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Depression: HELP
Articles from St. Louis
Based on 704 articles published since 2010
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These are the 704 published articles about Depression that originated from St. Louis during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

2 Guideline Consensus Recommendations for the Clinical Application of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in the Treatment of Depression. 2018

McClintock, Shawn M / Reti, Irving M / Carpenter, Linda L / McDonald, William M / Dubin, Marc / Taylor, Stephan F / Cook, Ian A / O'Reardon, John / Husain, Mustafa M / Wall, Christopher / Krystal, Andrew D / Sampson, Shirlene M / Morales, Oscar / Nelson, Brent G / Latoussakis, Vassilios / George, Mark S / Lisanby, Sarah H / Anonymous3580907 / Anonymous3590907. ·Department of Psychiatry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75390-8898. shawn.mcclintock@utsouthwestern.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. · Division of Brain Stimulation and Neurophysiology, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Butler Hospital, Brown Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College, White Plains, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Bioengineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rowan University School of Medicine, Stratford, New Jersey, USA. · PrarieCare, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Psychiatric Neurotherapeutics Program, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, St Louis Park, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. · Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. ·J Clin Psychiatry · Pubmed #28541649.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide expert recommendations for the safe and effective application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). PARTICIPANTS: Participants included a group of 17 expert clinicians and researchers with expertise in the clinical application of rTMS, representing both the National Network of Depression Centers (NNDC) rTMS Task Group and the American Psychiatric Association Council on Research (APA CoR) Task Force on Novel Biomarkers and Treatments. EVIDENCE: The consensus statement is based on a review of extensive literature from 2 databases (OvidSP MEDLINE and PsycINFO) searched from 1990 through 2016. The search terms included variants of major depressive disorder and transcranial magnetic stimulation. The results were limited to articles written in English that focused on adult populations. Of the approximately 1,500 retrieved studies, a total of 118 publications were included in the consensus statement and were supplemented with expert opinion to achieve consensus recommendations on key issues surrounding the administration of rTMS for MDD in clinical practice settings. CONSENSUS PROCESS: In cases in which the research evidence was equivocal or unclear, a consensus decision on how rTMS should be administered was reached by the authors of this article and is denoted in the article as "expert opinion." CONCLUSIONS: Multiple randomized controlled trials and published literature have supported the safety and efficacy of rTMS antidepressant therapy. These consensus recommendations, developed by the NNDC rTMS Task Group and APA CoR Task Force on Novel Biomarkers and Treatments, provide comprehensive information for the safe and effective clinical application of rTMS in the treatment of MDD.

3 Editorial Intrapartum oxytocin: time to focus on longer term consequences? 2019

Monks, D T / Palanisamy, A. ·Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MI, USA. ·Anaesthesia · Pubmed #31347150.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Crossover to Bilateral Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Potential Strategy When Patients Are Not Responding to Unilateral Left-Sided High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation. 2019

Cristancho, Pilar / Trapp, Nicholas T / Siddiqi, Shan H / Dixon, David / Miller, J Philip / Lenze, Eric J. ·University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics, Iowa City, IA. · Division of Biostatistics, School of Medicine, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO. ·J ECT · Pubmed #29877963.

ABSTRACT: Clinical trials using left-sided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) report remission rates of 14% to 32.6%. A large percentage of patients would not achieve remission with standard rTMS treatment. The question of what clinicians should do when a patient is not responding to standard high-frequency (HF) left-sided rTMS remains unanswered. This prospective case series examines whether crossover to bilateral stimulation enhances antidepressant outcomes in patients not responding to unilateral rTMS. Patients in a major depressive episode received an rTMS clinical protocol of 4 to 6 weeks' duration. Stimulation began with HF rTMS (10 Hz) over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (range, 3000-5000 pulses per session). A total of 17 patients without sufficient clinical improvement early in their rTMS course received 1-Hz rTMS (range, 600-1200 pps) over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (added to the HF left-sided stimulation). Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores decreased from 13.9 ± 3.9 (mean ± SD) from the start of augmentation to 12.2 ± 5.8 at the end of acute treatment, a 1.7-point change, Cohen d effect size = -0.35, 95% confidence interval, -1.01 to - 0.34, suggesting improvement. Remission rate in this sample was 24% (4/17). This case series indicates that crossover to bilateral stimulation is a feasible and potentially effective strategy when patients are not improving with standard rTMS. A randomized controlled trial comparing crossover versus standard rTMS is needed to determine the efficacy of this paradigm.

