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Diabetes Mellitus HELP
Based on 100,000 articles published since 2007
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These are the 100000 published articles about Diabetes Mellitus that originated from Worldwide during 2007-2018.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY 2018 POSITION STATEMENT ON INTEGRATION OF INSULIN PUMPS AND CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITORING IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS. 2018

Grunberger, George / Handelsman, Yehuda / Bloomgarden, Zachary T / Fonseca, Vivian A / Garber, Alan J / Haas, Richard A / Roberts, Victor L / Umpierrez, Guillermo E. · ·Endocr Pract · Pubmed #29547046.

ABSTRACT: This document represents the official position of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology. Where there are no randomized controlled trials or specific U.S. FDA labeling for issues in clinical practice, the participating clinical experts utilized their judgment and experience. Every effort was made to achieve consensus among the committee members. Position statements are meant to provide guidance, but they are not to be considered prescriptive for any individual patient and cannot replace the judgment of a clinician. AACE/ACE Task Force on Integration of Insulin Pumps and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in the Management of Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Chair George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE Task Force Members Yehuda Handelsman, MD, FACP, FNLA, MACE Zachary T. Bloomgarden, MD, MACE Vivian A. Fonseca, MD, FACE Alan J. Garber, MD, PhD, FACE Richard A. Haas, MD, FACE Victor L. Roberts, MD, MBA, FACP, FACE Guillermo E. Umpierrez, MD, CDE, FACP, FACE Abbreviations: AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists ACE = American College of Endocrinology A1C = glycated hemoglobin BGM = blood glucose monitoring CGM = continuous glucose monitoring CSII = continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion DM = diabetes mellitus FDA = Food & Drug Administration MDI = multiple daily injections T1DM = type 1 diabetes mellitus T2DM = type 2 diabetes mellitus SAP = sensor-augmented pump SMBG = self-monitoring of blood glucose STAR 3 = Sensor-Augmented Pump Therapy for A1C Reduction phase 3 trial.

2 Guideline Claimed effects, outcome variables and methods of measurement for health claims proposed under European Community Regulation 1924/2006 in the area of blood glucose and insulin concentrations. 2018

Martini, Daniela / Biasini, Beatrice / Zavaroni, Ivana / Bedogni, Giorgio / Musci, Marilena / Pruneti, Carlo / Passeri, Giovanni / Ventura, Marco / Galli, Daniela / Mirandola, Prisco / Vitale, Marco / Dei Cas, Alessandra / Bonadonna, Riccardo C / Del Rio, Daniele. ·The Laboratory of Phytochemicals in Physiology, Department of Food and Drug, University of Parma, Medical School, Building A, Via Volturno 39, 43125, Parma, Italy. · The Laboratory of Phytochemicals in Physiology, Department of Food Science, University of Parma, Medical School, Building A, Via Volturno 39, 43125, Parma, Italy. · Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria of Parma, Parma, Italy. · Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Liver Research Center, Basovizza, Trieste, Italy. · Department of Food and Drug, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · Department of Medicine and Surgery, Clinical Psychology Unit, University of Parma, Medical School Building, Parma, Italy. · Department of Medicine and Surgery, Building Clinica Medica Generale, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · Laboratory of Probiogenomics, Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · Department of Medicine and Surgery, Sport and Exercise Medicine Centre (SEM), University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · The Laboratory of Phytochemicals in Physiology, Department of Food and Drug, University of Parma, Medical School, Building A, Via Volturno 39, 43125, Parma, Italy. daniele.delrio@unipr.it. ·Acta Diabetol · Pubmed #29383587.

ABSTRACT: Most requests for authorization to bear health claims under Articles 13(5) and 14 related to blood glucose and insulin concentration/regulation presented to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) receive a negative opinion. Reasons for such decisions are mainly ascribable to poor substantiation of the claimed effects. In this scenario, a project was carried out aiming at critically analysing the outcome variables (OVs) and methods of measurement (MMs) to be used to substantiate health claims, with the final purpose to improve the quality of applications provided by stakeholders to EFSA. This manuscript provides a position statement of the experts involved in the project, reporting the results of an investigation aimed to collect, collate and critically analyse the information relevant to claimed effects (CEs), OVs and MMs related to blood glucose and insulin levels and homoeostasis compliant with Regulation 1924/2006. The critical analysis of OVs and MMs was performed with the aid of the pertinent scientific literature and was aimed at defining their appropriateness (alone or in combination with others) to support a specific CE. The results can be used to properly select OVs and MMs in a randomized controlled trial, for an effective substantiation of the claims, using the reference method(s) whenever available. Moreover, results can help EFSA in updating the guidance for the scientific requirements of health claims.

