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Diabetes Mellitus HELP
Based on 100,000 articles published since 2009
|||| 39 

These are the 100000 published articles about Diabetes Mellitus that originated from Worldwide during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Managing diabetes and liver disease association: Practice guidelines from the Egyptian Association for the Study of Liver and Gastrointestinal Disease (EASLGD). 2019

Hamed, Abd Elkhalek / Elsahar, Medhat / Elwan, Nadia M / El-Nakeep, Sarah / Naguib, Mervat / Soliman, Hanan Hamed / Aboubakr, Ashraf Ahmed / AbdelMaqsod, Amany / Sedrak, Heba / Assaad, Samir N / Elwakil, Reda / Esmat, Gamal / Salh, Samira / Mostafa, Taymour / Mogawer, Sherif / Sadek, Sameh Emil / Saber, Maha M / Ezelarab, Hanan / Mahmoud, Asem Ashraf / Sultan, Souad / El Kassas, Mohamed / Kamal, Ehab / ElSayed, Naglaa M / Moussa, Shorouk / Anonymous4751397. ·The Egyptian Association for the Study of Liver and Gastrointestinal Disease (EASLGD), Egypt; Department of Internal Medicine, Hepatology, and Diabetes, Egyptian Military Medical Academy, Egypt. Electronic address: akhalek_hamed@hotmail.com. · The Egyptian Association for the Study of Liver and Gastrointestinal Disease (EASLGD), Egypt; Police Medical Academy, Egypt. · Tanta University, Egypt. · Ain Shams University, Egypt. · Kasr Al Aini, Egypt. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hepatology, and Diabetes, Egyptian Military Medical Academy, Egypt. · Alexandria University, Egypt. · The Egyptian Association for the Study of Liver and Gastrointestinal Disease (EASLGD), Egypt; Ain Shams University, Egypt. · The Egyptian Association for the Study of Liver and Gastrointestinal Disease (EASLGD), Egypt; Kasr Al Aini, Egypt. · Department of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Egypt. · Department of Clinical Nutrition National Research Centre, Egypt. · Helwan University, Egypt. · Medical Department, National Research Centre, Egypt. ·Arab J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #30852101.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline [Consensus statement of the Chilean endocrinological society on the role of bariatric surgery in type 2 diabetes]. 2018

Sapunar, Jorge / Escalona, Alex / Araya, A Verónica / Aylwin, Carmen Gloria / Bastías, María Juliana / Boza, Camilo / Cárcamo, Carlos / Csendes A, Attila / Davidof F, Patricio / Funke, Ricardo / Gómez, Patricia / González, María Isabel / Lahsen, Rodolfo / Lanzarini, Enrique / Maíz, Alberto / Mujica, Verónica / Muñoz, Rodrigo / Pérez, Gustavo / Raimann, Félix / Salman, Patricio / Sepúlveda, Matías / Soto, Néstor / Villagrán, Rodrigo. ·Departamento de Medicina Interna y Centro EPICYN, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la Frontera, Temuco, Chile. · Clínica Universidad de los Andes, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de los Andes, Santiago, Chile. · Hospital Clínico, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Sección Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición, Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital Naval Almirante Nef, Viña del Mar, Chile. · Clínica Las Condes, Santiago, Chile. · Instituto de Cirugía, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile. · Hospital FACH, Santiago, Chile. · Clínica Sanatorio Alemán, Concepción, Chile. · Departamento. Nutrición, Diabetes y Metabolismo, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Católica del Maule, Talca, Chile. · Departamento de Cirugía Digestiva, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Centro Integral de Obesidad y Diabetes, Servicio de Cirugía y Endoscopía, Clínica Puerto Varas, Puerto Varas, Chile. · Unidad de Endocrinología, Departamento de Medicina Interna, Facultad de Medicina. universidad de Concepción. Concepción, Chile. · Hospital de la Dirección de Previsión de Carabineros de Chile (DIPRECA). Santiago, Chile. · Unidad de Endocrinología y Diabetes, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital San Borja Arriarán. Santiago, Chile. · Departamento de Cirugía Bariátrica Metabólica, Clínica Bupa Antofagasta. Antofagasta, Chile. ·Rev Med Chil · Pubmed #30724982.