5 Editorial Stopping Cognitive Decline in Patients With Late-Life Depression: A New Front in the Fight Against Dementia. 2018

Lenze, Eric J / Voineskos, Aristotle N / Butters, Meryl A / Karp, Jordan F / Anonymous2670956. ·Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. Electronic address: lenzee@wustl.edu. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. ·Am J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #30049598.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Depression and Functional Impairment: A Pernicious Pairing in Older Adults. 2018

Lenze, Eric J / Barco, Peggy P / Bland, Marghuretta D. ·Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, St Louis, MO. Electronic address: lenzee@wustl.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, St Louis, MO. ·Am J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #29107459.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Depression in patients with coronary artery disease: a more significant problem than previously recognized? 2017

Carney, Robert M / Freedland, Kenneth E. ·Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 4320 Forest Park Ave., Suite 301, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA. ·Eur Heart J Qual Care Clin Outcomes · Pubmed #29044397.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Pre-existing psychological depression confers increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes following cardiac surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Flaherty, Lauren B / Wood, Taylor / Cheng, Allen / Khan, Abdur R. ·Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Louisville School of Arts and Sciences, Louisville, Ky. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Ky. · Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Mo. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Ky. Electronic address: abdur.khan@louisville.edu. ·J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg · Pubmed #28818292.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial The Effectiveness and Harms of Antidepressants. 2017

Morley, John E. ·Division of Geriatric Medicine, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri. Electronic address: morley@slu.edu. ·J Am Med Dir Assoc · Pubmed #28283382.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Diet, Depression, and Destiny in Heart Failure. 2015

Freedland, Kenneth E. ·Department of Psychiatry, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. Electronic address: freedlak@bmc.wustl.edu. ·J Card Fail · Pubmed #26499954.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Risk for mood pathology: neural and psychological markers of abnormal negative information processing. 2014

Barch, Deanna M. ·Washington University. Electronic address: dbarch@artsci.wustl.edu. ·J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry · Pubmed #24745949.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Mild cognitive impairment-a treatable condition. 2014

Morley, John E. ·Division of Geriatric Medicine and Endocrinology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO. Electronic address: morley@slu.edu. ·J Am Med Dir Assoc · Pubmed #24359697.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Review Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and Alzheimer's disease. 2020

Mdawar, Bernadette / Ghossoub, Elias / Khoury, Rita. ·Department of Psychiatry, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. ·Neural Regen Res · Pubmed #31535641.

ABSTRACT: Given the failure to develop disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD), strategies aiming at preventing or delaying the onset of the disease are being prioritized. While the debate regarding whether depression is an etiological risk factor or a prodrome of AD rages on, a key determining factor may be the timing of depression onset in older adults. There is increasing evidence that untreated early-onset depression is a risk factor and that late-onset depression may be a catalyst of cognitive decline. Data from animal studies have shown a beneficial impact of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on pathophysiological biomarkers of AD including amyloid burden, tau deposits and neurogenesis. In humans, studies focusing on subjects with a prior history of depression also showed a delay in the onset of AD in those treated with most selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Paroxetine, which has strong anticholinergic properties, was associated with increased mortality and mixed effects on amyloid and tau deposits in mice, as well as increased odds of developing AD in humans. Although most of the data regarding selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors is promising, findings should be interpreted cautiously because of notable methodological heterogeneity between studies. There is thus a need to conduct large scale randomized controlled trials with long follow up periods to clarify the dose-effect relationship of specific serotonergic antidepressants on AD prevention.

