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Endocrine System Diseases HELP
Based on 100,000 articles published since 2008
|||| 22 

These are the 100000 published articles about Endocrine System Diseases that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Thyroid hormones treatment for subclinical hypothyroidism: a clinical practice guideline. 2019

Bekkering, G E / Agoritsas, T / Lytvyn, L / Heen, A F / Feller, M / Moutzouri, E / Abdulazeem, H / Aertgeerts, B / Beecher, D / Brito, J P / Farhoumand, P D / Singh Ospina, N / Rodondi, N / van Driel, M / Wallace, E / Snel, M / Okwen, P M / Siemieniuk, R / Vandvik, P O / Kuijpers, T / Vermandere, M. ·Academic Centre for General Practice, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Belgium trudy.bekkering@kuleuven.be. · Belgian Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, Cochrane Belgium. · Division of General Internal Medicine and Division of Clinical Epidemiology, University. · Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Innlandet Hospital Trust-division, Gjøvik, Norway. · Institute of Primary Health Care (BIHAM), University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of General Internal Medicine, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Munich, Germany. · Academic Centre for General Practice, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Belgium. · Milan, Italy. · Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit in Endocrinology (KER_Endo), Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. · Division General Internal Medicine, University Hospitals of Geneva, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA. · Primary Care Clinical Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane Qld 4029, Australia. · HRB Centre for Primary Care Research and Department of General Practice, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Endocrinology/General Internal Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands. · Effective Basic Services (eBASE), Bamenda, Cameroon. · Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. · Dutch College of General Practitioners, Utrecht, Netherlands. ·BMJ · Pubmed #31088853.

ABSTRACT: CLINICAL QUESTION: What are the benefits and harms of thyroid hormones for adults with subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH)? This guideline was triggered by a recent systematic review of randomised controlled trials, which could alter practice. CURRENT PRACTICE: Current guidelines tend to recommend thyroid hormones for adults with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels >10 mIU/L and for people with lower TSH values who are young, symptomatic, or have specific indications for prescribing. RECOMMENDATION: The guideline panel issues a strong recommendation against thyroid hormones in adults with SCH (elevated TSH levels and normal free T4 (thyroxine) levels). It does not apply to women who are trying to become pregnant or patients with TSH >20 mIU/L. It may not apply to patients with severe symptoms or young adults (such as those ≤30 years old). HOW THIS GUIDELINE WAS CREATED: A guideline panel including patients, clinicians, and methodologists produced this recommendation in adherence with standards for trustworthy guidelines using the GRADE approach. THE EVIDENCE: The systematic review included 21 trials with 2192 participants. For adults with SCH, thyroid hormones consistently demonstrate no clinically relevant benefits for quality of life or thyroid related symptoms, including depressive symptoms, fatigue, and body mass index (moderate to high quality evidence). Thyroid hormones may have little or no effect on cardiovascular events or mortality (low quality evidence), but harms were measured in only one trial with few events at two years' follow-up. UNDERSTANDING THE RECOMMENDATION: The panel concluded that almost all adults with SCH would not benefit from treatment with thyroid hormones. Other factors in the strong recommendation include the burden of lifelong management and uncertainty on potential harms. Instead, clinicians should monitor the progression or resolution of the thyroid dysfunction in these adults. Recommendations are made actionable for clinicians and their patients through visual overviews. These provide the relative and absolute benefits and harms of thyroid hormones in multilayered evidence summaries and decision aids available in MAGIC (https://app.magicapp.org/) to support shared decisions and adaptation of this guideline.

2 Guideline [Management of epithelial ovarian cancer. Short text drafted from the French joint recommendations of FRANCOGYN, CNGOF, SFOG, GINECO-ARCAGY and endorsed by INCa]. 2019

Lavoue, Vincent / Huchon, Cyrille / Akladios, Cherif / Alfonsi, Pascal / Bakrin, Naoual / Ballester, Marcos / Bendifallah, Sofiane / Bolze, Pierre-Adrien / Bonnet, Fabrice / Bourgin, Charlotte / Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie / Collinet, Pierre / Courbiere, Blandine / De la Motte Rouge, Thibault / Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan / Falandry, Claire / Ferron, Gwenal / Fournier, Laure / Gladieff, Laurence / Golfier, François / Gouy, Sébastien / Guyon, Frédérique / Lambaudie, Eric / Leary, Alexandra / Lecuru, Fabrice / Lefrere-Belda, Marie-Aude / Leblanc, Eric / Lemoine, Adrien / Narducci, Fabrice / Ouldamer, Lobna / Pautier, Patricia / Planchamp, François / Pouget, Nicolas / Ray-Coquard, Isabelle / Rousset-Jablonski, Christine / Senechal-Davin, Claire / Touboul, Cyril / Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle / Uzan, Catherine / You, Benoit / Daraï, Emile. ·CHU de Rennes, hôpital sud, service de gynécologie, 16, boulevard de Bulgarie, 35000 Rennes, France; Chemistry, oncogenesis, stress and signaling, centre Eugène Marquis, Inserm 1242, rue Bataille Flandres-Dunkerque, 35000 Rennes, France. Electronic address: Vincent.lavoue@chu-rennes.fr. · CHI Poissy, service de gynécologie, 78300 Poissy, France. · CHU Strasbourg, hôpital Hautepierre, service de gynécologie, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Hôpital Saint-Joseph, service d'anesthésie, 75000 Paris, France. · CHU Lyon-Sud, service de chirurgie digestive, Pierre-Bénite, 69000 Lyon, France. · Groupe hospitalier Diaconesses Croix Saint Simon, service de gynécologie, 75000 Paris, France. · AP-HP, institut universitaire de cancérologie Sorbonne université, service de gynécologie-obstétrique et médecine de la reproduction, hôpital Tenon, UMRS-938, 4, rue de La Chine, 75020 Tenon, France. · CHU Lyon-Sud, service de chirurgie gynécologique, Pierre Bénite, 69000 Lyon, France. · AP-HP, hôpital Tenon, service d'anesthésie, 75020 Tenon, France. · CHRU, hôpital Jeanne de Flandres, service de chirurgie gynécologique, 59000 Lille, France. · AP-HM La Conception, pôle Femmes-Parents-Enfants-centre clinico-biologique d'AMP, 147, boulevard Baille, 13000 Marseille, France; Aix-Marseille université, CNRS, IRD, Avignon université, IMBE UMR 7263, 13000 Marseille, France. · Centre Eugène Marquis, service d'oncologie médicale, 35000 Rennes, France. · CHU Lyon-Sud, service d'anatomo-pathologie, hospices civiles de Lyon, Pierre-Bénite, 69000 Lyon, France. · CHU Lyon-Sud, service d'oncogériatrie, hospices civiles de Lyon, Pierre-Bénite, 69000 Lyon, France. · Institut Claudius Regaud, IUCT Oncopole, service d'oncologie chirurgicale, 31000 Toulouse, France. · AP-HP, service de radiologie, hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, 75015 Paris, France. · Institut Claudius Regaud, IUCT Oncopole, service d'oncologie médicale, 31000 Toulouse, France. · Institut Gustave Roussy, service de chirurgie, 94800 Villejuif, France. · Institut Bergonié, service de chirurgie, 33000 Bordeaux, France. · Institut Paoli Calmette, service de chirurgie, 13000 Marseille, France. · Institut Gustave Roussy, service d'oncologie médicale, 94800 Villejuif, France. · AP-HP, hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, service de chirurgie gynécologique et oncologique, 75015 Paris, France. · AP-HP, hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, service d'anatomo-pathologie, 75015 Paris, France. · Centre Oscar Lambret, service de chirurgie, 59000 Lille, France. · CHU de Tours, service de chirurgie gynécologique, 37000 Tours, France. · Institut Bergonié, service de méthodologie, 33000 Bordeaux, France. · Curie (site Saint Cloud), service de chirurgie, 75000 Paris, France. · Centre Léon Bérard, service d'oncologie médicale, 69000 Lyon, France. · CHI de Créteil, service de chirurgie gynécologique, 94000 Créteil, France. · AP-HP, hôpital Tenon, service de radiologie, 75020 Tenon, France. · Institut universitaire de cancérologie, Sorbonne université, hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, service de chirurgie et cancérologie gynécologique et mammaire, Inserm U938, 75000 La pitié, France. · Institut de cancérologie des Hospices Civils de Lyon, service d'oncologie médicale, Pierre-Bénite, 69000 Lyon, France. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #30850152.

