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Depression: HELP
Articles from Washington area
Based on 2,724 articles published since 2008
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These are the 2724 published articles about Depression that originated from Washington area during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. 2016

Cohen, Ezra E W / LaMonte, Samuel J / Erb, Nicole L / Beckman, Kerry L / Sadeghi, Nader / Hutcheson, Katherine A / Stubblefield, Michael D / Abbott, Dennis M / Fisher, Penelope S / Stein, Kevin D / Lyman, Gary H / Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L. ·Medical Oncologist, Moores Cancer Center, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA. · Retired Head and Neck Surgeon, Former Associate Professor of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Louisiana State University Health and Science Center, New Orleans, LA. · Program Manager, National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Research Analyst-Survivorship, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Professor of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Cancer Surgery, and Director of Head and Neck Surgical Oncology, George Washington University, Washington, DC. · Associate Professor, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Section of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · Medical Director for Cancer Rehabilitation, Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, West Orange, NJ. · Chief Executive Officer, Dental Oncology Professionals, Garland, TX. · Clinical Instructor of Otolaryngology and Nurse, Miller School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Miami, Miami, FL. · Vice President, Behavioral Research, and Director, Behavioral Research Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Co-Director, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Professor of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. · Director, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC. ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #27002678.

ABSTRACT: Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

2 Guideline Screening for Depression in Adults: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2016

Siu, Albert L / Anonymous2730856 / Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten / Grossman, David C / Baumann, Linda Ciofu / Davidson, Karina W / Ebell, Mark / García, Francisco A R / Gillman, Matthew / Herzstein, Jessica / Kemper, Alex R / Krist, Alex H / Kurth, Ann E / Owens, Douglas K / Phillips, William R / Phipps, Maureen G / Pignone, Michael P. ·Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York2James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, New York. · University of California, San Francisco. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington. · University of Wisconsin, Madison. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Georgia, Athens. · Pima County Department of Health, Tucson, Arizona. · Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Independent consultant, Washington, DC. · Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · Fairfax Family Practice, Fairfax, Virginia13Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · New York University, New York. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California16Stanford University, Stanford, California. · University of Washington, Seattle. · Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. ·JAMA · Pubmed #26813211.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: Update of the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for depression in adults. METHODS: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for depression in adult populations, including older adults and pregnant and postpartum women; the accuracy of depression screening instruments; and the benefits and harms of depression treatment in these populations. POPULATION: This recommendation applies to adults 18 years and older. RECOMMENDATION: The USPSTF recommends screening for depression in the general adult population, including pregnant and postpartum women. Screening should be implemented with adequate systems in place to ensure accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and appropriate follow-up. (B recommendation).

3 Guideline American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. 2016

Runowicz, Carolyn D / Leach, Corinne R / Henry, N Lynn / Henry, Karen S / Mackey, Heather T / Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L / Cannady, Rachel S / Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L / Edge, Stephen B / Jacobs, Linda A / Hurria, Arti / Marks, Lawrence B / LaMonte, Samuel J / Warner, Ellen / Lyman, Gary H / Ganz, Patricia A. ·Carolyn D. Runowicz, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University · Karen S. Henry, Sylvester Cancer Center at the University of Miami, Miami, FL · Corinne R. Leach, Rebecca L. Cowens-Alvarado, Rachel S. Cannady, and Samuel J. LaMonte, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA · N. Lynn Henry, University of Michigan, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI · Heather T. Mackey, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh · Linda A. Jacobs, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA · Mandi L. Pratt-Chapman, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC · Stephen B. Edge, Baptist Cancer Center, Memphis, TN · Arti Hurria, City of Hope, Duarte · Patricia A. Ganz, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA · Lawrence B. Marks, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC · Ellen Warner, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada · and Gary H. Lyman, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA doi: 10.3322/caac.21319. Available online at cacancerjournal.com. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #26644543.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians and Journal of Clinical Oncology. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission by the American Cancer Society or the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

4 Guideline Screening, assessment, and care of anxiety and depressive symptoms in adults with cancer: an American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline adaptation. 2014

