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Depression: HELP
Articles from Washington area
Based on 3,923 articles published since 2009
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These are the 3923 published articles about Depression that originated from Washington area during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

2 Guideline Guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of perimenopausal depression: summary and recommendations. 2018

Maki, Pauline M / Kornstein, Susan G / Joffe, Hadine / Bromberger, Joyce T / Freeman, Ellen W / Athappilly, Geena / Bobo, William V / Rubin, Leah H / Koleva, Hristina K / Cohen, Lee S / Soares, Claudio N / Anonymous2691534. ·Departments of Psychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago IL USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Institute of Women's Health, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA USA. · Connors Center for Women's Health and Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital, Bedford MA. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD USA. · University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Queen's University School of Medicine, Ontario CA. ·Menopause · Pubmed #30179986.

ABSTRACT: There is a new appreciation of the perimenopause - defined as the early and late menopause transition stages as well as the early postmenopause - as a window of vulnerability for the development of both depressive symptoms and major depressive episodes. However, clinical recommendations on how to identify, characterize and treat clinical depression are lacking. To address this gap, an expert panel was convened to systematically review the published literature and develop guidelines on the evaluation and management of perimenopausal depression. The areas addressed included: 1) epidemiology; 2) clinical presentation; 3) therapeutic effects of antidepressants; 4) effects of hormone therapy; and 5) efficacy of other therapies (eg, psychotherapy, exercise, and natural health products). Overall, evidence generally suggests that most midlife women who experience a major depressive episode during the perimenopause have experienced a prior episode of depression. Midlife depression presents with classic depressive symptoms commonly in combination with menopause symptoms (ie, vasomotor symptoms, sleep disturbance), and psychosocial challenges. Menopause symptoms complicate, co-occur, and overlap with the presentation of depression. Diagnosis involves identification of menopausal stage, assessment of co-occurring psychiatric and menopause symptoms, appreciation of the psychosocial factors common in midlife, differential diagnoses, and the use of validated screening instruments. Proven therapeutic options for depression (ie, antidepressants, psychotherapy) are the front-line treatments for perimenopausal depression. Although estrogen therapy is not approved to treat perimenopausal depression, there is evidence that it has antidepressant effects in perimenopausal women, particularly those with concomitant vasomotor symptoms. Data on estrogen plus progestin are sparse and inconclusive.

3 Guideline Integrative Therapies During and After Breast Cancer Treatment: ASCO Endorsement of the SIO Clinical Practice Guideline. 2018

Lyman, Gary H / Greenlee, Heather / Bohlke, Kari / Bao, Ting / DeMichele, Angela M / Deng, Gary E / Fouladbakhsh, Judith M / Gil, Brigitte / Hershman, Dawn L / Mansfield, Sami / Mussallem, Dawn M / Mustian, Karen M / Price, Erin / Rafte, Susan / Cohen, Lorenzo. ·Gary H. Lyman and Heather Greenlee, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and University of Washington, Seattle, WA · Kari Bohlke, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA · Ting Bao and Gary E. Deng, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center · Dawn L. Hershman, Columbia University Medical Center, New York · Karen M. Mustian, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY · Angela M. DeMichele, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA · Judith M. Fouladbakhsh, Oakland University, Rochester, MI · Brigitte Gil, Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Burlington, MA · Sami Mansfield, Cancer Wellness for Life, Shawnee, KS · Sarah Cannon Cancer Institute, Kansas City, MO · Dawn M. Mussallem, The Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL · Erin Price, Smith Center for Healing and the Arts, Washington, DC · Susan Rafte, Houston, TX · and Lorenzo Cohen, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #29889605.

ABSTRACT: Purpose The Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO) produced an evidence-based guideline on use of integrative therapies during and after breast cancer treatment that was determined to be relevant to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) membership. ASCO considered the guideline for endorsement. Methods The SIO guideline addressed the use of integrative therapies for the management of symptoms and adverse effects, such as anxiety and stress, mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Interventions of interest included mind and body practices, natural products, and lifestyle modifications. SIO systematic reviews focused on randomized controlled trials that were published from 1990 through 2015. The SIO guideline was reviewed by ASCO content experts for clinical accuracy and by ASCO methodologists for developmental rigor. On favorable review, an ASCO Expert Panel was convened to review the guideline contents and recommendations. Results The ASCO Expert Panel determined that the recommendations in the SIO guideline-published in 2017-are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the guideline with a few added discussion points. Recommendations Key recommendations include the following: Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-l-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy because of a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related adverse effects. Additional information is available at: www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines .

4 Guideline Practical Assessment and Management of Vulnerabilities in Older Patients Receiving Chemotherapy: ASCO Guideline for Geriatric Oncology. 2018

Mohile, Supriya G / Dale, William / Somerfield, Mark R / Schonberg, Mara A / Boyd, Cynthia M / Burhenn, Peggy S / Canin, Beverly / Cohen, Harvey Jay / Holmes, Holly M / Hopkins, Judith O / Janelsins, Michelle C / Khorana, Alok A / Klepin, Heidi D / Lichtman, Stuart M / Mustian, Karen M / Tew, William P / Hurria, Arti. ·Supriya G. Mohile, Michelle C. Janelsins, and Karen M. Mustian, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester · Beverly Canin, Breast Cancer Options, Kingston · Stuart M. Lichtman and William P. Tew, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY · William Dale, Peggy S. Burhenn, and Arti Hurria, City of Hope, Duarte, CA · Mark R. Somerfield, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA · Mara A. Schonberg, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brookline, MA · Cynthia M. Boyd, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD · Harvey Jay Cohen, Duke University Medical Center, Durham · Judith O. Hopkins, Novant Health Oncology Specialists · Heidi D. Klepin, Wake Forest Baptist Comprehensive Cancer Center, Winston-Salem, NC · Holly M. Holmes, McGovern Medical School, Houston, TX · and Alok A. Khorana, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #29782209.

ABSTRACT: Purpose To provide guidance regarding the practical assessment and management of vulnerabilities in older patients undergoing chemotherapy. Methods An Expert Panel was convened to develop clinical practice guideline recommendations based on a systematic review of the medical literature. Results A total of 68 studies met eligibility criteria and form the evidentiary basis for the recommendations. Recommendations In patients ≥ 65 years receiving chemotherapy, geriatric assessment (GA) should be used to identify vulnerabilities that are not routinely captured in oncology assessments. Evidence supports, at a minimum, assessment of function, comorbidity, falls, depression, cognition, and nutrition. The Panel recommends instrumental activities of daily living to assess for function, a thorough history or validated tool to assess comorbidity, a single question for falls, the Geriatric Depression Scale to screen for depression, the Mini-Cog or the Blessed Orientation-Memory-Concentration test to screen for cognitive impairment, and an assessment of unintentional weight loss to evaluate nutrition. Either the CARG (Cancer and Aging Research Group) or CRASH (Chemotherapy Risk Assessment Scale for High-Age Patients) tools are recommended to obtain estimates of chemotherapy toxicity risk; the Geriatric-8 or Vulnerable Elders Survey-13 can help to predict mortality. Clinicians should use a validated tool listed at ePrognosis to estimate noncancer-based life expectancy ≥ 4 years. GA results should be applied to develop an integrated and individualized plan that informs cancer management and to identify nononcologic problems amenable to intervention. Collaborating with caregivers is essential to implementing GA-guided interventions. The Panel suggests that clinicians take into account GA results when recommending chemotherapy and that the information be provided to patients and caregivers to guide treatment decision making. Clinicians should implement targeted, GA-guided interventions to manage nononcologic problems. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines .

5 Guideline Deprescribing benzodiazepine receptor agonists: Evidence-based clinical practice guideline. 2018

Pottie, Kevin / Thompson, Wade / Davies, Simon / Grenier, Jean / Sadowski, Cheryl A / Welch, Vivian / Holbrook, Anne / Boyd, Cynthia / Swenson, Robert / Ma, Andy / Farrell, Barbara. ·Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and the Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine at the Bruyère Research Institute at the University of Ottawa in Ontario. kpottie@uottawa.ca. · Master's student in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Ottawa at the time of guideline development. · Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto in Ontario and Clinician Scientist and staff psychiatrist in the Geriatric Psychiatry Division at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto. · Clinician Investigator in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Ottawa and Clinical Scientist at the C.T. Lamont Centre for Primary Health Care Research of the Bruyère Research Institute. · Professor in the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. · Director of the Methods Centre at the Bruyère Research Institute and Assistant Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Ottawa at the time of guideline development. · Director of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Professor in the Department of Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, and Senior Scientist at the Centre for Evaluation of Medicines of St Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton. · Professor in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, MD. · Psychiatrist at the Ottawa Hospital and Full Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Ottawa. · Pharmacy resident at the Ottawa Hospital. · Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Ottawa, Adjunct Assistant Professor in the School of Pharmacy at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, and Scientist at the Bruyère Research Institute. ·Can Fam Physician · Pubmed #29760253.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop an evidence-based guideline to help clinicians make decisions about when and how to safely taper and stop benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BZRAs); to focus on the highest level of evidence available and seek input from primary care professionals in the guideline development, review, and endorsement processes. METHODS: The overall team comprised 8 clinicians (1 family physician, 2 psychiatrists, 1 clinical psychologist, 1 clinical pharmacologist, 2 clinical pharmacists, and 1 geriatrician) and a methodologist; members disclosed conflicts of interest. For guideline development, a systematic process was used, including the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. Evidence was generated by conducting a systematic review of BZRA deprescribing trials for insomnia, as well as performing a review of reviews of the harms of continued BZRA use and narrative syntheses of patient preferences and resource implications. This evidence and GRADE quality of evidence ratings were used to generate recommendations. The team refined guideline content and recommendations through consensus and synthesized clinical considerations to address front-line clinician questions. The draft guideline was reviewed by clinicians and stakeholders. RECOMMENDATIONS: We recommend that deprescribing (tapering slowly) of BZRAs be offered to elderly adults (≥ 65 years) who take BZRAs, regardless of duration of use, and suggest that deprescribing (tapering slowly) be offered to adults aged 18 to 64 who have used BZRAs for more than 4 weeks. These recommendations apply to patients who use BZRAs to treat insomnia on its own (primary insomnia) or comorbid insomnia where potential underlying comorbidities are effectively managed. This guideline does not apply to those with other sleep disorders or untreated anxiety, depression, or other physical or mental health conditions that might be causing or aggravating insomnia. CONCLUSION: Benzodiazepine receptor agonists are associated with harms, and therapeutic effects might be short term. Tapering BZRAs improves cessation rates compared with usual care without serious harms. Patients might be more amenable to deprescribing conversations if they understand the rationale (potential for harm), are involved in developing the tapering plan, and are offered behavioural advice. This guideline provides recommendations for making decisions about when and how to reduce and stop BZRAs. Recommendations are meant to assist with, not dictate, decision making in conjunction with patients.

6 Guideline Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) and International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) 2018 guidelines for the management of patients with bipolar disorder. 2018

Yatham, Lakshmi N / Kennedy, Sidney H / Parikh, Sagar V / Schaffer, Ayal / Bond, David J / Frey, Benicio N / Sharma, Verinder / Goldstein, Benjamin I / Rej, Soham / Beaulieu, Serge / Alda, Martin / MacQueen, Glenda / Milev, Roumen V / Ravindran, Arun / O'Donovan, Claire / McIntosh, Diane / Lam, Raymond W / Vazquez, Gustavo / Kapczinski, Flavio / McIntyre, Roger S / Kozicky, Jan / Kanba, Shigenobu / Lafer, Beny / Suppes, Trisha / Calabrese, Joseph R / Vieta, Eduard / Malhi, Gin / Post, Robert M / Berk, Michael. ·Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. · Departments of Psychiatry and Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Western University, London, ON, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. · Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. · School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Department of Neuropsychiatry, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Bipolar and Depression Research Program, VA Palo Alto, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Bipolar Unit, Institute of Neuroscience, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERSAM, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. · Deakin Univeristy, IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, School of Medicine, Barwon Health, Geelong, Vic., Australia. ·Bipolar Disord · Pubmed #29536616.

