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Diabetes Mellitus HELP
Based on 99,988 articles published since 2008
|||| 38 

These are the 99988 published articles about Diabetes Mellitus that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2018.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline 2019 Canadian guideline for physical activity throughout pregnancy. 2018

Mottola, Michelle F / Davenport, Margie H / Ruchat, Stephanie-May / Davies, Gregory A / Poitras, Veronica J / Gray, Casey E / Jaramillo Garcia, Alejandra / Barrowman, Nick / Adamo, Kristi B / Duggan, Mary / Barakat, Ruben / Chilibeck, Phil / Fleming, Karen / Forte, Milena / Korolnek, Jillian / Nagpal, Taniya / Slater, Linda G / Stirling, Deanna / Zehr, Lori. ·R Samuel McLaughlin Foundation-Exercise and Pregnancy Laboratory, School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Children's Health Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. · Program for Pregnancy and Postpartum Health, Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport and Recreation, Women and Children's Health Research Institute, Alberta Diabetes Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Human Kinetics, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. · Independent Researcher, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Clinical Research Unit, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte-INEF, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. · College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. · Department of Family and Community Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Granovsky Gluskin Family Medicine Centre, Sinai Health System, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Canadian Association of Midwives, Toronto, Canada. · John W Scott Health Sciences Library, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Middlesex-London Health Unit, London, Ontario, Canada. · School of Health and Human Services, Camosun College, Victoria, Canada. ·Br J Sports Med · Pubmed #30337460.

ABSTRACT: The objective is to provide guidance for pregnant women and obstetric care and exercise professionals on prenatal physical activity. The outcomes evaluated were maternal, fetal or neonatal morbidity, or fetal mortality during and following pregnancy. Literature was retrieved through searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection, CINAHL Plus with Full Text, Child Development & Adolescent Studies, Education Resources Information Center, SPORTDiscus, ClinicalTrials.gov and the Trip Database from inception up to 6 January 2017. Primary studies of any design were eligible, except case studies. Results were limited to English-language, Spanish-language or French-language materials. Articles related to maternal physical activity during pregnancy reporting on maternal, fetal or neonatal morbidity, or fetal mortality were eligible for inclusion. The quality of evidence was rated using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. The Guidelines Consensus Panel solicited feedback from end users (obstetric care providers, exercise professionals, researchers, policy organisations, and pregnant and postpartum women). The development of these guidelines followed the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II instrument. The benefits of prenatal physical activity are moderate and no harms were identified; therefore, the difference between desirable and undesirable consequences (net benefit) is expected to be moderate. The majority of stakeholders and end users indicated that following these recommendations would be feasible, acceptable and equitable. Following these recommendations is likely to require minimal resources from both individual and health systems perspectives.

2 Guideline Behavioral Weight Loss Interventions to Prevent Obesity-Related Morbidity and Mortality in Adults: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2018

Anonymous3041309 / Curry, Susan J / Krist, Alex H / Owens, Douglas K / Barry, Michael J / Caughey, Aaron B / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Grossman, David C / Kemper, Alex R / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Phipps, Maureen G / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #30326502.

ABSTRACT: Importance: More than 35% of men and 40% of women in the United States are obese. Obesity is associated with health problems such as increased risk for coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, various types of cancer, gallstones, and disability. Obesity is also associated with an increased risk for death, particularly among adults younger than 65 years. Objective: To update the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) 2012 recommendation on screening for obesity in adults. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on interventions (behavioral and pharmacotherapy) for weight loss or weight loss maintenance that can be provided in or referred from a primary care setting. Surgical weight loss interventions and nonsurgical weight loss devices (eg, gastric balloons) are considered to be outside the scope of the primary care setting. Findings: The USPSTF found adequate evidence that intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions in adults with obesity can lead to clinically significant improvements in weight status and reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes among adults with obesity and elevated plasma glucose levels; these interventions are of moderate benefit. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that behavior-based weight loss maintenance interventions are of moderate benefit. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that the harms of intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions (including weight loss maintenance interventions) in adults with obesity are small to none. Therefore, the USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that offering or referring adults with obesity to intensive behavioral interventions or behavior-based weight loss maintenance interventions has a moderate net benefit. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends that clinicians offer or refer adults with a body mass index of 30 or higher to intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions. (B recommendation).