ABSTRACT: Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and obesity are a public health problem in Chile. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment alternative to achieve a significant and sustained weight reduction in patients with morbid obesity. The results of controlled clinical trials indicate that, compared to medical treatment, surgery for obese patients with DM2 allows a better control of blood glucose and cardiovascular risk factors, reduces the need for medications and increases the likelihood for remission. Consensus conferences and clinical practice guidelines support bariatric surgery as an option to treat DM2 in Class III Obesity (Body Mass Index (BMI) > 40) regardless of the glycemic control and the complexity of pharmacological treatment and in Class II Obesity (BMI 35-39,9) with inadequate glycemic control despite optimal pharmacological treatment and lifestyle. However, surgical indication for patients with DM2 and BMI between 30-34.9, the most prevalent sub-group, is only suggested. The Chilean Societies of Endocrinology and Diabetes and of Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery decided to generate a consensus regarding the importance of other factors related to DM2 that would allow a better selection of candidates for surgery, particularly when weight does not constitute an indication. Considering the national reality, we also need a statement regarding the selection and characteristics of the surgical procedure as well as the role of the diabetologist in the multidisciplinary team.

3 Guideline Canadian Cardiovascular Society Position Statement on Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Update 2018. 2018

Brunham, Liam R / Ruel, Isabelle / Aljenedil, Sumayah / Rivière, Jean-Baptiste / Baass, Alexis / Tu, Jack V / Mancini, G B John / Raggi, Paolo / Gupta, Milan / Couture, Patrick / Pearson, Glen J / Bergeron, Jean / Francis, Gordon A / McCrindle, Brian W / Morrison, Katherine / St-Pierre, Julie / Henderson, Mélanie / Hegele, Robert A / Genest, Jacques / Goguen, Jeannette / Gaudet, Daniel / Paré, Guillaume / Romney, Jacques / Ransom, Thomas / Bernard, Sophie / Katz, Pamela / Joy, Tisha R / Bewick, David / Brophy, James. ·Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address: Liam.brunham@ubc.ca. · Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Nutrition, Metabolism and Atherosclerosis Clinic, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Schulich Heart Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, and Canadian Collaborative Research Network, Brampton, Ontario, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Laboratory Medicine, CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Québec City, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, McGill University, Clinique 180, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Pediatrics, Université de Montréal, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Departments of Medicine and Biochemistry, Schulich School of Medicine and Robarts Research Institute, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, University of Toronto and Division of Endocrinology, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto Ontario, Canada. · Lipidology Unit, Community Genomic Medicine Centre and ECOGENE-21, Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Saguenay, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Population Health Research Institute and Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Nutrition, Metabolism and Atherosclerosis Clinic, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Université de Montreal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Manitoba, St Boniface Hospital, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, St John, New Brunswick, Canada. ·Can J Cardiol · Pubmed #30527143.

ABSTRACT: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is the most common monogenic disorder causing premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. It affects 1 in 250 individuals worldwide, and of the approximately 145,000 Canadians estimated to have FH, most are undiagnosed. Herein, we provide an update of the 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement on FH addressing the need for case identification, prompt recognition, and treatment with statins and ezetimibe, and cascade family screening. We provide a new Canadian definition for FH and tools for clinicians to make a diagnosis. The risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients with "definite" FH is 10- to 20-fold that of a normolipidemic individual and initiating treatment in youth or young adulthood can normalize life expectancy. Target levels for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol are proposed and are aligned with the Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines on dyslipidemia. Recommendation for the use of inhibitors of proprotein convertase kexin/subtilisin type 9 are made in patients who cannot achieve therapeutic low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets on maximally tolerated statins and ezetimibe. The writing committee used the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology in the preparation of the present document, which offers guidance for practical evaluation and management of patients with FH. This position statement also aims to raise awareness of FH nationally, and to mobilize patient support, promote knowledge translation, and availability of treatment and health care resources for this under-recognized, but important medical condition.

