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Gout HELP
Based on 2,597 articles since 2006
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These are the 2597 published articles about Gout that originated from Worldwide during 2006-2015.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Italian Society of Rheumatology recommendations for the management of gout. 2013

Manara, M / Bortoluzzi, A / Favero, M / Prevete, I / Scirè, C A / Bianchi, G / Borghi, C / Cimmino, M A / D'Avola, G M / Desideri, G / Di Giacinto, G / Govoni, M / Grassi, W / Lombardi, A / Marangella, M / Matucci Cerinic, M / Medea, G / Ramonda, R / Spadaro, A / Punzi, L / Minisola, G. ·Epidemiology Unit, Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR), Milano, Italy. maria.manara@gmail.com · ·Reumatismo · Pubmed #23550256.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Gout is the most common arthritis in adults. Despite the availability of valid therapeutic options, the management of patients with gout is still suboptimal. The Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR) aimed to update, adapt to national contest and disseminate the 2006 EULAR recommendations for the management of gout. METHODS: The multidisciplinary group of experts included rheumatologists, general practitioners, internists, geriatricians, nephrologists, cardiologists and evidence-based medicine experts. To maintain consistency with EULAR recommendations, a similar methodology was utilized by the Italian group. The original propositions were translated in Italian and priority research queries were identified through a Delphi consensus approach. A systematic search was conducted for selected queries. Efficacy and safety data on drugs reported in RCTs were combined in a meta-analysis where feasible. The strength of recommendation was measured by utilising the EULAR ordinal and visual analogue scales. RESULTS: The original 12 propositions were translated and adapted to Italian context. Further evidences were collected about the role of diet in the non-pharmacological treatment of gout and the efficacy of oral corticosteroids and low-dose colchicine in the management of acute attacks. Statements concerning uricosuric treatments were withdrawn and replaced with a proposition focused on a new urate lowering agent, febuxostat. A research agenda was developed to identify topics still not adequately investigated concerning the management of gout. CONCLUSIONS: The SIR has developed updated recommendations for the management of gout adapted to the Italian healthcare system. Their implementation in clinical practice is expected to improve the management of patients with gout.

2 Guideline Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines for human leukocyte antigen-B genotype and allopurinol dosing. 2013

Hershfield, M S / Callaghan, J T / Tassaneeyakul, W / Mushiroda, T / Thorn, C F / Klein, T E / Lee, M T M. ·Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · ·Clin Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #23232549.

ABSTRACT: Allopurinol is the most commonly used drug for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. However, allopurinol is also one of the most common causes of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), which include drug hypersensitivity syndrome, Stevens–Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. A variant allele of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B, HLA-B*58:01, associates strongly with allopurinolinduced SCAR. We have summarized the evidence from the published literature and developed peer-reviewed guidelines for allopurinol use based on HLA-B genotype.

3 Guideline 2012 American College of Rheumatology guidelines for management of gout. Part 2: therapy and antiinflammatory prophylaxis of acute gouty arthritis. 2012

Khanna, Dinesh / Khanna, Puja P / Fitzgerald, John D / Singh, Manjit K / Bae, Sangmee / Neogi, Tuhina / Pillinger, Michael H / Merill, Joan / Lee, Susan / Prakash, Shraddha / Kaldas, Marian / Gogia, Maneesh / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Taylor, Will / Lioté, Frédéric / Choi, Hyon / Singh, Jasvinder A / Dalbeth, Nicola / Kaplan, Sanford / Niyyar, Vandana / Jones, Danielle / Yarows, Steven A / Roessler, Blake / Kerr, Gail / King, Charles / Levy, Gerald / Furst, Daniel E / Edwards, N Lawrence / Mandell, Brian / Schumacher, H Ralph / Robbins, Mark / Wenger, Neil / Terkeltaub, Robert / Anonymous4100728. ·University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #23024029.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline 2012 American College of Rheumatology guidelines for management of gout. Part 1: systematic nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapeutic approaches to hyperuricemia. 2012

Khanna, Dinesh / Fitzgerald, John D / Khanna, Puja P / Bae, Sangmee / Singh, Manjit K / Neogi, Tuhina / Pillinger, Michael H / Merill, Joan / Lee, Susan / Prakash, Shraddha / Kaldas, Marian / Gogia, Maneesh / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Taylor, Will / Lioté, Frédéric / Choi, Hyon / Singh, Jasvinder A / Dalbeth, Nicola / Kaplan, Sanford / Niyyar, Vandana / Jones, Danielle / Yarows, Steven A / Roessler, Blake / Kerr, Gail / King, Charles / Levy, Gerald / Furst, Daniel E / Edwards, N Lawrence / Mandell, Brian / Schumacher, H Ralph / Robbins, Mark / Wenger, Neil / Terkeltaub, Robert / Anonymous4090728. ·University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #23024028.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline 2011 Recommendations for the diagnosis and management of gout and hyperuricemia. 2011