Andersen, Barbara L / DeRubeis, Robert J / Berman, Barry S / Gruman, Jessie / Champion, Victoria L / Massie, Mary Jane / Holland, Jimmie C / Partridge, Ann H / Bak, Kate / Somerfield, Mark R / Rowland, Julia H / Anonymous2830791. ·Barbara L. Andersen, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH · Robert J. DeRubeis, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA · Barry S. Berman, Broward Health Medical Center, Fort Lauderdale, FL · Jessie Gruman, Center for Advancing Health, Washington, DC · Victoria L. Champion, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN · Mary Jane Massie, Jimmie C. Holland, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute, New York, NY · Ann H. Partridge, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA · Kate Bak and Mark R. Somerfield, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA · Julia H. Rowland, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #24733793.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: A Pan-Canadian Practice Guideline on Screening, Assessment, and Care of Psychosocial Distress (Depression, Anxiety) in Adults With Cancer was identified for adaptation. METHODS: American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for adapting clinical practice guidelines developed by other organizations. The guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor and content applicability. RESULTS: On the basis of content review of the pan-Canadian guideline, the ASCO panel agreed that, in general, the recommendations were clear, thorough, based on the most relevant scientific evidence, and presented options that will be acceptable to patients. However, for some topics addressed in the pan-Canadian guideline, the ASCO panel formulated a set of adapted recommendations based on local context and practice beliefs of the ad hoc panel members. It is recommended that all patients with cancer be evaluated for symptoms of depression and anxiety at periodic times across the trajectory of care. Assessment should be performed using validated, published measures and procedures. Depending on levels of symptoms and supplementary information, differing treatment pathways are recommended. Failure to identify and treat anxiety and depression increases the risk for poor quality of life and potential disease-related morbidity and mortality. This guideline adaptation is part of a larger survivorship guideline series. CONCLUSION: Although clinicians may not be able to prevent some of the chronic or late medical effects of cancer, they have a vital role in mitigating the negative emotional and behavioral sequelae. Recognizing and treating effectively those who manifest symptoms of anxiety or depression will reduce the human cost of cancer.

5 Guideline Recommendations for high-priority research on cancer-related fatigue in children and adults. 2013

Barsevick, Andrea M / Irwin, Michael R / Hinds, Pamela / Miller, Andrew / Berger, Ann / Jacobsen, Paul / Ancoli-Israel, Sonia / Reeve, Bryce B / Mustian, Karen / O'Mara, Ann / Lai, Jin-Shei / Fisch, Michael / Cella, David / Anonymous520770. ·Affiliations of authors: Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (AMB) · University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (MRI) · Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC (PH) · Emory University, Atlanta, GA (AM) · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (AB) · Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (PJ) · University of California-San Diego, San Diego, CA (SA-I) · University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (RBR) · University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (KM) · National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (AOM) · Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (J-SL, DC) · M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (MF). ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #24047960.

ABSTRACT: Over the past decades, some scientific progress has been made in understanding and treating cancer-related fatigue (CRF). However, three major problems have limited further progress: lack of agreement about measurement, inadequate understanding of the underlying biology, and problems in the conduct of clinical trials for CRF. This commentary reports the recommendations of a National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials Planning Meeting and an ongoing National Cancer Institute working group to address these problems so that high-priority research and clinical trials can be conducted to advance the science of CRF and its treatment. Recommendations to address measurement issues included revising the current case definition to reflect more rigorous criteria, adopting the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System fatigue scales as standard measures of CRF, and linking legacy measures to the scales. With regard to the biology of CRF, the group identified the need for longitudinal research to examine biobehavioral mechanisms underlying CRF and testing mechanistic hypotheses within the context of intervention research. To address clinical trial issues, recommendations included using only placebo-controlled trial designs. setting eligibility to minimize sample heterogeneity or enable subgroup analysis, establishing a CRF severity threshold for participation in clinical trials, conducting dissemination trials of efficacious interventions (such as exercise), and combining nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions to exploit the potential synergy between these approaches. Accomplishing these goals has the potential to advance the science of CRF and improve the clinical management of this troubling symptom.