3 Guideline Updates to the 2018

Anonymous2541292. · ·Diabetes Care · Pubmed #30135199.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline Type 1 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents: A Position Statement by the American Diabetes Association. 2018

Chiang, Jane L / Maahs, David M / Garvey, Katharine C / Hood, Korey K / Laffel, Lori M / Weinzimer, Stuart A / Wolfsdorf, Joseph I / Schatz, Desmond. ·McKinsey & Company and Diasome Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Palo Alto, CA. · Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA. · Division of Endocrinology, Boston Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Pediatric Endocrinology & Diabetes, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. · Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL schatz@ufl.edu. ·Diabetes Care · Pubmed #30093549.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline Practical Recommendations for Glucose Measurement, Glucose Monitoring and Glucose Control in Patients with Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes in Germany. 2018

Heinemann, Lutz / Deiss, Dorothee / Siegmund, Thorsten / Schlüter, Sandra / Naudorf, Michael / von Sengbusch, Simone / Lange, Karin / Freckmann, Guido. ·Arbeitsgemeinschaft Diabetes & Technologie der Deutschen Diabetes Gesellschaft e.V., Ulm (Diabetes & Technology Working Group of the German Diabetes Association). · Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Pädiatrische Diabetologie e. V., Münster (Paediatric Diabetology Working Group). ·Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes · Pubmed #29975980.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline Definition, Classification and Diagnosis of Diabetes Mellitus. 2018

Petersmann, Astrid / Nauck, Matthias / Müller-Wieland, Dirk / Kerner, Wolfgang / Müller, Ulrich A / Landgraf, Rüdiger / Freckmann, Guido / Heinemann, Lutz. ·Kommission für Labordiagnostik der Diabetologie der Deutschen Diabetes Gesellschaft (DDG) und der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Klinische Chemie und Laboratoriumsmedizin (DGKL) (Commission for Laboratory Diagnostics in Diabetology of the German Diabetes Association (DDG) and the German Association for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine). ·Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes · Pubmed #29975979.

ABSTRACT: Aim of recommendations like this one issued by the German Diabetes Association is to provide the GP and diabetologist and his team with information he needs for his daily practice. These recommendations are updated annually. They are written by a group of experts, but they are not evidence based guidelines. This specific recommendation for diabetes diagnosis briefly describes the diabetes types and the different options for diagnosis. Also the caveats and the practical procedure are presented.

7 Guideline Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk: Update of the recommendations of the Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease working group of the Spanish Diabetes Society (SED, 2018). 2018

Arrieta, Francisco / Iglesias, Pedro / Pedro-Botet, Juan / Becerra, Antonio / Ortega, Emilio / Obaya, Juan Carlos / Nubiola, Andreu / Maldonado, Gonzalo Fernando / Campos, Maria Del Mar / Petrecca, Romina / Pardo, José Luis / Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor / Alemán, José Juan / Navarro, Jorge / Duran, Santiago / Tébar, Francisco Javier / Aguilar, Manuel / Escobar, Fernando / Anonymous931301. ·Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, CIBEROBN, IRYCIS, Madrid, España. Electronic address: arri68@hotmail.com. · Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro-Mjadahonda, Madrid, España. · Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, España. · Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. · Hospital Universitario Araba, Vitoria-Gasteiz, España. · Hospital Clínic i Universitari, CIBEROBN, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, España. · Centro de Salud Chopera, Alcobendas, Madrid, España. · Hospital de l'Esperit Sant, Santa Coloma de Gramenet, Barcelona, España. · Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, España. · Hospital Universitario Princesa, Madrid, España. · Centro de Salud Orihuela, Orihuela, Alicante, España. · Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla, España. · Centro de Salud Tacoronte, Tacoronte, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, España. · Hospital Universitario Nuestra Señora de Valme, Sevilla, España. · Dirección de Atención Primaria, IIS INCLIVA, CIBERESP, Valencia, España. · Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia, España. · Hospital Puerta del Mar, Cádiz, España. ·Clin Investig Arterioscler · Pubmed #29754804.

ABSTRACT: This document is an update to the clinical practice recommendations for the management of cardiovascular risk factors in diabetes mellitus. The consensus is made by members of the Cardiovascular Risk Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society. We have proposed and updated interventions on lifestyle, pharmacological treatment indicated to achieve therapeutic objectives according to the levels of HbA1c, degree of obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, heart failure, platelet antiagregation, renal insufficiency, and diabetes in the elderly, as well as new biomarkers of interest in the evaluation of cardiovascular risk in individuals with diabetes mellitus. The work is an update of the interventions and therapeutic objectives in addition, it is noted the need for the inclusion of specialists in Endocrinology, Metabolism and Nutrition in Cardiac Rehabilitation Units for the control and monitoring of this population.