ABSTRACT: Faced to an undetermined ovarian mass on ultrasound, an MRI is recommended and the ROMA score (combining CA125 and HE4) can be proposed (grade A). In case of suspected early stage ovarian or fallopian tube cancer, omentectomy (at least infracolonic), appendectomy, multiple peritoneal biopsies, peritoneal cytology (grade C) and pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy are recommended (grade B) for all histological types, except for the expansive mucinous subtype where lymphadenectomy may be omitted (grade C). Minimally invasive surgery is recommended for early stage ovarian cancer, if there is no risk of tumor rupture (grade B). Adjuvant chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel is recommended for all high-grade ovarian or Fallopian tube cancers, stage FIGO I-IIA (grade A). In case of ovarian, Fallopian tube or primitive peritoneal cancer of FIGO III-IV stages, thoraco-abdomino-pelvic CT scan with injection (grade B) is recommended. Laparoscopic exploration for multiple biopsies (grade A) and to evaluate carcinomatosis score (at least using the Fagotti score) (grade C) are recommended to estimate the possibility of a complete surgery (i.e. no macroscopic residue). Complete medial laparotomy surgery is recommended for advanced cancers (grade B). It is recommended in advanced cancers to perform para-aortic and pelvic lymphadenectomy in case of clinical or radiological suspicion of metastatic lymph node (grade B). In the absence of clinical or radiological lymphadenopathy and in case of complete peritoneal surgery during an initial surgery for advanced cancer, it is possible not to perform a lymphadenectomy because it does not modify the medical treatment and the overall survival (grade B). Primary surgery is recommended when no tumor residue is possible (grade B). After a complete first surgery, it is recommended to deliver 6 cycles of intravenous (grade A) or to propose intraperitoneal (grade B) chemotherapy, to be discussed with patient, according to the benefit/risk ratio. After a complete interval surgery for a FIGO III stage, the hyperthermic intra peritoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) can be proposed in the same conditions of the OV-HIPEC trial (grade B). In case of tumor residue after surgery or FIGO stage IV, chemotherapy associated with bevacizumab is recommended (grade A).

3 Guideline Diabetes insipidus. 2019

Levy, Miles / Prentice, Malcolm / Wass, John. ·Department of Endocrinology, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester, UK. · Department of Endocrinology, Croydon University Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Endocrinology, Oxford University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. ·BMJ · Pubmed #30819684.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline Retrospective Application of the 2015 American Thyroid Association Guidelines for Ultrasound Classification, Biopsy Indications, and Follow-up Imaging of Thyroid Nodules: Can Improved Reporting Decrease Testing? 2019

Mohammadi, Manijeh / Betel, Carrie / Burton, Kirsteen Rennie / Higgins, Kevin McLughlin / Ghorab, Zeina / Halperin, Ilana Jaye. ·Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: mohammadi.mjh@gmail.com. · Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·Can Assoc Radiol J · Pubmed #30691566.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Thyroid ultrasound has been widely used to determine which nodules need further investigation. The goal of this study is to determine if using an ultrasonographic features checklist based on 2015 American Thyroid Association (ATA) guidelines can improve reporting and decrease unnecessary further testing. METHODS: In this retrospective study, ultrasonographic images of all nodules biopsied at our institution in 2014 and 2015 were reviewed by radiologists blinded to fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy result using a checklist. The checklist was prepared based on 2015 ATA guidelines. The ultrasonographic characteristics of thyroid nodules were compared with the result of biopsy to determine positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), sensitivity, and specificity for predicting malignancy. Radiologists also made an overall recommendation on need for FNA. RESULTS: A total of 425 thyroid nodule ultrasound scans were reviewed by radiologists. Biopsy results of 31 nodules were malignant and 394 were non-malignant. Malignant nodules showed higher frequency of solid composition, hypoechoechogenicity, and cervical lymph node involvement compared to benign nodules. Solid nodule composition had the highest PPV (13%) and NPV (94.7%). Extra-thyroid extension had the highest specificity (90.1%). Lesion vascularity had the highest sensitivity (83.8%), followed by hypoechogenicity (65.6%). Overall, the checklist had a positive predictive value of 9%, negative predictive value of 97.5%, sensitivity of 96.8%, and specificity of 11.14%. Radiologists determined that 10% of the nodules were very low-risk and did not require FNA. CONCLUSION: Using a checklist based on 2015 ATA guideline thyroid nodule ultrasonographic features is a sensitive tool with high NPV to predict benign thyroid nodule, thereby preventing unnecessary FNAs.

5 Guideline [Consensus statement of the Chilean endocrinological society on the role of bariatric surgery in type 2 diabetes]. 2018

Sapunar, Jorge / Escalona, Alex / Araya, A Verónica / Aylwin, Carmen Gloria / Bastías, María Juliana / Boza, Camilo / Cárcamo, Carlos / Csendes A, Attila / Davidof F, Patricio / Funke, Ricardo / Gómez, Patricia / González, María Isabel / Lahsen, Rodolfo / Lanzarini, Enrique / Maíz, Alberto / Mujica, Verónica / Muñoz, Rodrigo / Pérez, Gustavo / Raimann, Félix / Salman, Patricio / Sepúlveda, Matías / Soto, Néstor / Villagrán, Rodrigo. ·Departamento de Medicina Interna y Centro EPICYN, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la Frontera, Temuco, Chile. · Clínica Universidad de los Andes, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de los Andes, Santiago, Chile. · Hospital Clínico, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Sección Endocrinología, Diabetes y Nutrición, Departamento de Medicina Interna, Hospital Naval Almirante Nef, Viña del Mar, Chile. · Clínica Las Condes, Santiago, Chile. · Instituto de Cirugía, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile. · Hospital FACH, Santiago, Chile. · Clínica Sanatorio Alemán, Concepción, Chile. · Departamento. Nutrición, Diabetes y Metabolismo, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Católica del Maule, Talca, Chile. · Departamento de Cirugía Digestiva, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Centro Integral de Obesidad y Diabetes, Servicio de Cirugía y Endoscopía, Clínica Puerto Varas, Puerto Varas, Chile. · Unidad de Endocrinología, Departamento de Medicina Interna, Facultad de Medicina. universidad de Concepción. Concepción, Chile. · Hospital de la Dirección de Previsión de Carabineros de Chile (DIPRECA). Santiago, Chile. · Unidad de Endocrinología y Diabetes, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital San Borja Arriarán. Santiago, Chile. · Departamento de Cirugía Bariátrica Metabólica, Clínica Bupa Antofagasta. Antofagasta, Chile. ·Rev Med Chil · Pubmed #30724982.