4 Guideline Recommendations of the Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians regarding caesarean sections. 2018

Wielgos, Miroslaw / Bomba-Opoń, Dorota / Breborowicz, Grzegorz H / Czajkowski, Krzysztof / Debski, Romuald / Leszczynska-Gorzelak, Bozena / Oszukowski, Przemyslaw / Radowicki, Stanislaw / Zimmer, Mariusz. ·1st Chair and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland. dbomba@wum.edu.pl. ·Ginekol Pol · Pubmed #30508218.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline Clinical and Investigative Endocrinology and Diabetes. 2018

Anonymous4851337. · ·Endocr Pract · Pubmed #30430841.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline [Definition, epidemiology and risk factors of obstetric anal sphincter injuries: CNGOF Perineal Prevention and Protection in Obstetrics Guidelines]. 2018

Thubert, T / Cardaillac, C / Fritel, X / Winer, N / Dochez, V. ·Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, hôpitaux de Nantes, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 38, boulevard Jean-Monnet, 44000 Nantes, France; Université de Nantes, 1, rue Gaston-Veil, 44000 Nantes, France; GMC-UPMC 01, GREEN (Groupe de recherche clinique en neurourologie), 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. Electronic address: thibault.thubert@chu-nantes.fr. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, hôpitaux de Nantes, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 38, boulevard Jean-Monnet, 44000 Nantes, France; Université de Nantes, 1, rue Gaston-Veil, 44000 Nantes, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU de Poitiers, 2, rue de la Milétrie, 86021 Poitiers, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #30385355.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review was to agree on a definition of the obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), to determine the prevalence and risk factors. METHODS: A comprehensive review of the literature on the obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), establishment of levels of evidence (NP), and grades of recommendation according to the methodology of the recommendations for clinical practice. RESULTS: To classify obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), we have used the WHO-RCOG classification, which lists 4 degrees of severity. To designate obstetric anal sphincter injuries, we have used the acronym OASIS, rather than the standard French terms of "complete perineum" and "complicated complete perineum". OASIS with only isolated involvement of the EAS (3a and 3b) appears to have a better functional prognosis than OASIS affecting the IAS or the anorectal mucosa (3c and 4) (LE3). The prevalence of women with ano-rectal symptoms increases with the severity of the OASIS (LE3). In the long term, 35-60% of women who had an OASIS have anal or fecal incontinence (LE3). The prevalence of an OASI in the general population is between 0.25 to 6%. The prevalence of OASIS in primiparous women is between 1.4 and 16% and thus, should be considered more important than among the multiparous women (0.4 to 2.7%). In women with a history of previous OASIS, the risk of occurrence is higher and varies between 5.1 and 10.7% following childbirth. The priority in this context remains the training of childbirth professionals (midwives and obstetricians) to detect these injuries in the delivery room, immediately after the birth. The training and awareness of these practitioners of OASIS diagnosis improves its detection in the delivery room (LE2). Professional experience is associated with better detection of OASIS (LE3) (4). Continuing professional education of obstetrics professionals in the diagnosis and repair of OASIS must be encouraged (Grade C). In the case of second-degree perineal tear, the use of ultrasound in the delivery room improves the diagnosis of OASIS (LE2). Ultrasound decreases the prevalence of symptoms of severe anal incontinence at 1 year (LE2). The diagnosis of OASIS is improved by the use of endo-anal ultrasonography in post-partum (72h-6weeks) (LE2). The principal factors associated with OASIS are nulliparity and instrumental (vaginal operative) delivery; the others are advanced maternal age, history of OASIS, macrosomia, midline episiotomy, posterior cephalic positions, and long labour (LE2). The presence of a perianal lesion (perianal fissure, or anorectal or rectovaginal fistula) is associated with an increased risk of 4th degree lacerations (LE3). Crohn's disease without perianal involvement is not associated with an excess risk of OASIS (LE3). For women with type III genital mutilation, deinfibulation before delivery is associated with a reduction in the risk of OASIS (LE3); in this situation, deinfibulation is recommended before delivery (grade C). CONCLUSION: It is necessary to use a consensus definition of the OASIS to be able to better detect and treat them.