8 Guideline Insulin Access and Affordability Working Group: Conclusions and Recommendations. 2018

Cefalu, William T / Dawes, Daniel E / Gavlak, Gina / Goldman, Dana / Herman, William H / Van Nuys, Karen / Powers, Alvin C / Taylor, Simeon I / Yatvin, Alan L / Anonymous2741233. ·American Diabetes Association, Arlington, VA wcefalu@diabetes.org. · Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. · North Coast Health, Lakewood, OH. · USC Schaeffer Center for Health Policy & Economics, Los Angeles, CA. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. · Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN. · University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Popper & Yatvin, Philadelphia, PA. ·Diabetes Care · Pubmed #29739814.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Guideline The Berlin Declaration: A call to action to improve early actions related to type 2 diabetes. How can specialist care help? 2018

Ceriello, Antonio / Gavin, James R / Boulton, Andrew J M / Blickstead, Rick / McGill, Margaret / Raz, Itamar / Sadikot, Shaukat / Wood, David A / Cos, Xavier / Khunti, Kamlesh / Kalra, Sanjay / Das, Ashok Kumar / López, Cutberto Espinosa / Anonymous5301165. ·Department of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, IRCCS Multimedica, Milan, Italy; Insititut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabólicas Asociadas (CIBERDEM), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: aceriell@clinic.ub.es. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Diabetes Canada, Toronto, Canada. · Central Clinical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; The Diabetes Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Hadassah Ein Kerem Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. · Department of Endocrinology/Diabetology, Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre, Mumbai, India. · International Centre for Circulatory Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, UK. · Sant Marti de Provençals Primary Care Centres, Institut Català de la Salut, Barcelona, Spain; University Research Institute in Primary Care (IDIAP Jordi Gol), Barcelona, Spain. · Diabetes Research Centre, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom. · Bharti Hospital and B.R.I.D.E., Karnal, India. · Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Pondicherry, Puducherry, India. · CENAPRECE "National Center for Preventive Programs and Disease Control", Mexico City, Mexico. ·Diabetes Res Clin Pract · Pubmed #29596943.

ABSTRACT: Diabetes is a major global epidemic and places a huge burden on healthcare systems worldwide. The complications of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and related hospitalizations are major contributors to this burden, and there is strong evidence that the risk for these can be reduced by early action to identify and prevent progression of people at high risk of T2D and ensure tight glycemic control in those with established disease. In response to this, the Berlin Declaration was developed by four working groups of experts and ratified by healthcare professionals from 38 countries. Its aim is to act as a global call to action for early intervention in diabetes, in addition to providing short-, medium- and long-term targets that should be relevant to all nations. The Berlin Declaration focuses on four aspects of early action, and proposes actionable policies relating to each aspect: early detection, prevention, early control and early access to the right interventions. In addition, a number of treatment targets are proposed to provide goals for these policies. To ensure that the suggested policies are enacted in the most effective manner, the support of specialist care professionals is considered essential.

10 Guideline AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY 2018 POSITION STATEMENT ON INTEGRATION OF INSULIN PUMPS AND CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITORING IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS. 2018

Grunberger, George / Handelsman, Yehuda / Bloomgarden, Zachary T / Fonseca, Vivian A / Garber, Alan J / Haas, Richard A / Roberts, Victor L / Umpierrez, Guillermo E. · ·Endocr Pract · Pubmed #29547046.

ABSTRACT: This document represents the official position of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology. Where there are no randomized controlled trials or specific U.S. FDA labeling for issues in clinical practice, the participating clinical experts utilized their judgment and experience. Every effort was made to achieve consensus among the committee members. Position statements are meant to provide guidance, but they are not to be considered prescriptive for any individual patient and cannot replace the judgment of a clinician. AACE/ACE Task Force on Integration of Insulin Pumps and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in the Management of Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Chair George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE Task Force Members Yehuda Handelsman, MD, FACP, FNLA, MACE Zachary T. Bloomgarden, MD, MACE Vivian A. Fonseca, MD, FACE Alan J. Garber, MD, PhD, FACE Richard A. Haas, MD, FACE Victor L. Roberts, MD, MBA, FACP, FACE Guillermo E. Umpierrez, MD, CDE, FACP, FACE Abbreviations: AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists ACE = American College of Endocrinology A1C = glycated hemoglobin BGM = blood glucose monitoring CGM = continuous glucose monitoring CSII = continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion DM = diabetes mellitus FDA = Food & Drug Administration MDI = multiple daily injections T1DM = type 1 diabetes mellitus T2DM = type 2 diabetes mellitus SAP = sensor-augmented pump SMBG = self-monitoring of blood glucose STAR 3 = Sensor-Augmented Pump Therapy for A1C Reduction phase 3 trial.

