Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Glaucoma: HELP
Articles from Israel
Based on 124 articles published since 2008
||||

These are the 124 published articles about Glaucoma that originated from Israel during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5
1 Review Intraocular pressure-independent management of normal tension glaucoma. 2019

Adeghate, Jennifer / Rahmatnejad, Kamran / Waisbourd, Michael / Katz, L Jay. ·Wills Eye Hospital, Glaucoma Research Department, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Ophthalmology, New York, New York, USA. · Wills Eye Hospital, Glaucoma Research Department, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Wills Eye Hospital, Glaucoma Research Department, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Ophthalmology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Tel-Aviv University Medical Center, Glaucoma Research Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel. · Wills Eye Hospital, Glaucoma Research Department, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Ophthalmology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Electronic address: ljaykatz@gmail.com. ·Surv Ophthalmol · Pubmed #30300625.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Review Modifiable factors in the management of glaucoma: a systematic review of current evidence. 2017

Hecht, Idan / Achiron, Asaf / Man, Vitaly / Burgansky-Eliash, Zvia. ·Department of Ophthalmology, The Edith Wolfson Medical Center, 62 Halochamim St., Holon, Israel, 58100. idanhe@gmail.com. · Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. idanhe@gmail.com. · Department of Ophthalmology, The Edith Wolfson Medical Center, 62 Halochamim St., Holon, Israel, 58100. · Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Ophthalmology, Soroka University Medical Center, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, Israel. ·Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol · Pubmed #27743157.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Primary open angle glaucoma is a chronic optic neuropathy affecting millions of people worldwide and represents a major public health issue. Environmental factors, behaviors, and diet are intimately related to patient health and may play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of glaucoma. This study aims to review the literature, focusing on the last three years, regarding modifiable lifestyle interventions in the management of primary open angle glaucoma. METHODS: Electronic databases were searched for studies published between January 2013 and July 2016 on the topic of lifestyle interventions in primary open angle glaucoma. RESULTS: Sleeping with the head elevated and avoiding the worst eye-dependent side during sleep may slightly lower intraocular pressure and reduce visual field loss. Some food supplements and moderate aerobic exercise may also reduce intraocular pressure up to 2.0 and 3.0 mmHg, respectively. Frequency of coffee intake may be associated with disease progression. Potential negative effects are associated with weight-lifting and yoga exercises. CONCLUSIONS: Certain lifestyle habits could influence glaucoma progression, yet no specific interventions are currently supported by robust evidence. Awareness of the possible influences of certain habits should help guide clinical advice and is important to help patients avoid adverse outcomes and take an active role in the management of their disease.

3 Review Emerging risk factors for glaucoma onset and progression. 2015

Blumberg, Dana / Skaat, Alon / Liebmann, Jeffrey M. ·Bernard and Shirlee Brown Glaucoma Research Laboratory, Edward S. Harkness Eye Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Goldschleger Eye Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Bernard and Shirlee Brown Glaucoma Research Laboratory, Edward S. Harkness Eye Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: jml2314@cumc.columbia.edu. ·Prog Brain Res · Pubmed #26518074.

ABSTRACT: Glaucoma is a complex, multifactorial neurodegenerative disease process that leads to progressive damage to the optic nerve and irreversible visual impairment. Identification of ocular and systemic risk factors for disease onset and progression is critical for disease detection and surveillance. Although a great deal is known about risk factors for glaucoma, our expanding knowledge of glaucoma genotypes and phenotypes combined with advancements in technology and understanding of disease progression is rapidly enhancing our understanding of who is at greatest risk for glaucomatous visual impairment.

4 Review Retinal ganglion cell apoptotic pathway in glaucoma: Initiating and downstream mechanisms. 2015

Levkovitch-Verbin, Hani. ·Glaucoma Service, Goldschleger Eye Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer, Israel. Electronic address: halevko@hotmail.com. ·Prog Brain Res · Pubmed #26497784.

ABSTRACT: Apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in glaucoma causes progressive visual field loss, making it the primary cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Elevated intraocular pressure and aging, the main risk factors for glaucoma, accelerate RGC apoptosis. Numerous pathways and mechanisms were found to be involved in RGC death in glaucoma. Neurotrophic factors deprivation is an early event. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, glial cell dysfunction, and activation of apoptotic pathways and prosurvival pathways play a significant role in RGC death in glaucoma. The most important among the involved pathways are the MAP-kinase pathway, PI-3 kinase/Akt pathway, Bcl-2 family, caspase family, and IAP family.

5 Review Standard Trabeculectomy and Ex-PRESS Miniature Glaucoma Shunt: A Comparative Study and Literature Review. 2015

Moisseiev, Elad / Zunz, Eran / Tzur, Rotem / Kurtz, Shimon / Shemesh, Gabi. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel (affiliated to the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel). ·J Glaucoma · Pubmed #24633088.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety between standard trabeculectomy and the Ex-PRESS shunt implantation. METHODS: A retrospective review of the records of 100 eyes of 100 patients who underwent trabeculectomy or Ex-PRESS shunt implantation between July 2010 and June 2012 was conducted. Of these, 61 (61%) eyes underwent trabeculectomy and 39 (39%) eyes underwent Ex-PRESS shunt implantation. Demographic information, glaucoma type, surgical details, preoperative, and postoperative data including intraocular pressure (IOP), number of medications, reoperation, and occurrence of any complications were recorded. RESULTS: No differences in IOP reduction or number of postoperative IOP-lowering medications were demonstrated between the 2 procedures. Success rates were 86.9% for trabeculectomy and 84.6% for Ex-PRESS shunt. Rates of failure and hypotony were not significantly different between the groups. No parameter was correlated with success or failure of any procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Standard trabeculectomy and Ex-PRESS shunt have similar efficacy and safety profiles. As the Ex-PRESS shunt is considerably more expensive, its use may be unjustified, especially as a primary procedure.