14 Review Preschool Depression: a Diagnostic Reality. 2019

Donohue, Meghan Rose / Whalen, Diana J / Gilbert, Kirsten E / Hennefield, Laura / Barch, Deanna M / Luby, Joan. ·Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, Suite 2500, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA. rdonohue@wustl.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, Suite 2500, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA. · Department of Psychology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Radiology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA. ·Curr Psychiatry Rep · Pubmed #31748851.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We review findings related to predictors, correlates, outcomes, and treatment of preschool depression that have been published in the last 3 years. RECENT FINDINGS: Preschool depression displays a chronic course through late adolescence and is associated with temperamental and personality traits, poorer physical health, and negative parenting practices. Preschool depression predicts deficits into adolescence, including social difficulties and blunted neural response to rewards. Depressed preschoolers can experience suicidal ideation and behaviors and display an accurate understanding of the finality of death. A treatment for preschool depression has now been validated that uses the parent-child relationship to enhance emotion development and reduce depressive symptoms. Preschool depression is homotypic with depression that occurs later in life. Future work elucidating mechanisms through which preschool depression develops and informs the sub-groups for which particular treatments may be most effective will have considerable implications for prevention and early intervention.

15 Review The fetal origins of mental illness. 2019

Al-Haddad, Benjamin J S / Oler, Elizabeth / Armistead, Blair / Elsayed, Nada A / Weinberger, Daniel R / Bernier, Raphael / Burd, Irina / Kapur, Raj / Jacobsson, Bo / Wang, Caihong / Mysorekar, Indira / Rajagopal, Lakshmi / Adams Waldorf, Kristina M. ·Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. · Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. · Department of Global Health, University of Washington Seattle, WA; Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, WA. · Integrated Research Center for Fetal Medicine, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Lieber Institute for Brain Development, Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, Neuroscience, and McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore, MD. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. · Integrated Research Center for Fetal Medicine, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, WA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Genetics and Bioinformatics, Domain of Health Data and Digitalization, Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center for Reproductive Health Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. · Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Pathology and Immunology, Center for Reproductive Health Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. · Center for Innate Immunity and Immune Disease, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, WA. · Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Global Health, Center for Innate Immunity and Immune Disease, Center for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: adamsk@uw.edu. ·Am J Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #31207234.

ABSTRACT: The impact of infections and inflammation during pregnancy on the developing fetal brain remains incompletely defined, with important clinical and research gaps. Although the classic infectious TORCH pathogens (ie, Toxoplasma gondii, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus [CMV], herpes simplex virus) are known to be directly teratogenic, emerging evidence suggests that these infections represent the most extreme end of a much larger spectrum of injury. We present the accumulating evidence that prenatal exposure to a wide variety of viral and bacterial infections-or simply inflammation-may subtly alter fetal brain development, leading to neuropsychiatric consequences for the child later in life. The link between influenza infections in pregnant women and an increased risk for development of schizophrenia in their children was first described more than 30 years ago. Since then, evidence suggests that a range of infections during pregnancy may also increase risk for autism spectrum disorder and depression in the child. Subsequent studies in animal models demonstrated that both pregnancy infections and inflammation can result in direct injury to neurons and neural progenitor cells or indirect injury through activation of microglia and astrocytes, which can trigger cytokine production and oxidative stress. Infectious exposures can also alter placental serotonin production, which can perturb neurotransmitter signaling in the developing brain. Clinically, detection of these subtle injuries to the fetal brain is difficult. As the neuropsychiatric impact of perinatal infections or inflammation may not be known for decades after birth, our construct for defining teratogenic infections in pregnancy (eg, TORCH) based on congenital anomalies is insufficient to capture the full adverse impact on the child. We discuss the clinical implications of this body of evidence and how we might place greater emphasis on prevention of prenatal infections. For example, increasing uptake of the seasonal influenza vaccine is a key strategy to reduce perinatal infections and the risk for fetal brain injury. An important research gap exists in understanding how antibiotic therapy during pregnancy affects the fetal inflammatory load and how to avoid inflammation-mediated injury to the fetal brain. In summary, we discuss the current evidence and mechanisms linking infections and inflammation with the increased lifelong risk of neuropsychiatric disorders in the child, and how we might improve prenatal care to protect the fetal brain.