Hamburger, Max / Baraf, Herbert S B / Adamson, Thomas C / Basile, Jan / Bass, Lewis / Cole, Brent / Doghramji, Paul P / Guadagnoli, Germano A / Hamburger, Frances / Harford, Regine / Lieberman, Joseph A / Mandel, David R / Mandelbrot, Didier A / McClain, Bonny P / Mizuno, Eric / Morton, Allan H / Mount, David B / Pope, Richard S / Rosenthal, Kenneth G / Setoodeh, Katy / Skosey, John L / Edwards, N Lawrence / Anonymous5130703. ·Rheumatology Associates of Long Island, Melville, NY 11747, USA. mcapacious@aol.com · ·Postgrad Med · Pubmed #22156509.

ABSTRACT: Gout is a major health problem in the United States; it affects 8.3 million people, which is approximately 4% of the adult population. Gout is most often diagnosed and managed in primary care physician practices. Primary care physicians have a significant opportunity to diagnose and manage patients with gout and improve patient outcomes. Following publication of the 2006 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) gout guidelines, significant evidence on gout has accumulated and new treatments for patients with gout have become available. It is the objective of these 2011 recommendations for the diagnosis and management of gout and hyperuricemia to update the 2006 EULAR guidelines, paying special attention to the needs of primary care physicians, who manage most patients with gout. The revised 2011 recommendations are based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach as an evidence-based strategy for rating quality of evidence and grading strength of recommendation in clinical practice. A total of 26 key recommendations for diagnosis (n = 10) and management (n = 16) were evaluated. Presence of tophus (proven or suspected) and response to colchicine had the highest clinical diagnostic value (likelihood ratio [LR], 15.56 [95% CI, 2.11-114.71] and LR, 4.33 [95% CI, 1.16-16.16], respectively). The key aspect of effective management of an acute gout attack is initiation of treatment within hours of onset of first symptoms. Low-dose colchicine is better tolerated than and is as effective as high-dose colchicine (number needed to treat [NNT], 5 [95% CI, 3-13] and NNT, 6 [95% CI, 3-72], respectively). For urate-lowering therapy, allopurinol in combination with probenecid was shown to be more effective than either agent alone (effect size [ES], 5.51 for combination; ES, 4.46 for probenecid; and ES, 2.80 for allopurinol). Febuxostat, also a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, has a slightly different mechanism of action and can be prescribed at unchanged doses for patients with mild-to-moderate renal or hepatic impairment. Febuxostat 40 mg versus 80 mg (NNT, 6 [95% CI, 4-11]) and 120 mg (NNT, 6 [95% CI, 3-26]) both demonstrated long-term efficacy. The target of urate-lowering therapy should be a serum uric acid level of ≤ 6 mg/dL. For patients with refractory and tophaceous gout, intravenous pegloticase is a new treatment option.

6 Guideline Japanese guideline for the management of hyperuricemia and gout: second edition. 2011

Yamanaka, Hisashi / Anonymous1250703. ·Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo, Japan. yamanaka@ior.twmu.ac.jp · ·Nucleosides Nucleotides Nucleic Acids · Pubmed #22132951.

ABSTRACT: Gout is a urate deposition disease caused by persistent hyperuricemia. Because gout patients present with a variety of clinical symptoms, it is necessary to have a guideline for the standard management and care of gout and hyperuricemia. The Japanese Society of Gout and Nucleic Acid Metabolism, a scientific society committed to study nucleic acid metabolism and related diseases, established the first edition of the "Guideline for the Management of Hyperuricemia and Gout" in 2002, and published the revised version in January 2010. This second edition is not only evidence based on a search of systemic literature, but also includes consensus levels by a Delphi exercise to determine the strength of the recommendations. A draft version of this guideline was reviewed by internal and external reviewers as well as a patient. In this guideline, key messages from each chapter are listed as statements together with the evidence level, consensus level, and strength of the recommendation. In this proceeding, several selected chapters on the clinical management of gout and hyperuricemia are described. We hope this guideline is appropriately used for the standard management and care of patients with hyperuricemia and gout in daily practice.

