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Gout: HELP
Articles by Rieke E. Alten
Based on 7 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, R. Alten wrote the following 7 articles about Gout.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline [Full version of the S2e guidelines on gouty arthritis : Evidence-based guidelines of the German Society of Rheumatology (DGRh)]. 2016

Kiltz, U / Alten, R / Fleck, M / Krüger, K / Manger, B / Müller-Ladner, U / Nüßlein, H / Reuss-Borst, M / Schwarting, A / Schulze-Koops, H / Tausche, A / Braun, J. ·Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Claudiusstr. 45, 44649, Herne, Deutschland. uta.kiltz@elisabethgruppe.de. · Rheumatologie, Klinische Immunologie, Osteologie, Physikalische Therapie und Sportmedizin, Schlosspark-Klinik, Heubnerweg 2, 14059, Berlin, Deutschland. · Uniklinikum Regensburg, Klinik und Poliklinik für Innere Medizin I, Klinik für Rheumatologie/Klinische Immunologie, Asklepios-Klinikum, Kaiser-Karl-V.-Allee 3, 93077, Bad Abbach, Deutschland. · Rheumatologisches Praxiszentrum St. Bonifatius, St. Bonifatius Str. 5, 81541, München, Deutschland. · Medizinische Klinik 3, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, 91054, Erlangen, Deutschland. · Abteilung für Rheumatologie und Klinische Immunologie, Kerckhoff-Klinik, Benekestr. 2-8, 61231, Bad Nauheim, Deutschland. · Rheumatologische Schwerpunktpraxis, Kontumazgarten 4, 90429, Nürnberg, Deutschland. · Facharzt-Praxis für Rheumatologie und Onkologie, Frankenstr. 36, 97708, Bad Bocklet, Deutschland. · Rheumatologisch-immunologische Ambulanz, Universitätsklinik Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131, Mainz, Deutschland. · Klinikum der Universität München, Pettenkoferstr. 8a, 80336, München, Deutschland. · Medizinische Klinik III, Abteilung für Rheumatologie, Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307, Dresden, Deutschland. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Claudiusstr. 45, 44649, Herne, Deutschland. ·Z Rheumatol · Pubmed #27481119.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Review [Evidence-based recommendations for diagnostics and treatment of gouty arthritis in the specialist sector : S2e guidelines of the German Society of Rheumatology in cooperation with the AWMF]. 2017

Kiltz, U / Alten, R / Fleck, M / Krüger, K / Manger, B / Müller-Ladner, U / Nüsslein, H / Reuss-Borst, M / Schwarting, A / Schulze-Koops, H / Tausche, A K / Braun, J. ·Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Claudiusstr. 45, 44649, Herne, Deutschland. Uta.kiltz@elisabethgruppe.de. · Rheumatologie, Klinische Immunologie, Osteologie, Physikalische Therapie und Sportmedizin, Schlosspark-Klinik, Berlin, Deutschland. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Innere Medizin I, Klinik für Rheumatologie/Klinische Immunologie, Asklepios-Klinikum, Uniklinikum Regensburg, Bad Abbach, Deutschland. · Rheumatologisches Praxiszentrum St. Bonifatius, München, Deutschland. · Medizinische Klinik 3, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Deutschland. · Abteilung für Rheumatologie und Klinische Immunologie, Kerckhoff-Klinik, Bad Nauheim, Deutschland. · Rheumatologische Schwerpunktpraxis, Nürnberg, Deutschland. · Facharzt-Praxis für Rheumatologie und Onkologie, Bad Bocklet, Deutschland. · Rheumatologisch-immunologische Ambulanz, Universitätsklinik Mainz, Mainz, Deutschland. · Klinikum der Universität München, München, Deutschland. · Medizinische Klinik III, Abteilung für Rheumatologie, Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Deutschland. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Claudiusstr. 45, 44649, Herne, Deutschland. ·Z Rheumatol · Pubmed #28078432.

ABSTRACT: Due to the increasing prevalence of gout, particularly in old age, the disease is becoming of increasing importance in Germany. Gout is one of the most common forms of recurrent inflammatory arthritis and is induced by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in synovial fluid and other tissues. The principal goals of therapy in chronic gout are the symptomatic treatment of the acute joint inflammation and the causal treatment of the underlying metabolic cause, the hyperuricemia. Only a consistent and permanent reduction of the serum uric acid level ultimately results in an efficient avoidance of further gout attacks and therefore the prevention of structural damage. Due to an often inadequate treatment of gout, the target of healing the disease is often not achieved. A correct and timely diagnosis and adequate assessment of comorbidities associated with gout are, however, of substantial importance for patient and physician to achieve remission of the disease. In order to create a solid basis for a timely and effective treatment of affected patients, in 2016 the German Society of Rheumatology (DGRh) initiated the development of S2e guidelines on gouty arthritis for specialists. This article summarizes these S2e guidelines on the management of gouty arthritis in the specialist sector.

