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Glaucoma: HELP
Articles by Maria Vittoria Cicinelli
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Maria V. Cicinelli wrote the following 7 articles about Glaucoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Global causes of blindness and distance vision impairment 1990-2020: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Flaxman, Seth R / Bourne, Rupert R A / Resnikoff, Serge / Ackland, Peter / Braithwaite, Tasanee / Cicinelli, Maria V / Das, Aditi / Jonas, Jost B / Keeffe, Jill / Kempen, John H / Leasher, Janet / Limburg, Hans / Naidoo, Kovin / Pesudovs, Konrad / Silvester, Alex / Stevens, Gretchen A / Tahhan, Nina / Wong, Tien Y / Taylor, Hugh R / Anonymous4500923. ·Department of Mathematics and Data Science Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Vision and Eye Research Unit, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK. Electronic address: rb@rupertbourne.co.uk. · Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia; School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness, London, UK. · Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · York Hospital, York, UK. · Department of Ophthalmology, Universitätsmedizin, Mannheim, Germany; Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India. · Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Discovery Eye Center, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; MyungSung Christian Medical Center, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. · Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA. · Health Information Services, Grootebroek, Netherlands. · Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia; African Vision Research Institute, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Glenwood, Durban, South Africa. · National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Clinical Eye Research, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia. · SpaMedica Research Institute, Bolton, UK. · Department of Information, Evidence and Research, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. · Singapore Eye Research Institute, Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, National University of Singapore, Singapore. · Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. ·Lancet Glob Health · Pubmed #29032195.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Contemporary data for causes of vision impairment and blindness form an important basis of recommendations in public health policies. Refreshment of the Global Vision Database with recently published data sources permitted modelling of cause of vision loss data from 1990 to 2015, further disaggregation by cause, and forecasts to 2020. METHODS: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we analysed published and unpublished population-based data for the causes of vision impairment and blindness from 1980 to 2014. We identified population-based studies published before July 8, 2014, by searching online databases with no language restrictions (MEDLINE from Jan 1, 1946, and Embase from Jan 1, 1974, and the WHO Library Database). We fitted a series of regression models to estimate the proportion of moderate or severe vision impairment (defined as presenting visual acuity of <6/18 but ≥3/60 in the better eye) and blindness (presenting visual acuity of <3/60 in the better eye) by cause, age, region, and year. FINDINGS: We identified 288 studies of 3 983 541 participants contributing data from 98 countries. Among the global population with moderate or severe vision impairment in 2015 (216·6 million [80% uncertainty interval 98·5 million to 359·1 million]), the leading causes were uncorrected refractive error (116·3 million [49·4 million to 202·1 million]), cataract (52·6 million [18·2 million to 109·6 million]), age-related macular degeneration (8·4 million [0·9 million to 29·5 million]), glaucoma (4·0 million [0·6 million to 13·3 million]), and diabetic retinopathy (2·6 million [0·2 million to 9·9 million]). Among the global population who were blind in 2015 (36·0 million [12·9 million to 65·4 million]), the leading causes were cataract (12·6 million [3·4 million to 28·7 million]), uncorrected refractive error (7·4 million [2·4 million to 14·8 million]), and glaucoma (2·9 million [0·4 million to 9·9 million]). By 2020, among the global population with moderate or severe vision impairment (237·1 million [101·5 million to 399·0 million]), the number of people affected by uncorrected refractive error is anticipated to rise to 127·7 million (51·0 million to 225·3 million), by cataract to 57·1 million (17·9 million to 124·1 million), by age-related macular degeneration to 8·8 million (0·8 million to 32·1 million), by glaucoma to 4·5 million (0·5 million to 15·4 million), and by diabetic retinopathy to 3·2 million (0·2 million to 12·9 million). By 2020, among the global population who are blind (38·5 million [13·2 million to 70·9 million]), the number of patients blind because of cataract is anticipated to rise to 13·4 million (3·3 million to 31·6 million), because of uncorrected refractive error to 8·0 million (2·5 million to 16·3 million), and because of glaucoma to 3·2 million (0·4 million to 11·0 million). Cataract and uncorrected refractive error combined contributed to 55% of blindness and 77% of vision impairment in adults aged 50 years and older in 2015. World regions varied markedly in the causes of blindness and vision impairment in this age group, with a low prevalence of cataract (<22% for blindness and 14·1-15·9% for vision impairment) and a high prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (>14% of blindness) as causes in the high-income subregions. Blindness and vision impairment at all ages in 2015 due to diabetic retinopathy (odds ratio 2·52 [1·48-3·73]) and cataract (1·21 [1·17-1·25]) were more common among women than among men, whereas blindness and vision impairment due to glaucoma (0·71 [0·57-0·86]) and corneal opacity (0·54 [0·43-0·66]) were more common among men than among women, with no sex difference related to age-related macular degeneration (0·91 [0·70-1·14]). INTERPRETATION: The number of people affected by the common causes of vision loss has increased substantially as the population increases and ages. Preventable vision loss due to cataract (reversible with surgery) and refractive error (reversible with spectacle correction) continue to cause most cases of blindness and moderate or severe vision impairment in adults aged 50 years and older. A large scale-up of eye care provision to cope with the increasing numbers is needed to address avoidable vision loss. FUNDING: Brien Holden Vision Institute.