7 Guideline 2019 Canadian guideline for physical activity throughout pregnancy. 2018

Mottola, Michelle F / Davenport, Margie H / Ruchat, Stephanie-May / Davies, Gregory A / Poitras, Veronica J / Gray, Casey E / Jaramillo Garcia, Alejandra / Barrowman, Nick / Adamo, Kristi B / Duggan, Mary / Barakat, Ruben / Chilibeck, Phil / Fleming, Karen / Forte, Milena / Korolnek, Jillian / Nagpal, Taniya / Slater, Linda G / Stirling, Deanna / Zehr, Lori. ·R Samuel McLaughlin Foundation-Exercise and Pregnancy Laboratory, School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Children's Health Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. · Program for Pregnancy and Postpartum Health, Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport and Recreation, Women and Children's Health Research Institute, Alberta Diabetes Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Human Kinetics, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. · Independent Researcher, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Clinical Research Unit, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte-INEF, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. · College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. · Department of Family and Community Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Granovsky Gluskin Family Medicine Centre, Sinai Health System, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Canadian Association of Midwives, Toronto, Canada. · John W Scott Health Sciences Library, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Middlesex-London Health Unit, London, Ontario, Canada. · School of Health and Human Services, Camosun College, Victoria, Canada. ·Br J Sports Med · Pubmed #30337460.

ABSTRACT: The objective is to provide guidance for pregnant women and obstetric care and exercise professionals on prenatal physical activity. The outcomes evaluated were maternal, fetal or neonatal morbidity, or fetal mortality during and following pregnancy. Literature was retrieved through searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection, CINAHL Plus with Full Text, Child Development & Adolescent Studies, Education Resources Information Center, SPORTDiscus, ClinicalTrials.gov and the Trip Database from inception up to 6 January 2017. Primary studies of any design were eligible, except case studies. Results were limited to English-language, Spanish-language or French-language materials. Articles related to maternal physical activity during pregnancy reporting on maternal, fetal or neonatal morbidity, or fetal mortality were eligible for inclusion. The quality of evidence was rated using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. The Guidelines Consensus Panel solicited feedback from end users (obstetric care providers, exercise professionals, researchers, policy organisations, and pregnant and postpartum women). The development of these guidelines followed the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II instrument. The benefits of prenatal physical activity are moderate and no harms were identified; therefore, the difference between desirable and undesirable consequences (net benefit) is expected to be moderate. The majority of stakeholders and end users indicated that following these recommendations would be feasible, acceptable and equitable. Following these recommendations is likely to require minimal resources from both individual and health systems perspectives.

8 Guideline Behavioral Weight Loss Interventions to Prevent Obesity-Related Morbidity and Mortality in Adults: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2018

Anonymous2681258 / Curry, Susan J / Krist, Alex H / Owens, Douglas K / Barry, Michael J / Caughey, Aaron B / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Grossman, David C / Kemper, Alex R / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Phipps, Maureen G / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #30326502.

ABSTRACT: Importance: More than 35% of men and 40% of women in the United States are obese. Obesity is associated with health problems such as increased risk for coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, various types of cancer, gallstones, and disability. Obesity is also associated with an increased risk for death, particularly among adults younger than 65 years. Objective: To update the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) 2012 recommendation on screening for obesity in adults. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on interventions (behavioral and pharmacotherapy) for weight loss or weight loss maintenance that can be provided in or referred from a primary care setting. Surgical weight loss interventions and nonsurgical weight loss devices (eg, gastric balloons) are considered to be outside the scope of the primary care setting. Findings: The USPSTF found adequate evidence that intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions in adults with obesity can lead to clinically significant improvements in weight status and reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes among adults with obesity and elevated plasma glucose levels; these interventions are of moderate benefit. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that behavior-based weight loss maintenance interventions are of moderate benefit. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that the harms of intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions (including weight loss maintenance interventions) in adults with obesity are small to none. Therefore, the USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that offering or referring adults with obesity to intensive behavioral interventions or behavior-based weight loss maintenance interventions has a moderate net benefit. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends that clinicians offer or refer adults with a body mass index of 30 or higher to intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions. (B recommendation).

9 Guideline ISPAD Position Statement on Type 1 Diabetes in Schools. 2018

Goss, P W / Middlehurst, A / Acerini, C L / Anderson, B J / Bratina, N / Brink, S / Calliari, L / Forsander, G / Goss, J L / Maahs, D / Milosevic, R / Pacaud, D / Paterson, M A / Pitman, L / Rowley, E / Wolfsdorf, J. · ·Pediatr Diabetes · Pubmed #30295419.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline Management of Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes, 2018. A Consensus Report by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). 2018

Davies, Melanie J / D'Alessio, David A / Fradkin, Judith / Kernan, Walter N / Mathieu, Chantal / Mingrone, Geltrude / Rossing, Peter / Tsapas, Apostolos / Wexler, Deborah J / Buse, John B. ·Diabetes Research Centre, University of Leicester, Leicester, U.K. · Leicester Diabetes Centre, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, U.K. · Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC. · National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Department of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. · Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology, UZ Gasthuisberg, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, London, U.K. · Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark. · University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Second Medical Department, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Medicine and Diabetes Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC jbuse@med.unc.edu. ·Diabetes Care · Pubmed #30291106.