3 Clinical Trial Lesinurad monotherapy in gout patients intolerant to a xanthine oxidase inhibitor: a 6 month phase 3 clinical trial and extension study. 2017

Tausche, Anne-Kathrin / Alten, Rieke / Dalbeth, Nicola / Kopicko, Jeff / Fung, Maple / Adler, Scott / Bhakta, Nihar / Storgard, Chris / Baumgartner, Scott / Saag, Kenneth. ·Department of Rheumatology, Technical University Dresden, Dresden. · Department of Internal Medicine II, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. · Global Medicines Development, Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Clinical Development Unit, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Gaithersburg, MD. · Clinical Research and Development, Ardea Biosciences, Inc., San Diego, CA. · Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #29029210.

ABSTRACT: Objective: To investigate the efficacy and safety of lesinurad, a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor, in a 6 month, phase 3 clinical trial and extension study. Methods: Patients with gout who cannot take a xanthine oxidase inhibitor (XOI) and have serum uric acid (sUA) ⩾6.5 mg/dl were randomized to receive oral lesinurad (400 mg daily) or placebo. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with sUA <6.0 mg/dl at month 6. Safety assessments included treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and laboratory data. Patients who completed the study were eligible for an open-label, uncontrolled extension study of lesinurad 400 mg monotherapy. Results: Patients (n = 214) were primarily white males (mean age 54.4 years; gout duration 11.2 years). Significantly more patients achieved the primary endpoint with lesinurad than placebo (29.9 vs 1.9%; P < 0.0001). Overall TEAE rates were higher with lesinurad (77.6 vs 65.4%); renal-related TEAEs (17.8%), renal-related serious TEAEs (4.7%) and serum creatinine elevations (1.5 times baseline, 24.3%) occurred only with lesinurad. A total of 143 patients (65 lesinurad, 78 placebo) enrolled in the extension study. Treatment with lesinurad 400 mg resulted in rapid and sustained sUA lowering that persisted for up to 18 months before the study was terminated prematurely. No new safety findings were observed in the extension. Conclusion: In patients with gout and intolerance/contraindication to XOIs, lesinurad 400 mg monotherapy demonstrated superior sUA lowering compared with placebo, with sustained effects for up to 18 months. Due to a high incidence of serum creatinine elevations and renal-related adverse events, including serious adverse events with lesinurad 400 mg, lesinurad should not be used as monotherapy. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinincaltrials.gov), NCT01508702.