11 Guideline Practical management of diabetes patients before, during and after surgery: A joint French diabetology and anaesthesiology position statement. 2018

Cosson, E / Catargi, B / Cheisson, G / Jacqueminet, S / Ichai, C / Leguerrier, A-M / Ouattara, A / Tauveron, I / Bismuth, E / Benhamou, D / Valensi, P. ·Département d'endocrinologie-diabétologie-nutrition, CRNH-IdF, CINFO, hôpital Jean-Verdier, université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, AP-HP, 93140 Bondy, France; UMR U1153 Inserm, U1125 Inra, CNAM, université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 93000 Bobigny, France. · Service d'endocrinologie-maladies métaboliques, hôpital Saint-André, CHU de Bordeaux, 1, rue Jean-Burguet, 33000 Bordeaux, France. Electronic address: bogdan.catargi@chu-bordeaux.fr. · Service d'anesthésie-réanimation chirurgicale, hôpitaux universitaires Paris-Sud, hôpital de Bicêtre, AP-HP, 78, rue du Général-Leclerc, 94275 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Institut de cardio-métabolisme et nutrition, hôpital de la Pitié-Salpêtrière, AP-HP, 75013 Paris, France; Département du diabète et des maladies métaboliques, hôpital de la Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. · Service de la réanimation polyvalente, hôpital Pasteur 2, CHU de Nice, 30, voie Romaine, 06001 Nice cedex 1, France; IRCAN, Inserm U1081, CNRS UMR 7284, university hospital of Nice, 06000 Nice, France. · Service de diabétologie-endocrinologie, CHU hôpital Sud, CHU de Rennes, 16, boulevard de Bulgarie, 35056 Rennes, France. · Department of anaesthesia and critical care II, Magellan medico-surgical center, CHU de Bordeaux, 33000 Bordeaux, France; Inserm, UMR 1034, biology of cardiovascular diseases, université Bordeaux, 33600 Pessac, France. · Service d'endocrinologie-diabétologie, CHU de Clermont-Ferrand, 58, rue Montalembert, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France; UFR médecine, université Clermont-Auvergne, 28, place Henri-Dunant, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France; UMR CNRS 6293, Inserm U1103, génétique reproduction et développement, université Clermont-Auvergne, 63170 Aubière, France; Endocrinologie-diabétologie, CHU G.-Montpied, BP 69, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand, France. · Service d'endocrinologie-pédiatrie-diabète, hôpital Robert-Debré, AP-HP, 75019 Paris, France. · Département d'endocrinologie-diabétologie-nutrition, CRNH-IdF, CINFO, hôpital Jean-Verdier, université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, AP-HP, 93140 Bondy, France. ·Diabetes Metab · Pubmed #29496345.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Guideline Claimed effects, outcome variables and methods of measurement for health claims proposed under European Community Regulation 1924/2006 in the area of blood glucose and insulin concentrations. 2018

Martini, Daniela / Biasini, Beatrice / Zavaroni, Ivana / Bedogni, Giorgio / Musci, Marilena / Pruneti, Carlo / Passeri, Giovanni / Ventura, Marco / Galli, Daniela / Mirandola, Prisco / Vitale, Marco / Dei Cas, Alessandra / Bonadonna, Riccardo C / Del Rio, Daniele. ·The Laboratory of Phytochemicals in Physiology, Department of Food and Drug, University of Parma, Medical School, Building A, Via Volturno 39, 43125, Parma, Italy. · The Laboratory of Phytochemicals in Physiology, Department of Food Science, University of Parma, Medical School, Building A, Via Volturno 39, 43125, Parma, Italy. · Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria of Parma, Parma, Italy. · Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Liver Research Center, Basovizza, Trieste, Italy. · Department of Food and Drug, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · Department of Medicine and Surgery, Clinical Psychology Unit, University of Parma, Medical School Building, Parma, Italy. · Department of Medicine and Surgery, Building Clinica Medica Generale, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · Laboratory of Probiogenomics, Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · Department of Medicine and Surgery, Sport and Exercise Medicine Centre (SEM), University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · The Laboratory of Phytochemicals in Physiology, Department of Food and Drug, University of Parma, Medical School, Building A, Via Volturno 39, 43125, Parma, Italy. daniele.delrio@unipr.it. ·Acta Diabetol · Pubmed #29383587.

ABSTRACT: Most requests for authorization to bear health claims under Articles 13(5) and 14 related to blood glucose and insulin concentration/regulation presented to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) receive a negative opinion. Reasons for such decisions are mainly ascribable to poor substantiation of the claimed effects. In this scenario, a project was carried out aiming at critically analysing the outcome variables (OVs) and methods of measurement (MMs) to be used to substantiate health claims, with the final purpose to improve the quality of applications provided by stakeholders to EFSA. This manuscript provides a position statement of the experts involved in the project, reporting the results of an investigation aimed to collect, collate and critically analyse the information relevant to claimed effects (CEs), OVs and MMs related to blood glucose and insulin levels and homoeostasis compliant with Regulation 1924/2006. The critical analysis of OVs and MMs was performed with the aid of the pertinent scientific literature and was aimed at defining their appropriateness (alone or in combination with others) to support a specific CE. The results can be used to properly select OVs and MMs in a randomized controlled trial, for an effective substantiation of the claims, using the reference method(s) whenever available. Moreover, results can help EFSA in updating the guidance for the scientific requirements of health claims.

13 Guideline Diabetic Foot Australia guideline on footwear for people with diabetes. 2018

van Netten, Jaap J / Lazzarini, Peter A / Armstrong, David G / Bus, Sicco A / Fitridge, Robert / Harding, Keith / Kinnear, Ewan / Malone, Matthew / Menz, Hylton B / Perrin, Byron M / Postema, Klaas / Prentice, Jenny / Schott, Karl-Heinz / Wraight, Paul R. ·1School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD Australia. · 0000000089150953 · grid.1024.7 · Diabetic Foot Australia, Brisbane, QLD Australia. · Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Research Centre, Brisbane, QLD Australia. · Allied Health Research Collaborative, Metro North Hospital & Health Service, Brisbane, QLD Australia. · 5Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance (SALSA), Department of Surgery, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ USA. · 0000 0001 2168 186X · grid.134563.6 · Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · 7Vascular Surgery, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia Australia. · 0000 0004 1936 7304 · grid.1010.0 · 8University Dean of Clinical Innovation, Professor of Wound Healing Research, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK. · 0000 0001 0807 5670 · grid.5600.3 · 9High Risk Foot Service, Liverpool Hospital, South Western Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, NSW Australia. · 0000 0001 2105 7653 · grid.410692.8 · 10Discipline of Podiatry, School of Allied Health, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC Australia. · 0000 0001 2342 0938 · grid.1018.8 · 11La Trobe Rural Health School, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe University, Bendigo, VIC Australia. · Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Groningen, the Netherlands. · Wound Consultant, Trojan Health, Perth, WA Australia. · 14School of Health and Human Sciences (Pedorthics) Southern Cross University Gold Coast Campus, Bilinga, QLD Australia. · 0000000121532610 · grid.1031.3 · 15Diabetic Foot Unit, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC Australia. · 0000 0004 0624 1200 · grid.416153.4 ·J Foot Ankle Res · Pubmed #29371890.

ABSTRACT: Background: The aim of this paper was to create an updated Australian guideline on footwear for people with diabetes. Methods: We reviewed new footwear publications, (inter)national guidelines, and consensus expert opinion alongside the 2013 Australian footwear guideline to formulate updated recommendations. Result: We recommend health professionals managing people with diabetes should: (1) Advise people with diabetes to wear footwear that fits, protects and accommodates the shape of their feet. (2) Advise people with diabetes to always wear socks within their footwear, in order to reduce shear and friction. (3) Educate people with diabetes, their relatives and caregivers on the importance of wearing appropriate footwear to prevent foot ulceration. (4) Instruct people with diabetes at intermediate- or high-risk of foot ulceration to obtain footwear from an appropriately trained professional to ensure it fits, protects and accommodates the shape of their feet. (5) Motivate people with diabetes at intermediate- or high-risk of foot ulceration to wear their footwear at all times, both indoors and outdoors. (6) Motivate people with diabetes at intermediate- or high-risk of foot ulceration (or their relatives and caregivers) to check their footwear, each time before wearing, to ensure that there are no foreign objects in, or penetrating, the footwear; and check their feet, each time their footwear is removed, to ensure there are no signs of abnormal pressure, trauma or ulceration. (7) For people with a foot deformity or pre-ulcerative lesion, consider prescribing medical grade footwear, which may include custom-made in-shoe orthoses or insoles. (8) For people with a healed plantar foot ulcer, prescribe medical grade footwear with custom-made in-shoe orthoses or insoles with a demonstrated plantar pressure relieving effect at high-risk areas. (9) Review prescribed footwear every three months to ensure it still fits adequately, protects, and supports the foot. (10) For people with a plantar diabetic foot ulcer, footwear is not specifically recommended for treatment; prescribe appropriate offloading devices to heal these ulcers. Conclusions: This guideline contains 10 key recommendations to guide health professionals in selecting the most appropriate footwear to meet the specific foot risk needs of an individual with diabetes.

14 Guideline ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 190: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. 2018

Anonymous1091291. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #29370047.

ABSTRACT: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common medical complications of pregnancy. However, debate continues to surround the diagnosis and treatment of GDM despite several recent large-scale studies addressing these issues. The purposes of this document are the following: 1) provide a brief overview of the understanding of GDM, 2) review management guidelines that have been validated by appropriately conducted clinical research, and 3) identify gaps in current knowledge toward which future research can be directed.

15 Guideline ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 190 Summary: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. 2018

Anonymous1061291. · ·Obstet Gynecol · Pubmed #29370044.

ABSTRACT: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common medical complications of pregnancy. However, debate continues to surround the diagnosis and treatment of GDM despite several recent large-scale studies addressing these issues. The purposes of this document are the following: 1) provide a brief overview of the understanding of GDM, 2) review management guidelines that have been validated by appropriately conducted clinical research, and 3) identify gaps in current knowledge toward which future research can be directed.

16 Guideline FIGO's response to the global challenge of hyperglycemia in pregnancy - toward a global consensus. 2018

Kapur, Anil / Mahmood, Tahir / Hod, Moshe. ·a FIGO Working Group on Hyperglycemia in Pregnancy, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), Waterloo Court , London , UK. ·Gynecol Endocrinol · Pubmed #28980832.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Guideline None 2017

Faludi, André Arpad / Izar, Maria Cristina de Oliveira / Saraiva, José Francisco Kerr / Bianco, Henrique Tria / Chacra, Ana Paula Marte / Bertoluci, Marcello Casaccia / Moreira, Rodrigo Oliveira / Turatti, Luiz Alberto Andreotti / Bertolami, Adriana / Sulzbach, Martha L / Schaan, Beatriz D / Valerio, Cynthia Melissa / Bertolami, Marcelo Chiara / Malachias, Marcus Vinícius Bolívar / Vencio, Sérgio / Betti, Roberto Tadeu Barcellos / Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein / Salles, João Eduardo Nunes / Hohl, Alexandre. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #29489927.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Guideline AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON TESTING FOR AUTONOMIC AND SOMATIC NERVE DYSFUNCTION. 2017

Vinik, Aaron I / Camacho, Pauline M / Davidson, Jaime A / Handelsman, Yehuda / Lando, Howard M / Leddy, Anne L / Reddy, Sethu K / Cook, Richard / Spallone, Vicenza / Tesfaye, Solomon / Ziegler, Dan / Anonymous2521077. · ·Endocr Pract · Pubmed #29320641.

ABSTRACT: This document represents the official position of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology. Where there were no randomized controlled trials or specific U.S. FDA labeling for issues in clinical practice, the participating clinical experts utilized their judgment and experience. Every effort was made to achieve consensus among the committee members. Position statements are meant to provide guidance, but they are not to be considered prescriptive for any individual patient and cannot replace the judgment of a clinician.

19 Guideline [Recommendations for the use of ranibizumab in diabetic macular edema at IMSS]. 2017

Ortiz-Lerma, Roberto / González-Cervantes, Carlos Pedro / Hernández-Núñez, Fabiola / Ancona-Durán, Irene / Betesh-Rodríguez, Isaac / Méndez, Noé / Garza-Cantú, Daniel / López-Martínez, Óscar / Martínez-Ruiz, Adriana Marcela / López-Montero, Luis Miguel / Muñoz, Armando / Blancas-Ontiveros, Jorge Alberto / Fernández-Trejo, Carlos Mariano / Mayorga-Rubalcava, Juan Carlos / Flores-Góngora, Silvia Elizabeth / Gómez-Galván, Jorge Luis / Domínguez-Álvarez, Patricia Armida / Sánchez-Hernández, Erik / Cantú-Yeverinon, Homero. ·aJefatura del Servicio de Oftalmología, Hospital General "Dr. Gaudencio González Garza", Centro Médico Nacional La Raza, Ciudad de México. ·Rev Med Inst Mex Seguro Soc · Pubmed #29190870.

ABSTRACT: Diabetic macular edema can occur at any stage of diabetic retinopathy. It represents the main cause of vision loss in diabetes type I and II with a prevalence of 3-10% in diabetic patients of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). Our aim is to elaborate treatment guidelines and provide recommendations for the use of intravitreal ranibizumab for diabetic medical edema at IMSS. Nine retina specialists and 10 ophthalmologists from IMSS high specialty medical units gathered to discuss the bibliographic evidence for the safety and efficacy of ranibizumab for this disease, in order to create consensus on its use in the institution. Intravitreal ranibizumab injection should be used on patients presenting diffuse or cystic diabetic macular edema who have strict metabolic control and visual acuity between 20/30 and 20/200 ETDRS, as well as structural features, such as inferior foveal limit of 280 μm and ischemic areas no larger than 50% of the central foveal area. Treatment regime should consist of a loading charge of three monthly injections of ranibizumab 0.5 mg, followed by monthly follow-ups and treatment as needed according to anatomic and functional criteria. This consensus decision-making process on the criteria to treat and re-treat patients with this drug will result in better health outcomes than those currently observed among patients with diabetic macular edema at IMSS.

20 Guideline Excerpt from the Canadian Ophthalmological Society evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of diabetic retinopathy. 2017

Hooper, Philip / Boucher, Marie Carole / Cruess, Alan / Dawson, Keith G / Delpero, Walter / Greve, Mark / Kozousek, Vladimir / Lam, Wai-Ching / Maberley, David A L. ·Philip Hooper, London, ON (Chair) (retina and uveitis) · Marie Carole Boucher, Montreal, QC (retina and teleophthalmology) · Alan Cruess, Halifax, NS (retina) · Keith G. Dawson, Vancouver, BC (endocrinology) · Walter Delpero, Ottawa, ON (cataract and strabismus) · Mark Greve, Edmonton, AB (retina and teleophthalmology) · Vladimir Kozousek, Halifax, NS (medical retina) · Wai-Ching Lam, Toronto, ON (retina and research) · David A.L. Maberley, Vancouver, BC (retina). ·Can J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #29074014.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline Synopsis of the 2017 U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs/U.S. Department of Defense Clinical Practice Guideline: Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. 2017

Conlin, Paul R / Colburn, Jeffrey / Aron, David / Pries, Rose Mary / Tschanz, Mark P / Pogach, Leonard. ·From VA Boston Healthcare System, West Roxbury, Massachusetts; San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio; VHA National Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Durham, North Carolina; San Diego Internal Medicine, San Diego, California; and Veterans Affairs Central Office, Office of Specialty Care Services, Washington, DC. ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #29059687.

ABSTRACT: Description: In April 2017, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) approved a joint clinical practice guideline for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: The VA/DoD Evidence-Based Practice Work Group convened a joint VA/DoD guideline development effort that included a multidisciplinary panel of practicing clinician stakeholders and conformed to the Institute of Medicine's tenets for trustworthy clinical practice guidelines. The guideline panel developed key questions in collaboration with the ECRI Institute, which systematically searched and evaluated the literature through June 2016, developed an algorithm, and rated recommendations by using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. Recommendations: This synopsis summarizes key features of the guideline in 7 areas: patient-centered care and shared decision making, glycemic biomarkers, hemoglobin A1c target ranges, individualized treatment plans, outpatient pharmacologic treatment, glucose targets for critically ill patients, and treatment of hospitalized patients.

22 Guideline Insulin therapy for adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a position statement of the Korean Diabetes Association, 2017. 2017

Lee, Byung-Wan / Kim, Jin Hwa / Ko, Seung-Hyun / Hur, Kyu Yeon / Kim, Nan-Hee / Rhee, Sang Youl / Kim, Hyun Jin / Moon, Min Kyong / Park, Seok-O / Choi, Kyung Mook / Anonymous4461194. ·Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Gwangmyeong Sungae Hospital, Gwangmyeong, Korea. ·Korean J Intern Med · Pubmed #29057642.

ABSTRACT: The Korean Diabetes Association (KDA) has regularly updated its Clinical Practice Guidelines. In 2017, the KDA published a position statement on the use of antihyperglycemic agents for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Growing evidence from new multinational clinical trials using novel and traditional insulin analogues has also been accumulated. Following global trends, many results of clinical trials, especially concerning the clinical efficacy and safety of insulin therapy, have been published about Korean patients with T2DM. After a systematic search of recent evidence, the KDA updated and modified its clinical practice recommendations regarding the initiation, choice, and intensification of insulin and created an insulin treatment algorithm for the first time to guide physicians caring for adult Korean patients with T2DM.