6 Review Targeting the A3 adenosine receptor for glaucoma treatment (review). 2013

Fishman, Pnina / Cohen, Shira / Bar-Yehuda, Sara. ·Can-Fite BioPharma, Petach-Tikva 49170, Israel. pnina@canfite.co.il ·Mol Med Rep · Pubmed #23563604.

ABSTRACT: Glaucoma is a worldwide disease and the second leading cause of blindness. Current treatments are associated with a number of side-effects and poor compliance, due to the requirement for treatment administration several times a day. These treatments typically aim to lower intraocular pressure (IOP); however, they are unable to protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from undergoing apoptosis, which is the main cause of vision loss. A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) agonists have been found to protect normal cells from undergoing apoptosis via the downregulation of death signals. Furthermore, A3AR agonists have been reported to have several ophthalmological effects, including the prevention of ganglion cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo and anti‑inflammatory effects in experimental models of autoimmune uveitis. CF101, an orally bioavailable A3AR agonist, has been analyzed in dry eye syndrome phase II clinical trials and was identified to be safe and well tolerated. The anti‑inflammatory effect of CF101 was shown to significantly improve corneal staining, tear meniscus and tear break‑up time in dry eye patients. In addition, CF101 was found to decrease IOP in patients. The safety and efficacy of CF101, together with its suitability for oral administration, indicates that it has potential as a candidate drug for the treatment of glaucoma.

7 Review Anterior segment uses of bevacizumab. 2012

Bahar, Irit / Yeung, Sonia N / Sella, Ruti / Slomovic, Allan. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Petach Tiqva, Israel. ·Curr Opin Ophthalmol · Pubmed #22634640.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: A significant recent advancement in the treatment of neovascularization of the anterior segment of the eye is the development of antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapeutic agents.We present a review of the current knowledge on anti-VEGF therapy with bevacizumab for anterior segment neovascularization. RECENT FINDINGS: A review of the recent peer-reviewed literature reveals an increasing number of experimental and clinical studies on the use of Avastin in both human and animal eye models. Although the numbers are still relatively small, the evidence suggests that bevacizumab may be effective in the treatment of corneal and iris neovascularization. Its effect on primary and recurrent pterygium is more controversial. In general, achievement of vessels regression is usually partial, and recurrence may occur after cessation of treatment. Response to treatment is affected by the chronicity of vessels, their extent, the cause for blood vessels formation, and the route of administration. SUMMARY: Effective short-term response together with high patient tolerance to local bevacizumab therapy offer encouraging results for the management of anterior segment neovascular disorders. Although statistically significant regression of vessels has been documented in many studies, the clinical significance of this finding is still a subject of debate.

8 Review Laser-assisted techniques for penetrating and nonpenetrating glaucoma surgery. 2012

Geffen, Noa / Assia, Ehud I / Melamed, Shlomo. ·Departments of Ophthalmology, Meir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. ·Dev Ophthalmol · Pubmed #22517177.

ABSTRACT: The use of lasers is slowly pervading all sub-specialties of Ophthalmology, especially glaucoma, and lasers are slowly replacing many glaucoma surgeries. Conventional trabeculectomy has so far remained the gold standard for glaucoma surgery, and efforts are being made to develop a new surgical approach to overcome the limited success rate and safety issues of the traditional trabeculectomy. There is a great interest in using lasers to create an ab interno and ab externo penetrating and nonpenetrating filtering surgery. Theoretically, laser-assisted surgery offers the potential advantage of improved accuracy, repeatability, and safety, although the main drawback of using lasers for this purpose is the potential collateral damage induced by the scattered energy. Collateral thermal damage adjacent to the sclerostomy site is believed to be detrimental to the long-term success of the filtering procedure. Employing a laser with high water absorbance and low light scattering reduces the extent of collateral thermal damage and improves the long-term surgical success. An increasing number of different radiation sources were examined for penetrating and nonpenetrating glaucoma surgery with various success rates.

9 Review Objectives of teaching direct ophthalmoscopy to medical students. 2012

Benbassat, Jochanan / Polak, Bettine C P / Javitt, Jonathan C. ·Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute, The Smokler Center for Health Policy Research, Jerusalem, Israel. benbasat@jdc.org.il ·Acta Ophthalmol · Pubmed #22040169.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To propose the objectives of undergraduate training in direct ophthalmoscopy (DO). METHOD: Narrative review of the literature on (i) opinions about the expected proficiency from students in DO, and (ii) estimates of its diagnostic value. RESULTS: (i) Authorities disagree on the proficiency in DO that they expect from students. Textbooks of physical diagnosis differ in their coverage of DO. Surveys have indicated that US physicians expect students to be able to detect optic nerve head abnormalities. The Association of American Medical Colleges expects students to perform ophthalmoscopic examination and describe observations. The International Council of Ophthalmology expects students to recognize also diabetic and hypertensive retinopathies. The Association of University Professors in Ophthalmology requires that students recognize papilloedema, cholesterol emboli, glaucomatous cupping and macular degeneration. (ii) There is evidence that DO, even by ophthalmologists, is inadequate for screening for glaucoma, diabetic and hypertensive retinopathies. Two studies have suggested a limited value of DO in detecting clinical emergencies. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence that DO, even by ophthalmologists, is sub-optimal in detecting common abnormalities challenges existing the notions of training medical students. On pending the results of additional studies of the value of DO in detecting emergencies, we suggest that undergraduate teaching of DO should impart the following: (i) an ability to identify the red fundus reflex and optic disc; (ii) an ability to recognize signs of clinical emergencies in patients, mannequins or fundus photographs; and (iii) knowledge about, but not an ability to detect, other retinopathies.