ABSTRACT: The American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes convened a panel to update the prior position statements, published in 2012 and 2015, on the management of type 2 diabetes in adults. A systematic evaluation of the literature since 2014 informed new recommendations. These include additional focus on lifestyle management and diabetes self-management education and support. For those with obesity, efforts targeting weight loss, including lifestyle, medication, and surgical interventions, are recommended. With regards to medication management, for patients with clinical cardiovascular disease, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor or a glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist with proven cardiovascular benefit is recommended. For patients with chronic kidney disease or clinical heart failure and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, an SGLT2 inhibitor with proven benefit is recommended. GLP-1 receptor agonists are generally recommended as the first injectable medication.

11 Guideline ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines 2018: Limited Care Guidance Appendix. 2018

Codner, Ethel / Acerini, Carlo L / Craig, Maria E / Hofer, Sabine E / Maahs, David M. · ·Pediatr Diabetes · Pubmed #30276975.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Guideline ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines 2018: Definition, epidemiology, and classification of diabetes in children and adolescents. 2018

Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J / Kahkoska, Anna R / Jefferies, Craig / Dabelea, Dana / Balde, Naby / Gong, Chun X / Aschner, Pablo / Craig, Maria E. ·Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. · Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. · Starship Children's Hospital, Auckland District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand. · Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado. · Department of Endocrinology, University Hospital, Conakry, Guinea. · Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · Colombian Diabetes Association, Bogotá, Colombia. · The Children's Hospital at Westmead, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · School of Women's and Children's Health, University of NSW, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Pediatr Diabetes · Pubmed #30226024.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Guideline ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines 2018: The diagnosis and management of monogenic diabetes in children and adolescents. 2018

Hattersley, Andrew T / Greeley, Siri A W / Polak, Michel / Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar / Njølstad, Pål R / Mlynarski, Wojciech / Castano, Luis / Carlsson, Annelie / Raile, Klemens / Chi, Dung V / Ellard, Sian / Craig, Maria E. ·Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK. · The University of Chicago Medicine, Comer Children's Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. · Hôpital Universitaire Necker-Enfants Malades, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France. · Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Hospital Infantil Universitario Niño Jesús, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Pediatrics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Pediatrics, Oncology, Hematology and Diabetology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Endocrinology and Diabetes Research Group, BioCruces Health Research Institute, Cruces University Hospital, Barakaldo, Spain. · Department of Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism & Genetics, National Children's Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam. · Department of Pediatrics, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam. · The Children's Hospital at Westmead and Discipline of Child Health and Adolescent Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · School of Women's and Children's Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. ·Pediatr Diabetes · Pubmed #30225972.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline Medicines for Treatment Intensification in Type 2 Diabetes and Type of Insulin in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes in Low-Resource Settings: Synopsis of the World Health Organization Guidelines on Second- and Third-Line Medicines and Type of Insulin for the Control of Blood Glucose Levels in Nonpregnant Adults With Diabetes Mellitus. 2018

Roglic, Gojka / Norris, Susan L. ·World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland (G.R., S.L.N.). ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #30178023.