16 Review The assessment of resistance to antidepressant treatment: Rationale for the Antidepressant Treatment History Form: Short Form (ATHF-SF). 2019

Sackeim, Harold A / Aaronson, Scott T / Bunker, Mark T / Conway, Charles R / Demitrack, Mark A / George, Mark S / Prudic, Joan / Thase, Michael E / Rush, A John. ·Departments of Psychiatry and Radiology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: has1@columbia.edu. · Sheppard Pratt Health System and Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA. · LivaNova PLC, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Trevena, Inc., Chesterbrook, PA, USA. · Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · New York State Psychiatric Institute and Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore; Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; Texas Tech University, Permian Basin, TX, USA. ·J Psychiatr Res · Pubmed #30974339.

ABSTRACT: There is considerable diversity in how treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is defined. However, every definition incorporates the concept that patients with TRD have not benefited sufficiently from one or more adequate trials of antidepressant treatment. This review examines the issues fundamental to the systematic evaluation of antidepressant treatment adequacy and resistance. These issues include the domains of interventions deemed effective in treatment of major depressive episodes (e.g., pharmacotherapy, brain stimulation, and psychotherapy), the subgroups of patients for whom distinct adequacy criteria are needed (e.g., bipolar vs. unipolar depression, psychotic vs. nonpsychotic depression), whether trials should be rated dichotomously as adequate or inadequate or on a potency continuum, whether combination and augmentation strategies require specific consideration, and the criteria used to evaluate the adequacy of treatment delivery (e.g., dose, duration), trial adherence, and clinical outcome. This review also presents the Antidepressant Treatment History Form: Short-Form (ATHF-SF), a completely revised version of an earlier instrument, and details how these fundamental issues were addressed in the ATHF-SF.

17 Review Neurostimulation for depression in epilepsy. 2018

Conway, Charles R / Udaiyar, Anita / Schachter, Steven C. ·Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8134, Saint Louis, MO 63110, United States. Electronic address: conwaycr@wustl.edu. · 4400 Lindell Boulevard, Apt 7 A, Saint Louis, MO 63108, United States. · Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, CIMIT- 125 Nashua Street, Suite 324, Boston, MA 02114, United States. Electronic address: sschacht@bidmc.harvard.edu. ·Epilepsy Behav · Pubmed #30558717.

ABSTRACT: Epilepsy is often associated with comorbid psychiatric illnesses that can significantly impact its long-term course. The most frequent of these psychiatric comorbidities is major depressive disorder, which affects an estimated 40% of patients with epilepsy. Many patients are underdiagnosed or undertreated, yet managing their mood symptoms is critical to improving their outcomes. When conventional psychiatric treatments fail in the management of depression, neuromodulation techniques may offer promise, including electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), as discussed in this review. "This article is part of the Supplement issue Neurostimulation for Epilepsy."

18 Review Pharmacogenetic guidelines and decision support tools for depression treatment: application to late-life. 2018

Chang, Donald D / Eyreeuro, Harris A / Abbott, Ryan / Coudreaut, Michael / Baune, Bernhard T / Shaman, Jeffrey A / Lavretsky, Helen / Lenze, Eric J / Merrill, David A / Singh, Ajeet B / Mulsant, Benoit H / Reynolds, Charles F / Müller, Daniel J / Bousman, Chad. ·School of Medicine, University of Queensland-Ochsner Clinical School, Brisbane, Queensland, 4072, Australia. · Innovation Institute, Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX 77006, USA. · IMPACT SRC, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, 3220, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, 3003, Australia. · Discipline of Psychiatry, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, 5055, Australia. · University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK. · David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, UT 84102, USA. · Coriell Life Sciences, Philadelphia, PA 19112, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H7, Canada. · Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction & Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H7, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA. · Departments of Medical Genetics, Psychiatry, & Physiology & Pharmacology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, AN T2N 1N4, Canada. ·Pharmacogenomics · Pubmed #30422065.