ABSTRACT: Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and obesity are a public health problem in Chile. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment alternative to achieve a significant and sustained weight reduction in patients with morbid obesity. The results of controlled clinical trials indicate that, compared to medical treatment, surgery for obese patients with DM2 allows a better control of blood glucose and cardiovascular risk factors, reduces the need for medications and increases the likelihood for remission. Consensus conferences and clinical practice guidelines support bariatric surgery as an option to treat DM2 in Class III Obesity (Body Mass Index (BMI) > 40) regardless of the glycemic control and the complexity of pharmacological treatment and in Class II Obesity (BMI 35-39,9) with inadequate glycemic control despite optimal pharmacological treatment and lifestyle. However, surgical indication for patients with DM2 and BMI between 30-34.9, the most prevalent sub-group, is only suggested. The Chilean Societies of Endocrinology and Diabetes and of Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery decided to generate a consensus regarding the importance of other factors related to DM2 that would allow a better selection of candidates for surgery, particularly when weight does not constitute an indication. Considering the national reality, we also need a statement regarding the selection and characteristics of the surgical procedure as well as the role of the diabetologist in the multidisciplinary team.

6 Guideline Recommendations of the Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians regarding caesarean sections. 2018

Wielgos, Miroslaw / Bomba-Opoń, Dorota / Breborowicz, Grzegorz H / Czajkowski, Krzysztof / Debski, Romuald / Leszczynska-Gorzelak, Bozena / Oszukowski, Przemyslaw / Radowicki, Stanislaw / Zimmer, Mariusz. ·1st Chair and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland. dbomba@wum.edu.pl. ·Ginekol Pol · Pubmed #30508218.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Guideline Management of nonobstructive azoospermia: a committee opinion. 2018

Anonymous2351126. ·American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama. ·Fertil Steril · Pubmed #30503112.

ABSTRACT: The management of nonobstructive azoospermia in the context of fertility treatment is discussed. This document replaces the ASRM document titled "Evaluation of azoospermia," last published in 2008.

8 Guideline [French ccAFU guidelines - Update 2018-2020: Adrenal cancer]. 2018

Savoie, P-H / Murez, T / Fléchon, A / Sèbe, P / Rocher, L / Camparo, P / Morel-Journel, N / Ferretti, L / Méjean, A. ·Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service d'urologie, hôpital d'instruction des armées Sainte-Anne, BP 600, 83800 Toulon cedex 09, France. Electronic address: phsavoie@hotmail.fr. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service d'urologie et transplantation rénale, CHU Lapeyronie, 371, avenue du Doyen-Gaston-Giraud, 34295 Montpellier cedex 5, France. Electronic address: thibaut.murez@gmail.com. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service d'oncologie médicale, centre Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. Electronic address: aude.flechon@lyon.unicancer.fr. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service d'urologie, groupe hospitalier Diaconesses Croix Saint Simon, 125, rue d'Avron, 75020 Paris, France. Electronic address: psebe@hopital-dcss.org. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service de radiologie, HU Paris Sud, site Kremlin-Bicêtre, AP-HP, 94270 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. Electronic address: laurence.rocher@aphp.fr. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Centre de pathologie, 51, rue de Jeanne-D'Arc, 80000 Amiens, France. Electronic address: philippecamparo@gmail.com. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service d'urologie, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud (Pierre Bénite), HCL groupement hospitalier du Sud, 69495 Pierre Bénite cedex, France. Electronic address: nico.morelj@gmail.com. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service d'urologie, MSP de Bordeaux-Bagatelle, 203, route de Toulouse, BP 50048, 33401 Talence cedex, France. Electronic address: ludovic.ferretti@gmail.com. · Service d'urologie, hôpital d'instruction des armées Sainte-Anne, BP 600, 83800 Toulon cedex 09, France; Service d'urologie, hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, université Paris Descartes, AP-HP, 75015 Paris, France. Electronic address: arnaud.mejean@aphp.fr. ·Prog Urol · Pubmed #30473001.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update French oncology guidelines concerning adrenal cancer. METHODS: Comprehensive Medline search between 2016 and 2018 upon diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of adrenal cancer to update 2013 guidelines. Level of evidence was evaluated according to AGREE-II. RESULTS: Adrenal cancers are mainly represented by adrenocortical carcinomas (AC), malignant pheochromocytomas (MPC) and adrenal metastases (AM). Medical background of these tumors is either the exploration of hormonal or tumor symptoms, or an adrenal incidentaloma. Etiological explorations are based on hormonal biochemical assessment, morphological and functional imaging and histological analysis. AC and MPC are mostly sporadic but hereditary origin is still possible. The suspicion of AC is driven mainly by radiological signs of malignancy, signs of local invasion or distant metastasis, and type of hormonal secretion but the accurate diagnosis is histological. The diagnosis of MPC is clinical, biological and radiological. The diagnosis of MS involves a percutaneous biopsy. Medical files should be discussed within the COMETE - Adrenal Cancer Network (Appendix 1). Oncological adjuvant treatments are specific for the histological type. In the AC, their indication depends on the risk of recurrence and is based on mitotane, external radiotherapy or chemotherapy. In the MPC, it is based on internal radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Metastatic forms treatment is exceptionally surgical. Debulking is uncommon. For metastatic unresectable AC, treatment is based on mitotane monotherapy or triple chemotherapy. For metastatic unresectable MPC, treatment is based on exclusive metabolic radiotherapy or triple chemotherapy. Recurrences are frequent and sometimes delayed, which justifies a close and long follow-up. CONCLUSION: The curative treatment of Adrenal cancers is surgical provided. This treatment is rarely sufficient alone, the prognosis is then pejorative.

9 Guideline [French ccAFU guidelines - Update 2018-2020: Testicular germ cell tumors]. 2018

Murez, T / Fléchon, A / Savoie, P-H / Rocher, L / Camparo, P / Morel-Journel, N / Ferretti, L / Sèbe, P / Méjean, A. ·Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service d'urologie, CHRU de Montpellier, 371, avenue du Doyen-Gaston-Giraud, 34295 Montpellier cedex 5, France. Electronic address: t-murez@chu-montpellier.fr. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service d'oncologie médicale, centre Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service d'urologie, hôpital d'instruction des armées Sainte-Anne, BP 600, 83800 Toulon cedex 09, France. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service de radiologie, CHU Paris Sud, site Kremlin-Bicêtre, AP-HP, 94270 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Centre de pathologie, 51, rue de Jeanne-D'Arc, 80000 Amiens, France. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service d'urologie, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud (Pierre Bénite), HCL groupement hospitalier du Sud, 69495 Pierre Bénite cedex, France. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service d'urologie, MSP de Bordeaux-Bagatelle, 203, route de Toulouse, BP 50048, 33401 Talence cedex, France. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service d'urologie, groupe hospitalier Diaconesses Croix Saint-Simon, 125, rue d'Avron, 75020 Paris, France. · Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France; Service d'urologie, hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, université Paris Descartes, AP-HP, 75015 Paris, France. ·Prog Urol · Pubmed #30472999.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update French guidelines concerning testicular germ cell cancer. METHODS: Comprehensive Medline search between 2016 and 2018 upon diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of testicular germ cell cancer and treatments toxicities. Level of evidence was evaluated. RESULTS: Testicular Germ cell tumor diagnosis is based on physical examination, biology tests (serum tumor markers AFP, hCGt, LDH) and radiological assessment (scrotal ultrasound and chest, abdomen and pelvis computerized tomography). Total inguinal orchiectomy is the first- line treatment allowing characterization of the histological type, local staging and identification of risk factors for micrometastases. In case of several therapeutic options, one must inform his patient balancing risks and benefits. Surveillance is usually chosen in stage I seminoma compliant patients as the evolution rate is low between 15 to 20%. Carboplatin AUC7 is an alternative option. Radiotherapy indication should be avoided. In stage I non-seminomatous patients, either surveillance or risk-adapted strategy can be applied. Staging retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy has restricted indications. Metastatic germ cell tumors are usually treated by PEB chemotherapy according to IGCCCG prognostic classification. Lombo-aortic radiotherapy is still a standard treatment for stage IIA. Residual masses should be evaluated by biological and radiological assessment 3 to 4 weeks after the end of chemotherapy. Retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy is advocated for every non-seminomatous residual mass more than one cm. 18FDG uptake should be evaluated for each seminoma residual mass more than 3cm. CONCLUSIONS: A rigorous use of classifications is mandatory to define staging since initial diagnosis. Applying treatments based on these classifications leads to excellent survival rates (99% in CSI, 85% in CSII+).