10 Clinical Trial A prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-masked, three-armed, multicentre phase II/III trial for the Study of a Topical Treatment of Ischaemic Central Retinal Vein Occlusion to Prevent Neovascular Glaucoma - the STRONG study: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. 2017

Lorenz, Katrin / Scheller, Yvonne / Bell, Katharina / Grus, Franz / Ponto, Katharina A / Bock, Felix / Cursiefen, Claus / Flach, Jens / Gehring, Marta / Peto, Tunde / Silva, Rufino / Tal, Yossi / Pfeiffer, Norbert. ·Department of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, D-55131, Mainz, Germany. katrin.lorenz@unimedizin-mainz.de. · Department of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, D-55131, Mainz, Germany. · Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, University Medical Center, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131, Mainz, Germany. · Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924, Cologne, Germany. · Bundesverband Glaukom-Selbsthilfe e.V., Märkische Str. 61, 44141, Dortmund, Germany. · Gene Signal International SA, EPFL Innovation Park-A, 1015, Lausanne, Switzerland. · NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra (FMUC), Azinhaga de Santa Comba, Celas, 3000-075, Coimbra, Portugal. · Department of Ophthalmology, Coimbra Hospital and University Center (CHUC), Praceta Prof. Mota Pinto, 3000-075, Coimbra, Portugal. · Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image (AIBILI), Azinhaga de Santa Comba, Celas, 3000-548, Coimbra, Portugal. · TechnoSTAT Ltd., 34 Jerusalem Rd., Raanana, 4350108, Israel. ·Trials · Pubmed #28302155.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Neovascular glaucoma (NVG) is rare, comprising only 3.9% of all glaucoma cases. The most common cause of NVG is ischaemic central retinal vein occlusion (iCRVO). NVG frequently results in blindness and painful end-stage glaucomatous damage leading to the need for enucleation. Currently, there is no preventive therapy for NVG following iCRVO. Rescue treatments have severe drawbacks. Accordingly, there is a great need for preventing the often visually devastating outcomes of NVG. The STRONG study is designed to test whether the topically active anti-angiogenic agent aganirsen is able to inhibit the formation of neovascularisation leading to the development of secondary NVG in eyes with iCRVO. At the same time, STRONG will provide important information on the natural course of iCRVO and NVG in a large and well-characterised cohort of such patients. METHODS/DESIGN: This protocol describes a phase II/III, prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-masked, three-armed multicentre study for the investigation of aganirsen, a new topical treatment for iCRVO in order to prevent NVG. The study will evaluate the efficacy of two different doses of this newly developed antisense oligonucleotide formulated in an eye emulsion to avoid new vessel formation by blocking insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS)-1. This leads to subsequent down-regulation of both angiogenic as well as proinflammatory growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Eligible patients (n = 333) will be treated with topical aganirsen or placebo for a period of 24 weeks. They will also be invited to participate in substudies involving analysis of gonioscopic images, detection of biomarkers for NVG and risk factors for iCRVO. DISCUSSION: The STRONG study has the potential to offer a new treatment modality for patients suffering from iCRVO with a high risk of developing NVG. The topical administration can reduce patients' burden and risk related to rescue treatment, such as destructive laser treatment or enucleation, but requires a high level of patient compliance. TRIAL REGISTRATION: EudraCT: 2014-000239-18; ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02947867 . (Registered on 15 October 2016); see also http://strong-nvg.com .

11 Clinical Trial Topical bevacizumab for neovascular glaucoma: a pilot study. 2014

Waisbourd, Michael / Shemesh, Gabi / Kurtz, Shimon / Rachmiel, Rony / Moisseiev, Elad / Zayit-Soudri, Shiri / Loewenstein, Anat / Barequet, Irina. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Tel Aviv Medical Center (affiliated to the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University), Tel Aviv, Israel. ·Pharmacology · Pubmed #24556733.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIMS: Bevacizumab (Avastin), an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor drug, has been successfully used in recent years to treat ocular pathologies, mostly by intravitreal administration. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of topically applied bevacizumab for the treatment of neovascular glaucoma (NVG). METHODS: Patients with NVG were treated with topical bevacizumab (25 mg/ml) 4 times daily during 2 weeks. The following parameters were evaluated at baseline and on days 3, 7 and 14: visual acuity, slit-lamp examination, intraocular pressure (IOP), heart rate and systemic blood pressure. Iris neovascularization was documented using slit-lamp color photos at baseline and on day 14. RESULTS: Eight eyes of 8 patients with NVG were evaluated. After the 2-week treatment, mean IOP was lowered from 34.9 mm Hg (SD 12.8) at baseline to 28.8 mm Hg (SD 9.9) on day 14, representing a mean reduction of 6.1 mm Hg (17.5%). Three patients had clinical regression of their iris neovascularization. Ocular adverse events were transient and included mild upper eyelid swelling, mild exacerbation of superficial punctate keratitis and mild corneal epithelial bullae in an already edematous cornea. There were no serious systemic adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Topical application of bevacizumab may lower IOP and result in regression of neovascularization in patients with NVG.