ABSTRACT: The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) previously published treatment guidelines for bipolar disorder in 2005, along with international commentaries and subsequent updates in 2007, 2009, and 2013. The last two updates were published in collaboration with the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD). These 2018 CANMAT and ISBD Bipolar Treatment Guidelines represent the significant advances in the field since the last full edition was published in 2005, including updates to diagnosis and management as well as new research into pharmacological and psychological treatments. These advances have been translated into clear and easy to use recommendations for first, second, and third- line treatments, with consideration given to levels of evidence for efficacy, clinical support based on experience, and consensus ratings of safety, tolerability, and treatment-emergent switch risk. New to these guidelines, hierarchical rankings were created for first and second- line treatments recommended for acute mania, acute depression, and maintenance treatment in bipolar I disorder. Created by considering the impact of each treatment across all phases of illness, this hierarchy will further assist clinicians in making evidence-based treatment decisions. Lithium, quetiapine, divalproex, asenapine, aripiprazole, paliperidone, risperidone, and cariprazine alone or in combination are recommended as first-line treatments for acute mania. First-line options for bipolar I depression include quetiapine, lurasidone plus lithium or divalproex, lithium, lamotrigine, lurasidone, or adjunctive lamotrigine. While medications that have been shown to be effective for the acute phase should generally be continued for the maintenance phase in bipolar I disorder, there are some exceptions (such as with antidepressants); and available data suggest that lithium, quetiapine, divalproex, lamotrigine, asenapine, and aripiprazole monotherapy or combination treatments should be considered first-line for those initiating or switching treatment during the maintenance phase. In addition to addressing issues in bipolar I disorder, these guidelines also provide an overview of, and recommendations for, clinical management of bipolar II disorder, as well as advice on specific populations, such as women at various stages of the reproductive cycle, children and adolescents, and older adults. There are also discussions on the impact of specific psychiatric and medical comorbidities such as substance use, anxiety, and metabolic disorders. Finally, an overview of issues related to safety and monitoring is provided. The CANMAT and ISBD groups hope that these guidelines become a valuable tool for practitioners across the globe.

7 Guideline Consensus Recommendations for the Clinical Application of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in the Treatment of Depression. 2018

McClintock, Shawn M / Reti, Irving M / Carpenter, Linda L / McDonald, William M / Dubin, Marc / Taylor, Stephan F / Cook, Ian A / O'Reardon, John / Husain, Mustafa M / Wall, Christopher / Krystal, Andrew D / Sampson, Shirlene M / Morales, Oscar / Nelson, Brent G / Latoussakis, Vassilios / George, Mark S / Lisanby, Sarah H / Anonymous1321283 / Anonymous1331283. ·Department of Psychiatry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75390-8898. shawn.mcclintock@utsouthwestern.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. · Division of Brain Stimulation and Neurophysiology, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Butler Hospital, Brown Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College, White Plains, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Bioengineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rowan University School of Medicine, Stratford, New Jersey, USA. · PrarieCare, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Psychiatric Neurotherapeutics Program, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, St Louis Park, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. · Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. ·J Clin Psychiatry · Pubmed #28541649.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide expert recommendations for the safe and effective application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). PARTICIPANTS: Participants included a group of 17 expert clinicians and researchers with expertise in the clinical application of rTMS, representing both the National Network of Depression Centers (NNDC) rTMS Task Group and the American Psychiatric Association Council on Research (APA CoR) Task Force on Novel Biomarkers and Treatments. EVIDENCE: The consensus statement is based on a review of extensive literature from 2 databases (OvidSP MEDLINE and PsycINFO) searched from 1990 through 2016. The search terms included variants of major depressive disorder and transcranial magnetic stimulation. The results were limited to articles written in English that focused on adult populations. Of the approximately 1,500 retrieved studies, a total of 118 publications were included in the consensus statement and were supplemented with expert opinion to achieve consensus recommendations on key issues surrounding the administration of rTMS for MDD in clinical practice settings. CONSENSUS PROCESS: In cases in which the research evidence was equivocal or unclear, a consensus decision on how rTMS should be administered was reached by the authors of this article and is denoted in the article as "expert opinion." CONCLUSIONS: Multiple randomized controlled trials and published literature have supported the safety and efficacy of rTMS antidepressant therapy. These consensus recommendations, developed by the NNDC rTMS Task Group and APA CoR Task Force on Novel Biomarkers and Treatments, provide comprehensive information for the safe and effective clinical application of rTMS in the treatment of MDD.