2 Article Prevalence and causes of vision loss in East Asia in 2015: magnitude, temporal trends and projections. 2020

Cheng, Ching-Yu / Wang, Ningli / Wong, Tien Y / Congdon, Nathan / He, Mingguang / Wang, Ya Xing / Braithwaite, Tasanee / Casson, Robert J / Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria / Das, Aditi / Flaxman, Seth R / Jonas, Jost B / Keeffe, Jill Elizabeth / Kempen, John H / Leasher, Janet / Limburg, Hans / Naidoo, Kovin / Pesudovs, Konrad / Resnikoff, Serge / Silvester, Alexander J / Tahhan, Nina / Taylor, Hugh R / Bourne, Rupert R A / Anonymous4311174. ·Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore. · Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences Academic Clinical Program (Eye ACP), Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore. · Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing Ophthalmology & Visual Science Key Lab, Beijing, China. · Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · Preventive Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Guangdong, China. · Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast School of Medicine Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Belfast, UK. · Ophthalmology Eye and Ear Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital University of Medical Science, Beijing, China. · School of Medicine, Vision and Eye Research Unit (VERU), Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK. · Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Ophthalmology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Department of Ophthalmology, University Vita-Salute, San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Ophthalmic Public Health, Leeds Teaching Hospital NHS Trust, London, UK. · Department of Mathematics and Data Science Institute, Imperial College, London, UK. · Department of Ophthalmology, Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg, Seegartenklinik Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany. · L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India. · Ophthalmology and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · HPD/College of Optometry, Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA. · Health Information Services, Grootebroek, The Netherlands. · African Vision Research Institute, Durban, South Africa. · Pesudovs, GLENELG, South Australia, Australia. · Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Ophthalmology, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · Melbourne School of Population Health, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria, Australia. · School of Medicine, Vision and Eye Research Unit (VERU), Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK rb@rupertbourne.co.uk. ·Br J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #31462416.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To determine the prevalence and causes of blindness and vision impairment (VI) in East Asia in 2015 and to forecast the trend to 2020. METHODS: Through a systematic literature review and meta-analysis, we estimated prevalence of blindness (presenting visual acuity <3/60 in the better eye), moderate-to-severe vision impairment (MSVI; 3/60≤presenting visual acuity <6/18), mild vision impairment (mild VI: 6/18≤presenting visual acuity <6/12) and uncorrected presbyopia for 1990, 2010, 2015 and 2020. A total of 44 population-based studies were included. RESULTS: In 2015, age-standardised prevalence of blindness, MSVI, mild VI and uncorrected presbyopia was 0.37% (80% uncertainty interval (UI) 0.12%-0.68%), 3.06% (80% UI 1.35%-5.16%) and 2.65% (80% UI 0.92%-4.91%), 32.91% (80% UI 18.72%-48.47%), respectively, in East Asia. Cataract was the leading cause of blindness (43.6%), followed by uncorrected refractive error (12.9%), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, corneal diseases, trachoma and diabetic retinopathy (DR). The leading cause for MSVI was uncorrected refractive error, followed by cataract, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, corneal disease, trachoma and DR. The burden of VI due to uncorrected refractive error, cataracts, glaucoma and DR has continued to rise over the decades reported. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing the public healthcare barriers for cataract and uncorrected refractive error can help eliminate almost 57% of all blindness cases in this region. Therefore, public healthcare efforts should be focused on effective screening and effective patient education, with access to high-quality healthcare.

3 Article Prevalence and causes of blindness and vision impairment: magnitude, temporal trends and projections in South and Central Asia. 2019

Nangia, Vinay / Jonas, Jost B / George, Ronnie / Lingam, Vijaya / Ellwein, Leon / Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria / Das, Aditi / Flaxman, Seth R / Keeffe, Jill E / Kempen, John H / Leasher, Janet / Limburg, Hans / Naidoo, Kovin / Pesudovs, Konrad / Resnikoff, Serge / Silvester, Alexander J / Tahhan, Nina / Taylor, Hugh R / Wong, Tien Y / Bourne, Rupert R A / Anonymous8091112. ·Suraj Eye Institute, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India. · Department of Ophthalmology, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · Department of Glaucoma, Medical Research Foundation, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. · National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Health Education Yorkshire and the Humber, Humber, UK. · Department of Mathematics, Data Science Institute, Imperial College, London, UK. · Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, India. · Director of Epidemiology, Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Discovery Eye Center, MyungSung Christian Medical Center and Medical School, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. · Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA. · Health Information Services, Grootebroek, The Netherlands. · African Vision Research Institute, University of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa and Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, Victoria, Australia. · 5 Rose St, Glenelg, Glenelg, South Australia, Australia. · Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, Australia & School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Pauls Eye Unit, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · Melbourne School of Population Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Parkville, Australia. · Singapore Eye Research Institute, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Asia. · Vision and Eye Research Unit, School of Medicine, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK rb@rupertbourne.co.uk. ·Br J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #30409914.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To assess prevalence and causes of vision loss in Central and South Asia. METHODS: A systematic review of medical literature assessed the prevalence of blindness (presenting visual acuity<3/60 in the better eye), moderate and severe vision impairment (MSVI; presenting visual acuity <6/18 but ≥3/60) and mild vision impairment (MVI; presenting visual acuity <6/12 and ≥6/18) in Central and South Asia for 1990, 2010, 2015 and 2020. RESULTS: In Central and South Asia combined, age-standardised prevalences of blindness, MSVI and MVI in 2015 were for men and women aged 50+years, 3.72% (80% uncertainty interval (UI): 1.39-6.75) and 4.00% (80% UI: 1.41-7.39), 16.33% (80% UI: 8.55-25.47) and 17.65% (80% UI: 9.00-27.62), 11.70% (80% UI: 4.70-20.32) and 12.25% (80% UI:4.86-21.30), respectively, with a significant decrease in the study period for both gender. In South Asia in 2015, 11.76 million individuals (32.65% of the global blindness figure) were blind and 61.19 million individuals (28.3% of the global total) had MSVI. From 1990 to 2015, cataract (accounting for 36.58% of all cases with blindness in 2015) was the most common cause of blindness, followed by undercorrected refractive error (36.43%), glaucoma (5.81%), age-related macular degeneration (2.44%), corneal diseases (2.43%), diabetic retinopathy (0.16%) and trachoma (0.04%). For MSVI in South Asia 2015, most common causes were undercorrected refractive error (accounting for 66.39% of all cases with MSVI), followed by cataract (23.62%), age-related macular degeneration (1.31%) and glaucoma (1.09%). CONCLUSIONS: One-third of the global blind resided in South Asia in 2015, although the age-standardised prevalence of blindness and MSVI decreased significantly between 1990 and 2015.