3 Guideline AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON TESTING FOR AUTONOMIC AND SOMATIC NERVE DYSFUNCTION. 2017

Vinik, Aaron I / Camacho, Pauline M / Davidson, Jaime A / Handelsman, Yehuda / Lando, Howard M / Leddy, Anne L / Reddy, Sethu K / Cook, Richard / Spallone, Vicenza / Tesfaye, Solomon / Ziegler, Dan / Anonymous2521077. · ·Endocr Pract · Pubmed #29320641.

ABSTRACT: This document represents the official position of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology. Where there were no randomized controlled trials or specific U.S. FDA labeling for issues in clinical practice, the participating clinical experts utilized their judgment and experience. Every effort was made to achieve consensus among the committee members. Position statements are meant to provide guidance, but they are not to be considered prescriptive for any individual patient and cannot replace the judgment of a clinician.

4 Guideline Excerpt from the Canadian Ophthalmological Society evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of diabetic retinopathy. 2017

Hooper, Philip / Boucher, Marie Carole / Cruess, Alan / Dawson, Keith G / Delpero, Walter / Greve, Mark / Kozousek, Vladimir / Lam, Wai-Ching / Maberley, David A L. ·Philip Hooper, London, ON (Chair) (retina and uveitis); Marie Carole Boucher, Montreal, QC (retina and teleophthalmology); Alan Cruess, Halifax, NS (retina); Keith G. Dawson, Vancouver, BC (endocrinology); Walter Delpero, Ottawa, ON (cataract and strabismus); Mark Greve, Edmonton, AB (retina and teleophthalmology); Vladimir Kozousek, Halifax, NS (medical retina); Wai-Ching Lam, Toronto, ON (retina and research); David A.L. Maberley, Vancouver, BC (retina).. Electronic address: cjo@cos-sco.ca. · Philip Hooper, London, ON (Chair) (retina and uveitis); Marie Carole Boucher, Montreal, QC (retina and teleophthalmology); Alan Cruess, Halifax, NS (retina); Keith G. Dawson, Vancouver, BC (endocrinology); Walter Delpero, Ottawa, ON (cataract and strabismus); Mark Greve, Edmonton, AB (retina and teleophthalmology); Vladimir Kozousek, Halifax, NS (medical retina); Wai-Ching Lam, Toronto, ON (retina and research); David A.L. Maberley, Vancouver, BC (retina). ·Can J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #29074014.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline Synopsis of the 2017 U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs/U.S. Department of Defense Clinical Practice Guideline: Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. 2017

Conlin, Paul R / Colburn, Jeffrey / Aron, David / Pries, Rose Mary / Tschanz, Mark P / Pogach, Leonard. ·From VA Boston Healthcare System, West Roxbury, Massachusetts; San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio; VHA National Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Durham, North Carolina; San Diego Internal Medicine, San Diego, California; and Veterans Affairs Central Office, Office of Specialty Care Services, Washington, DC. ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #29059687.

ABSTRACT: Description: In April 2017, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) approved a joint clinical practice guideline for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: The VA/DoD Evidence-Based Practice Work Group convened a joint VA/DoD guideline development effort that included a multidisciplinary panel of practicing clinician stakeholders and conformed to the Institute of Medicine's tenets for trustworthy clinical practice guidelines. The guideline panel developed key questions in collaboration with the ECRI Institute, which systematically searched and evaluated the literature through June 2016, developed an algorithm, and rated recommendations by using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. Recommendations: This synopsis summarizes key features of the guideline in 7 areas: patient-centered care and shared decision making, glycemic biomarkers, hemoglobin A1c target ranges, individualized treatment plans, outpatient pharmacologic treatment, glucose targets for critically ill patients, and treatment of hospitalized patients.

6 Guideline Management della retinopatia diabetica e dell'edema maculare diabetico: linee guida "Euretina 2017". 2017

Turchetti, P / Librando, A / Angelucci, F / Carlesimo, S C / Migliorini, R. ·Istituto Nazionale per la promozione della salute delle popolazioni Migranti ed il contrasto delle malattie della Povertà. (INMP/NIHMP), Rome 00153, Italia. · Dipartimento Organi di Senso, Facoltà di Medicina e Odontoiatria, Sapienza Università di Roma, Italia. · Centro specialistico di Salute Aurelia S.R.L., Roma, Italia. ·Clin Ter · Pubmed #29044359.

ABSTRACT: Si prevede che la malattia diabetica con tutte le sue complicanze avrà un forte aumento di incidenza con un grosso impatto socioeconomico nei prossimi decenni in tutto il mondo. Pertanto ben si comprende l'importanza di individuare attraverso una fine diagnostica quanto più precocemente la comparsa dei sintomi diabetici, migliorare lo stile di vita ed impostare cure efficienti. Riportiamo la serie di raccomandazioni EURETINA 2017, dei maggiori esperti in Europa per la gestione della malattia diabetica e delle complicanze della retina. Per combattere questa "pestilenza" occorre un team medico preparato. Il trattamento laser è stato considerato sino a non molto tempo fa il Gold standard della retinopatia diabetica e dell'edema diabetico (RD e EMD). Recenti studi hanno dimostrato, invece, che si possono raggiungere risultati migliori mediante l'iniezione diretta di farmaci nella cavità vitreale. In particolare è emerso terapia di prima linea, molecole in grado di inibire il fattore di crescita endoteliale vascolare (anti VEGF) mentre non è più raccomandata la fotocoagulazione laser per il trattamento del DME. Nell'ambito delle molecole farmacologiche gli steroidi hanno mantenuto un ruolo nella gestione del DME cronicamente persistente.