6 Guideline Screening for depression in adults: U.S. preventive services task force recommendation statement. 2009

Anonymous2730644. ·U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, Maryland, USA. ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #19949144.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: Update of the 2002 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for depression in adults. METHODS: The USPSTF examined evidence on the benefits and harms of screening primary care patients for depression, including direct evidence that depression screening programs improve health outcomes. The USPSTF did not reexamine evidence for those key questions that had strong, consistent evidence in the 2002 review, including questions about the accuracy of screening instruments in identifying depressed adult patients in primary care settings, and the efficacy of treatment of depressed adults with antidepressants or psychotherapy. New areas of evidence considered for this review (and not reviewed in 2002) include efficacy of treatment of depression in older adult patients, harms of screening for depression in primary care settings, and adverse events from treatment of depression in adults. RECOMMENDATIONS: The USPSTF recommends screening adults for depression when staff-assisted depression care supports are in place to assure accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and follow-up. (Grade B recommendation) The USPSTF recommends against routinely screening adults for depression when staff-assisted depression care supports are not in place. There may be considerations that support screening for depression in an individual patient. (Grade C recommendation).

7 Editorial The development of glutamate-based antidepressants is taking longer than expected. 2018

Garay, Ricardo / Zarate, Carlos A / Cavero, Icilio / Kim, Yong-Ku / Charpeaud, Thomas / Skolnick, Phil. ·Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Craven, Villemoisson-sur-Orge, France; CNRS, National Centre of Scientific Research, Paris, France. Electronic address: ricardo.garay@orange.fr. · Experimental Therapeutics and Pathophysiology Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Department of Safety Pharmacology, Craven, Villemoisson-sur-Orge, France. · Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Centre Médico-Psychologique B, CHU, Université d'Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Opiant Pharmaceuticals, Santa Monica, CA, USA. ·Drug Discov Today · Pubmed #29501913.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Botulinum Toxin: Does it have a Place in the Management of Depression? 2018

Rudorfer, Matthew V. ·Treatment and Preventive Interventions Research Branch, Division of Services and Intervention Research, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892-9629, USA. mrudorfe@mail.nih.gov. ·CNS Drugs · Pubmed #29498020.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Programs for Preventing Depression in Adolescence: Who Benefits and Who Does Not? An Introduction to the Supplemental Issue. 2018

Howe, George W / Pantin, Hilda / Perrino, Tatiana. ·Department of Psychology, George Washington University, 2125 G Street NW, Washington, DC, 20052, USA. ghowe@gwu.edu. · Division of Prevention Sciences and Community Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA. ·Prev Sci · Pubmed #29368296.

ABSTRACT: We introduce this supplemental issue of Prevention Science, which brings together a set of papers from leading investigators who have conducted trials testing whether intervention programs prevent adolescent depression. Using data from these trials, these papers explore a series of factors that might account for variation in intervention benefit, employing several novel methods for assessing effect heterogeneity. These studies follow two general paradigms: three papers report findings from single randomized preventive intervention trials, while the remaining papers develop and apply new methods for combining data from multiple studies to evaluate effect heterogeneity more broadly. Colleagues from NIMH and SAMHSA also provide commentaries on these studies. They conclude that synthesis of findings from multiple trials holds great promise for advancing the field, and progress will be accelerated if collaborative data sharing becomes the norm rather than the exception.

10 Editorial The Good News About Preventing Adolescent Depression. 2018

Del Vecchio, Paolo. ·Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockville, MD, USA. paolo.delvecchio@samhsa.hhs.gov. ·Prev Sci · Pubmed #29313163.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Strength in Numbers. 2018

Goldstein, Amy B / Avenevoli, Shelli. ·MedStar Health Research Institute, Hyattsville, MD, USA. · National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. avenevos@mail.nih.gov. ·Prev Sci · Pubmed #29222616.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Time for Networks. 2017

DePaulo, J Raymond / McDonald, William M. ·From the *Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; †National Network of Depression Centers, Ann Arbor, MI; and ‡Department of Psychiatry, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. ·J ECT · Pubmed #29190223.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Perimenopausal depression and early menopause: cause or consequence? 2017

Reding, Katherine M / Schmidt, Peter J / Rubinow, David R. ·Behavioral Endocrinology Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD Department of Psychiatry, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC. ·Menopause · Pubmed #29040218.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial An Ounce of Prevention? 2017