12 Clinical Trial Characterization and comparison of the 10-2 SITA-standard and fast algorithms. 2012

Barkana, Yaniv / Bakshi, Erez / Goldich, Yakov / Morad, Yair / Kaplan, Audrey / Avni, Isaac / Zadok, David. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Zerifin 73000, Israel. ·ScientificWorldJournal · Pubmed #22654632.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To compare the 10-2 SITA-standard and SITA-fast visual field programs in patients with glaucoma. METHODS: We enrolled 26 patients with open angle glaucoma with involvement of at least one paracentral location on 24-2 SITA-standard field test. Each subject performed 10-2 SITA-standard and SITA-fast tests. Within 2 months this sequence of tests was repeated. RESULTS: SITA-fast was 30% shorter than SITA-standard (5.5 ± 1.1 vs 7.9 ± 1.1 minutes, P < 0.001). Mean MD was statistically significantly higher for SITA-standard compared with SITA-fast at first visit (Δ = 0.3 dB, P = 0.017) but not second visit. Inter-visit difference in MD or in number of depressed points was not significant for both programs. Bland-Altman analysis showed that clinically significant variations can exist in individual instances between the 2 programs and between repeat tests with the same program. CONCLUSIONS: The 10-2 SITA-fast algorithm is significantly shorter than SITA-standard. The two programs have similar long-term variability. Average same-visit between-program and same-program between-visit sensitivity results were similar for the study population, but clinically significant variability was observed for some individual test pairs. Group inter- and intra-program test results may be comparable, but in the management of the individual patient field change should be verified by repeat testing.

13 Clinical Trial CO2 laser-assisted sclerectomy surgery, part II: multicenter clinical preliminary study. 2012

Geffen, Noa / Ton, Yokrat / Degani, Joshua / Assia, Ehud I. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Meir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Israel. ·J Glaucoma · Pubmed #21173710.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of CO2 laser-assisted sclerectomy surgery (CLASS) in primary and pseudoexfoliative open-angle glaucoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients for primary filtration surgery underwent CLASS with a CO2 laser system (OT-134-IOPtiMate, IOPtima Ltd., Ramat Gan, Israel). This self-controlled system gradually ablates and removes scleral layers until percolating fluid absorbs the energy, attenuating further tissue ablation. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured at baseline, 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Complete success was defined as 5≤IOP≤18 mm Hg and 20% IOP reduction with no medication at a 12-month endpoint visit, and qualified success as the same IOP range with or without medication. RESULTS: Thirty of 37 patients completed 12 months of follow-up. Mitomycin C was used in 25 procedures (83.3%). The mean baseline IOP of 26.3±7.8 mm Hg (mean±SD) dropped to 14.4±3.4 and 14.3±3.1 mm Hg at 6 and 12 months, respectively, with 42.4% and 40.7% IOP reduction at 6 and 12 months, respectively (P<0.001). Complete success was achieved by 76.7% and 60% of the patients at 6 and 12 months, respectively, whereas qualified success was achieved by 83.3% and 86.6% of the patients at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Complications were mild and transitory with no sequela. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term and intermediate results suggest that CLASS may become a simple, safe, and effective means of choice for the treatment of open-angle glaucoma.

14 Article TGF-β-induced IOP elevations are mediated by RhoA in the early but not the late fibrotic phase of open angle glaucoma. 2018

Hill, Lisa J / Mead, Ben / Thomas, Chloe N / Foale, Simon / Feinstein, Elena / Berry, Martin / Blanch, Richard J / Ahmed, Zubair / Logan, Ann. ·Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom. · Section of Retinal Ganglion Cell Biology, Laboratory of Retinal Cell and Molecular Biology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Neuroscience and Ophthalmology Research Group, Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom. · Research Division, Quark Pharmaceuticals, Ness Ziona, Israel. · Academic Department of Military Surgery and Trauma, Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, Birmingham, UK. ·Mol Vis · Pubmed #30429640.

ABSTRACT: Purpose: Elevations in intraocular pressure (IOP) are associated with the development of glaucoma and loss of sight. High transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) 1 levels in the eye's anterior chamber can lead to dysfunctional contractions through RhoA signaling in trabecular meshwork (TM) cells and IOP spikes. Sustained high TGF-β levels leads to TM fibrosis and sustained increases in IOP. We investigated whether inhibiting RhoA, using a siRNA-mediated RhoA (siRhoA), controls IOP by altering TM expression of fibrosis and contractility-related proteins in a rodent model of glaucoma. Methods: TGF-β was injected intracamerally twice a week into adult Sprague Dawley rats, and IOP was recorded with tonometry. Animals were euthanized on day 7 and 35 with TM expression of fibrosis and contractility-related proteins, as well as survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) assessed with immunohistochemistry. siRNA against RhoA or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was also injected intracamerally into select animals. Successful RhoA knockdown was determined with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry, and the effects of the knockdown on the parameters above analyzed. Results: TGF-β caused increased TM contractile proteins and IOP spikes by day 7, sustained increases in IOP from day 15, and TM fibrosis at day 35. siRhoA abolished the transient 7 day IOP rise but not the later sustained IOP increase (due to fibrosis). At 35 days, TGF-β-related RGC loss was not prevented with siRhoA treatment. Conclusions: We conclude that RhoA signaling mediates the early IOP rise induced by TM cellular changes associated with contractility but not the sustained IOP elevation caused by TM fibrosis. Thus, RhoA therapies offer a clinically relevant opportunity for IOP management, likely through the modulation of TM contractility, but appear to be ineffective in the amelioration of fibrosis.

15 Article Diagnostic Capability of Three-Dimensional Macular Parameters for Glaucoma Using Optical Coherence Tomography Volume Scans. 2018

Verticchio Vercellin, Alice C / Jassim, Firas / Poon, Linda Yi-Chieh / Tsikata, Edem / Braaf, Boy / Shah, Sneha / Ben-David, Geulah / Shieh, Eric / Lee, Ramon / Simavli, Huseyin / Que, Christian J / Papadogeorgou, Georgia / Guo, Rong / Vakoc, Benjamin J / Bouma, Brett E / de Boer, Johannes F / Chen, Teresa C. ·University Eye Clinic, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS), Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. · IRCCS-Fondazione Bietti, Rome, Italy. · Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Department of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma Service, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. · Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. · Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States. · Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Jules Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California, United States. · University of Southern California Roski Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, United States. · Kudret Eye Hospital, Kadikoy, Istanbul, Turkey. · University of the East Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center, Quezon City, Philippines. · Romblon Provincial Hospital, Liwanag, Odiongan, Romblon, Philippines. · Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. · University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Internal Medicine, Los Angeles, California, United States. · LaserLaB Amsterdam, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vrije Universiteit, The Netherlands. · Department of Ophthalmology, VU Medical Center, The Netherlands. ·Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci · Pubmed #30326067.

ABSTRACT: Purpose: To compare the diagnostic capability of three-dimensional (3D) macular parameters against traditional two-dimensional (2D) retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. To determine if manual correction and interpolation of B-scans improve the ability of 3D macular parameters to diagnose glaucoma. Methods: A total of 101 open angle glaucoma patients (29 with early glaucoma) and 57 healthy subjects had peripapillary 2D RNFL thickness and 3D macular volume scans. Four parameters were calculated for six different-sized annuli: total macular thickness (M-thickness), total macular volume (M-volume), ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness, and GCC volume of the innermost 3 macular layers (retinal nerve fiber layer + ganglion cell layer + inner plexiform layer). All macular parameters were calculated with and without correction and interpolation of frames with artifacts. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) were calculated for all the parameters. Results: The 3D macular parameter with the best diagnostic performance was GCC-volume-34, with an inner diameter of 3 mm and an outer of 4 mm. The AUROC for RNFL thickness and GCC-volume-34 were statistically similar for all regions (global: RNFL thickness 0.956, GCC-volume-34 0.939, P value = 0.3827), except for the temporal GCC-volume-34, which was significantly better than temporal RNFL thickness (P value = 0.0067). Correction of artifacts did not significantly change the AUROC of macular parameters (P values between 0.8452 and 1.0000). Conclusions: The diagnostic performance of best macular parameters (GCC-volume-34 and GCC-thickness-34) were similar to or better than 2D RNFL thickness. Manual correction of artifacts with data interpolation is unnecessary in the clinical setting.

16 Article A promising drug candidate for the treatment of glaucoma based on a P2Y6-receptor agonist. 2018

Jacob, Tali Fishman / Singh, Vijay / Dixit, Mudit / Ginsburg-Shmuel, Tamar / Fonseca, Begoña / Pintor, Jesus / Youdim, Moussa B H / Major, Dan T / Weinreb, Orly / Fischer, Bilha. ·GlaucoPharm Ltd, P.O.Box 620, New Industrial Park, 20692, Yokneam, Israel. · Department of Chemistry, Gonda-Goldschmied Medical Research Center, Bar-Ilan University, 52900, Ramat Gan, Israel. · Escuela Universitaria De Optica, Universidad Complutense De Madrid, C/Arcos De Jalon 118, 28037, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Chemistry, Gonda-Goldschmied Medical Research Center, Bar-Ilan University, 52900, Ramat Gan, Israel. majort@biu.ac.il. · GlaucoPharm Ltd, P.O.Box 620, New Industrial Park, 20692, Yokneam, Israel. orly.weinreb@youdim.com. · Department of Chemistry, Gonda-Goldschmied Medical Research Center, Bar-Ilan University, 52900, Ramat Gan, Israel. bilha.fischer@biu.ac.il. ·Purinergic Signal · Pubmed #30019187.

ABSTRACT: Extracellular nucleotides can regulate the production/drainage of the aqueous humor via activation of P2 receptors, thus affecting the intraocular pressure (IOP). We evaluated 5-OMe-UDP(α-B), 1A, a potent P2Y6-receptor agonist, for reducing IOP and treating glaucoma. Cell viability in the presence of 1A was measured using [3-(4, 5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl) 2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide] (MTT) assay in rabbit NPE ciliary non-pigmented and corneal epithelial cells, human retinoblastoma, and liver Huh7 cells. The effect of 1A on IOP was determined in acute glaucomatous rabbit hyaluronate model and phenol-induced chronic glaucomatous rabbit model. The origin of activity of 1A was investigated by generation of a homology model of hP2Y6-R and docking studies. 1A did not exert cytotoxic effects up to 100 mM vs. trusopt and timolol in MTT assay in ocular and liver cells. In normotensive rabbits, 100 μM 1A vs. xalatan, trusopt, and pilocarpine reduced IOP by 45 vs. 20-30%, respectively. In the phenol animal model, 1A (100 μM) showed reduction of IOP by 40 and 20%, following early and late administration, respectively. Docking results suggest that the high activity and selectivity of 1A is due to intramolecular interaction between Pα-BH