4 Article Development of Preliminary Remission Criteria for Gout Using Delphi and 1000Minds Consensus Exercises. 2016

de Lautour, Hugh / Taylor, William J / Adebajo, Ade / Alten, Rieke / Burgos-Vargas, Ruben / Chapman, Peter / Cimmino, Marco A / da Rocha Castelar Pinheiro, Geraldo / Day, Ric / Harrold, Leslie R / Helliwell, Philip / Janssen, Matthijs / Kerr, Gail / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Khanna, Dinesh / Khanna, Puja P / Lin, Chingtsai / Louthrenoo, Worawit / McCarthy, Geraldine / Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia / Mikuls, Ted R / Neogi, Tuhina / Ogdie, Alexis / Perez-Ruiz, Fernando / Schlesinger, Naomi / Ralph Schumacher, H / Scirè, Carlo A / Singh, Jasvinder A / Sivera, Francisca / Slot, Ole / Stamp, Lisa K / Tausche, Anne-Kathrin / Terkeltaub, Robert / Uhlig, Till / van de Laar, Mart / White, Douglas / Yamanaka, Hisashi / Zeng, Xuejun / Dalbeth, Nicola. ·Auckland District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand. · University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. · University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Schlosspark-Klinik, Charité, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Hospital General de México, Mexico City, Mexico. · Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand. · Università di Genova, Genova, Italy. · Pedro Ernesto University Hospital, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · University of New South Wales and St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, and Corrona, LLC, Southborough. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds, UK. · Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, The Netherlands. · Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Georgetown and Howard University Hospitals, Washington, DC. · University of California School of Medicine, San Diego. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · University of Michigan and Ann Arbor VA Medical Center, Ann Arbor. · Taichung Veteran's General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · Mater Misericordiae University Hospital and University College, Dublin, Ireland. · Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Hospital Universitario Cruces, OSI-EEC, and Biocruces Health Research Institute, Biscay, Spain. · Rutgers University Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey. · IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · University of Alabama at Birmingham and the Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham. · Hospital General Universitario Elda, Elda, Spain. · Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark. · University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. · University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Germany. · University of California San Diego VA Medical Center, La Jolla. · National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Universiteit Twente, Erschede, The Netherlands. · Waikato DHB and Waikato Clinical School, University of Auckland, Hamilton, New Zealand. · Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · University of Auckland and Auckland District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #26414176.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To establish consensus for potential remission criteria to use in clinical trials of gout. METHODS: Experts (n = 88) in gout from multiple countries were invited to participate in a web-based questionnaire study. Three rounds of Delphi consensus exercises were conducted using SurveyMonkey, followed by a discrete-choice experiment using 1000Minds software. The exercises focused on identifying domains, definitions for each domain, and the timeframe over which remission should be defined. RESULTS: There were 49 respondents (56% response) to the initial survey, with subsequent response rates ranging from 57% to 90%. Consensus was reached for the inclusion of serum urate (98% agreement), flares (96%), tophi (92%), pain (83%), and patient global assessment of disease activity (93%) as measurement domains in remission criteria. Consensus was also reached for domain definitions, including serum urate (<0.36 mm), pain (<2 on a 10-point scale), and patient global assessment (<2 on a 10-point scale), all of which should be measured at least twice over a set time interval. Consensus was not achieved in the Delphi exercise for the timeframe for remission, with equal responses for 6 months (51%) and 1 year (49%). In the discrete-choice experiment, there was a preference towards 12 months as a timeframe for remission. CONCLUSION: These consensus exercises have identified domains and provisional definitions for gout remission criteria. Based on the results of these exercises, preliminary remission criteria are proposed with domains of serum urate, acute flares, tophus, pain, and patient global assessment. These preliminary criteria now require testing in clinical data sets.

5 Article OMERACT endorsement of measures of outcome for studies of acute gout. 2014

Singh, Jasvinder A / Taylor, William J / Dalbeth, Nicola / Simon, Lee S / Sundy, John / Grainger, Rebecca / Alten, Rieke / March, Lyn / Strand, Vibeke / Wells, George / Khanna, Dinesh / McQueen, Fiona / Schlesinger, Naomi / Boonen, Annelies / Boers, Maarten / Saag, Kenneth G / Schumacher, H Ralph / Edwards, N Lawrence. ·From Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA; Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Wellington; Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; SDG LLC, Cambridge, Massachusetts,; Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA, and Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore; Schlosspark-Klinik Teaching Hospital of the Charité, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany; University of Sydney Institute of Bone and Joint Research and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia; Stanford University Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Portolo Valley, California, USA; University of Ottawa, London, Ontario, Canada; University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; University of Auckland, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, Grafton, Auckland, New Zealand; Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA; Maastricht University Medical Center, Division of Rheumatology, and Caphri Research Institute, University Maastricht; VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; University of Pennsylvania and Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Rheumatology, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida, USA. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #24334651.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the extent to which participants at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 11 meeting agree that instruments used in clinical trials to measure OMERACT core outcome domains in acute gout fulfill OMERACT filter requirements of truth, discrimination, and feasibility; and where future research efforts need to be directed. METHODS: Results of a systematic literature review and analysis of individual-level data from recent clinical studies of acute gout were presented to OMERACT participants. The information was discussed in breakout groups, and opinion was defined by subsequent voting in a plenary session. Endorsement was defined as at least 70% of participants voting in agreement with the proposition (where the denominator excluded those participants who did not vote or who voted "don't know"). RESULTS: The following measures were endorsed for use in clinical trials of acute gout: (1) 5-point Likert scale and/or visual analog scale (0 to 100 mm) to measure pain; (2) 4-point Likert scale for joint swelling; (3) 4-point Likert scale for joint tenderness; and (4) 5-point Likert scale for patient global assessment of response to treatment. Measures for the activity limitations domain were not endorsed. CONCLUSION: Measures of pain, joint swelling, joint tenderness, and patient global assessment in acute gout were endorsed at OMERACT 11. These measures should now be used in clinical trials of acute gout.