7 Guideline British Society for Rheumatology and British Health Professionals in Rheumatology guideline for the management of gout. 2007

Jordan, Kelsey M / Cameron, J Stewart / Snaith, Michael / Zhang, Weiya / Doherty, Michael / Seckl, Jonathan / Hingorani, Aroon / Jaques, Richard / Nuki, George / Anonymous1640589. ·Rheumatology Department, Princess Royal Hospital, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals Trust, UK. · ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #17522099.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Guideline EULAR evidence based recommendations for gout. Part I: Diagnosis. Report of a task force of the Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutics (ESCISIT). 2006

Zhang, W / Doherty, M / Pascual, E / Bardin, T / Barskova, V / Conaghan, P / Gerster, J / Jacobs, J / Leeb, B / Lioté, F / McCarthy, G / Netter, P / Nuki, G / Perez-Ruiz, F / Pignone, A / Pimentão, J / Punzi, L / Roddy, E / Uhlig, T / Zimmermann-Gòrska, I / Anonymous3250569. ·Academic Rheumatology, University of Nottingham, Clinical Sciences Building, City Hospital, Nottingham NG5 1PB, UK. weiya.zhang@nottingham.ac.uk · ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #16707533.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop evidence based recommendations for the diagnosis of gout. METHODS: The multidisciplinary guideline development group comprised 19 rheumatologists and one evidence based medicine expert, representing 13 European countries. Ten key propositions regarding diagnosis were generated using a Delphi consensus approach. Research evidence was searched systematically for each proposition. Wherever possible the sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratio (LR), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio were calculated for diagnostic tests. Relative risk and odds ratios were estimated for risk factors and co-morbidities associated with gout. The quality of evidence was categorised according to the evidence hierarchy. The strength of recommendation (SOR) was assessed using the EULAR visual analogue and ordinal scales. RESULTS: 10 key propositions were generated though three Delphi rounds including diagnostic topics in clinical manifestations, urate crystal identification, biochemical tests, radiographs, and risk factors/co-morbidities. Urate crystal identification varies according to symptoms and observer skill but is very likely to be positive in symptomatic gout (LR = 567 (95% confidence interval (CI), 35.5 to 9053)). Classic podagra and presence of tophi have the highest clinical diagnostic value for gout (LR = 30.64 (95% CI, 20.51 to 45.77), and LR = 39.95 (21.06 to 75.79), respectively). Hyperuricaemia is a major risk factor for gout and may be a useful diagnostic marker when defined by the normal range of the local population (LR = 9.74 (7.45 to 12.72)), although some gouty patients may have normal serum uric acid concentrations at the time of investigation. Radiographs have little role in diagnosis, though in late or severe gout radiographic changes of asymmetrical swelling (LR = 4.13 (2.97 to 5.74)) and subcortical cysts without erosion (LR = 6.39 (3.00 to 13.57)) may be useful to differentiate chronic gout from other joint conditions. In addition, risk factors (sex, diuretics, purine-rich foods, alcohol, lead) and co-morbidities (cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and chronic renal failure) are associated with gout. SOR for each proposition varied according to both the research evidence and expert opinion. CONCLUSIONS: 10 key recommendations for diagnosis of gout were developed using a combination of research based evidence and expert consensus. The evidence for diagnostic tests, risk factors, and co-morbidities was evaluated and the strength of recommendation was provided.

9 Guideline EULAR evidence based recommendations for gout. Part II: Management. Report of a task force of the EULAR Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutics (ESCISIT). 2006

Zhang, W / Doherty, M / Bardin, T / Pascual, E / Barskova, V / Conaghan, P / Gerster, J / Jacobs, J / Leeb, B / Lioté, F / McCarthy, G / Netter, P / Nuki, G / Perez-Ruiz, F / Pignone, A / Pimentão, J / Punzi, L / Roddy, E / Uhlig, T / Zimmermann-Gòrska, I / Anonymous3240569. ·Academic Rheumatology, University of Nottingham, Clinical Sciences Building, City Hospital, Nottingham NG5 1PB, UK. weiya.zhang@nottingham.ac.uk · ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #16707532.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop evidence based recommendations for the management of gout. METHODS: The multidisciplinary guideline development group comprised 19 rheumatologists and one evidence based medicine expert representing 13 European countries. Key propositions on management were generated using a Delphi consensus approach. Research evidence was searched systematically for each proposition. Where possible, effect size (ES), number needed to treat, relative risk, odds ratio, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio were calculated. The quality of evidence was categorised according to the level of evidence. The strength of recommendation (SOR) was assessed using the EULAR visual analogue and ordinal scales. RESULTS: 12 key propositions were generated after three Delphi rounds. Propositions included both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments and addressed symptomatic control of acute gout, urate lowering therapy (ULT), and prophylaxis of acute attacks. The importance of patient education, modification of adverse lifestyle (weight loss if obese; reduced alcohol consumption; low animal purine diet) and treatment of associated comorbidity and risk factors were emphasised. Recommended drugs for acute attacks were oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral colchicine (ES = 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.25 to 1.50)), or joint aspiration and injection of corticosteroid. ULT is indicated in patients with recurrent acute attacks, arthropathy, tophi, or radiographic changes of gout. Allopurinol was confirmed as effective long term ULT (ES = 1.39 (0.78 to 2.01)). If allopurinol toxicity occurs, options include other xanthine oxidase inhibitors, allopurinol desensitisation, or a uricosuric. The uricosuric benzbromarone is more effective than allopurinol (ES = 1.50 (0.76 to 2.24)) and can be used in patients with mild to moderate renal insufficiency but may be hepatotoxic. When gout is associated with the use of diuretics, the diuretic should be stopped if possible. For prophylaxis against acute attacks, either colchicine 0.5-1 mg daily or an NSAID (with gastroprotection if indicated) are recommended. CONCLUSIONS: 12 key recommendations for management of gout were developed, using a combination of research based evidence and expert consensus. The evidence was evaluated and the SOR provided for each proposition.