10 Guideline Clinical and Investigative Endocrinology and Diabetes. 2018

Anonymous3541075. · ·Endocr Pract · Pubmed #30430841.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline [Additional non-contraceptive effects of contraception: CNGOF Contraception Guidelines]. 2018

Amat, L / Bulach, A / Leclercq, M / Mesrine, S / Scheffler, F / Sperandeo, D / Scheffler, M. ·Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHRU de Nancy, 10, avenue du Dr-Heydenreich, 54035 Nancy, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, hôpital Jeanne-de-Flandre, CHRU de Lille, avenue Eugène-Avinée, 59000 Lille, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHIC d'Amboise, rue des Ursulines, 37403 Amboise cedex, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU d'Amiens, place Victor-Pauchet, 80054 Amiens, France. · Clinique de Bonneveine, 89, boulevard du Sablier, 13008 Marseille, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHRU de Nancy, 10, avenue du Dr-Heydenreich, 54035 Nancy, France. Electronic address: michele@cglre.org. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #30414725.

ABSTRACT: Hormonal and intrauterine contraceptive methods provide women with highly efficient protection against undesired pregnancy. Additional non-contraceptive effects are now well documented. Combined hormonal contraceptives use, either through the oral transdermal and vaginal route, allow a reduction in menorrhagia, dysmenorrhea, functional ovarian cysts, benign breast and uterine disease, endometriosis-related pain and recurrence. A reduction in ovarian cancer risks, including in women with BRCA syndrome, endometrial and colon cancer is documented. This effect is prolonged for years after contraception discontinuation. Non-contraceptive benefits of progestin-only contraceptives are less documented. Use of the levonorgestrel IUD is associated with a reduction in menorrhagia, dysmenorrhea including in case of endometriosis. Copper IUD use is associated with a decrease in cervix and endometrial cancer risk.

12 Guideline [Definition, epidemiology and risk factors of obstetric anal sphincter injuries: CNGOF Perineal Prevention and Protection in Obstetrics Guidelines]. 2018

Thubert, T / Cardaillac, C / Fritel, X / Winer, N / Dochez, V. ·Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, hôpitaux de Nantes, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 38, boulevard Jean-Monnet, 44000 Nantes, France; Université de Nantes, 1, rue Gaston-Veil, 44000 Nantes, France; GMC-UPMC 01, GREEN (Groupe de recherche clinique en neurourologie), 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. Electronic address: thibault.thubert@chu-nantes.fr. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, hôpitaux de Nantes, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 38, boulevard Jean-Monnet, 44000 Nantes, France; Université de Nantes, 1, rue Gaston-Veil, 44000 Nantes, France. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU de Poitiers, 2, rue de la Milétrie, 86021 Poitiers, France. ·Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol · Pubmed #30385355.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review was to agree on a definition of the obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), to determine the prevalence and risk factors. METHODS: A comprehensive review of the literature on the obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), establishment of levels of evidence (NP), and grades of recommendation according to the methodology of the recommendations for clinical practice. RESULTS: To classify obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), we have used the WHO-RCOG classification, which lists 4 degrees of severity. To designate obstetric anal sphincter injuries, we have used the acronym OASIS, rather than the standard French terms of "complete perineum" and "complicated complete perineum". OASIS with only isolated involvement of the EAS (3a and 3b) appears to have a better functional prognosis than OASIS affecting the IAS or the anorectal mucosa (3c and 4) (LE3). The prevalence of women with ano-rectal symptoms increases with the severity of the OASIS (LE3). In the long term, 35-60% of women who had an OASIS have anal or fecal incontinence (LE3). The prevalence of an OASI in the general population is between 0.25 to 6%. The prevalence of OASIS in primiparous women is between 1.4 and 16% and thus, should be considered more important than among the multiparous women (0.4 to 2.7%). In women with a history of previous OASIS, the risk of occurrence is higher and varies between 5.1 and 10.7% following childbirth. The priority in this context remains the training of childbirth professionals (midwives and obstetricians) to detect these injuries in the delivery room, immediately after the birth. The training and awareness of these practitioners of OASIS diagnosis improves its detection in the delivery room (LE2). Professional experience is associated with better detection of OASIS (LE3) (4). Continuing professional education of obstetrics professionals in the diagnosis and repair of OASIS must be encouraged (Grade C). In the case of second-degree perineal tear, the use of ultrasound in the delivery room improves the diagnosis of OASIS (LE2). Ultrasound decreases the prevalence of symptoms of severe anal incontinence at 1 year (LE2). The diagnosis of OASIS is improved by the use of endo-anal ultrasonography in post-partum (72h-6weeks) (LE2). The principal factors associated with OASIS are nulliparity and instrumental (vaginal operative) delivery; the others are advanced maternal age, history of OASIS, macrosomia, midline episiotomy, posterior cephalic positions, and long labour (LE2). The presence of a perianal lesion (perianal fissure, or anorectal or rectovaginal fistula) is associated with an increased risk of 4th degree lacerations (LE3). Crohn's disease without perianal involvement is not associated with an excess risk of OASIS (LE3). For women with type III genital mutilation, deinfibulation before delivery is associated with a reduction in the risk of OASIS (LE3); in this situation, deinfibulation is recommended before delivery (grade C). CONCLUSION: It is necessary to use a consensus definition of the OASIS to be able to better detect and treat them.

13 Guideline 2019 Canadian guideline for physical activity throughout pregnancy. 2018

Mottola, Michelle F / Davenport, Margie H / Ruchat, Stephanie-May / Davies, Gregory A / Poitras, Veronica J / Gray, Casey E / Jaramillo Garcia, Alejandra / Barrowman, Nick / Adamo, Kristi B / Duggan, Mary / Barakat, Ruben / Chilibeck, Phil / Fleming, Karen / Forte, Milena / Korolnek, Jillian / Nagpal, Taniya / Slater, Linda G / Stirling, Deanna / Zehr, Lori. ·R Samuel McLaughlin Foundation-Exercise and Pregnancy Laboratory, School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Children's Health Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. · Program for Pregnancy and Postpartum Health, Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport and Recreation, Women and Children's Health Research Institute, Alberta Diabetes Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Department of Human Kinetics, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. · Independent Researcher, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Clinical Research Unit, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte-INEF, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. · College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. · Department of Family and Community Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Granovsky Gluskin Family Medicine Centre, Sinai Health System, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Canadian Association of Midwives, Toronto, Canada. · John W Scott Health Sciences Library, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Middlesex-London Health Unit, London, Ontario, Canada. · School of Health and Human Services, Camosun College, Victoria, Canada. ·Br J Sports Med · Pubmed #30337460.

