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Fibromyalgia: HELP
Articles from Merseyside
Based on 8 articles published since 2009
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These are the 8 published articles about Fibromyalgia that originated from Merseyside during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Concomitant fibromyalgia complicating chronic inflammatory arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2018

Duffield, Stephen J / Miller, Natasha / Zhao, Sizheng / Goodson, Nicola J. ·Department of Musculoskeletal Biology 1, Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Clinical Sciences Centre, University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool, UK. · School of Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #29788461.

ABSTRACT: Objectives: This systematic review and meta-analysis will describe the prevalence of concomitant FM in adults with inflammatory arthritis and quantify the impact of FM on DAS. Methods: Cochrane library, MEDLINE, Psychinfo, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science were searched using key terms and predefined exclusion criteria. As appropriate, proportional and pairwise meta-analysis methods were used to pool results. Results: Forty articles were identified. In RA the prevalence of FM ranged from 4.9 to 52.4% (21% pooled). In axSpA the range was 4.11-25.2% (13% pooled in AS only). In PsA the range was 9.6-27.2% (18% pooled). The presence of concomitant FM was related to higher DAS in patients with RA and AS (DAS28 mean difference 1.24, 95% CI: 1.10, 1.37 in RA; BASDAI mean difference 2.22, 95% CI: 1.86, 2.58 in AS). Concomitant FM was also associated with higher DAS in existing PsA studies. Self-reported, rather than objective, components of DAS appear to be raised in the presence of FM (e.g. tender joint count and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain scores). Conclusion: FM is common in RA, AxSpA and PsA. Comorbid FM appears to amplify DAS and could therefore influence management of these rheumatic conditions.

2 Review Immunoglobulin responsive chronic pain. 2010

Goebel, Andreas. ·Pain Research Institute, 3rd Floor, Clinical Sciences Centre, Liverpool University, Liverpool, UK. andreasgoebel@rocketmail.com ·J Clin Immunol · Pubmed #20424897.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Over the last 15 years, clinical and experimental data have emerged that suggest that peripheral and central, glial-mediated neuroimmune activation is both necessary and sufficient to sustain chronic pain. Immune modulation appears to be, therefore, a possible new therapeutic option. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Medline database and international trial registry databases were searched using the keywords "intravenous immunoglobulin" or "IVIG," "pain" or "chronic pain," "neuropathic pain," "CRPS," "complex regional pain syndrome" or "fibromyalgia." RESULTS: Evidence from RCTs suggest that IVIG is effective to reduce pain in complex regional pain syndrome (low-dose IVIG) and post-polio syndrome (high-dose IVIG), and open trials have suggested efficacy in additional pain conditions. CONCLUSION: IVIG therapy may emerge as a novel treatment modality for refractory cases. However, before this drug can be confidently used by clinicians, important questions need to be answered concerning optimal treatment doses, duration of treatment, and its effect on function and quality of life.

3 Article A systematic review and meta-analysis of the prevalence of small fiber pathology in fibromyalgia: Implications for a new paradigm in fibromyalgia etiopathogenesis. 2019