7 Guideline Diabetes in older people: position statement of The Hong Kong Geriatrics Society and the Hong Kong Society of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Reproduction. 2017

Wong, C W / Lee, J Sw / Tam, K F / Hung, H F / So, W Y / Shum, C K / Lam, C Y / Cheng, J N / Man, S P / Auyeung, T W. ·Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Caritas Medical Centre, Sham Shui Po, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Tai Po Hospital, Tai Po, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine, Hong Kong Buddhist Hospital, Lok Fu, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Lai Chi Kok, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Tuen Mun Hospital, Tuen Mun, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Jordan, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Pok Oi Hospital, Yuen Long, Hong Kong. ·Hong Kong Med J · Pubmed #29026049.

ABSTRACT: Following a survey on the clinical practice of geriatricians in the management of older people with diabetes and a study of hypoglycaemia in diabetic patients, a round-table discussion with geriatricians and endocrinologists was held in January 2015. Consensus was reached for six domains specifically related to older diabetic people: (1) the considerations when setting an individualised diabetic management; (2) inclusion of geriatric syndrome screening in assessment; (3) glycaemic and blood pressure targets; (4) pharmacotherapy; (5) restrictive diabetic diet; and (6) management goals for nursing home residents.

8 Guideline Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes: Synopsis of the 2017 American Diabetes Association Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes. 2017

Chamberlain, James J / Kalyani, Rita Rastogi / Leal, Sandra / Rhinehart, Andrew S / Shubrook, Jay H / Skolnik, Neil / Herman, William H. ·From St. Mark's Hospital and St. Mark's Diabetes Center, Salt Lake City, Utah; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; SinfoníaRx, Tucson, Arizona; Glytec, Marco Island, Florida; Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Vallejo, California; Abington Memorial Hospital, Jenkintown, Pennsylvania; and University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #28892816.

ABSTRACT: Description: The American Diabetes Association (ADA) annually updates Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payers, and other interested parties with evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. Methods: For the 2017 Standards of Care, the ADA Professional Practice Committee did MEDLINE searches from 1 January 2016 to November 2016 to add, clarify, or revise recommendations on the basis of new evidence. The committee rated the recommendations as A, B, or C, depending on the quality of evidence, or E for expert consensus or clinical experience. The Standards of Care were reviewed and approved by the Executive Committee of the ADA Board of Directors, which includes health care professionals, scientists, and laypersons. Feedback from the larger clinical community informed revisions. Recommendation: This synopsis focuses on recommendations from the 2017 Standards of Care about monitoring and pharmacologic approaches to glycemic management for type 1 diabetes.

9 Guideline [2016 European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice. The Sixth Joint Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology and Other Societies on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Clinical Practice (constituted by representatives of 10 societies and by invited experts. Developed with the special contribution of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation]. 2017

Piepoli, Massimo F / Hoes, Arno W / Agewall, Stefan / Albus, Christian / Brotons, Carlos / Catapano, Alberico L / Cooney, Marie-Therese / Corrà, Ugo / Cosyns, Bernard / Deaton, Christi / Graham, Ian / Hall, Michael Stephen / Hobbs, F D Richard / Løchen, Maja-Lisa / Löllgen, Herbert / Marques-Vidal, Pedro / Perk, Joep / Prescott, Eva / Redon, Josep / Richter, Dimitrios J / Sattar, Naveed / Smulders, Yvo / Tiberi, Monica / van der Worp, H Bart / van Dis, Ineke / Verschuren, W M Monique. ·European Society of Cardiology (ESC). · International Society of Behavioural Medicine (ISBM). · WONCA Europe. · European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS). · International Diabetes Federation European Region (IDF Europe). · International Federation of Sport Medicine (FIMS). · European Society of Hypertension (ESH). · European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). · European Stroke Organisation (ESO). · European Heart Network (EHN). ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #28714997.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline Polish Forum for Prevention Guidelines on Diabetes: update 2017. 2017

Małecki, Maciej / Kozek, Elżbieta / Zozulińska-Ziółkiewicz, Dorota / Kopeć, Grzegorz / Knap, Klaudia / Sarnecka, Agnieszka / Podolec, Jakub / Pająk, Andrzej / Zdrojewski, Tomasz / Czarnecka, Danuta / Jankowski, Piotr / Nowicka, Grażyna / Windak, Adam / Stańczyk, Jerzy / Undas, Anetta / Członkowska, Anna / Niewada, Maciej / Podolec, Piotr. ·Department of Cardiac and Vascular Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College at John Paul II Hospital, Kraków. ppodolec@interia.pl. ·Kardiol Pol · Pubmed #28707289.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON MENOPAUSE-2017 UPDATE. 2017

Cobin, Rhoda H / Goodman, Neil F / Anonymous2741041. · ·Endocr Pract · Pubmed #28703650.