4 Article Prevalence and causes of vision loss in South-east Asia and Oceania in 2015: magnitude, temporal trends and projections. 2019

Keeffe, Jill Elizabeth / Casson, Robert J / Pesudovs, Konrad / Taylor, Hugh R / Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria / Das, Aditi / Flaxman, Seth R / Jonas, Jost B / Kempen, John H / Leasher, Janet / Limburg, Hans / Naidoo, Kovin / Silvester, Alexander J / Stevens, Gretchen A / Tahhan, Nina / Wong, Tien Yin / Resnikoff, Serge / Bourne, Rupert R A / Anonymous721087. ·L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India jillkeeffe@lvpei.org. · University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Melbourne School of Population Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Health Education Yorkshire, London, UK. · Department of Mathematics and Data Science Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Ophthalmology, Universitätsmedizin, Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · Immunology and Uveitis Service, Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Discovery Eye Center, Leawood, Kansas, USA. · MyungSung Christian Medical Center, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. · Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA. · Health Information Services, Grootebroek, The Netherlands. · African Vision Research Institute, University of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa & Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · St Pauls Eye Unit, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Prescot Street, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Information, Evidence and Research, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. · Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Singapore Eye Research Institute, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore. · Vision & Eye Research Unit, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK. ·Br J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #30209084.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To assess prevalence and causes of vision impairment in South-east Asia and Oceania regions from 1990 to 2015 and to forecast the figures for 2020. METHODS: Based on a systematic review of medical literature, prevalence of blindness (presenting visual acuity (PVA) <3/60 in the better eye), moderate and severe vision impairment (MSVI; PVA <6/18 but ≥3/60), mild vision impairment (PVA <6/12 but ≥6/18) and near vision impairment (>N5 or N8 in the presence of normal vision) were estimated for 1990, 2010, 2015 and 2020. RESULTS: The age-standardised prevalence of blindness for all ages and both genders was higher in the Oceania region but lower for MSVI when comparing the subregions. The prevalence of near vision impairment in people≥50 years was 41% (uncertainty interval (UI) 18.8 to 65.9). Comparison of the data for 2015 with 2020 predicts a small increase in the numbers of people affected by blindness, MSVI and mild VI in both subregions. The numbers predicted for near VI in South-east Asia are from 90.68 million in 2015 to 102.88 million in 2020. The main causes of blindness and MSVI in both subregions in 2015 were cataract, uncorrected refractive error, glaucoma, corneal disease and age-related macular degeneration. There was no trachoma in Oceania from 1990 and decreasing prevalence in South-east Asia with elimination predicted by 2020. CONCLUSIONS: In both regions, the main challenges for eye care come from cataract which remains the main cause of blindness with uncorrected refractive error the main cause of MSVI. The trend between 1990 and 2015 is for a lower prevalence of blindness and MSVI in both regions.

5 Article Comparison of methods to quantify macular and peripapillary vessel density in optical coherence tomography angiography. 2018

Rabiolo, Alessandro / Gelormini, Francesco / Sacconi, Riccardo / Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria / Triolo, Giacinto / Bettin, Paolo / Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros / Bandello, Francesco / Querques, Giuseppe. ·Department of Ophthalmology, University Vita-Salute, IRCCS San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. · Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America. · Eye Clinic, Department of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #30335815.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To compare macular and peripapillary vessel density values calculated on optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) images with different algorithms, elaborate conversion formula, and compare the ability to discriminate healthy from affected eyes. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of healthy subjects, patients with diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma patients (44 eyes in each group). Vessel density in the macular superficial capillary plexus (SCP), deep capillary plexus (DCP), and the peripapillary radial capillary plexus (RCP) were calculated with seven previously published algorithms. Systemic differences, diagnostic properties, reliability, and agreement of the methods were investigated. RESULTS: Healthy eyes exhibited higher vessel density values in all plexuses compared to diseased eyes regardless of the algorithm used (p<0.01). The estimated vessel densities were significantly different at all the plexuses (p<0.0001) as a function of method used. Inter-method reliability and agreement was mostly poor to moderate. A conversion formula was available for every method, except for the conversion between multilevel and fixed at the DCP. Substantial systemic, non-constant biases were evident between many algorithms. No algorithm outperformed the others for discrimination of patients from healthy subjects in all the retinal plexuses, but the best performing algorithm varied with the selected plexus. CONCLUSIONS: Absolute vessel density values calculated with different algorithms are not directly interchangeable. Differences between healthy and affected eyes could be appreciated with all methods with different discriminatory abilities as a function of the plexus analyzed. Longitudinal monitoring of vessel density should be performed with the same algorithm. Studies adopting vessel density as an outcome measure should not rely on external normative databases.

