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Fibromyalgia: HELP
Articles by M. Bridget Zimmerman
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, M. B. Zimmerman wrote the following 5 articles about Fibromyalgia.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Reliability and Construct Validity of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Instruments in Women with Fibromyalgia. 2017

Merriwether, Ericka N / Rakel, Barbara A / Zimmerman, Miriam B / Dailey, Dana L / Vance, Carol G T / Darghosian, Leon / Golchha, Meenakshi / Geasland, Katherine M / Chimenti, Ruth / Crofford, Leslie J / Sluka, Kathleen A. ·Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science. · College of Nursing. · College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. · Department of Medicine/Rheumatology & Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. ·Pain Med · Pubmed #27561310.

ABSTRACT: Objective: The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) was developed to standardize measurement of clinically relevant patient-reported outcomes. This study evaluated the reliability and construct validity of select PROMIS static short-form (SF) instruments in women with fibromyalgia. Design: Analysis of baseline data from the Fibromyalgia Activity Study with TENS (FAST), a randomized controlled trial of the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Setting: Dual site, university-based outpatient clinics. Subjects: Women aged 20 to 67 years diagnosed with fibromyalgia. Methods: Participants completed the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) and 10 PROMIS static SF instruments. Internal consistency was calculated using Cronbach alpha. Convergent validity was examined against the FIQR using Pearson correlation and multiple regression analysis. Results: PROMIS static SF instruments had fair to high internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.58 to 0.94, P  < 0.05). PROMIS 'physical function' domain score was highly correlated with FIQR 'function' score (r = -0.73). The PROMIS 'total' score was highly correlated with the FIQR total score (r = -0.72). Correlations with FIQR total score of each of the three PROMIS domain scores were r = -0.65 for 'physical function,' r = -0.63 for 'global,' and r = -0.57 for 'symptom' domain. PROMIS 'physical function,' 'global,' and 'symptom' scores explained 58% of the FIQR total score variance. Conclusions: Select PROMIS static SF instruments demonstrate convergent validity with the FIQR, a legacy measure of fibromyalgia disease severity. These results highlight the potential utility of select PROMIS static SFs for assessment and tracking of patient-reported outcomes in fibromyalgia.

2 Clinical Trial Effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain, function, and quality of life in fibromyalgia: a double-blind randomized clinical trial. 2015

Noehren, Brian / Dailey, Dana L / Rakel, Barbara A / Vance, Carol G T / Zimmerman, Miriam B / Crofford, Leslie J / Sluka, Kathleen A. ·B. Noehren, PT, PhD, Division of Physical Therapy, College of Health Sciences University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky. · D.L. Dailey, PT, PhD, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. · B.A. Rakel, RN, PhD, College of Nursing, University of Iowa. · C.G.T. Vance, PT, PhD, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, College of Medicine, University of Iowa. · M.B. Zimmerman, PhD, Biostatistics, University of Iowa. · L.J. Crofford, MD, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. · K.A. Sluka, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52422-1089 (USA). kathleen-sluka@uiowa.edu. ·Phys Ther · Pubmed #25212518.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia is a common chronic pain condition that has a significant impact on quality of life and often leads to disability. To date, there have been few well-controlled trials assessing the utility of nonpharmacological treatment modalities such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in the management of pain and improvement in function in individuals with fibromyalgia. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study will be to complete a long-term, multicenter study to assess the effects of TENS in women with fibromyalgia. DESIGN: This will be a phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred forty-three participants with fibromyalgia will be recruited for this study. INTERVENTION: Participants will be randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: the intervention (TENS), placebo, or no treatment. After completing the randomized period, all participants will receive the intervention for 1 month. The participants will be asked to use TENS at the highest tolerable level for at least 2 hours daily during physical activity. MEASUREMENTS: The primary outcome will be pain with movement, with secondary outcomes assessing functional abilities, patient-reported outcomes, and quantitative sensory testing. LIMITATIONS: Because having participants refrain from their typical medications is not practical, their usage and any change in medication use will be recorded. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study will provide some of the first evidence from a large-scale, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial on the effectiveness of TENS on pain control and quality-of-life changes in patients with fibromyalgia.

3 Article Somatic symptom presentations in women with fibromyalgia are differentially associated with elevated depression and anxiety. 2020

Hadlandsmyth, Katherine / Dailey, Dana L / Rakel, Barbara A / Zimmerman, M Bridget / Vance, Carol Gt / Merriwether, Ericka N / Chimenti, Ruth L / Geasland, Katharine M / Crofford, Leslie J / Sluka, Kathleen A. ·Department of Anesthesia, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA. · Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA. · College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA. · College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA. · College of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, USA. ·J Health Psychol · Pubmed #29076404.