ABSTRACT: Late-life depression (LLD) is a major depressive disorder that affects someone after the age of 60 years. LLD is frequently associated with inadequate response and remission from antidepressants, in addition to polypharmacy. Pharmacogenetics offers a promising approach to improve clinical outcomes in LLD via new discoveries determining the genetic basis of response rates and side effects, as well as the development of tailored pharmacogenetic-based decision support tools. This invited review evaluates the LLD pharmacogenetic evidence base and the extent to which this was incorporated into existing commercial decision support tools and clinical pharmacogenetic guidelines.

19 Review Cognitive Deficits in Psychotic Disorders: A Lifespan Perspective. 2018

Sheffield, Julia M / Karcher, Nicole R / Barch, Deanna M. ·Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1601 23rd Ave S, Nashville, TN, 37212, USA. Julia.sheffield@vumc.org. · Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Washington University St. Louis, 1 Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO, 63130, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Radiology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA. ·Neuropsychol Rev · Pubmed #30343458.

ABSTRACT: Individuals with disorders that include psychotic symptoms (i.e. psychotic disorders) experience broad cognitive impairments in the chronic state, indicating a dimension of abnormality associated with the experience of psychosis. These impairments negatively impact functional outcome, contributing to the disabling nature of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and psychotic depression. The robust and reliable nature of cognitive deficits has led researchers to explore the timing and profile of impairments, as this may elucidate different neurodevelopmental patterns in individuals who experience psychosis. Here, we review the literature on cognitive deficits across the life span of individuals with psychotic disorder and psychotic-like experiences, highlighting the dimensional nature of both psychosis and cognitive ability. We identify premorbid generalized cognitive impairment in schizophrenia that worsens throughout development, and stabilizes by the first-episode of psychosis, suggesting a neurodevelopmental course. Research in affective psychosis is less clear, with mixed evidence regarding premorbid deficits, but a fairly reliable generalized deficit at first-episode, which appears to worsen into the chronic state. In general, cognitive impairments are most severe in schizophrenia, intermediate in bipolar disorder, and the least severe in psychotic depression. In all groups, cognitive deficits are associated with poorer functional outcome. Finally, while the generalized deficit is the clearest and most reliable signal, data suggests specific deficits in verbal memory across all groups, specific processing speed impairments in schizophrenia and executive functioning impairments in bipolar disorder. Cognitive deficits are a core feature of psychotic disorders that provide a window into understanding developmental course and risk for psychosis.

20 Review The Efficacy of Buprenorphine in Major Depression, Treatment-Resistant Depression and Suicidal Behavior: A Systematic Review. 2018

Serafini, Gianluca / Adavastro, Giulia / Canepa, Giovanna / De Berardis, Domenico / Valchera, Alessandro / Pompili, Maurizio / Nasrallah, Henry / Amore, Mario. ·Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy. gianluca.serafini@unige.it. · IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, 16132 Genoa, Italy. gianluca.serafini@unige.it. · Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy. siriogiulia@libero.it. · IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, 16132 Genoa, Italy. siriogiulia@libero.it. · Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy. giovanna.canepa@ordinepsicologiliguria.it. · Villa San Giuseppe Hospital, Hermanas Hospitalarias, Ascoli Piceno, Italy, Polyedra Research Group, 64100 Teramo, Italy. dodebera@aliceposta.it. · NHS, Department of Mental Health, Psychiatric Service of Diagnosis and Treatment, Hospital "G. Mazzini", Asl 4, 64100 Teramo, Italy. a.valchera@ospedaliere.it. · Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Organs, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. maurizio.pompili@uniroma1.it. · Department of Neurology & Psychiatry, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63104, USA. hnasral@slu.edu. · Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy. mario.amore@unige.it. · IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, 16132 Genoa, Italy. mario.amore@unige.it. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #30111745.

ABSTRACT: Although several pharmacological options to treat depression are currently available, approximately one third of patients who receive antidepressant medications do not respond adequately or achieve a complete remission. Thus, novel strategies are needed to successfully address those who did not respond, or partially respond, to available antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Research findings revealed that the opioid system is significantly involved in the regulation of mood and incentives salience and may be an appropriate target for novel therapeutic agents. The present study aimed to systematically review the current literature about the use of buprenorphine (BUP) for major depression, treatment-resistant depression (TRD), non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) behavior, and suicidal behavior. We investigated Pubmed and Scopus databases using the following keywords: "buprenorphine AND depression", "buprenorphine AND treatment resistant depression", "buprenorphine AND suicid*", "buprenorphine AND refractory depression". Several evidence demonstrate that, at low doses, BUP is an efficacious, well-tolerated, and safe option in reducing depressive symptoms, serious suicidal ideation, and NSSI, even in patients with TRD. However, more studies are needed to evaluate the long-term effects, and relative efficacy of specific combinations (e.g., BUP + samidorphan (BUP/SAM), BUP + naloxone (BUP/NAL), BUP + naltrexone) over BUP monotherapy or adjunctive BUP treatment with standard antidepressants, as well as to obtain more uniform guidance about the optimal BUP dosing interval.

21 Review Vagus Nerve Stimulation: Changing the Paradigm for Chronic Severe Depression? 2018

Aaronson, Scott T / Conway, Charles R. ·Clinical Research Programs, Sheppard Pratt Health System, 6501 North Charles Street, Towson, MD 21204, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland Medical School, 655 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address: saaronson@sheppardpratt.org. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8134, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. ·Psychiatr Clin North Am · Pubmed #30098654.

ABSTRACT: Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been studied for its effect on treatment-resistant depression. Open-label studies have shown a significant positive effect in an especially treatment-resistant depressive population. Insurance company support for VNS has been limited but may be reviewed given recent positive open-label data. Coming developments in novel external ways to stimulate the vagus nerve may revive interest in this area. This article reviews the clinical development of VNS starting with the first recognition of its potential for treating depression, parses the results of several large clinical trials, and suggests a future path for optimal clinical development and use.

22 Review The Mechanism of Action of Vagus Nerve Stimulation in Treatment-Resistant Depression: Current Conceptualizations. 2018

Conway, Charles R / Xiong, Willa. ·Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8134, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address: conwaycr@wustl.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8134, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. ·Psychiatr Clin North Am · Pubmed #30098653.

ABSTRACT: Stimulation of the left cervical vagus nerve, or vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), brings about an antidepressant response in a subset of treatment-resistant depression (TRD) patients. How this occurs is poorly understood; however, knowledge of the neuroanatomic vagal pathways, in conjunction with functional brain imaging studies, suggests several brain regions associated with mood regulation are critical: brainstem nuclei (locus coeruleus, dorsal raphe, and ventral tegmental area), thalamus, and insular and prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, animal studies suggest that VNS enhances neuroplasticity and changes in neuronal firing patterns. Continued study to better understand the mechanism of action of VNS in TRD is warranted.

23 Review Understanding Mechanisms of Genetic Risk for Adolescent Internalizing and Externalizing Problems: The Mediating Role of Parenting and Personality. 2018

Su, Jinni / Kuo, Sally I-Chun / Bucholz, Kathleen K / Edenberg, Howard J / Kramer, John R / Schuckit, Marc / Dick, Danielle M. ·Department of Psychology,Virginia Commonwealth University,Richmond,Virginia,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis,St. Louis,Missouri,USA. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,Indiana University,Bloomington,Indiana,47405,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,University of Iowa,Iowa City,Iowa,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,University of California at San Diego,La Jolla,California,USA. ·Twin Res Hum Genet · Pubmed #30027866.