ABSTRACT: Description: The World Health Organization developed these guidelines to provide guidance on selection of medicines for treatment intensification in type 2 diabetes and on use of insulin (human or analogue) in type 1 and 2 diabetes. The target audience includes clinicians, policymakers, national diabetes program managers, and medicine procurement officers. The target population is adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes in low-resource settings in low- or high-income countries. The guidelines also apply to disadvantaged populations in high-income countries. Methods: The recommendations were formulated by a 12-member guideline development group and are based on high-quality systematic reviews identified via a search of several bibliographic databases from 1 January 2007 to 1 March 2017. The GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system was used to assess the quality of the evidence and the strength of the recommendations. The guideline was peer-reviewed by 6 external reviewers. Recommendation 1: Give a sulfonylurea to patients with type 2 diabetes who do not achieve glycemic control with metformin alone or who have contraindications to metformin (strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). Recommendation 2: Introduce human insulin treatment to patients with type 2 diabetes who do not achieve glycemic control with metformin and/or a sulfonylurea (strong recommendation, very-low-quality evidence). Recommendation 3: If insulin is unsuitable, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, a sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor, or a thiazolidinedione (TZD) may be added (weak recommendation, very-low-quality evidence). Recommendation 4: Use human insulin to manage blood glucose in adults with type 1 diabetes and in adults with type 2 diabetes for whom insulin is indicated (strong recommendation, low-quality evidence). Recommendation 5: Consider long-acting insulin analogues to manage blood glucose in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who have frequent severe hypoglycemia with human insulin (weak recommendation, moderate-quality evidence for severe hypoglycemia).

15 Guideline ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines 2018: Diabetes education in children and adolescents. 2018

Phelan, Helen / Lange, Karin / Cengiz, Eda / Gallego, Patricia / Majaliwa, Edna / Pelicand, Julie / Smart, Carmel / Hofer, Sabine E. ·Department of Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, John Hunter Children's Hospital, Newcastle, Australia. · Department Medical Psychology OE 5430, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. · Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · School of Medicine, Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital London, Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. · Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Paediatric and Child Health, Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. · Medical School, University of Valparaiso, San Felipe, Chile. · Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. ·Pediatr Diabetes · Pubmed #30175451.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline Glycaemic management during the inpatient enteral feeding of people with stroke and diabetes. 2018

Roberts, A W / Penfold, S / Anonymous3251013. ·Cardiff and Vale University Health Board, Cardiff, UK. · Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bournemouth, UK. ·Diabet Med · Pubmed #30152589.

ABSTRACT: This paper is an abridged and modified version of guidelines produced by the Joint British Diabetes Societies for inpatient care on glycaemic management during the enteral feeding of people with stroke and diabetes. These were revised in 2017 and have been adapted specifically for Diabetic Medicine. The full version can be found at: www.diabetes.org.uk/joint-british-diabetes-society or https://abcd.care/joint-british-diabetes-societies-jbds-inpatient-care-group. Many people have both diabetes and an acute stroke, and a stanv dard approach to the management of people with stroke is the provision of adequate nutrition. Frequently, this involves a period of enteral feeding if there is impaired ability to swallow food safely. There is currently considerable variability in the management of people with diabetes fed enterally after a stroke, and the evidence base guiding diabetes management in this clinical situation is very weak, although poor glycaemic outcomes in people receiving enteral feeding after stroke may worsen recovery and cause harm. The aim of this document is to provide sensible clinical guidance in this area, written by a multidisciplinary team; this guideline had input from diabetes specialist nurses, diabetologists, dietitians, stroke physicians and pharmacists with expertise in this area, and from UK professional organizations. It is aimed at multidisciplinary teams managing people with stroke and diabetes who require enteral feeding. We recognize that there is limited clinical evidence in this area.

17 Guideline Managing hyperglycaemia during antenatal steroid administration, labour and birth in pregnant women with diabetes. 2018

Dashora, U / Murphy, H R / Temple, R C / Stanley, K P / Castro, E / George, S / Dhatariya, K / Haq, M / Sampson, M / Anonymous3241013. ·Conquest Hospital, St Leonards on Sea, UK. · Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. · Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. · Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich, UK. · East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust, St Leonards on Sea, UK. · East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust, Stevenage, UK. · Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust, Tunbridge Wells, UK. ·Diabet Med · Pubmed #30152588.

ABSTRACT: Optimal glycaemic control before and during pregnancy improves both maternal and fetal outcomes. This article summarizes the recently published guidelines on the management of glycaemic control in pregnant women with diabetes on obstetric wards and delivery units produced by the Joint British Diabetes Societies for Inpatient Care and available in full at www.diabetes.org.uk/joint-british-diabetes-society and https://abcd.care/joint-british-diabetes-societies-jbds-inpatient-care-group. Hyperglycaemia following steroid administration can be managed by variable rate intravenous insulin infusion (VRIII) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in women who are willing and able to safely self-manage insulin dose adjustment. All women with diabetes should have capillary blood glucose (CBG) measured hourly once they are in established labour. Those who are found to be higher than 7 mmol/l on two consecutive occasions should be started on VRIII. If general anaesthesia is used, CBG should be monitored every 30 min in the theatre. Both the VRIII and CSII rate should be reduced by at least 50% once the placenta is delivered. The insulin dose needed after delivery in insulin-treated Type 2 and Type 1 diabetes is usually 25% less than the doses needed at the end of first trimester. Additional snacks may be needed after delivery especially if breastfeeding. Stop all anti-diabetes medications after delivery in gestational diabetes. Continue to monitor CBG before and 1 h after meals for up to 24 h after delivery to pick up any pre-existing diabetes or new-onset diabetes in pregnancy. Women with Type 2 diabetes on oral treatment can continue to take metformin after birth.