ABSTRACT: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)/American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Position Statement is designed to update the previous menopause clinical practice guidelines published in 2011 but does not replace them. The current document reviews new clinical trials published since then as well as new information regarding possible risks and benefits of therapies available for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. AACE reinforces the recommendations made in its previous guidelines and provides additional recommendations on the basis of new data. A summary regarding this position statement is listed below: New information available from randomized clinical trials and epidemiologic studies reported after 2011 was critically reviewed. No previous recommendations from the 2011 menopause clinical practice guidelines have been reversed or changed. Newer information enhances AACE's guidance for the use of hormone therapy in different subsets of women. Newer information helps to support the use of various types of estrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and progesterone, as well as the route of delivery. Newer information supports the previous recommendation against the use of bioidentical hormones. The use of nonhormonal therapies for the symptomatic relief of menopausal symptoms is supported. Newer information enhances AACE's guidance for the use of hormone therapy in different subsets of women. Newer information helps to support the use of various types of estrogens, SERMs, and progesterone, as well as the route of delivery. Newer information supports the previous recommendation against the use of bioidentical hormones. The use of nonhormonal therapies for the symptomatic relief of menopausal symptoms is supported. New recommendations in this position statement include: 1. RECOMMENDATION: the use of menopausal hormone therapy in symptomatic postmenopausal women should be based on consideration of all risk factors for cardiovascular disease, age, and time from menopause. 2. RECOMMENDATION: the use of transdermal as compared with oral estrogen preparations may be considered less likely to produce thrombotic risk and perhaps the risk of stroke and coronary artery disease. 3. RECOMMENDATION: when the use of progesterone is necessary, micronized progesterone is considered the safer alternative. 4. RECOMMENDATION: in symptomatic menopausal women who are at significant risk from the use of hormone replacement therapy, the use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and possibly other nonhormonal agents may offer significant symptom relief. 5. RECOMMENDATION: AACE does not recommend use of bioidentical hormone therapy. 6. RECOMMENDATION: AACE fully supports the recommendations of the Comité de l'Évolution des Pratiques en Oncologie regarding the management of menopause in women with breast cancer. 7. RECOMMENDATION: HRT is not recommended for the prevention of diabetes. 8. RECOMMENDATION: In women with previously diagnosed diabetes, the use of HRT should be individualized, taking in to account age, metabolic, and cardiovascular risk factors. ABBREVIATIONS: AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists; ACE = American College of Endocrinology; BMI = body mass index; CAC = coronary artery calcification; CEE = conjugated equine estrogen; CEPO = Comité de l'Évolution des Pratiques en Oncologie; CAD = coronary artery disease; CIMT = carotid intima media thickness; CVD = cardiovascular disease; FDA = Food and Drug Administration; HDL = high-density lipoprotein; HRT = hormone replacement therapy; HT = hypertension; KEEPS = Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MBS = metabolic syndrome; MPA = medroxyprogesterone acetate; RR = relative risk; SERM = selective estrogen-receptor modulator; SSRI = selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor; VTE = venous thrombo-embolism; WHI = Women's Health Initiative.

12 Guideline A Practical Guide to the Use of Glucose-Lowering Agents With Cardiovascular Benefit or Proven Safety. 2017

Fitchett, David / Cheng, Alice / Connelly, Kim / Goldenberg, Ronald / Goodman, Shaun G / Leiter, Lawrence A / Lonn, Eva / Paty, Breay / Poirier, Paul / Stone, James / Thompson, David / Yale, Jean-Francois / Mancini, G B John. ·Division of Cardiology, St Michael's Hospital, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: fitchettd@smh.ca. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, St Michael's Hospital, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Endocrinology and Metabolism, North York General Hospital and LMC Diabetes and Endocrinology, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Population Health Research Institute and Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Heart and Lung Institute, Laval University, Québec City, Québec, Canada. · Department of Cardiac Sciences, Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology, McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology, McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #28668144.

ABSTRACT: Patients with type 2 diabetes continue to have a high residual risk for cardiovascular events despite intensive risk factor modification. Recent clinical trials have shown that the antihyperglycemic agents empagliflozin and liraglutide reduce cardiovascular events. Other drugs have been shown to have cardiovascular safety. With glucose-lowering agents proven to reduce adverse cardiovascular outcomes, many cardiologists have begun to prescribe or recommend glucose-lowering agents. Other cardiologists are not yet comfortable with this role because they are not accustomed to initiating these drugs. This document provides updated details of glucose-lowering agents associated with either proven cardiovascular benefit or safety, to help cardiologists to safely prescribe and monitor their patients with diabetes.