ABSTRACT: Genetic predispositions play an important role in the development of internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Understanding the mechanisms through which genetic risk unfolds to influence these developmental outcomes is critical for developing prevention and intervention efforts, capturing key elements of Irv's research agenda and scientific legacy. In this study, we examined the role of parenting and personality in mediating the effect of genetic risk on adolescents' major depressive disorder and conduct disorder symptoms. Longitudinal data were drawn from a sample of 709 European American adolescents and their mothers from the Collaborative Studies on Genetics of Alcoholism. Results from multivariate path analysis indicated that adolescents' depressive symptoms genome-wide polygenic scores (DS_GPS) predicted lower parental knowledge, which in turn was associated with more subsequent major depressive disorder and conduct disorder symptoms. Adolescents' DS_GPS also had indirect effects on these outcomes via personality, with a mediating effect via agreeableness but not via other dimensions of personality. Findings revealed that the pattern of associations was similar across adolescent gender. Our findings emphasize the important role of evocative gene-environment correlation processes and intermediate phenotypes in the pathways of risk from genetic predispositions to complex adolescent outcomes.

24 Review The Compelling and Persistent Problem of Bipolar Disorder Disguised as Major Depression Disorder: An Integrative Review [Formula: see text]. 2018

Stiles, Brandie M / Fish, Anne F / Vandermause, Roxanne / Malik, Azfar M. ·1 Brandie M. Stiles, PhD, MSN, PMHNP-BC, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA; Centerpointe Hospital, St. Louis, MO, USA. · 2 Anne F. Fish, PhD, RN, FAHA, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA. · 3 Roxanne Vandermause, PhD, RN, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA. · 4 Azfar M. Malik, MD, MBA, Centerpointe Hospital, St. Louis, MO, USA. ·J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc · Pubmed #29952230.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Up to 40% of patients with bipolar disorder are misdiagnosed, usually with major depression disorder. OBJECTIVE: The purpose was to describe the current state of the science of the misdiagnosis of bipolar disorder, with the ultimate goal of improving psychiatric diagnostic workups including screening. DESIGN: An integrative review was conducted using standard criteria for evaluating research articles. RESULTS: Forty-nine articles met the eligibility criteria. Articles explored patient-related and health care provider-related factors contributing to the misdiagnosis of bipolar disorder as well as consequences of misdiagnosis. Clinically oriented, reliable, and valid screening tools for bipolar disorder also were reviewed. CONCLUSIONS: Awareness of multiple, challenging patient-related factors and more comprehensive assessment and screening by health care providers may reduce misdiagnosis.

25 Review Effort-cost decision-making in psychosis and depression: could a similar behavioral deficit arise from disparate psychological and neural mechanisms? 2018

Culbreth, A J / Moran, E K / Barch, D M. ·Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences,Washington University in Saint Louis,St. Louis, MO,USA. · Department of Psychiatry,Washington University in Saint Louis,St. Louis, MO,USA. ·Psychol Med · Pubmed #28889803.

ABSTRACT: Motivational impairment is a common feature of both depression and psychosis; however, the psychological and neural mechanisms that give rise to motivational impairment in these disorders are poorly understood. Recent research has suggested that aberrant effort-cost decision-making (ECDM) may be a potential contributor to motivational impairment in both psychosis and depression. ECDM refers to choices that individuals make regarding the amount of 'work' they are willing to expend to obtain a certain outcome or reward. Recent experimental work has suggested that those with psychosis and depression may be less willing to expend effort to obtain rewards compared with controls, and that this effort deficit is related to motivational impairment in both disorders. In the current review, we aim to summarize the current literature on ECDM in psychosis and depression, providing evidence for transdiagnostic impairment. Next, we discuss evidence for the hypothesis that a seemingly similar behavioral ECDM deficit might arise from disparate psychological and neural mechanisms. Specifically, we argue that effort deficits in psychosis might be largely driven by deficits in cognitive control and the neural correlates of cognitive control processes, while effort deficits in depression might be largely driven by reduced reward responsivity and the associated neural correlates of reward responsivity. Finally, we will provide some discussion regarding future directions, as well as interpretative challenges to consider when examining ECDM transdiagnostically.

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