17 Article Comparison of the Ahmed and Baerveldt glaucoma shunts with combined cataract extraction. 2018

Rai, Amrit S / Shoham-Hazon, Nir / Christakis, Panos G / Rai, Amandeep S / Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K. ·Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. · Department of Ophthalmology, Barzilai University Hospital, Ashkelon, Israel. · Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. Electronic address: ikeahmed@mac.com. ·Can J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #29631822.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To compare the surgical outcomes of combined phacoemulsification with either Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) or Baerveldt glaucoma implant (BGI). DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 104 eyes that underwent combined phacoemulsification with either AGV (PhacoAGV; n = 57) or BGI (PhacoBGI; n = 47) implantation. METHODS: Failure was defined as uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP; <5 mm Hg, ≥18 mm Hg, or <20% reduction), additional glaucoma surgery, vision-threatening complications, or progression to no-light-perception vision. RESULTS: The PhacoAGV group was older (p = 0.03), had poorer baseline visual acuity (VA; p = 0.001), and had fewer previous glaucoma surgeries (p = 0.04). Both groups had similar baseline IOP (PhacoAGV: 26.4 ± 8.3 mm Hg; PhacoBGI: 25.7 ± 7.3; p = 0.66) and glaucoma medications (PhacoAGV: 3.8 ± 1.0; PhacoBGI: 3.6 ± 1.5; p = 0.54). At 2 years, failure rates were 44% in the PhacoAGV group and 23% in the PhacoBGI group (p = 0.02). Both groups had similar mean IOP reduction (PhacoAGV: 45%; PhacoBGI: 47%, p = 0.67) and medication use reduction (PhacoAGV: 47%; PhacoBGI: 58%, p = 0.38). The PhacoBGI group had higher IOP and medication use up to 1 month (p < 0.05). Both groups improved in VA from baseline (p < 0.05) and had similar overall complication rates (p = 0.31). The PhacoBGI group required more overall interventions (p < 0.0005). CONCLUSIONS: This comparative study found no difference in IOP, glaucoma medications, or complication rates between PhacoAGV and PhacoBGI at 2 years, despite BGIs being implanted in patients at higher risk for failure. The PhacoAGV group had higher failure rates at 2 years. Both groups had significant improvements in VA due to removal of their cataracts. The PhacoBGI group required more interventions, but most of these were minor slit-lamp procedures.

18 Article Hyaluronidase injection for improved tissue dissection in Baerveldt tube surgery. 2018

Zahavi, Alon / Grigg, John R. ·1 Discipline of Ophthalmology, Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales - Australia. · 4 Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, Petach Tikva - Israel. · 3 Glaucoma Unit, Sydney Eye Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales - Australia. ·Eur J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #29077179.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To describe a novel technique for tissue dissection during Baerveldt tube surgery. METHODS: We present a technique for posterior dissection of conjunctiva and Tenon tissue for the placement of a glaucoma drainage device. Hyaluronidase is used in the early stages of surgery in order to minimize tissue trauma and facilitate easy dissection even through existing adhesions and conjunctival scarring. RESULTS: The technique facilitates convenient dissection through tissues. We did not experience any intraoperative or postoperative complications. CONCLUSIONS: The described technique has substantial advantages for Baerveldt tube surgery, specifically in cases of previous ocular surgery and subsequent conjunctival scarring. It is safe and easy to perform, and should be considered in cases of glaucoma drainage device implantation surgeries.

19 Article Comparison of graft survival following penetrating keratoplasty and Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty in eyes with a glaucoma drainage device. 2018

Iverson, Shawn M / Spierer, Oriel / Papachristou, George C / Feuer, William J / Shi, Wei / Greenfield, David S / O'Brien, Terrence P. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 7101 Fairway Drive, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, 33418, USA. · Ophthalmology Division, Tel Aviv Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 7101 Fairway Drive, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, 33418, USA. tobrien@med.miami.edu. ·Int Ophthalmol · Pubmed #28303370.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To compare corneal graft survival rates after penetrating keratoplasty (PK) and Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK) in patients with a glaucoma drainage device (GDD) or medically managed glaucoma. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted on consecutive patients who underwent primary PK or primary DSEK. Inclusion criteria consisted of eyes with a diagnosis of glaucoma prior to corneal transplantation and a minimum of 6 months of follow-up. Graft failure was defined as an edematous cornea with failure to maintain deturgescence lasting beyond a period of 1 month of intense steroid therapy or vascularization and scarring resulting in irreversible loss of central graft clarity. Corneal graft survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Patients were divided into four groups: GDD-PK, GDD-DSEK, medical-PK and medical-DSEK. RESULTS: Fifty-six eyes of 56 patients were identified as meeting inclusion criteria. Among eyes with a GDD, there was no difference in the proportion of failures between PK grafts (48%) and DSEK grafts (50%) (p = 0.90). Failure occurred earlier in DSEK recipients compared to PK recipients, 5.82 ± 6.77 months versus 14.40 ± 7.70 months, respectively (p = 0.04). A Kaplan-Meier analysis did not identify a difference between the four groups with respect to graft failure (p = 0.52). CONCLUSION: There is no significant difference in graft survival rates between medically and surgically treated glaucoma patients for either PK or DSEK grafts. In patients with GDD, graft failure occurs earlier in DSEK compared to PK.