ABSTRACT: The objective is to provide guidance for pregnant women and obstetric care and exercise professionals on prenatal physical activity. The outcomes evaluated were maternal, fetal or neonatal morbidity, or fetal mortality during and following pregnancy. Literature was retrieved through searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection, CINAHL Plus with Full Text, Child Development & Adolescent Studies, Education Resources Information Center, SPORTDiscus, ClinicalTrials.gov and the Trip Database from inception up to 6 January 2017. Primary studies of any design were eligible, except case studies. Results were limited to English-language, Spanish-language or French-language materials. Articles related to maternal physical activity during pregnancy reporting on maternal, fetal or neonatal morbidity, or fetal mortality were eligible for inclusion. The quality of evidence was rated using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. The Guidelines Consensus Panel solicited feedback from end users (obstetric care providers, exercise professionals, researchers, policy organisations, and pregnant and postpartum women). The development of these guidelines followed the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II instrument. The benefits of prenatal physical activity are moderate and no harms were identified; therefore, the difference between desirable and undesirable consequences (net benefit) is expected to be moderate. The majority of stakeholders and end users indicated that following these recommendations would be feasible, acceptable and equitable. Following these recommendations is likely to require minimal resources from both individual and health systems perspectives.

14 Guideline Thyroid ultrasonography reporting: consensus of Italian Thyroid Association (AIT), Italian Society of Endocrinology (SIE), Italian Society of Ultrasonography in Medicine and Biology (SIUMB) and Ultrasound Chapter of Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM). 2018

Rago, T / Cantisani, V / Ianni, F / Chiovato, L / Garberoglio, R / Durante, C / Frasoldati, A / Spiezia, S / Farina, R / Vallone, G / Pontecorvi, A / Vitti, P. ·Endocrinology Unit, Dept. Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa, 2, 56124, Pisa, Italy. rago@endoc.med.unipi.it. · Dept. of Radiological Science, Policlinico Umberto I, University Sapienza, Viale del Policlinico, 155, Rome, 00161, Italy. · Endocrinology Unit, University Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo Agostino Gemelli, 8, Rome, 00168, Italy. · Internal Medicine and Endocrinology Unit - ICS Maugeri, IRCCS, University of Pavia, Via S. Maugeri, 4, Pavia, 27100, Italy. · Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism Unit, Dept. Medical Science, University of Torino, Via Magellano, 1, Turin, 10128, Italy. · Dept. of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, University Sapienza, Viale del Policlinico, 155, Rome, 00161, Italy. · Endocrinology Unit, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova, IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento, 80, Reggio Emilia, 42123, Italy. · Endocrine Surgery, Ospedale del Mare, Via Enrico Russo, Naples, 80147, Italy. · Dept. of Advanced Biomedical Science, University of Naples Federico II, Corso Umberto I, 40, Naples, 80128, Italy. · Endocrinology Unit, Dept. Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa, 2, 56124, Pisa, Italy. ·J Endocrinol Invest · Pubmed #30327945.

ABSTRACT: Thyroid ultrasonography (US) is the gold standard for thyroid imaging and its widespread use is due to an optimal spatial resolution for superficial anatomic structures, a low cost and the lack of health risks. Thyroid US is a pivotal tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of autoimmune thyroid diseases, for assessing nodule size and echostructure and defining the risk of malignancy in thyroid nodules. The main limitation of US is the poor reproducibility, due to the variable experience of the operators and the different performance and settings of the equipments. Aim of this consensus statement is to standardize the report of thyroid US through the definition of common minimum requirements and a correct terminology. US patterns of autoimmune thyroid diseases are defined. US signs of malignancy in thyroid nodules are classified and scored in each nodule. We also propose a simplified nodule risk stratification, based on the predictive value of each US sign, classified and scored according to the strength of association with malignancy, but also to the estimated reproducibility among different operators.

15 Guideline Behavioral Weight Loss Interventions to Prevent Obesity-Related Morbidity and Mortality in Adults: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2018

Anonymous2781080 / Curry, Susan J / Krist, Alex H / Owens, Douglas K / Barry, Michael J / Caughey, Aaron B / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Grossman, David C / Kemper, Alex R / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Phipps, Maureen G / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #30326502.

ABSTRACT: Importance: More than 35% of men and 40% of women in the United States are obese. Obesity is associated with health problems such as increased risk for coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, various types of cancer, gallstones, and disability. Obesity is also associated with an increased risk for death, particularly among adults younger than 65 years. Objective: To update the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) 2012 recommendation on screening for obesity in adults. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on interventions (behavioral and pharmacotherapy) for weight loss or weight loss maintenance that can be provided in or referred from a primary care setting. Surgical weight loss interventions and nonsurgical weight loss devices (eg, gastric balloons) are considered to be outside the scope of the primary care setting. Findings: The USPSTF found adequate evidence that intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions in adults with obesity can lead to clinically significant improvements in weight status and reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes among adults with obesity and elevated plasma glucose levels; these interventions are of moderate benefit. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that behavior-based weight loss maintenance interventions are of moderate benefit. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that the harms of intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions (including weight loss maintenance interventions) in adults with obesity are small to none. Therefore, the USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that offering or referring adults with obesity to intensive behavioral interventions or behavior-based weight loss maintenance interventions has a moderate net benefit. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends that clinicians offer or refer adults with a body mass index of 30 or higher to intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions. (B recommendation).

16 Guideline European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guidelines on the management of adrenocortical carcinoma in adults, in collaboration with the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors 2018

Fassnacht, Martin / Dekkers, Olaf / Else, Tobias / Baudin, Eric / Berruti, Alfredo / de Krijger, Ronald / Haak, Harm / Mihai, Radu / Assie, Guillaume / Terzolo, Massimo. ·Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Internal Medicine I, University Hospital · Comprehensive Cancer Center Mainfranken, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany · Department of Clinical Epidemiology · Department of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands · Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark · Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA · Endocrine Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France · INSERM UMR 1185, Faculté de Médecine, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, Université Paris Sud, Paris, France · Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences, and Public Health, Medical Oncology, University of Brescia at ASST Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy · Department of Pathology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands · Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands · Department of Pathology, Reinier de Graaf Hospital, Delft, the Netherlands · Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht, the Netherlands · Department of Internal Medicine, Máxima Medical Centre, Eindhoven/Veldhoven, the Netherlands · Maastricht University, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Ageing and Long-Term Care, Maastricht, the Netherlands · Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht, the Netherlands · Department of Endocrine Surgery, Churchill Cancer Centre, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK · Department of Endocrinology, Reference Center for Rare Adrenal Diseases, Reference Center dor Rare Adrenal Cancers, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France · Institut Cochin, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1016, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique UMR8104, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France · Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, Internal Medicine, San Luigi Hospital, University of Turin, Orbassano, Italy ·Eur J Endocrinol · Pubmed #30299884.