6 Article A delphi exercise to identify characteristic features of gout - opinions from patients and physicians, the first stage in developing new classification criteria. 2013

Prowse, Rebecca L / Dalbeth, Nicola / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Adebajo, Adewale O / Gaffo, Angelo L / Terkeltaub, Robert / Mandell, Brian F / Suryana, Bagus P P / Goldenstein-Schainberg, Claudia / Diaz-Torne, Cèsar / Khanna, Dinesh / Lioté, Frederic / Mccarthy, Geraldine / Kerr, Gail S / Yamanaka, Hisashi / Janssens, Hein / Baraf, Herbert F / Chen, Jiunn-Horng / Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia / Harrold, Leslie R / Stamp, Lisa K / Van De Laar, Mart A / Janssen, Matthijs / Doherty, Michael / Boers, Maarten / Edwards, N Lawrence / Gow, Peter / Chapman, Peter / Khanna, Puja / Helliwell, Philip S / Grainger, Rebecca / Schumacher, H Ralph / Neogi, Tuhina / Jansen, Tim L / Louthrenoo, Worawit / Sivera, Francisca / Taylor, William J / Alten, Rieke. ·University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #23418379.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To identify a comprehensive list of features that might discriminate between gout and other rheumatic musculoskeletal conditions, to be used subsequently for a case-control study to develop and test new classification criteria for gout. METHODS: Two Delphi exercises were conducted using Web-based questionnaires: one with physicians from several countries who had an interest in gout and one with patients from New Zealand who had gout. Physicians rated a list of potentially discriminating features that were identified by literature review and expert opinion, and patients rated a list of features that they generated themselves. Agreement was defined by the RAND/UCLA disagreement index. RESULTS: Forty-four experienced physicians and 9 patients responded to all iterations. For physicians, 71 items were identified by literature review and 15 more were suggested by physicians. The physician survey showed agreement for 26 discriminatory features and 15 as not discriminatory. The patients identified 46 features of gout, for which there was agreement on 25 items as being discriminatory and 7 items as not discriminatory. CONCLUSION: Patients and physicians agreed upon several key features of gout. Physicians emphasized objective findings, imaging, and patterns of symptoms, whereas patients emphasized severity, functional results, and idiographic perception of symptoms.

7 Article Canakinumab for acute gouty arthritis in patients with limited treatment options: results from two randomised, multicentre, active-controlled, double-blind trials and their initial extensions. 2012

Schlesinger, Naomi / Alten, Rieke E / Bardin, Thomas / Schumacher, H Ralph / Bloch, Mark / Gimona, Alberto / Krammer, Gerhard / Murphy, Valda / Richard, Dominik / So, Alexander K. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA; schlesna@umdnj.edu ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #22586173.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Gouty arthritis patients for whom non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are inappropriate have limited treatment options. Canakinumab, an anti-interleukin-1β monoclonal antibody, may be an option for such patients. The authors assessed the efficacy/safety of one dose of canakinumab 150 mg (n=230) or triamcinolone acetonide (TA) 40 mg (n=226) at baseline and upon a new flare in frequently flaring patients contraindicated for, intolerant of, or unresponsive to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or colchicine. Core study co-primary endpoints were pain intensity 72 h postdose (0-100 mm visual analogue scale and time to first new flare. METHODS: Two 12-week randomised, multicentre, active-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group core studies with double-blind 12-week extensions (response in acute flare and in prevention of episodes of re-flare in gout (β-RELIEVED and β-RELIEVED-II)). RESULTS: 82.6% patients had comorbidities. Mean 72-h visual analogue scale pain score was lower with canakinumab (25.0 mm vs 35.7 mm; difference, -10.7 mm; 95% CI -15.4 to -6.0; p<0.0001), with significantly less physician-assessed tenderness and swelling (ORs=2.16 and 2.74; both p≤0.01) versus TA. Canakinumab significantly delayed time to first new flare, reduced the risk of new flares by 62% versus TA (HR: 0.38; 95% CI 0.26 to 0.57) in the core studies and by 56% (HR: 0.44; 95% CI 0.32 to 0.60; both p≤0.0001) over the entire 24-week period, and decreased median C-reactive protein levels (p≤0.0001 at 72 h and 7 days). Over the 24-week period, adverse events were reported in 66.2% (canakinumab) and 52.8% (TA) and serious adverse events were reported in 8.0% (canakinumab) and 3.5% (TA) of patients. Adverse events reported more frequently with canakinumab included infections, low neutrophil count and low platelet count. CONCLUSION: Canakinumab provided significant pain and inflammation relief and reduced the risk of new flares in these patients with acute gouty arthritis.