20 Article Toxicity risk from glucocorticoids in sarcoidosis patients. 2017

Khan, Nauman A / Donatelli, Christopher V / Tonelli, Adriano R / Wiesen, Jonathan / Ribeiro Neto, Manuel L / Sahoo, Debasis / Culver, Daniel A. ·Department of Hospital Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, USA. Electronic address: Khann3@ccf.org. · Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Louis Stoke Cleveland VA Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, USA. · Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Respiratory Institute, Cleveland Clinic, USA. · Community Intensivists Group, Cleveland & Ben Gurion University, Israel. ·Respir Med · Pubmed #29229111.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Glucocorticoids (GC) are considered first-line therapy for treating sarcoidosis, but there are few data about the adverse consequences of GC. Although there are several steroid-sparing medications available for treatment, a large proportion of patients are treated with prolonged courses of GC. The toxicities of GC in sarcoidosis populations have not been carefully evaluated. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of all newly diagnosed sarcoidosis patients who had the entirety of their medical care in a single health system. We analyzed the time to development of a composite toxicity end-point, including diabetes, hypertension, weight gain, hyperlipidemia, low bone density and ocular complications of GC using Cox proportional hazards analysis. RESULTS: One hundred and five patients were ever treated with GC, whereas 49 were not treated during a median follow-up of 101 months. GC-treated patients developed 1.3 ± 1.1 toxicities during therapy, versus 0.6 ± 1.0 in the non-treated group. After adjustment for age, gender, race and preexisting conditions, the hazard ratio for ever-treated patients was 2.37 (1.34-4.17) for the composite end-point. Age and the presence of preexisting conditions also were associated with reaching the end-point. Similar effects were seen when analyzed for cumulative GC dose and for duration of GC use. For individual end-points, weight gain (HR 2.04) and new hypertension (HR 3.36) were associated with any use of GC. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that GC are associated with clinically important toxicities in sarcoidosis patients, associated with both the cumulative dose and duration of treatment.

21 Article [Cataract and glaucoma: what is the appropriate terminology in Hebrew?] 2017

Kratz, Assaf / Levy, Jhaim. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel affiliated with Soroka Medical Center, Beer Sheva, Israel. ·Harefuah · Pubmed #28853534.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Article Diagnostic Capability of Peripapillary Three-dimensional Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Volume for Glaucoma Using Optical Coherence Tomography Volume Scans. 2017

Khoueir, Ziad / Jassim, Firas / Poon, Linda Yi-Chieh / Tsikata, Edem / Ben-David, Geulah S / Liu, Yingna / Shieh, Eric / Lee, Ramon / Guo, Rong / Papadogeorgou, Georgia / Braaf, Boy / Simavli, Huseyin / Que, Christian / Vakoc, Benjamin J / Bouma, Brett E / de Boer, Johannes F / Chen, Teresa C. ·Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts; Beirut Eye Specialist Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Ophthalmology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts; Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Jules Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Southern California Roski Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts; Pamukkale University School of Medicine, Denizli, Turkey. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts; University of the East Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center, Quezon City, Philippines. · Department of Physics, LaserLaB Amsterdam, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Department of Ophthalmology, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: Teresa_Chen@meei.harvard.edu. ·Am J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #28807732.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To determine the diagnostic capability of peripapillary 3-dimensional (3D) retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) volume measurements from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) volume scans for open-angle glaucoma (OAG). DESIGN: Assessment of diagnostic accuracy. METHODS: Setting: Academic clinical setting. STUDY POPULATION: Total of 180 patients (113 OAG and 67 normal subjects). OBSERVATION PROCEDURES: One eye per subject was included. Peripapillary 3D RNFL volumes were calculated for global, quadrant, and sector regions, using 4 different-size annuli. Peripapillary 2D RNFL thickness circle scans were also obtained. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) values, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, positive and negative likelihood ratios. RESULTS: Among all 2D and 3D RNFL parameters, best diagnostic capability was associated with inferior quadrant 3D RNFL volume of the smallest annulus (AUROC value 0.977). Otherwise, global 3D RNFL volume AUROC values were comparable to global 2D RNFL thickness AUROC values for all 4 annulus sizes (P values: .0593 to .6866). When comparing the 4 annulus sizes for global RNFL volume, the smallest annulus had the best AUROC values (P values: .0317 to .0380). The smallest-size annulus may have the best diagnostic potential, partly owing to having no areas excluded for being larger than the 6 × 6 mm CONCLUSION: Peripapillary 3D RNFL volume showed excellent diagnostic performance for detecting glaucoma. Peripapillary 3D RNFL volume parameters have the same or better diagnostic capability compared to peripapillary 2D RNFL thickness measurements, although differences were not statistically significant.

23 Article Comparison of intraocular pressure measurements using Goldmann tonometer, I-care pro, Tonopen XL, and Schiotz tonometer in patients after Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty. 2017

Ohana, Oded / Varssano, David / Shemesh, Gabi. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Affiliated to the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. ·Indian J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #28724814.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Post-Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK) patients are prone for intraocular pressure (IOP) elevations and glaucoma. Corneal characteristics influence various IOP measuring devices in various ways. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement between four different IOP measuring devices: Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT), I-care pro, Tonopen XL, and Schiotz tonometr in patients who underwent DSEK. METHODS: This was a prospective comparative study using a convenience cohort of post-DSEK patients with compact grafts. Post-DSEK patients had IOP measured using GAT, I-care Pro, Tonopen XL, and Schiotz tonometer. Measurements were compared and agreement assessed. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for comparison of means as variables did not show a normal distribution. Bland-Altman plots were used for assessing agreement. RESULTS: Thirty eyes of 24 patients were included in the study. Mean time from DSEK surgery was 25.31 ± 13.05 months. Mean IOP with GAT, I-care pro, Tonopen XL, and Schiotz tonometer was 13.99 ± 3.76, 13.92 ± 3.36, 13.31 ± 3.89, and 12.83 ± 4.07, respectively. GAT, I-care pro, and Tonopen XL had similar mean IOP measurements (P = 0.135 and P = 0.551, respectively), while Schiotz tonometry measurements were higher (P = 0.046). Bland-Altman plots show good agreement between GAT, Tonopen XL, and I-care pro. GAT and Schiotz tonometry show less agreement, with large variations in the differences of measured IOP. CONCLUSIONS: IOP measurements in post-DSEK patients showed good agreement between GAT and either Tonopen XL or I-care pro. Schiotz tonometer has large variations in this patient group. IOP measurements and IOP difference between devices were not dependent on central corneal thickness.