13 Guideline Practice Bulletin No. 180: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. 2017

Anonymous2461093. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #28644336.

ABSTRACT: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common medical complications of pregnancy. However, debate continues to surround the diagnosis and treatment of GDM despite several recent large-scale studies addressing these issues. The purposes of this document are the following: 1) provide a brief overview of the understanding of GDM, 2) review management guidelines that have been validated by appropriately conducted clinical research, and 3) identify gaps in current knowledge toward which future research can be directed.

14 Guideline Practice Bulletin No. 180 Summary: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. 2017

Anonymous5430911. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #28644329.

ABSTRACT: GESTATIONAL DIABETES MELLITUS: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common medical complications of pregnancy. However, debate continues to surround the diagnosis and treatment of GDM despite several recent large-scale studies addressing these issues. The purposes of this document are the following: 1) provide a brief overview of the understanding of GDM, 2) review management guidelines that have been validated by appropriately conducted clinical research, and 3) identify gaps in current knowledge toward which future research can be directed.

15 Guideline Action on diabetic macular oedema: achieving optimal patient management in treating visual impairment due to diabetic eye disease. 2017

Gale, R / Scanlon, P H / Evans, M / Ghanchi, F / Yang, Y / Silvestri, G / Freeman, M / Maisey, A / Napier, J. ·The Action on DMO group, UK. · The York Hospital, York, UK. · Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cheltenham, UK. · University Hospital, Llandough, Cardiff, UK. · Bradford Teaching Hospitals, Bradford, UK. · The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust, Wolverhampton, UK. · Belfast Health & Social Care Trust, Belfast, UK. · Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK. · Cardiff and Vale University Health Board, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK. · Bayer, Reading, UK. ·Eye (Lond) · Pubmed #28490797.

ABSTRACT: This paper identifies best practice recommendations for managing diabetes and sight-threatening diabetic eye disease. The authors provide an update for ophthalmologists and allied healthcare professionals on key aspects of diabetes management, supported by a review of the pertinent literature, and recommend practice principles for optimal patient management in treating visual impairment due to diabetic eye disease. In people with diabetes, early optimal glycaemic control reduces the long-term risk of both microvascular and macrovascular complications. The authors propose more can and should be done to maximise metabolic control, promote appropriate behavioural modifications and encourage timely treatment intensification when indicated to ameliorate diabetes-related complications. All people with diabetes should be screened for sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy promptly and regularly. It is shown that attitudes towards treatment adherence in diabetic macular oedema appear to mirror patients' views and health behaviours towards the management of their own diabetes. Awareness of diabetic macular oedema remains low among people with diabetes, who need access to education early in their disease about how to manage their diabetes to delay progression and possibly avoid eye-related complications. Ophthalmologists and allied healthcare professionals play a vital role in multidisciplinary diabetes management and establishment of dedicated diabetic macular oedema clinics is proposed. A broader understanding of the role of the diabetes specialist nurse may strengthen the case for comprehensive integrated care in ophthalmic practice. The recommendations are based on round table presentations and discussions held in London, UK, September 2016.

16 Guideline Vitamin D supplementation in the prevention and management of major chronic diseases not related to mineral homeostasis in adults: research for evidence and a scientific statement from the European society for clinical and economic aspects of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis (ESCEO). 2017