ABSTRACT: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and in most cases steroid hormone-producing tumor with variable prognosis. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide clinicians with best possible evidence-based recommendations for clinical management of patients with ACC based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. We predefined four main clinical questions, which we judged as particularly important for the management of ACC patients and performed systematic literature searches: (A) What is needed to diagnose an ACC by histopathology? (B) Which are the best prognostic markers in ACC? (C) Is adjuvant therapy able to prevent recurrent disease or reduce mortality after radical resection? (D) What is the best treatment option for macroscopically incompletely resected, recurrent or metastatic disease? Other relevant questions were discussed within the group. Selected Recommendations: (i) We recommend that all patients with suspected and proven ACC are discussed in a multidisciplinary expert team meeting. (ii) We recommend that every patient with (suspected) ACC should undergo careful clinical assessment, detailed endocrine work-up to identify autonomous hormone excess and adrenal-focused imaging. (iii) We recommend that adrenal surgery for (suspected) ACC should be performed only by surgeons experienced in adrenal and oncological surgery aiming at a complete en bloc resection (including resection of oligo-metastatic disease). (iv) We suggest that all suspected ACC should be reviewed by an expert adrenal pathologist using the Weiss score and providing Ki67 index. (v) We suggest adjuvant mitotane treatment in patients after radical surgery that have a perceived high risk of recurrence (ENSAT stage III, or R1 resection, or Ki67 >10%). (vi) For advanced ACC not amenable to complete surgical resection, local therapeutic measures (e.g. radiation therapy, radiofrequency ablation, chemoembolization) are of particular value. However, we suggest against the routine use of adrenal surgery in case of widespread metastatic disease. In these patients, we recommend either mitotane monotherapy or mitotane, etoposide, doxorubicin and cisplatin depending on prognostic parameters. In selected patients with a good response, surgery may be subsequently considered. (vii) In patients with recurrent disease and a disease-free interval of at least 12 months, in whom a complete resection/ablation seems feasible, we recommend surgery or alternatively other local therapies. Furthermore, we offer detailed recommendations about the management of mitotane treatment and other supportive therapies. Finally, we suggest directions for future research.

17 Guideline International neuromonitoring study group guidelines 2018: Part II: Optimal recurrent laryngeal nerve management for invasive thyroid cancer-incorporation of surgical, laryngeal, and neural electrophysiologic data. 2018

Wu, Che-Wei / Dionigi, Gianlorenzo / Barczynski, Marcin / Chiang, Feng-Yu / Dralle, Henning / Schneider, Rick / Al-Quaryshi, Zaid / Angelos, Peter / Brauckhoff, Katrin / Brooks, Jennifer A / Cernea, Claudio R / Chaplin, John / Chen, Amy Y / Davies, Louise / Diercks, Gill R / Duh, Quan Yang / Fundakowski, Christopher / Goretzki, Peter E / Hales, Nathan W / Hartl, Dana / Kamani, Dipti / Kandil, Emad / Kyriazidis, Natalia / Liddy, Whitney / Miyauchi, Akira / Orloff, Lisa / Rastatter, Jeff C / Scharpf, Joseph / Serpell, Jonathan / Shin, Jennifer J / Sinclair, Catherine F / Stack, Brendan C / Tolley, Neil S / Slycke, Sam Van / Snyder, Samuel K / Urken, Mark L / Volpi, Erivelto / Witterick, Ian / Wong, Richard J / Woodson, Gayle / Zafereo, Mark / Randolph, Gregory W. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Division for Endocrine Surgery, Department of Human Pathology in Adulthood and Childhood "G. Barresi", University Hospital G. Martino, University of Messina, Messina, Italy. · Department of Endocrine Surgery, Jagiellonian University, Third Chair of General Surgery, Krakow, Poland. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Halle, Halle/Saale, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral, and Vascular Surgery, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, U.S.A. · Division of Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. · Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Otolaryngology, Division of Thyroid and Parathyroid Surgery, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. · Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Gillies Hospital and Clinics, Epsom, New Zealand. · VA Endocrine Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Outcomes Group, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Norwich, Vermont, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. · Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. · P.G. Stadtische Kliniken Neuss Lukaskrankenhaus GmbH, Neuss, Nordrhein-Westfalen, DE. · Department of Otolaryngology, Uniformed Services of the Health Sciences, San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A. · San Antonio Head and Neck, San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France. · Department of Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. · Department of Surgery, Kuma Hospital, Kobe, Japan. · Department of Otolaryngology, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A. · Breast, Endocrine and General Surgery Unit, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Monash University School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures, and Linguistics, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Otolaryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Icahn School of Medicine, New York, New York, U.S.A. · Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Imperial College Hospitals NHS Trust, St. Mary's Hospital, London, United Kingdom. · Onze-Lieve-Vrouw Hospital Aalst, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of General Surgery, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine, Edinburg, Texas, U.S.A. · Clinics Hospital, University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Otolaryngology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Surgery-Head and Neck Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, U.S.A. · 865 Indianola Drive, Merritt Island, Florida, U.S.A. · Department of Head and Neck Surgery, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Endocrine Surgery Service, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. ·Laryngoscope · Pubmed #30291765.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this publication was to inform surgeons as to the modern state-of-the-art evidence-based guidelines for management of the recurrent laryngeal nerve invaded by malignancy through blending the domains of 1) surgical intraoperative information, 2) preoperative glottic function, and 3) intraoperative real-time electrophysiologic information. These guidelines generated by the International Neural Monitoring Study Group (INMSG) are envisioned to assist the clinical decision-making process involved in recurrent laryngeal nerve management during thyroid surgery by incorporating the important information domains of not only gross surgical findings but also intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve functional status and preoperative laryngoscopy findings. These guidelines are presented mainly through algorithmic workflow diagrams for convenience and the ease of application. These guidelines are published in conjunction with the INMSG Guidelines Part I: Staging Bilateral Thyroid Surgery With Monitoring Loss of Signal. Level of Evidence: 5 Laryngoscope, 128:S18-S27, 2018.

18 Guideline Management of Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes, 2018. A Consensus Report by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). 2018

Davies, Melanie J / D'Alessio, David A / Fradkin, Judith / Kernan, Walter N / Mathieu, Chantal / Mingrone, Geltrude / Rossing, Peter / Tsapas, Apostolos / Wexler, Deborah J / Buse, John B. ·Diabetes Research Centre, University of Leicester, Leicester, U.K. · Leicester Diabetes Centre, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, U.K. · Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC. · National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Department of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. · Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology, UZ Gasthuisberg, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, London, U.K. · Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark. · University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Second Medical Department, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Medicine and Diabetes Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC jbuse@med.unc.edu. ·Diabetes Care · Pubmed #30291106.

ABSTRACT: The American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes convened a panel to update the prior position statements, published in 2012 and 2015, on the management of type 2 diabetes in adults. A systematic evaluation of the literature since 2014 informed new recommendations. These include additional focus on lifestyle management and diabetes self-management education and support. For those with obesity, efforts targeting weight loss, including lifestyle, medication, and surgical interventions, are recommended. With regards to medication management, for patients with clinical cardiovascular disease, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor or a glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist with proven cardiovascular benefit is recommended. For patients with chronic kidney disease or clinical heart failure and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, an SGLT2 inhibitor with proven benefit is recommended. GLP-1 receptor agonists are generally recommended as the first injectable medication.