Grayston, Rebecca / Czanner, Gabriela / Elhadd, Kareim / Goebel, Andreas / Frank, Bernhard / Üçeyler, Nurcan / Malik, Rayaz A / Alam, Uazman. ·Department of Eye & Vision Sciences, Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool and Aintree University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Eye & Vision Sciences, Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool and Aintree University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK; Department of Biostatistics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK. · The Pain Research Institute, University of Liverpool and The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Neurology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. · Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Doha, Qatar. · Department of Eye & Vision Sciences, Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool and Aintree University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK; Diabetes & Endocrinology Research & Pain Research Institute, Department of Eye & Vision Sciences, Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool and Aintree University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK; Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University NHS Hospital Trust, Liverpool, UK; Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Gastroenterology, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. Electronic address: uazman.alam@liverpool.ac.uk. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #30314675.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Fibromyalgia is a condition which exhibits chronic widespread pain with neuropathic pain features and has a major impact on health-related quality of life. The pathophysiology remains unclear, however, there is increasing evidence for involvement of the peripheral nervous system with a high prevalence of small fiber pathology (SFP). The aim of this systematic literature review is to establish the prevalence of SFP in fibromyalgia. METHODS: An electronic literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library databases. Published full-text, English language articles that provide SFP prevalence data in studies of fibromyalgia of patients over 18years old were included. All articles were screened by two independent reviewers using a priori criteria. Methodological quality and risk of bias were evaluated using the critical appraisal tool by Munn et al. Overall and subgroup pooled prevalence were calculated by random-effects meta-analysis with 95% CI. RESULTS: Database searches found 935 studies; 45 articles were screened of which 8 full text articles satisfied the inclusion criteria, providing data from 222 participants. The meta-analysis demonstrated the pooled prevalence of SFP in fibromyalgia is 49% (95% CI: 38-60%) with a moderate degree of heterogeneity, (I CONCLUSION: There is a high prevalence of SFP in fibromyalgia. This study provides compelling evidence of a distinct phenotype involving SFP in fibromyalgia. Identifying SFP will aid in determining its relationship to pain and potentially facilitate the development of future interventions and pharmacotherapy.

4 Article Altered theta oscillations in resting EEG of fibromyalgia syndrome patients. 2018

Fallon, N / Chiu, Y / Nurmikko, T / Stancak, A. ·Department Psychological Sciences, Institute of Psychology, Health, and Society, University of Liverpool, UK. · Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, UK. · Pain Research Institute, Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, UK. · The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK. ·Eur J Pain · Pubmed #28758313.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by widespread pain, sleep disturbance, fatigue and cognitive/affective symptoms. Functional imaging studies have revealed that FM and other chronic pain syndromes can affect resting brain activity. This study utilized electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings to investigate the relative power of ongoing oscillatory activity in the resting brain. METHODS: A 64-channel EEG was recorded at rest in 19 female FM patients and 18 healthy, age-matched, control subjects. The Manual Tender Point Scale (MTPS) examination was performed to quantify tonic pain and tenderness on the day of testing along with measures of mood, arousal and fatigue. Oscillations in delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequency bands were analysed using Standardised Low-Resolution Brain Electromagnetic Tomography to evaluate sources of spectral activity throughout the whole brain. RESULTS: FM patients exhibited greater pain, tiredness and tension on the day of testing relative to healthy control participants and augmented theta activity in prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. No significant differences were seen in other frequency bands. Augmented frontal theta activity in FM patients significantly correlated with measures of tenderness and mean tiredness scores. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that alterations to resting-state oscillatory activity may relate to ongoing tonic pain and fatigue in FM, and manifest in brain regions relevant for cognitive-attentional aspects of pain processing and endogenous pain inhibition. Enhanced low-frequency oscillations were previously seen in FM and other chronic pain syndromes, and may relate to pathophysiological mechanisms for ongoing pain such as thalamocortical dysrhythmia. SIGNIFICANCE: Increased prefrontal theta activity may contribute to persistent pain in fibromyalgia or represent the outcome of prolonged symptoms. The findings point to the potential for therapeutic interventions aimed at normalizing neural oscillations, while further research utilizing quantitative analysis of resting EEG could benefit our understanding of fibromyalgia pathophysiology.

5 Article Functional Connectivity with the Default Mode Network Is Altered in Fibromyalgia Patients. 2016

Fallon, Nicholas / Chiu, Yee / Nurmikko, Turo / Stancak, Andrej. ·Department of Psychological Sciences, Institute of Psychology, Health, and Society, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Wirral, United Kingdom. · Pain Research Institute, Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, United Kingdom. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #27442504.