8 Guideline American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. 2016

Cohen, Ezra E W / LaMonte, Samuel J / Erb, Nicole L / Beckman, Kerry L / Sadeghi, Nader / Hutcheson, Katherine A / Stubblefield, Michael D / Abbott, Dennis M / Fisher, Penelope S / Stein, Kevin D / Lyman, Gary H / Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L. ·Medical Oncologist, Moores Cancer Center, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA. · Retired Head and Neck Surgeon, Former Associate Professor of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Louisiana State University Health and Science Center, New Orleans, LA. · Program Manager, National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Research Analyst-Survivorship, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Professor of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Cancer Surgery, and Director of Head and Neck Surgical Oncology, George Washington University, Washington, DC. · Associate Professor, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Section of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · Medical Director for Cancer Rehabilitation, Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, West Orange, NJ. · Chief Executive Officer, Dental Oncology Professionals, Garland, TX. · Clinical Instructor of Otolaryngology and Nurse, Miller School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Miami, Miami, FL. · Vice President, Behavioral Research, and Director, Behavioral Research Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Co-Director, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Professor of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. · Director, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC. ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #27002678.

ABSTRACT: Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

9 Guideline Screening for Depression in Adults: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2016

Siu, Albert L / Anonymous2730856 / Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten / Grossman, David C / Baumann, Linda Ciofu / Davidson, Karina W / Ebell, Mark / García, Francisco A R / Gillman, Matthew / Herzstein, Jessica / Kemper, Alex R / Krist, Alex H / Kurth, Ann E / Owens, Douglas K / Phillips, William R / Phipps, Maureen G / Pignone, Michael P. ·Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York2James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, New York. · University of California, San Francisco. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington. · University of Wisconsin, Madison. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Georgia, Athens. · Pima County Department of Health, Tucson, Arizona. · Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Independent consultant, Washington, DC. · Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · Fairfax Family Practice, Fairfax, Virginia13Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · New York University, New York. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California16Stanford University, Stanford, California. · University of Washington, Seattle. · Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. ·JAMA · Pubmed #26813211.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: Update of the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for depression in adults. METHODS: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for depression in adult populations, including older adults and pregnant and postpartum women; the accuracy of depression screening instruments; and the benefits and harms of depression treatment in these populations. POPULATION: This recommendation applies to adults 18 years and older. RECOMMENDATION: The USPSTF recommends screening for depression in the general adult population, including pregnant and postpartum women. Screening should be implemented with adequate systems in place to ensure accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and appropriate follow-up. (B recommendation).

10 Guideline American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. 2016

Runowicz, Carolyn D / Leach, Corinne R / Henry, N Lynn / Henry, Karen S / Mackey, Heather T / Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L / Cannady, Rachel S / Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L / Edge, Stephen B / Jacobs, Linda A / Hurria, Arti / Marks, Lawrence B / LaMonte, Samuel J / Warner, Ellen / Lyman, Gary H / Ganz, Patricia A. ·Carolyn D. Runowicz, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University · Karen S. Henry, Sylvester Cancer Center at the University of Miami, Miami, FL · Corinne R. Leach, Rebecca L. Cowens-Alvarado, Rachel S. Cannady, and Samuel J. LaMonte, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA · N. Lynn Henry, University of Michigan, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI · Heather T. Mackey, Oncology Nursing Society, Pittsburgh · Linda A. Jacobs, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA · Mandi L. Pratt-Chapman, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC · Stephen B. Edge, Baptist Cancer Center, Memphis, TN · Arti Hurria, City of Hope, Duarte · Patricia A. Ganz, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA · Lawrence B. Marks, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC · Ellen Warner, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada · and Gary H. Lyman, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA doi: 10.3322/caac.21319. Available online at cacancerjournal.com. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #26644543.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians and Journal of Clinical Oncology. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission by the American Cancer Society or the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