18 Guideline Management of hyperglycaemia and steroid (glucocorticoid) therapy: a guideline from the Joint British Diabetes Societies (JBDS) for Inpatient Care group. 2018

Roberts, A / James, J / Dhatariya, K / Anonymous3221013. ·Cardiff and Vale University Local Health Board, Cardiff, UK. · University Hospitals Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK. · Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich, UK. ·Diabet Med · Pubmed #30152586.

ABSTRACT: Glucocorticoids (steroids) are widely used across many medical specialities for their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. However, one of their major side effects is the development of hyperglycaemia. It is well recognized that high glucose levels in people with diabetes in hospital are associated with harm and increased lengths of hospital stay. The use of glucocorticoid (steroid) treatment in people with pre-existing diabetes will undoubtedly result in worsening glucose control, and this may be termed 'steroid-induced hyperglycaemia', and will warrant temporary additional, and more active, glycaemic management. A rise in glucose may occur in people without a known diagnosis of diabetes, and this may be termed 'steroid-induced diabetes'. There is a lack of evidence to guide how people with hyperglycaemia should be managed, and much of the guidance given here is a consensus based on best practice collated from around the United Kingdom. Where evidence is available, this is referenced. These guidelines on the management of people with diabetes treated with steroids has been adapted specifically for Diabetic Medicine. The full version of the guidelines can be found on line at: www.diabetes.org.uk/joint-british-diabetes-society or https://abcd.care/joint-british-diabetes-societies-jbds-inpatient-care-group.

19 Guideline Management of adults with diabetes on the haemodialysis unit: summary of guidance from the Joint British Diabetes Societies and the Renal Association. 2018

Frankel, A H / Kazempour-Ardebili, S / Bedi, R / Chowdhury, T A / De, P / El-Sherbini, Nevine / Game, F / Gray, S / Hardy, D / James, J / Kong, M-F / Ramlan, G / Southcott, E / Winocour, P. ·Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK. · Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. · Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel, London, UK. · Birmingham City Hospital (Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust), Birmingham, UK. · Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and University of Nottingham, UK. · East and North Herts NHS Trust, UK. · University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, UK. · North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust, UK. · St James University Hospital, Leeds, UK. · Queen Elizabeth II Hospital, Welwyn Garden City, UK. ·Diabet Med · Pubmed #30152585.

ABSTRACT: Diabetic nephropathy remains the principal cause of end-stage renal failure in the UK and its prevalence is set to increase. People with diabetes and end-stage renal failure on maintenance haemodialysis are highly vulnerable, with complex comorbidities, and are at high risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, the leading cause of mortality in this population. The management of people with diabetes receiving maintenance haemodialysis is shared between diabetes and renal specialist teams and the primary care team, with input from additional healthcare professionals providing foot care, dietary support and other aspects of multidisciplinary care. In this setting, one specialty may assume that key aspects of care are being provided elsewhere, which can lead to important components of care being overlooked. People with diabetes and end-stage renal failure require improved delivery of care to overcome organizational difficulties and barriers to communication between healthcare teams. No comprehensive guidance on the management of this population has previously been produced. These national guidelines, the first in this area, bring together in one document the disparate needs of people with diabetes on maintenance haemodialysis. The guidelines are based on the best available evidence, or on expert opinion where there is no clear evidence to inform practice. We aim to provide clear advice to clinicians caring for this vulnerable population and to encourage and improve education for clinicians and people with diabetes to promote empowerment and self-management.