10 Editorial Rules of engagement: turning recommendations into results in the diagnosis and management of gout. 2015

Grainger, Rebecca / Harrison, Andrew A. ·Rehabilitation Teaching and Research Unit, University of Otago Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand. · ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #25923604.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Editorial: Can GPR43 Sensing of Short-Chain Fatty Acids Unchain Inflammasome-Driven Arthritis? 2015

Haslberger, Alexander / Terkeltaub, Robert. ·University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California, and University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #25914362.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Hyperuricemia starts at 360 micromoles (6 mg/dL). 2015

Bardin, Thomas. ·Université Paris 7, hôpital Lariboisière, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. Electronic address: thomas.bardin@lrb.aphp.fr. ·Joint Bone Spine · Pubmed #25776444.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Is the double contour sign specific for gout? Or only for crystal arthritis? 2015

Singh, Jasvinder A / Dalbeth, Nicola. ·Medicine Service, Birmingham VA Medical Center, Department of Medicine at School of Medicine, and Division of Epidemiology at School of Public Health, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama; and Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA; · University of Auckland, and Auckland District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25729038.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial When gout goes to the heart: does gout equal a cardiovascular disease risk factor? 2015

Singh, Jasvinder A. ·Medicine Service, Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama, USA Medicine and Division of Epidemiology, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama, USA Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #25603830.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Malohani, bula vinaka, fakalofa lahi atu, kia orana, talofa lava, malo e lelei, greetings. 2014

Sundborn, Gerhard. · ·Pac Health Dialog · Pubmed #25928988.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Gout, tophi and the wonders of NETs. 2014

Pisetsky, David S. · ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #25606589.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial PEG-ing down (and preventing?) the cause of pegloticase failure. 2014

Abeles, Aryeh M. · ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #25142440.

ABSTRACT: Pegloticase is a powerful but underutilized weapon in the rheumatologist's armamentarium. The drug's immunogenicity leads to neutralizing antibody formation and rapid loss of efficacy in roughly one-half of all patients, which remains an impediment to broader use. New data, however, suggest that drug survival might improve with concomitant immunosuppressive agent (s), which merits further study. Efficacy appears to be unchanged when pegloticase is infused at 3-week (rather than 2-week) intervals. Stretching the time between infusions may also improve patient adherence and allow for earlier identification of transient responders.

18 Editorial Musculoskeletal disorders and the Global Burden of Disease study. 2014

Storheim, Kjersti / Zwart, John-Anker. ·Communication and Research Unit for Musculoskeletal Disorders (FORMI), Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo, , Oslo, Norway. · ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #24790065.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Treat to target in gout by combining two modes of action. 2014

Jansen, Tim L. ·Department of Rheumatology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands tim.jansen@radboudumc.nl. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #24758888.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Gout and crystal arthropathies. 2014

Neogi, Tuhina. ·Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, and Rheumatology, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, Clin Epi Unit, Suite X200, Boston, MA 02118, USA. Electronic address: tneogi@bu.edu. ·Rheum Dis Clin North Am · Pubmed #24703355.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Gout and crystal arthropathies. 2014

Weisman, Michael H. ·Division of Rheumatology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA. Electronic address: michael.weisman@cshs.org. ·Rheum Dis Clin North Am · Pubmed #24703354.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial Gout: a disease of the past, the present, but not the future? 2014

Anonymous1670772. · ·Lancet · Pubmed #24461111.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial Crystal deposition diseases. 2014

Choi, Hyon. ·Boston University School of Medicine, Section of Rheumatology and the Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Curr Opin Rheumatol · Pubmed #24445481.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial Gout in Māori. 2014

Gosling, Anna L / Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth / Merriman, Tony R. ·Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, 913 Dunedin, 9054 New Zealand. anna.gosling@anatomy.otago.ac.nz. · ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #24067884.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial Duel energy CT imaging of tophaceous gout. 2013

Fitzgerald, L / Donnellan, J / Buckley, O / Kane, D. · ·Ir Med J · Pubmed #24282889.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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