24 Article Relationship Between Serum Glucose Levels and Intraocular Pressure, a Population-based Cross-sectional Study. 2017

Cohen, Eytan / Kramer, Michal / Shochat, Tzippy / Goldberg, Elad / Krause, Ilan. ·*Department of Medicine F-Recanati †Clinical Pharmacology Unit §Department of Ophthalmology ∥Statistical Counseling Unit, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, Petach Tikva ‡SacklerFaculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. ·J Glaucoma · Pubmed #28598960.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship between serum glucose levels and intraocular pressure (IOP) both in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) as well as in subjects with diabetes mellitus (DM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data of a cross-sectional sample of 18,406 subjects who underwent routine annual screening at a tertiary medical center in 2000 to 2013 were analyzed. RESULTS: Mean (SD) age of the subjects was 46 (10) years; 68% were male. Mean (95% confidence interval) IOP measured 13.1 (13.0-13.1) mm Hg in subjects with normal glucose levels, 13.7 (13.6-13.8) mm Hg in subjects with IFG, and 14.3 (14.1-14.4) mm Hg in subjects with diabetes. The difference in IOP between subjects with normal and abnormal (DM or IFG) serum glucose levels were significant, even after adjusting for age, body mass index, and hypertension (P<0.0001). There was a positive linear correlation between serum glucose levels and IOP in both men (r=0.12; P<0.0001) and women (r=0.17; P<0.0001). For every 10 mg/dL increase in fasting serum glucose, IOP increased by 0.09 mm Hg in men and by 0.11 mm Hg in women. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that similar to subjects with DM, subjects with IFG also have IOP levels that are higher than those with normal serum glucose. Moreover, there is a direct correlation between fasting serum glucose levels and changes in IOP. These findings highlight another end-organ effect of uncontrolled glucose levels.

25 Article β-Zone Parapapillary Atrophy and Rates of Glaucomatous Visual Field Progression: African Descent and Glaucoma Evaluation Study. 2017

De Moraes, C Gustavo / Murphy, James T / Kaplan, Chad M / Reimann, Jeremy J / Skaat, Alon / Blumberg, Dana M / Al-Aswad, Lama / Cioffi, George A / Girkin, Christopher A / Medeiros, Felipe A / Weinreb, Robert N / Zangwill, Linda / Liebmann, Jeffrey M. ·Bernard and Shirlee Brown Glaucoma Research Laboratory, Edward S. Harkness Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Goldschleger Eye Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, University of Alabama, Birmingham. · Hamilton Glaucoma Center, Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Diego. ·JAMA Ophthalmol · Pubmed #28494060.

ABSTRACT: Importance: β-zone parapapillary atrophy (βPPA) has been reported as a risk factor for glaucoma onset and progression. Previous studies have shown that the prevalence of βPPA differs between individuals of African descent (AD) and European descent (ED). Objective: To test whether the association between the presence and progression of βPPA vs visual field progression of glaucoma differs between these 2 ancestry groups. Design, Setting, and Participants: In a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal cohort study, 634 individuals (1090 eyes) enrolled in the African Descent and Evaluation Study (ADAGES) with a diagnosis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON) or ocular hypertension (OHT) and at least 2 disc stereophotographs were included. Two graders masked to clinical and ancestry data reviewed and graded the baseline and last disc stereophotographs for the presence of βPPA at baseline and βPPA progression (development or enlargement). Mixed-effects linear models were tested with visual field mean deviation as a dependent variable and time (alone and with interaction terms) as independent variables. ADAGES enrollment began in January 2003 and ended in July 2006; follow-up ended in 2016. Exposures: Disc stereophotographs. Main Outcomes and Measures: Progression of βPPA in AD and ED individuals. Results: In 634 patients, a total of 814 eyes of AD (395 eyes) and ED (419) patients with GON and 276 eyes of AD (106) and ED (170) patients with OHT who were enrolled in ADAGES were analyzed. There were 336 (53.0%) women in the study; mean (SD) age was 61.9 (12.7) years. In the OHT group, the association between βPPA at baseline and visual field progression was not significantly different between AD and ED eyes (β = 0.071; 95% CI, -0.016 to 0.158; P = .11), nor was the association between βPPA progression and visual field progression (β = 0.020; 95% CI, -0.465 to 0.506; P = .93). In the GON group, ED eyes with baseline βPPA progressed faster than did AD eyes with baseline βPPA (β = -0.124; 95% CI, -0.241 to -0.007; P = .04), although the association between βPPA progression and visual field progression did not differ significantly between race groups (β = -0.101; 95% CI, -0.323 to 0.119; P = .37). Conclusions and Relevance: Race had a significant effect on the association between baseline βPPA and rates of visual field progression in eyes with GON. Progression of βPPA was not associated with faster visual field progression in either racial group.

Next