19 Guideline [The French Genetic and Cancer Consortium guidelines for multigene panel analysis in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer predisposition]. 2018

Moretta, Jessica / Berthet, Pascaline / Bonadona, Valérie / Caron, Olivier / Cohen-Haguenauer, Odile / Colas, Chrystelle / Corsini, Carole / Cusin, Véronica / De Pauw, Antoine / Delnatte, Capucine / Dussart, Sophie / Jamain, Christophe / Longy, Michel / Luporsi, Elisabeth / Maugard, Christine / Nguyen, Tan Dat / Pujol, Pascal / Vaur, Dominique / Andrieu, Nadine / Lasset, Christine / Noguès, Catherine / Anonymous7380963. ·Institut Paoli-Calmettes, oncogénétique clinique, département d'anticipation et de suivi des cancers, 232, boulevard Sainte-Marguerite, 13009 Marseille, France. Electronic address: morettaj@ipc.unicancer.fr. · Centre François-Baclesse, oncogénétique clinique, département de biopathologie, 14000 Caen, France. · Centre Léon-Berard, unité clinique d'oncologie génétique, 69008 Lyon, France; Université Lyon 1, CNRS, LBBE UMR 5558, 69622 Villeurbanne, France. · Gustave-Roussy hôpital universitaire, département de médecine, 94800 Villejuif, France. · GH Saint-Louis-Lariboisière-Fernand-Widal, oncogénétique, 75010 Paris, France. · Institut Curie, oncogénétique, 75005 Paris, France. · CHRU de Montpellier, hôpital Arnaud de Villeneuve, service d'oncogénétique, 34090 Montpellier, France. · Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière-Charles-Foix, service de génétique, 75013 Paris, France. · ICO-Centre René-Gauducheau, unité d'oncogénétique, 44800 Nantes, France. · Centre Léon-Berard, unité clinique d'oncologie génétique, 69008 Lyon, France. · Unicancer, 75654 Paris France. · Institut Bergonié, oncogénétique, Inserm U 1218, 33000 Bordeaux, France. · CHR de Metz Thionville, oncogénétique, 57100 Metz, France. · CHU de Strasbourg, oncogénétique clinique, oncogénétique moléculaire, évaluation familiale et suivi, laboratoire d'oncobiologie, 67000 Strasbourg, France. · Institut Jean-Godinot, oncogénétique, 51100 Reims, France. · Centre François-Baclesse, laboratoire de biologie et de génétique du cancer, 14000 Caen, France. · Inserm, U900, Institut Curie, PSL Research University, Mines ParisTech, 75005 Paris, France. · Université Lyon 1, CNRS, LBBE UMR 5558, 69622 Villeurbanne, France; Centre Léon Bérard, département de santé publique, unité de prévention et épidémiologie génétique, 69008 Lyon, France. · Institut Paoli-Calmettes, oncogénétique clinique, département d'anticipation et de suivi des cancers, 232, boulevard Sainte-Marguerite, 13009 Marseille, France; Aix-Marseille université, Inserm, IRD, SESSTIM, 13000 Marseille, France. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #30268633.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Next generation sequencing allows the simultaneous analysis of large panel of genes for families or individuals with a strong suspicion of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC). Because of lack of guidelines, several panels of genes potentially involved in HBOC were designed, with large disparities not only in their composition but also in medical care offered to mutation carriers. Then, homogenization in practices is needed. METHODS: The French Genetic and Cancer Group (GGC) - Unicancer conducted an exhaustive bibliographic work on 18 genes of interest. Only publications with unbiased risk estimates were retained. RESULTS: The expertise of each 18 genes was based on clinical utility criteria, i.e. a relative risk of cancer of 4 and more, available medical tools for screening and prevention of mutation carriers, and pre-symptomatic genetic tests for relatives. Finally, 13 genes were selected to be included in a HBOC diagnosis gene panel: BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, TP53, CDH1, PTEN, RAD51C, RAD51D, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, EPCAM. The reasons for excluding NBN, RAD51B, CHEK2, STK11, ATM, BARD1, BRIP1 from the HBOC diagnosis panel are presented. Screening, prevention and genetic counselling guidelines were detailed for each of the 18 genes. DISCUSSION: Due to the rapid increase in knowledge, the GGC has planned a yearly update of the bibliography to take into account new findings. Furthermore, genetic-epidemiological studies are being initiated to better estimate the cancer risk associated with genes which are not yet included in the HBOC diagnosis panel.

20 Guideline Graves' disease and pregnancy. 2018

Illouz, Frédéric / Luton, Dominique / Polak, Michel / Besançon, Alix / Bournaud, Claire. ·Service d'endocrinologie diabète nutrition, centre de référence des maladies rares de la thyroïde et des récepteurs hormonaux, CHU d'Angers, 49933 Angers cedex 09, France. Electronic address: Frillouz@chu-angers.fr. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, DHU risque et grossesse, hôpital Bichat-Beaujon, université Denis-Diderot-Paris VII, 46, rue Henri-Huchard, 75018 Paris, France. · Endocrinologie gynécologie diabétologie pédiatriques, Inserm U1016, institut Imagine, centre de référence des maladies endocriniennes rares de la croissance et du développement, hôpital universitaire Necker Enfants malades, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, université Paris Descartes, 75743 75743 Paris, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, hospices civils de lyon, groupement hospitalier Est, 69677 Bron cedex, France. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30224035.

ABSTRACT: This section deals with the specificities of managing Graves' disease during pregnancy. Graves' disease incurs risks of fetal, neonatal and maternal complications that are rare but may be severe: fetal hyper- or hypothyroidism, usually first showing as fetal goiter, neonatal dysthyroidism, premature birth and pre-eclampsia. Treatment during pregnancy is based on antithyroid drugs alone, without association to levothyroxine. An history of Graves' disease, whether treated radically or not, with persistent maternal anti-TSH-receptor antibodies must be well identified. Fetal monitoring should be initiated in a multidisciplinary framework that should be continued throughout pregnancy. Neonatal monitoring is also crucial if the mother still shows anti-TSH-receptor antibodies at end of pregnancy or underwent antithyroid treatment. The risk of recurrence of hyperthyroidism in the weeks following delivery requires maternal monitoring. The long-term neuropsychological progression of children of mothers with Graves' disease is poorly known.

21 Guideline Diagnostic procedure in suspected Graves' disease. 2018

Goichot, Bernard / Leenhardt, Laurence / Massart, Catherine / Raverot, Véronique / Tramalloni, Jean / Iraqi, Hinde / Anonymous1411119. ·Service de médecine interne, endocrinologie et nutrition, hôpital de Hautepierre, hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, avenue Molière, 67098 Strasbourg cedex, France. Electronic address: bernard.goichot@chru-strasbourg.fr. · Unité thyroïde tumeurs endocrines, institut E3M, hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. · Service de biochimie-toxicologie, laboratoire d'hormonologie, CHU de Rennes, 35033 Rennes Cedex 09, France. · Service de biochimie et biologie moléculaire, laboratoire d'hormonologie, groupement hospitalier Est, CHU de Lyon, 69500 Bron, France. · Cabinet de radiologie, 92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine, France. · Service d'endocrinologie, CHU de Rabat, Rabat, Morocco. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30220410.

ABSTRACT: Diagnostic procedure in suspected Graves' disease has never been studied scientifically and actual practice seems quite variable, notably between countries. Recommendations are few and weak (expert opinion). This article presents the recommendations of an expert consensus meeting organized by the French Society of Endocrinology in 2016. In case of clinically suspected thyrotoxicosis, the first-line biological assessment is of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Free T4 and possibly free T3 assays assess biological severity and are necessary for treatment efficacy monitoring. Positive diagnosis of Graves' disease after biological confirmation of thyrotoxicosis does not always require complementary etiological examinations if clinical presentation is unambiguous, notably including extra-thyroid signs. Otherwise, first-line anti-TSH-receptor (TSH-R) antibody screening is recommended for its good intrinsic performance (sensitivity and specificity) and ease of access in France. Scintigraphy is reserved to rare cases of Graves' disease with negative antibody findings or when another etiology is suspected. Thyroid ultrasound scan may be contributive, but is not recommended in first line.

22 Guideline The polycystic ovary syndrome: a position statement from the Polish Society of Endocrinology, the Polish Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians, and the Polish Society of Gynaecological Endocrinology. 2018

Milewicz, Andrzej / Kudła, Marek / Spaczyński, Robert Z / Dębski, Romuald / Męczekalski, Błażej / Wielgoś, Mirosław / Ruchała, Marek / Małecka-Tendera, Ewa / Kos-Kudła, Beata / Jędrzejuk, Diana / Zachurzok, Agnieszka. ·Katedra i Klinika Endokrynologii, Diabetologii i Leczenia Izotopami Uniwersytetu Medycznego im. Piastów Śląskich we Wrocławiu. diana.jedrzejuk@umed.wroc.pl. ·Endokrynol Pol · Pubmed #30209800.

ABSTRACT: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) diagnosis and therapy still arouse a lot of controversy. Each year brings new information, so, having collected the experience of three scientific societies, we present contemporary recommendations concerning PCOS diagnostics and treat-ment. In adult female diagnosis, we still use the Rotterdam criteria, which is two out of three of the follwing characteristics: a) ovulation abnormality, b) clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism, and c) polycystic ovaries. In the case of teenagers, diagnostic criteria are as follows: menstruation disturbances two years after menarche and clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism. The presence of polycysti-cally abnormal ovaries is not necessary. The consensus paper presents the threats resulting from imperfect diagnostic methods applied in PCOS (hyperandrogenism diagnostics, ultrasound examination of ovaries). Suggested therapy includes personalised schemes according to the dominant PCOS phenotype, i.e. metabolic, hyperandrogenic, or reproductive ones.

23 Guideline Treatment of adult Graves' disease. 2018

Corvilain, Bernard / Hamy, Antoine / Brunaud, Laurent / Borson-Chazot, Françoise / Orgiazzi, Jacques / Bensalem Hachmi, Leila / Semrouni, Mourad / Rodien, Patrice / Lussey-Lepoutre, Charlotte. ·Department of Endocrinology, Erasme University Hospital, université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Service de chirurgie viscérale et endocrine, CHU d'Angers, 49000 Angers, France. · Service de chirurgie, unité de chirurgie endocrinienne, thyroïdienne et métabolique, unité multidisciplinaire de chirurgie de l'obésité, université de Lorraine, CHU Nancy, hôpital Brabois adultes, 11, allée du Morvan, 54511 Vandœuvre-les-Nancy, France. · HESPER EA 7425, hospices civils de Lyon, fédération d'endocrinologie, université Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 69008 Lyon, France. · CERMEP-imagerie du vivant, université Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France. · Service d'endocrinologie à l'Institut national de nutrition de Tunis, faculté de médecine de Tunis, Tunisia. · Departement de médecine, CHU Beni Messous, Alger, Algeria. · Service EDN, centre de référence des maladies rares de la thyroïde et des récepteurs hormonaux, CHU d'Angers, 49000 Angers, France. Electronic address: Parodien@chu-angers.fr. · Service de médecine nucléaire, Inserm U970, Sorbonne université, groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpétrière, 75013 Paris, France. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30193753.

ABSTRACT: Treatment strategy in Graves' disease firstly requires recovery of euthyroid status by antithyroid therapy. Treatment modalities, precautions, advantages and side-effects are to be discussed with the patient. No particular treatment modality has demonstrated superiority. Pregnancy or pregnancy project affects choice of treatment and monitoring. Graves' orbitopathy is liable to be aggravated by iodine-131 treatment and requires pre-treatment assessment. Iodine-131 treatment aims at achieving hypothyroidism. Thyroid surgery for Graves' disease should preferably be performed by an expert team. In case of recurrence of hyperthyroidism, the various treatment options should be discussed with the patient. Empiric treatment of thyroid dermopathy uses local corticosteroids in occlusive dressing.

24 Guideline Graves' disease in children. 2018

Léger, Juliane / Oliver, Isabelle / Rodrigue, Danielle / Lambert, Anne-Sophie / Coutant, Régis. ·Department of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology and Reference Center for rare Diseases of Growth and Development, CHU Robert-Debre, 75019 Paris, France. · Endocrine, Bone Diseases, Genetics, Obesity, and Gynecology Unit, Children's Hospital, University Hospital, 31000 Toulouse, France. · Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, CHU Bicêtre, 94275 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Department of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology and Reference Center for Rare Diseases of Thyroid and Hormone Receptivity, University hospital of Angers, 4, rue Larrey, 49933 Angers cedex 9, France. Electronic address: recoutant@chu-angers.fr. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30180972.

ABSTRACT: R1 The diagnosis of Graves' disease in children is based on detecting a suppression of serum TSH concentrations and the presence of anti-TSH receptor antibodies. 1/+++. R2 Thyroid ultrasound is unnecessary for diagnosis, but can be useful for assessing the size and homogeneity of the goiter. 2/+. R3. Thyroid scintigraphy is not required for the diagnosis of Graves' disease. 1/+++. R4. The measurement of T4L and T3L levels is not necessary for the diagnosis of Graves' disease in children but can be useful for the management and assessment of prognosis. 1/++. R5. In the absence of TSH receptor autoantibodies, the possibility of genetically inherited hyperthyroidism must be considered. 1/++. R6. Drug therapy is the primary line of treatment for children and consists of imidazole, carbimazole or thiamazole, with an initial dosage of 0.4 to 0.8mg/kg/day (0.3 to 0.6mg/kg/day for thiamazole) depending on the initial severity, up to maximum of 30mg. 1/++. R7. Propylthiouracil is contraindicated for children with Grave's disease. 1/+++. R8. Before starting treatment, it may be useful to perform a CBC in order to assess the degree of neutropenia caused by hyperthyroidism. It is not necessary to perform systematic CBCs during follow-up. 2/+. R9. An emergency CBC should be performed if symptoms include fever or angina. If neutrophil counts are <1000/mm

25 Guideline [Recommendations for the diagnosis and follow up of the foetus and newborn child born to mothers with autoimmune thyroid disease]. 2018

Ares Segura, Susana / Temboury Molina, Carmen / Chueca Guindulain, María Jesús / Grau Bolado, Gema / Alija Merillas, María Jesus / Caimari Jaume, María / Casano Sancho, Paula / Moreno Navarro, José Carlos / Rial Rodríguez, José Manuel / Rodríguez Sánchez, Amparo / Anonymous11331104. ·Servicio de Neonatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. Electronic address: susana.ares@salud.madrid.org. · Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Universitario del Sureste, Madrid, España. · Endocrinología Pediátrica, Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra, España. · Endocrinología Infantil, Hospital Universitario Cruces, Barakaldo, Vizcaya, España. · Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Universitario de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, España. · Endocrinología Pediátrica, Hospital Universitario Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Baleares, España. · Sección de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu , Barcelona, España. · Institute for Medical and Molecular Genetics (INGEMM), Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. · Pediatría, Hospital Universitario Nuestra Señora de Candelaria, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, España. · Unidad de Metabolismo y Desarrollo, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón , Madrid, España. ·An Pediatr (Barc) · Pubmed #30177500.

ABSTRACT: The objective of this document is to review the current recommendations in the management of the foetus and the newborn child born to mothers with autoimmune thyroid disease. In 2017, the American Thyroid Association published guidelines for the diagnosis and management of thyroid disease during pregnancy and post-partum. In this guide, 97 recommendations were made, and an algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of gestational hypothyroidism was proposed. Also, in this last year, a wide review was been published on the foetal and neonatal approach of the child of a mother with Graves' disease. The importance of the determination of maternal antibodies against thyrotropin receptor in the second half of pregnancy is stressed, in order to adequately stratify the risk in the neonate.

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