20 Guideline Royal College of Psychiatrists Liaison Faculty & Joint British Diabetes Societies (JBDS): guidelines for the management of diabetes in adults and children with psychiatric disorders in inpatient settings. 2018

Price, H C / Ismail, K / Anonymous3211013. ·Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK. ·Diabet Med · Pubmed #30152583.

ABSTRACT: The Royal College of Psychiatrists Liaison Faculty & Joint British Diabetes Societies (JBDS) for Inpatient Care guidelines for the management of diabetes in adults and children with psychiatric disorders in inpatient settings are available in full at: www.diabetes.org.uk/joint-british-diabetes-society and https://abcd.care/joint-british-diabetes-societies-jbds-inpatient-care-group. This article summarizes the guidelines and recommendations. Commissioners are urged to ensure that the needs of people with diabetes and severe mental illness are specifically addressed in contracts with providers of inpatient care, and to avoid financial or other barriers to cross-organizational working and to ensure that patient-structured education is commissioned to meets the complex needs of people with diabetes and severe mental illness. Acute trusts are asked to develop joint pathways with mental health providers and facilitate multidisciplinary working and to screen for mental ill health in those admitted with acute complications of diabetes whose aetiology is unclear or not medically explained. Mental health trusts should create a diabetes register, screen for diabetes, particularly in those prescribed second-generation antipsychotics and ensure that staff are trained in managing and avoiding hypoglycaemia, and the safe use of insulin. Finally, clinical teams should ensure that all staff can access training in diabetes and mental health to support them to care for people with both diabetes and severe mental illness, develop local pathways for joint working and ensure best practice tariff criteria are met for diabetic ketoacidosis and hypoglycaemia, and for children and young people with diabetes.

21 Guideline ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines 2018: The delivery of ambulatory diabetes care to children and adolescents with diabetes. 2018

Pihoker, Catherine / Forsander, Gun / Fantahun, Bereket / Virmani, Anju / Corathers, Sarah / Benitez-Aguirre, Paul / Fu, Junfen / Maahs, David M. ·Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Division of Diabetes, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Department of Pediatrics and Child Health at Saint Paul's Hospital Millennium Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. · Department of Pediatrics, Max, Pentamed and SL Jain Hospitals, Delhi, India. · Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Sydney Medical School, Discipline of Child & Adolescent Health, The Children's Hospital at Westmead Clinical School Children's Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia. · Children's Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China. · Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, Stanford, California. ·Pediatr Diabetes · Pubmed #30144259.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Guideline Updates to the 2018

Anonymous4960959. · ·Diabetes Care · Pubmed #30135199.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines 2018: Exercise in children and adolescents with diabetes. 2018

Adolfsson, Peter / Riddell, Michael C / Taplin, Craig E / Davis, Elizabeth A / Fournier, Paul A / Annan, Francesca / Scaramuzza, Andrea E / Hasnani, Dhruvi / Hofer, Sabine E. ·Department of Pediatrics, Kungsbacka Hospital, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Muscle Health Research Centre, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Princess Margaret Hospital; Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia. · School of Human Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. · Children and Young People's Diabetes Service, University College London Hospitals NHS, Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Division of Pediatrics, ASST Cremona, "Ospedale Maggiore di Cremona", Cremona, Italy. · Diacare-Diabetes Care and Hormone Clinic, Ahmedabad, India. · Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. ·Pediatr Diabetes · Pubmed #30133095.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines 2018: Management of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes in children and adolescents. 2018

Moran, Antoinette / Pillay, Kubendran / Becker, Dorothy / Granados, Andrea / Hameed, Shihab / Acerini, Carlo L. ·Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. · Westville Hospital, Durban, South Africa. · Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Pediatrics, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Department of Endocrinology, Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia. · School of Women's and Children's Health, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW, Australia. · Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. ·Pediatr Diabetes · Pubmed #30094886.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline Type 1 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents: A Position Statement by the American Diabetes Association. 2018

Chiang, Jane L / Maahs, David M / Garvey, Katharine C / Hood, Korey K / Laffel, Lori M / Weinzimer, Stuart A / Wolfsdorf, Joseph I / Schatz, Desmond. ·McKinsey & Company and Diasome Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Palo Alto, CA. · Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA. · Division of Endocrinology, Boston Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Pediatric Endocrinology & Diabetes, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. · Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL schatz@ufl.edu. ·Diabetes Care · Pubmed #30093549.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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