Ashar, Bimal H. ·Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 601 North Caroline Street, #7143, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. Electronic address: Bashar1@jhmi.edu. ·Med Clin North Am · Pubmed #28577630.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial The Importance of Earnest (Exercise). 2016

Talbott, John A. ·Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. ·J Nerv Ment Dis · Pubmed #27570897.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Hard-Wired Bias: How Even Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trials Can Be Skewed From the Start. 2015

Prasad, Vinay / Berger, Vance W. ·Medical Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. Electronic address: vinayak.prasad@nih.gov. · University of Maryland Baltimore County, Biometry Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD. ·Mayo Clin Proc · Pubmed #26277702.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Measuring the Long-term Impact of War-Zone Military Service Across Generations and Changing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Definitions. 2015

Hoge, Charles W. ·Center for Psychiatry and Neuroscience, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, Maryland. ·JAMA Psychiatry · Pubmed #26200673.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Child development and maternal wellbeing: family perspectives for low-income and middle-income countries. 2015

Black, Maureen M / Surkan, Pamela J. ·Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: mblack@peds.umaryland.edu. · Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA. ·Lancet Glob Health · Pubmed #26144388.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Effect of Treating Mothers' Depression on Children's Well-Being. 2015

Coiro, Mary Jo. ·From the Department of Psychology, Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore. ·Am J Psychiatry · Pubmed #25930128.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Getting to the roots: early life intervention and adult health. 2015

Bullock, Ann. ·From the Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention, Indian Health Service, Rockville, Md. ·Am J Psychiatry · Pubmed #25640927.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Posttraumatic stress symptoms in critical illness survivors: yet another reason they matter?*. 2014

Bienvenu, O Joseph. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. ·Crit Care Med · Pubmed #25402281.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial What is hydroxynorketamine and what can it bring to neurotherapeutics? 2014

Singh, Nagendra S / Zarate, Carlos A / Moaddel, Ruin / Bernier, Michel / Wainer, Irving W. ·Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD , USA. ·Expert Rev Neurother · Pubmed #25331415.

ABSTRACT: (R,S)-Ketamine was initially developed as an anesthetic agent and its pharmacological properties were determined on the basis of this clinical use. However, pharmacological studies in rat led to the development of the 'Ketamine Paradigm', whereby (R,S)-ketamine and its N-demethylated metabolite (R,S)-norketamine were deemed the active compounds whereas the other ketamine metabolites were considered inactive. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies with (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine, a previously identified 'inactive' metabolite, have demonstrated that this compound is an active and selective inhibitor of the α7 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and that this activity contributes to the pharmacological responses associated with the antidepressant activity of (R,S)-ketamine. Thus, it appears that it is necessary to reassess the 'Ketamine Paradigm' in regards to the use of sub-anesthetic doses of (R,S)-ketamine in the treatment of treatment-resistant depression.

23 Editorial A practical and effective primary care intervention for treating adolescent depression. 2014

Reeves, Gloria M / Riddle, Mark A. ·Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore. · Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. ·JAMA · Pubmed #25157722.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial A possible association between SSRI drugs and alcohol dependence. 2014

Kruszewski, Stefan P. ·Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Medical School, Baltimore, MD, USA. ·Int J Risk Saf Med · Pubmed #24902501.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial Current perspective on mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia. 2014

Krantz, David S / Burg, Matthew M. ·Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Uniformed Services, University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. ·Psychosom Med · Pubmed #24677165.

ABSTRACT: Mental stress and emotional arousal can act as triggers of myocardial infarction and other adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This editorial presents an overview of the research on mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) and comments on two investigations examining MSIMI published in this journal. These studies confirm that MSIMI is frequently observed in patients with coronary artery disease and that characteristics, such as being a woman younger than 50 years and depression, may increase the relative risk of MSIMI. The method used for determining MSIMI (i.e., assessing cardiac function as determined by echocardiography versus measurement of myocardial perfusion using single-photon emission computed tomography), as well as the nature of the mental stress protocols (i.e., one stress task versus several repeated tasks), may have important effects on the findings of MSIMI research and on their interpretation. An overview of clinical characteristics of MSIMI is presented, and the article concludes with possible directions for future MSIMI research.

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