23 Guideline Antihyperglycemic agent therapy for adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus 2017: a position statement of the Korean Diabetes Association. 2017

Ko, Seung-Hyun / Hur, Kyu Yeon / Rhee, Sang Youl / Kim, Nan-Hee / Moon, Min Kyong / Park, Seok-O / Lee, Byung-Wan / Kim, Hyun Jin / Choi, Kyung Mook / Kim, Jin Hwa / Anonymous4451194. ·Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Gwangmyeong Sungae Hospital, Gwangmyeong, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju, Korea. ·Korean J Intern Med · Pubmed #29056038.

ABSTRACT: In 2017, the Korean Diabetes Association (KDA) published a position statement on the use of antihyperglycemic agents for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The KDA regularly updates its Clinical Practice Guidelines, but since the last update in 2015, many results from clinical trials have been introduced, and domestic data from studies performed in Korean patients with T2DM have been published. Recently, evidence from large clinical studies assessing cardiovascular outcomes following the use of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists in patients with T2DM were incorporated into the recommendations. Additionally, new data from clinical trials using dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors and thiazolidinediones in Korean patients with T2DM were added. Following a systematic review and assessment of recent evidence, the KDA updated and modified its clinical practice recommendations regarding the use of antihyperglycemic agents and revised the treatment algorithm for Korean adult patients with T2DM.

24 Guideline Management della retinopatia diabetica e dell'edema maculare diabetico: linee guida "Euretina 2017". 2017

Turchetti, P / Librando, A / Angelucci, F / Carlesimo, S C / Migliorini, R. ·Istituto Nazionale per la promozione della salute delle popolazioni Migranti ed il contrasto delle malattie della Povertà. (INMP/NIHMP), Rome 00153, Italia. · Dipartimento Organi di Senso, Facoltà di Medicina e Odontoiatria, Sapienza Università di Roma, Italia. · Centro specialistico di Salute Aurelia S.R.L., Roma, Italia. ·Clin Ter · Pubmed #29044359.

ABSTRACT: Si prevede che la malattia diabetica con tutte le sue complicanze avrà un forte aumento di incidenza con un grosso impatto socioeconomico nei prossimi decenni in tutto il mondo. Pertanto ben si comprende l'importanza di individuare attraverso una fine diagnostica quanto più precocemente la comparsa dei sintomi diabetici, migliorare lo stile di vita ed impostare cure efficienti. Riportiamo la serie di raccomandazioni EURETINA 2017, dei maggiori esperti in Europa per la gestione della malattia diabetica e delle complicanze della retina. Per combattere questa "pestilenza" occorre un team medico preparato. Il trattamento laser è stato considerato sino a non molto tempo fa il Gold standard della retinopatia diabetica e dell'edema diabetico (RD e EMD). Recenti studi hanno dimostrato, invece, che si possono raggiungere risultati migliori mediante l'iniezione diretta di farmaci nella cavità vitreale. In particolare è emerso terapia di prima linea, molecole in grado di inibire il fattore di crescita endoteliale vascolare (anti VEGF) mentre non è più raccomandata la fotocoagulazione laser per il trattamento del DME. Nell'ambito delle molecole farmacologiche gli steroidi hanno mantenuto un ruolo nella gestione del DME cronicamente persistente.

25 Guideline Diabetes in older people: position statement of The Hong Kong Geriatrics Society and the Hong Kong Society of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Reproduction. 2017

Wong, C W / Lee, J Sw / Tam, K F / Hung, H F / So, W Y / Shum, C K / Lam, C Y / Cheng, J N / Man, S P / Auyeung, T W. ·Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Caritas Medical Centre, Sham Shui Po, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Tai Po Hospital, Tai Po, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine, Hong Kong Buddhist Hospital, Lok Fu, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Lai Chi Kok, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Tuen Mun Hospital, Tuen Mun, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Jordan, Hong Kong. · Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Pok Oi Hospital, Yuen Long, Hong Kong. ·Hong Kong Med J · Pubmed #29026049.

ABSTRACT: Following a survey on the clinical practice of geriatricians in the management of older people with diabetes and a study of hypoglycaemia in diabetic patients, a round-table discussion with geriatricians and endocrinologists was held in January 2015. Consensus was reached for six domains specifically related to older diabetic people: (1) the considerations when setting an individualised diabetic management; (2) inclusion of geriatric syndrome screening in assessment; (3) glycaemic and blood pressure targets; (4) pharmacotherapy; (5) restrictive diabetic diet; and (6) management goals for nursing home residents.

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