Cianferotti, Luisella / Bertoldo, Francesco / Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A / Bruyere, Olivier / Cooper, Cyrus / Cutolo, Maurizio / Kanis, John A / Kaufman, Jean-Marc / Reginster, Jean-Yves / Rizzoli, Rene / Brandi, Maria Luisa. ·Bone Metabolic Diseases Unit, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University Hospital of Florence and University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Geriatrics and Aging Research, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Liege, CHU Sart Tilman, Liege, 4000, Belgium. · MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, Hants, UK. · Research Laboratory and Academic Division of Clinical Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Genoa, Italy. · Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Sheffield, UK. · Institute for Health and Aging, Catholic University of Australia, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Department of Endocrinology and Unit for Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Diseases, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège, CHU Sart-Tilman, Liège, Belgium. · Service of Bone Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland. · Bone Metabolic Diseases Unit, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University Hospital of Florence and University of Florence, Florence, Italy. marialuisa.brandi@unifi.it. ·Endocrine · Pubmed #28390010.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Optimal vitamin D status promotes skeletal health and is recommended with specific treatment in individuals at high risk for fragility fractures. A growing body of literature has provided indirect and some direct evidence for possible extraskeletal vitamin D-related effects. PURPOSE AND METHODS: Members of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis have reviewed the main evidence for possible proven benefits of vitamin D supplementation in adults at risk of or with overt chronic extra-skeletal diseases, providing recommendations and guidelines for future studies in this field. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Robust mechanistic evidence is available from in vitro studies and in vivo animal studies, usually employing cholecalciferol, calcidiol or calcitriol in pharmacologic rather than physiologic doses. Although many cross-sectional and prospective association studies in humans have shown that low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (i.e., <50 nmol/L) are consistently associated with chronic diseases, further strengthened by a dose-response relationship, several meta-analyses of clinical trials have shown contradictory results. Overall, large randomized controlled trials with sufficient doses of vitamin D are missing, and available small to moderate-size trials often included people with baseline levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels >50 nmol/L, did not simultaneously assess multiple outcomes, and did not report overall safety (e.g., falls). Thus, no recommendations can be made to date for the use of vitamin D supplementation in general, parental compounds, or non-hypercalcemic vitamin D analogs in the prevention and treatment of extra-skeletal chronic diseases. Moreover, attainment of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels well above the threshold desired for bone health cannot be recommended based on current evidence, since safety has yet to be confirmed. Finally, the promising findings from mechanistic studies, large cohort studies, and small clinical trials obtained for autoimmune diseases (including type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and systemic lupus erythematosus), cardiovascular disorders, and overall reduction in mortality require further confirmation.

17 Guideline Pharmacologic Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes: Synopsis of the 2017 American Diabetes Association Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes. 2017

Chamberlain, James J / Herman, William H / Leal, Sandra / Rhinehart, Andrew S / Shubrook, Jay H / Skolnik, Neil / Kalyani, Rita Rastogi. ·From St. Mark's Hospital and St. Mark's Diabetes Center, Salt Lake City, Utah; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; SinfoníaRx, Tucson, Arizona Glytec, Greenville, South Carolina; Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Vallejo, California; Abington-Jefferson Health, Jenkintown, Pennsylvania; and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #28288484.

ABSTRACT: Description: The American Diabetes Association (ADA) annually updates the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payers, and other interested parties with evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. Methods: For the 2017 Standards, the ADA Professional Practice Committee updated previous MEDLINE searches performed from 1 January 2016 to November 2016 to add, clarify, or revise recommendations based on new evidence. The committee rates the recommendations as A, B, or C, depending on the quality of evidence, or E for expert consensus or clinical experience. The Standards were reviewed and approved by the Executive Committee of the ADA Board of Directors, which includes health care professionals, scientists, and laypersons. Feedback from the larger clinical community informed revisions. Recommendations: This synopsis focuses on recommendations from the 2017 Standards about pharmacologic approaches to glycemic treatment of type 2 diabetes.

18 Guideline ABM Clinical Protocol #27: Breastfeeding an Infant or Young Child with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes. 2017

Miller, Diana / Mamilly, Leena / Fourtner, Shannon / Rosen-Carole, Casey. ·1 Pediatric Endocrinology, University at Buffalo , Buffalo, New York. · 2 Division of General Pediatrics, Maternal Fetal Medicine and General Pediatrics, University of Rochester , Rochester, New York. · 3 Division of Neonatology, Maternal Fetal Medicine and General Pediatrics, University of Rochester , Rochester, New York. ·Breastfeed Med · Pubmed #28135112.

ABSTRACT: A central goal of The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine is the development of clinical protocols for managing common medical problems that may impact breastfeeding success. These protocols serve only as guidelines for the care of breastfeeding mothers and infants and do not delineate an exclusive course of treatment or serve as standards of medical care. Variations in treatment may be appropriate according to the needs of an individual patient.

19 Guideline Clinical worthlessness of genetic prediction of common forms of diabetes mellitus and related chronic complications: A position statement of the Italian Society of Diabetology. 2017

Buzzetti, R / Prudente, S / Copetti, M / Dauriz, M / Zampetti, S / Garofolo, M / Penno, G / Trischitta, V. ·Department of Experimental Medicine, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy; UOC Diabetology, Polo Pontino, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Mendel Laboratory, IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Unit of Biostatistics, IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Verona School of Medicine and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Section of Diabetes and Metabolic Disease, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa and Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Experimental Medicine, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy; Mendel Laboratory, IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy; Research Unit of Diabetes and Endocrine Diseases, IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. Electronic address: vincenzo.trischitta@uniroma1.it. ·Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis · Pubmed #28063875.

ABSTRACT: AIM: We are currently facing several attempts aimed at marketing genetic data for predicting multifactorial diseases, among which diabetes mellitus is one of the more prevalent. The present document primarily aims at providing to practicing physicians a summary of available data regarding the role of genetic information in predicting diabetes and its chronic complications. DATA SYNTHESIS: Firstly, general information about characteristics and performance of risk prediction tools will be presented in order to help clinicians to get acquainted with basic methodological information related to the subject at issue. Then, as far as type 1 diabetes is concerned, available data indicate that genetic information and counseling may be useful only in families with many affected individuals. However, since no disease prevention is possible, the utility of predicting this form of diabetes is at question. In the case of type 2 diabetes, available data really question the utility of adding genetic information on top of well performing, easy available and inexpensive non-genetic markers. Finally, the possibility of using the few available genetic data on diabetic complications for improving our ability to predict them will also be presented and discussed. For cardiovascular complication, the addition of genetic information to models based on clinical features does not translate in a substantial improvement in risk discrimination. For all other diabetic complications genetic information are currently very poor and cannot, therefore, be used for improving risk stratification. CONCLUSIONS: In all, nowadays the use of genetic testing for predicting diabetes and its chronic complications is definitively of little value in clinical practice.

20 Guideline Oral Pharmacologic Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Practice Guideline Update From the American College of Physicians. 2017

Qaseem, Amir / Barry, Michael J / Humphrey, Linda L / Forciea, Mary Ann / Anonymous1101000. ·From American College of Physicians and University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; and Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #28055075.

ABSTRACT: Description: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on oral pharmacologic treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults. This guideline serves as an update to the 2012 ACP guideline on the same topic. This guideline is endorsed by the American Academy of Family Physicians. Methods: This guideline is based on a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials and observational studies published through December 2015 on the comparative effectiveness of oral medications for type 2 diabetes. Evaluated interventions included metformin, thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, and sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors. Study quality was assessed, data were extracted, and results were summarized qualitatively on the basis of the totality of evidence identified by using several databases. Evaluated outcomes included intermediate outcomes of hemoglobin A1c, weight, systolic blood pressure, and heart rate; all-cause mortality; cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality; retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy; and harms. This guideline grades the recommendations by using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. Target Audience and Patient Population: The target audience for this guideline includes all clinicians, and the target patient population includes adults with type 2 diabetes. Recommendation 1: ACP recommends that clinicians prescribe metformin to patients with type 2 diabetes when pharmacologic therapy is needed to improve glycemic control. (Grade: strong recommendation; moderate-quality evidence). Recommendation 2: ACP recommends that clinicians consider adding either a sulfonylurea, a thiazolidinedione, an SGLT-2 inhibitor, or a DPP-4 inhibitor to metformin to improve glycemic control when a second oral therapy is considered. (Grade: weak recommendation; moderate-quality evidence.) ACP recommends that clinicians and patients select among medications after discussing benefits, adverse effects, and costs.

21 Guideline Controversial issues in CKD clinical practice: position statement of the CKD-treatment working group of the Italian Society of Nephrology. 2017

Bellizzi, Vincenzo / Conte, Giuseppe / Borrelli, Silvio / Cupisti, Adamasco / De Nicola, Luca / Di Iorio, Biagio R / Cabiddu, Gianfranca / Mandreoli, Marcora / Paoletti, Ernesto / Piccoli, Giorgina B / Quintaliani, Giuseppe / Ravera, Maura / Santoro, Domenico / Torraca, Serena / Minutolo, Roberto / Anonymous6920879. ·Division of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, Nephrology Unit, University Hospital "San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d'Aragona", Via San Leonardo, 84131, Salerno, Italy. vincenzo.bellizzi@tin.it. · Nephrology Division, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Dept. of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Nephrology Unit, Landolfi Hospital, Solofra, AV, Italy. · Nephrology Division, Brotzu Hospital, Cagliari, Italy. · Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, Ospedale S. Maria della Scaletta, Imola, BO, Italy. · Nephrology Unit, University of Genoa and IRCCS A.O.U. San Martino IST, Genoa, Italy. · Dept. of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy. · Nephrologie, CH Le Mans, Le Mans, France. · O. U. Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Perugia, Italy. · Dept. of Internal Medicine, University of Messina, Messina, Italy. · Division of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, Nephrology Unit, University Hospital "San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d'Aragona", Via San Leonardo, 84131, Salerno, Italy. ·J Nephrol · Pubmed #27568307.

ABSTRACT: This position paper of the study group "Conservative treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease-CKD" of the Italian Society of Nephrology addresses major practical, unresolved, issues related to the conservative treatment of chronic renal disease. Specifically, controversial topics from everyday clinical nephrology practice which cannot find a clear, definitive answer in the current literature or in nephrology guidelines are discussed. The paper reports the point of view of the study group. Concise and practical advice is given on several common issues: renal biopsy in diabetes; dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS); management of iron deficiency; low protein diet; dietary salt intake; bicarbonate supplementation; treatment of obesity; the choice of conservative therapy vs. dialysis. For each topic synthetic statements, guideline-style, are reported.

22 Guideline The Prevention and Treatment of Retinal Complications in Diabetes. 2016

Schorr, Susanne Gabriele / Hammes, Hans-Peter / Müller, Ulrich Alfons / Abholz, Heinz-Harald / Landgraf, Rüdiger / Bertram, Bernd. ·German Agency for Quality in Medicine (ÄZQ), Berlin. ·Dtsch Arztebl Int · Pubmed #28073426.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus can cause retino pathy and maculopathy, which can irreversibly damage vision and lead to blindness. The prevalence of retinopathy is 9-16% in patients with type 2 diabetes and 24-27% in patients with type 1 diabetes. 0.2-0.5% of diabetics are blind. METHODS: The National Disease Management Guideline on the prevention and treatment of retinal complications in diabetes was updated according to recommendations developed by seven scientific medical societies and organizations and by patient representatives and then approved in a formal consensus process. These recommendations are based on international guidelines and systematic reviews of the literature. RESULTS: Regular ophthalmological examinations enable the detection of retinopathy in early, better treatable stages. The control intervals should be based on the individual risk profile: 2 years for low-risk patients and 1 year for others, or even shorter depending on the severity of retinopathy. General risk factors for retinopathy include the duration of diabetes, the degree of hyperglycemia, hypertension, and diabetic nephropathy. The general, individually adapted treatment strategies are aimed at improving the risk profile. The most important specifically ophthalmological treatment recommendations are for panretinal laser coagulation in proliferative diabetic retinopathy and, in case of clinically significant diabetic macular edema with foveal involvement, for the intravitreal application of medications (mainly, vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF] inhibitors), if an improvement of vision with this treatment is thought to be possible. CONCLUSION: Regular, risk-adapted ophthalmological examinations, with standardized documentation of the findings for communication between ophthalmologists and the patients' treating primary care physicians/diabetologists, is essential for the prevention of diabetic retinal complications, and for their optimal treatment if they are already present.

23 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 8 - Hypertension and Associated Clinical Conditions 2016

Malachias, M V B / Amodeo, C / Paula, R B / Cordeiro, A C / Magalhães, L B N C / Bodanese, L C. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819387.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline Practice Bulletin No. 173 Summary: Fetal Macrosomia. 2016

Anonymous4031027. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #27776066.

ABSTRACT: Suspected fetal macrosomia is encountered commonly in obstetric practice. As birth weight increases, the likelihood of labor abnormalities, shoulder dystocia, birth trauma, and permanent injury to the neonate increases. The purpose of this document is to quantify those risks, address the accuracy and limitations of methods for estimating fetal weight, and suggest clinical management for a pregnancy with suspected fetal macrosomia.

25 Guideline 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines for the Management of Dyslipidemia for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in the Adult. 2016

Anderson, Todd J / Grégoire, Jean / Pearson, Glen J / Barry, Arden R / Couture, Patrick / Dawes, Martin / Francis, Gordon A / Genest, Jacques / Grover, Steven / Gupta, Milan / Hegele, Robert A / Lau, David C / Leiter, Lawrence A / Lonn, Eva / Mancini, G B John / McPherson, Ruth / Ngui, Daniel / Poirier, Paul / Sievenpiper, John L / Stone, James A / Thanassoulis, George / Ward, Richard. ·Libin Cardiovascular Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: todd.anderson@ahs.ca. · Institut de Cardiologie de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Chilliwack General Hospital, Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada. · Centre Hospitalier de l'Université Laval, Laval, Québec, Canada. · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · Montréal General Hospital and McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada. · Julia MacFarlane Diabetes Research Centre, Libin Cardiovascular Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Institut Universitaire de cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Québec City, Québec, Canada. · Libin Cardiovascular Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary and Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #27712954.

ABSTRACT: Since the publication of the 2012 guidelines new literature has emerged to inform decision-making. The 2016 guidelines primary panel selected a number of clinically relevant questions and has produced updated recommendations, on the basis of important new findings. In subjects with clinical atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm, most subjects with diabetes or chronic kidney disease, and those with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥ 5 mmol/L, statin therapy is recommended. For all others, there is an emphasis on risk assessment linked to lipid determination to optimize decision-making. We have recommended nonfasting lipid determination as a suitable alternative to fasting levels. Risk assessment and lipid determination should be considered in individuals older than 40 years of age or in those at increased risk regardless of age. Pharmacotherapy is generally not indicated for those at low Framingham Risk Score (FRS; <10%). A wider range of patients are now eligible for statin therapy in the FRS intermediate risk category (10%-19%) and in those with a high FRS (> 20%). Despite the controversy, we continue to advocate for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets for subjects who start therapy. Detailed recommendations are also presented for health behaviour modification that is indicated in all subjects. Finally, recommendation for the use of nonstatin medications is provided. Shared decision-making is vital because there are many areas in which clinical trials do not fully inform practice. The guidelines are meant to be a platform for meaningful conversation between patient and care provider so that individual decisions can be made for risk screening, assessment, and treatment.

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