11 Editorial Digital Phenotyping With Mobile and Wearable Devices: Advanced Symptom Measurement in Child and Adolescent Depression. 2019

Sequeira, Lydia / Battaglia, Marco / Perrotta, Steve / Merikangas, Kathleen / Strauss, John. ·Cundill Centre for Child and Youth Depression, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada; Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cundill Centre for Child and Youth Depression, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada; University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cundill Centre for Child and Youth Depression, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Genetic Epidemiology Research Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD. · Cundill Centre for Child and Youth Depression, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada; Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: john.strauss@camh.ca. ·J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry · Pubmed #31445619.

ABSTRACT: With an estimated 75% of all mental disorders beginning in the first two decades of life,

12 Editorial Editorial: Brain and Somatization Symptoms in Psychiatric Disorders. 2019

Fu, Xiaoya / Zhang, Fengyu / Liu, Feng / Yan, Chaogan / Guo, Wenbin. ·Department of Psychiatry, The Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, China. · The Global Clinical and Translational Research Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States. · Peking University Huilongguan Clinical Medical School and Beijing Huilongguan Hospital, Beijing, China. · Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, China. · Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Center, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. ·Front Psychiatry · Pubmed #30984040.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Commentary on "Depression Predicts Delirium After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery Independent of Cognitive Impairment and Cerebrovascular Disease: An Analysis of the Neuropsychiatric Outcomes After Heart Surgery Study". 2019

Chan, Carol K / Neufeld, Karin J. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (CKC, KJN), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: cchan46@jhmi.edu. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (CKC, KJN), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. ·Am J Geriatr Psychiatry · Pubmed #30777638.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Probing the Irritability-Suicidality Nexus. 2019

Stringaris, Argyris / Vidal-Ribas, Pablo. ·Mood Brain & Development Unit, Emotion and Development Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. Electronic address: argyris.stringaris@nih.gov. · Mood Brain & Development Unit, Emotion and Development Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. ·J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry · Pubmed #30577933.

ABSTRACT: Suicide is a major public health concern.

15 Editorial Associations of TBI, PTSD, and depression with dementia risk among female military veterans: Not just men. 2019

Schneider, Andrea L C / Ling, Geoffrey. ·From Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore; and Department of Neurology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD. ·Neurology · Pubmed #30541868.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Neuromodulation: Past, Present, and Future. 2019

Becker, Jonathan Essary / Maley, Christopher Todd / Shultz, Elizabeth K B / Peters, Todd E. ·Vanderbilt University Medical School, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 1601 23rd Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37212, USA. Electronic address: jonathan.e.becker@vumc.org. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 1601 23rd Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37212, USA. Electronic address: christopher.maley@vumc.org. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 1601 23rd Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37212, USA. Electronic address: elizabeth.shultz@vumc.org. · Child and Adolescent Services, Sheppard Pratt Health System, 6501 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21204, USA. Electronic address: tpeters@sheppardpratt.org. ·Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am · Pubmed #30389080.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Population-Based Estimates of Heritability Shed New Light on Clinical Features of Major Depression. 2018

McMahon, Francis J. ·From the Genetic Basis of Mood and Anxiety Disorders Section, Human Genetics Branch, NIMH Intramural Research Program, NIH, Bethesda, Md. ·Am J Psychiatry · Pubmed #30380936.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Parental Psychiatric Symptoms and Children's Outcomes: Toward Understanding and Responding to Intergenerational Risk in Child Psychiatry. 2018

Biel, Matthew G. ·Georgetown University Medical Center/MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC. Electronic address: mgb101@gunet.georgetown.edu. ·J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry · Pubmed #30196865.

ABSTRACT: Family history of psychiatric illness is a core feature of any competent clinical history taken in a child and adolescent psychiatry clinical setting, and this history is often limited to reviewing caregivers' reports of diagnosed or suspected mental disorders in biological parents and relatives across several generations. Less commonly included is a detailed inquiry into parents' and caregivers' current mental health, including psychiatric symptoms at the time that their child is presenting for evaluation. Recent evidence is a strong reminder that parental mental illness is an important adversity that critically affects lifelong mental well-being in offspring, and that maternal depression in particular is an established factor influencing offspring mental health.

19 Editorial Recent Findings of the Comparative Efficacy and Tolerability of Antidepressants for Major Depressive Disorder: Do We Now Know What to Prescribe? 2018

Rudorfer, Matthew V. ·Treatment and Preventive Interventions Research Branch, Division of Services and Intervention Research (DSIR), National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Blvd, Room 7137, Bethesda, MD, 20892-9629, USA. mrudorfe@mail.nih.gov. ·CNS Drugs · Pubmed #30187214.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Possibly no baseline severity effect for antidepressants versus placebo but for antipsychotics. Why? 2018

Leucht, Stefan / Levine, S Z / Samara, M / Cipriani, A / Davis, J M / Furukawa, T A. ·Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Technische Universität München, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Ismaningerstr. 22, 81675, Munich, Germany. Stefan.Leucht@tum.de. · Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. Stefan.Leucht@tum.de. · University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Technische Universität München, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Ismaningerstr. 22, 81675, Munich, Germany. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Psychiatric Institute, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. · Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan. ·Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci · Pubmed #30178421.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial The Workforce Shortage of Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists: Is It Time for a Different Approach? 2018

Findling, Robert L / Stepanova, Ekaterina. ·Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: rfindli1@jhmi.edu. · Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. ·J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry · Pubmed #29706155.

ABSTRACT: Psychiatric disorders affect a large number of children around the world. Recent data have reported that approximately 10% to 13% of children have a serious emotional disturbance with significant functional impairment, suggesting that at least 1 in 10 children require mental health services.

22 Editorial The development of glutamate-based antidepressants is taking longer than expected. 2018

Garay, Ricardo / Zarate, Carlos A / Cavero, Icilio / Kim, Yong-Ku / Charpeaud, Thomas / Skolnick, Phil. ·Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Craven, Villemoisson-sur-Orge, France; CNRS, National Centre of Scientific Research, Paris, France. Electronic address: ricardo.garay@orange.fr. · Experimental Therapeutics and Pathophysiology Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Department of Safety Pharmacology, Craven, Villemoisson-sur-Orge, France. · Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Centre Médico-Psychologique B, CHU, Université d'Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Opiant Pharmaceuticals, Santa Monica, CA, USA. ·Drug Discov Today · Pubmed #29501913.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial Botulinum Toxin: Does it have a Place in the Management of Depression? 2018

Rudorfer, Matthew V. ·Treatment and Preventive Interventions Research Branch, Division of Services and Intervention Research, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892-9629, USA. mrudorfe@mail.nih.gov. ·CNS Drugs · Pubmed #29498020.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial Programs for Preventing Depression in Adolescence: Who Benefits and Who Does Not? An Introduction to the Supplemental Issue. 2018

Howe, George W / Pantin, Hilda / Perrino, Tatiana. ·Department of Psychology, George Washington University, 2125 G Street NW, Washington, DC, 20052, USA. ghowe@gwu.edu. · Division of Prevention Sciences and Community Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA. ·Prev Sci · Pubmed #29368296.

ABSTRACT: We introduce this supplemental issue of Prevention Science, which brings together a set of papers from leading investigators who have conducted trials testing whether intervention programs prevent adolescent depression. Using data from these trials, these papers explore a series of factors that might account for variation in intervention benefit, employing several novel methods for assessing effect heterogeneity. These studies follow two general paradigms: three papers report findings from single randomized preventive intervention trials, while the remaining papers develop and apply new methods for combining data from multiple studies to evaluate effect heterogeneity more broadly. Colleagues from NIMH and SAMHSA also provide commentaries on these studies. They conclude that synthesis of findings from multiple trials holds great promise for advancing the field, and progress will be accelerated if collaborative data sharing becomes the norm rather than the exception.

25 Editorial The Good News About Preventing Adolescent Depression. 2018

Del Vecchio, Paolo. ·Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockville, MD, USA. paolo.delvecchio@samhsa.hhs.gov. ·Prev Sci · Pubmed #29313163.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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