ABSTRACT: This study examined whether depression and anxiety differentially relate to fatigue, sleep disturbance, pain catastrophizing, fear of movement, and pain severity in women with fibromyalgia. Baseline data from the Fibromyalgia Activity Study with Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation were analyzed. Of 191 participants, 50 percent reported high anxiety and/or depression (17% high anxiety, 9% high depression, and 24% both). Fatigue and sleep impairment were associated with high depression (

4 Article Development of a method to maximize the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation intensity in women with fibromyalgia. 2018

Vance, Carol Gt / Chimenti, Ruth L / Dailey, Dana L / Hadlandsmyth, Katherine / Zimmerman, M Bridget / Geasland, Katharine M / Williams, Jonathan M / Merriwether, Ericka N / Alemo Munters, Li / Rakel, Barbara A / Crofford, Leslie J / Sluka, Kathleen A. ·Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA, USA, carol-vance@uiowa.edu. · Department of Anesthesia, College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA. · Department of Medicine/Rheumatology & Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Physical Therapy, New York University, New York, NY, USA. · College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA. ·J Pain Res · Pubmed #30349353.

ABSTRACT: Introduction: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological intervention clinically used for pain relief. The importance of utilizing the adequate stimulation intensity is well documented; however, clinical methods to achieve the highest possible intensity are not established. Objectives: Our primary aim was to determine if exposure to the full range of clinical levels of stimulation, from sensory threshold to noxious, would result in higher final stimulation intensities. A secondary aim explored the association of pain, disease severity, and psychological variables with the ability to achieve higher final stimulation intensity. Methods: Women with fibromyalgia (N=143) were recruited for a dual-site randomized controlled trial - Fibromyalgia Activity Study with TENS (FAST). TENS electrodes and stimulation were applied to the lumbar area, and intensity was increased to sensory threshold (ST), then to "strong but comfortable" (SC1), then to "noxious" (N). This was followed by a reduction to the final stimulation intensity of "strong but comfortable" (SC2). We called this the Setting of Intensity of TENS (SIT) test. Results: There was a significant increase from SC1 (37.5 mA IQR: 35.6-39.0) to SC2 (39.2 mA IQR: 37.1-45.3) ( Conclusion: The SC2-SC1 increase was significantly associated with age and anxiety, with greater mean increases associated with older age and higher anxiety. Thus, although all patients may benefit from this protocol, older women and women with elevated anxiety receive the greatest benefit.

5 Article Physical activity is related to function and fatigue but not pain in women with fibromyalgia: baseline analyses from the Fibromyalgia Activity Study with TENS (FAST). 2018

Merriwether, Ericka N / Frey-Law, Laura A / Rakel, Barbara A / Zimmerman, Miriam B / Dailey, Dana L / Vance, Carol G T / Golchha, Meenakshi / Geasland, Katherine M / Chimenti, Ruth / Crofford, Leslie J / Sluka, Kathleen A. ·Department of Physical Therapy, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA. · College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA. · College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA. · Department of Medicine/Rheumatology & Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA. kathleen-sluka@uiowa.edu. · College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA. kathleen-sluka@uiowa.edu. · Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, 1-242 MEB, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA, 52422-1089, USA. kathleen-sluka@uiowa.edu. ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #30157911.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although exercise is an effective treatment for fibromyalgia, the relationships between lifestyle physical activity and multiple symptomology domains of fibromyalgia are not clear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to comprehensively examine the relationships between lifestyle physical activity with multiple outcome domains in women with fibromyalgia, including pain, fatigue, function, pain-related psychological constructs, and quality of life. METHODS: Women (N = 171), aged 20 to 70 years, diagnosed with fibromyalgia, recruited from an ongoing two-site clinical trial were included in this prespecified subgroup analysis of baseline data. Physical activity was assessed using self-report and accelerometry. Symptomology was assessed using questionnaires of perceived physical function, quality of life, fatigue, pain intensity and interference, disease impact, pain catastrophizing, and fear of movement. In addition, quantitative sensory testing of pain sensitivity and performance-based physical function were assessed. Correlation coefficients, regression analyses and between-group differences in symptomology by activity level were assessed, controlling for age and body mass index (BMI). RESULTS: Lifestyle physical activity was most closely associated with select measures of physical function and fatigue, regardless of age and BMI. Those who performed the lowest levels of lifestyle physical activity had poorer functional outcomes and greater fatigue than those with higher physical activity participation. No relationships between lifestyle physical activity and pain, pain sensitivity, or pain-related psychological constructs were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Lifestyle physical activity is not equally related to all aspects of fibromyalgia symptomology. Lifestyle physical activity levels have the strongest correlations with function, physical quality of life, and movement fatigue in women with fibromyalgia. No relationships between lifestyle physical activity and pain, pain sensitivity, or psychological constructs were observed. These data suggest that physical activity levels are more likely to affect function and fatigue, but have negligible relationships with pain and pain-related psychological constructs, in women with fibromyalgia. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01888640 . Registered on 28 June 2013.