6 Article Prevalence and causes of vision loss in high-income countries and in Eastern and Central Europe in 2015: magnitude, temporal trends and projections. 2018

Bourne, Rupert R A / Jonas, Jost B / Bron, Alain M / Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria / Das, Aditi / Flaxman, Seth R / Friedman, David S / Keeffe, Jill E / Kempen, John H / Leasher, Janet / Limburg, Hans / Naidoo, Kovin / Pesudovs, Konrad / Peto, Tunde / Saadine, Jinan / Silvester, Alexander J / Tahhan, Nina / Taylor, Hugh R / Varma, Rohit / Wong, Tien Y / Resnikoff, Serge / Anonymous2511112. ·Vision & Eye Research Unit, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK. · Department of Ophthalmology, Universitätsmedizin, Mannheim, Germany. · Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · INRA, UMR1324 Centre des Sciences du Goût et de l'Alimentation, Dijon, France. · CNRS, UMR6265 Centre des Sciences du Goût et de l'Alimentation, Dijon, France. · Centre des Sciences du Goût et de l'Alimentation, Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Dijon, France. · Ophthalmology Department, Dijon University Hospital, Dijon, France. · San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Health Education Yorkshire and the Humber, Leeds, UK. · Department of Mathematics and Data Science Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Statistics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India. · Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Discovery Eye Center, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. · Myungsung Christian Medical Center and Medical School, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. · Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA. · Health Information Services, Grootebroek, The Netherlands. · African Vision Research Institute, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Brien Holden Vision Institute, Durban, South Africa. · NHMRC Centre for Clinical Eye Research, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK. · Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · St Pauls Eye Unit, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Melbourne School of Population Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Singapore Eye Research Institute, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ·Br J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #29545417.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Within a surveillance of the prevalence and causes of vision impairment in high-income regions and Central/Eastern Europe, we update figures through 2015 and forecast expected values in 2020. METHODS: Based on a systematic review of medical literature, prevalence of blindness, moderate and severe vision impairment (MSVI), mild vision impairment and presbyopia was estimated for 1990, 2010, 2015, and 2020. RESULTS: Age-standardised prevalence of blindness and MSVI for all ages decreased from 1990 to 2015 from 0.26% (0.10-0.46) to 0.15% (0.06-0.26) and from 1.74% (0.76-2.94) to 1.27% (0.55-2.17), respectively. In 2015, the number of individuals affected by blindness, MSVI and mild vision impairment ranged from 70 000, 630 000 and 610 000, respectively, in Australasia to 980 000, 7.46 million and 7.25 million, respectively, in North America and 1.16 million, 9.61 million and 9.47 million, respectively, in Western Europe. In 2015, cataract was the most common cause for blindness, followed by age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, uncorrected refractive error, diabetic retinopathy and cornea-related disorders, with declining burden from cataract and AMD over time. Uncorrected refractive error was the leading cause of MSVI. CONCLUSIONS: While continuing to advance control of cataract and AMD as the leading causes of blindness remains a high priority, overcoming barriers to uptake of refractive error services would address approximately half of the MSVI burden. New data on burden of presbyopia identify this entity as an important public health problem in this population. Additional research on better treatments, better implementation with existing tools and ongoing surveillance of the problem is needed.

7 Minor Subconjunctival sustained-release dexamethasone implant as an adjunct to trabeculectomy for primary open angle glaucoma. 2016

Furino, Claudio / Boscia, Francesco / Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria / Sborgia, Alessandra / Alessio, Giovanni. ·Department of Ophthalmology, University of Bari, Bari, Italy. ·Indian J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #27146944.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --