa system has been shown to have different, often opposite, neurophysiological and behavioral influences. This includes major depressive disorder (MDD). Here, we have undertaken a review of dynorphin/ kappa neurobiology as related to behaviors, especially MDD. Highlights include the unique features of dynorphin and kappa receptors and the special relation of a plant-based agonist of the kappa receptor salvinorin A. In addition to acting as a kappa opioid agonist, we conclude that salvinorin A has a complex pharmacologic profile, with potential additional mechanisms of action. Its unique neurophysiological effects make Salvinorina A an ideal candidate for MDD treatment research.

23 Review A meta-analysis of temperament and character dimensions in patients with mood disorders: Comparison to healthy controls and unaffected siblings. 2016

Zaninotto, Leonardo / Solmi, Marco / Toffanin, Tommaso / Veronese, Nicola / Cloninger, C Robert / Correll, Christoph U. ·Department of Biomedical and Neuro-Motor Sciences, University of Bologna, Viale Carlo Pepoli 5, 40123 Bologna, Italy. Electronic address: leozanin8@gmail.com. · Department of Neuroscience, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Geriatric Section, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. · The Zucker Hillside Hospital, Psychiatry Research, North Shore-Glen Oaks, NY, USA; Hofsra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine, Hampstead, NY, USA. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #26803780.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cloninger's psychobiological model of personality has been extensively applied to subjects affected by mood disorders (MOOD). However, most studies are widely heterogeneous in terms of sample size, methods of assessment, and selection of participants. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of literature and a random effects meta-analysis of studies comparing at least two of the following groups: (a) adults with a primary MOOD diagnosis (Bipolar Disorder (BP) or major depressive disorder (MDD)), (b) their unaffected siblings (SIB) or (c) healthy subjects (HS), and reporting quantitative results from the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ) or the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Subgroup, sensitivity and meta-regression analyses were also conducted. RESULTS: High Harm Avoidance and low Self-Directedness were consistently associated with MOOD and SIB samples. BP was characterized by higher scores in Novelty Seeking and Self-Transcendence than HS, SIB and MDD. Age seemed to have a negative effect on Novelty Seeking and a positive effect on Harm Avoidance, Cooperativeness and Self-Transcendence. An euthymic mood state was associated with reduced Harm Avoidance, but increased Reward Dependence, Self-Directedness and Cooperativeness. LIMITATIONS: The quality of the included studies varied and was relatively low. Moreover, publication bias and heterogeneity in the distribution of effect sizes may also have limited our results. CONCLUSION: High Harm Avoidance and Low Self-Directedness may be trait markers for MOOD in general, while high Novelty Seeking and high Self-Transcendence may be specific to BP. Future studies are needed to disentangle the state-trait effect of each personality dimension.

24 Review Mechanisms Underlying Motivational Deficits in Psychopathology: Similarities and Differences in Depression and Schizophrenia. 2016

Barch, Deanna M / Pagliaccio, David / Luking, Katherine. ·Departments of Psychology, Psychiatry and Radiology, Washington University, Box 1125, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO, 63130, USA. dbarch@wustl.edu. · Neurosciences Program, Washington University, Box 1125, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO, 63130, USA. ·Curr Top Behav Neurosci · Pubmed #26026289.

ABSTRACT: Motivational and hedonic impairments are core aspects of a variety of types of psychopathology. These impairments cut across diagnostic categories and may be critical to understanding major aspects of the functional impairments accompanying psychopathology. Given the centrality of motivational and hedonic systems to psychopathology, the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative includes a "positive valence" systems domain that outlines a number of constructs that may be key to understanding the nature and mechanisms of motivational and hedonic impairments in psychopathology. These component constructs include initial responsiveness to reward, reward anticipation or expectancy, incentive or reinforcement learning, effort valuation, and action selection. Here, we review behavioral and neuroimaging studies providing evidence for impairments in these constructs in individuals with psychosis versus in individuals with depressive pathology. There are important differences in the nature of reward-related and hedonic deficits associated with psychosis versus depression that have major implications for our understanding of etiology and treatment development. In particular, the literature strongly suggests the presence of impairments in in-the-moment hedonics or "liking" in individuals with depressive pathology, particularly among those who experience anhedonia. Such deficits may propagate forward and contribute to impairments in other constructs that are dependent on hedonic responses, such as anticipation, learning, effort, and action selection. Such hedonic impairments could reflect alterations in dopamine and/or opioid signaling in the striatum related to depression or specifically to anhedonia in depressed populations. In contrast, the literature points to relatively intact in-the-moment hedonic processing in psychosis, but provides much evidence for impairments in other components involved in translating reward to action selection. Particularly, individuals with schizophrenia exhibit altered reward prediction and associated striatal and prefrontal activation, impaired reward learning, and impaired reward-modulated action selection.

25 Review Impacts of dance on non-motor symptoms, participation, and quality of life in Parkinson disease and healthy older adults. 2015

McNeely, M E / Duncan, R P / Earhart, G M. ·Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA; Department of Neurology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA. Electronic address: mcneelym@wusm.wustl.edu. · Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA; Department of Neurology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA. Electronic address: duncanr@wusm.wustl.edu. · Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA; Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA; Department of Neurology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA. Electronic address: earhartg@wusm.wustl.edu. ·Maturitas · Pubmed #26318265.

ABSTRACT: Evidence indicates exercise is beneficial for motor and non-motor function in older adults and people with chronic diseases including Parkinson disease (PD). Dance may be a relevant form of exercise in PD and older adults due to social factors and accessibility. People with PD experience motor and non-motor symptoms, but treatments, interventions, and assessments often focus more on motor symptoms. Similar non-motor symptoms also occur in older adults. While it is well-known that dance may improve motor outcomes, it is less clear how dance affects non-motor symptoms. This review aims to describe the effects of dance interventions on non-motor symptoms in older adults and PD, highlights limitations of the literature, and identifies opportunities for future research. Overall, intervention parameters, study designs, and outcome measures differ widely, limiting comparisons across studies. Results are mixed in both populations, but evidence supports the potential for dance to improve mood, cognition, and quality of life in PD and healthy older adults. Participation and non-motor symptoms like sleep disturbances, pain, and fatigue have not been measured in older adults. Additional well-designed studies comparing dance and exercise interventions are needed to clarify the effects of dance on non-motor function and establish recommendations for these populations.

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