ABSTRACT: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients show altered connectivity with the network maintaining ongoing resting brain activity, known as the default mode network (DMN). The connectivity patterns of DMN with the rest of the brain in FMS patients are poorly understood. This study employed seed-based functional connectivity analysis to investigate resting-state functional connectivity with DMN structures in FMS. Sixteen female FMS patients and 15 age-matched, healthy control subjects underwent T2-weighted resting-state MRI scanning and functional connectivity analyses using DMN network seed regions. FMS patients demonstrated alterations to connectivity between DMN structures and anterior midcingulate cortex, right parahippocampal gyrus, left superior parietal lobule and left inferior temporal gyrus. Correlation analysis showed that reduced functional connectivity between the DMN and the right parahippocampal gyrus was associated with longer duration of symptoms in FMS patients, whereas augmented connectivity between the anterior midcingulate and posterior cingulate cortices was associated with tenderness and depression scores. Our findings demonstrate alterations to functional connectivity between DMN regions and a variety of regions which are important for pain, cognitive and emotional processing in FMS patients, and which may contribute to the development or maintenance of chronic symptoms in FMS.

6 Article Altered cortical processing of observed pain in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. 2015

Fallon, Nicholas / Li, Xiaoyun / Chiu, Yee / Nurmikko, Turo / Stancak, Andrej. ·Department Psychological Sciences, Institute of Psychology, Health, and Society, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. Electronic address: nickfal@liverpool.ac.uk. · Department Psychological Sciences, Institute of Psychology, Health, and Society, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Wirral, United Kingdom. · Pain Research Institute, Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, United Kingdom. ·J Pain · Pubmed #25979860.

ABSTRACT: PERSPECTIVE: Patients with FMS demonstrate increased activations associated with pain and nonpain pictures. The findings suggest that even innocuous, everyday visual stimuli with somatic connotations may challenge the emotional state of patients with FMS. Our study points toward the importance of cognitive-emotional therapeutic approaches for the treatment of FMS.

7 Article Ipsilateral cortical activation in fibromyalgia patients during brushing correlates with symptom severity. 2013

Fallon, Nicholas / Chiu, Yee Ho / Li, Xiaoyun / Nurmikko, Turo J / Stancak, Andrej. ·Department of Experimental Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Health, and Society, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. nickfal@liverpool.ac.uk ·Clin Neurophysiol · Pubmed #22819596.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cortical activation patterns during mechanical-tactile stimulation in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients and to correlate cortical activation changes with clinical symptoms. METHODS: Nineteen female FMS patients and 18 matched, healthy control subjects underwent EEG examination during brushing stimulation of the right forearm. Participants rated any pain experienced and underwent a manual tender point scale (MTPS) examination. Amplitude changes of cortical rhythms during brushing were analysed in alpha (8-13 Hz) and beta (16-24 Hz) frequency bands. RESULTS: Thirteen patients reported pain during brushing. Independent t-test comparison of event related desynchronisation (ERD) during brushing revealed a cluster of electrodes over ipsilateral (right) central-parietal region which demonstrated ERD in patients only. Clinical MTPS scores correlated with beta-band ERD in this cluster of electrodes. Beamformer analysis revealed a widespread array of source activations in patients, including bilateral insula and primary and secondary somatosensory cortices. Control subject source activations were limited to contralateral (left) hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate ipsilateral cortical activations in FMS patients, but not in healthy controls, during brushing. Ipsilateral ERD during brushing is associated with MTPS score suggesting abnormal processing of somatosensory input which may contribute to clinical pain. SIGNIFICANCE: Altered functioning in FMS may reflect physiological changes in response to afferent somatosensory information manifesting in chronic pain.

8 Minor Cognitive dysfunction in patients with fibromyalgia. 2016

Williamson, J / Larner, A J. ·Neurology Specialist Trainee/Consultant Neurologist Cognitive Function Clinic Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery Liverpool L9 7LJ. ·Br J Hosp Med (Lond) · Pubmed #26875810.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --